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hawks

hawks

hawks Sentence Examples

  • The staff officers bore similar titles, relics of the time when the order existed only for amusement: Genii, Hydras, Furies, Goblins, Night Hawks, Magi, Monks and Turks.

  • Vultures and hawks are well represented, but perhaps the most numerous of all are the parrots, of which there are six or seven species.

  • Birds of prey comprise several species of hawks and owls, and a few eagles.

  • The birds are similar to those of central Europe; in the mountains vultures, eagles, buzzards, kites, falcons and hawks are found.

  • Pandionidae, ospreys or fish hawks, cosmopolitan.

  • Hawks, History of North Carolina (2 vols.

  • Fisher, Hawks and Owls of the United States in their Relation to Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bull.

  • Throughout their history they appear as a rude people, the tribute they brought to the Chinese court consisting of stone arrow-heads, hawks, gold, 4 and latterly ginseng.

  • Mountain hares, partridges and quails afford good sport; baboons and great hawks live in the mountains.

  • The avifauna is varied and abundant, comprising eagles, vultures (protected by law), hawks, owls, pelicans, cranes, turkeys, geese, partridges " (called quail or " Bob White " elsewhere), ducks, &c., besides numerous smaller species, many of which are brilliant of plumage but harsh of voice.

  • There are many varieties of birds to be found in the woods of the Bahamas; they include flamingoes and the beautiful hummingbird, as well as wild geese, ducks, pigeons, hawks, green parrots and doves.

  • Among the larger birds are cranes, herons, the ibis, storks, eagles, vultures, falcons, hawks, kites, owls, the secretary birds, pelicans, flamingoes, wild duck and geese, gulls, and of game birds, the paauw, koraan, pheasant, partridge, guinea fowl and quail.

  • The more important wild animals are a large wild sheep (Ovis poli), foxes, wolves, jackals, bears, boars, deer and leopards; amongst birds, there are partridges, pheasants, ravens, jays, sparrows, larks, a famous breed of hawks, &c.

  • By some authors it is referred to the eagles, by others to the buzzards, and by others again to the hawks; but possibly the first of these alliances is the most likely to be true.

  • In the cultivated parts of Yemen and Tehama small birds are very numerous, so also are birds of prey, vultures, kites and hawks.

  • The birds include eagles - some are called lammervangers from their occasional attacks on young lambs - vultures, hawks, kites, owls, crows, ravens, the secretary bird, cranes, a small white heron, quails, partridges, korhaans, wild geese, duck, and guineafowl, swallows, finches, starlings, the mossie or Cape sparrow, and the widow bird, noted for the length of its tail in summer.

  • In the Virginia Blue Ridge the following are the highest peaks east of New river: Mount Weather (about 1850 ft.), Mary's Rock (3523), Peaks of Otter (4001 and 3875), Stony Man (4031), Hawks Bill (4066).

  • Of birds, eagles, vultures, hawks, owls and quails are common; snipe, curlews, plovers, storks and herons frequent the marshy parts; and the ostrich the desert.

  • The golden eagle, bald-headed eagle, osprey and a large variety of hawks are common in Canada, as are the snowy owl, the horned owl and others inhabiting northern climates.

  • Besides these we find reference in charters of the 9th century to the keeping of the king's hunters, horses, dogs and hawks, and the entertaining of messengers and other persons in the king's service.

  • It is clear from the frequent references to dogs and hawks in the charters that hunting and falconry were keenly pursued by the kings and their retinues.

  • and birds of prey, as bears, wolves, foxes, dogs, wild cats, stoats, weasels, eagles, hawks and owls, and never spared by man; even domestic animals, as cattle, goats and reindeer, join in the destruction, stamping them to the ground with their feet, and even eating their bodies.

  • At human sacrifices, however, dogs and hawks were often offered with the men.

  • To gamekeepers and those interested in the preservation of game, all animals such as the pole-cat, weasel, stoat, hawks, owls, &c., which destroy the eggs or young of preserved birds, are classed as "vermin," and the same term includes rats, mice, &c. It is also the collective name given to all those disgusting and objectionable insects that infest human beings, houses, &c., when allowed to be in a filthy and unsanitary condition, such as bugs, fleas, lice, &c.

  • The fact that both sexes of the cuckoo resemble the hawk does not necessarily prove this suggested explanation to be false; but if it be true that the smaller passerine birds are duped by the similarity to the bird of prey, it may be that the cuckoos themselves escape molestation from larger hawks on account of their resemblance to the sparrowhawk.

  • Some observations, however, of Guy Marshall on the inedibility of certain birds suggest that the resemblance between cuckoos a'nd hawks on the one hand and cuckoos and drongos on the other may be susceptible of another explanation in full agreement with the theory of mimicry as propounded by Bates.

  • It is clearly possible, therefore, that cuckoos which mimic drongos and hawks may be protected from those enemies which find these birds distasteful.

  • The friar-birds are noisy and pugnacious species of the group of honeyeaters, and mob hawks and other birds of prey, which leave them unmolested.

  • Among birds of prey are the golden eagle, bald eagle, hawks and owls.

  • The birds include the ostrich, marabout, vultures, kites, hawks, ground hornbill, great bustard, guinea fowl, partridge, lesser bustard, quail, snipe, duck, widgeon, teal, geese of various kinds, paraquets, doves, blue, bronze and green pigeons, and many others.

  • There are many kinds of kites, falcons and hawks, kestrel being numerous.

  • The addiction of the Franks in later centuries to the chase is evidenced by the frequency with which not only the laity but also the clergy were warned by provincial councils against expending so much of their time and money on hounds, hawks and falcons; and we have similar proof with regard to the habits of other Teutonic nations subsequent to the introduction of Christianity.

  • 4 Of his grandson Athelstan it is related by William of Malmesbury that after the victory of Brunanburgh he imposed upon the vanquished king of Wales a yearly tribute, which included a certain number of "hawks and sharp-scented dogs fit for hunting wild beasts."

  • The carrion hawks are represented by the Polyborus tharus, popularly called the " caracara," and the Phalcobaenus carunculatus; the falcons by the Aesalon columbarius; and the kites by the Gampsonyx swainsoni.

  • There are deer (at least five species), boars, bears, antelopes, beavers, otters, badgers, tiger-cats, marten, an inferior sable, striped squirrels, &c. Among birds there are black eagles, peregrines (largely used in hawking), and, specially protected by law, turkey bustards, three varieties of pheasants, swans, geese, common and spectacled teal, mallards, mandarin ducks white and pink ibis, cranes, storks, egrets, herons, curlews, pigeons, doves, nightjars, common and blue magpies, rooks, crows, orioles, halcyon and blue kingfishers, jays, nut-hatches, redstarts, snipe, grey shrikes, hawks, kites, &c. But, pending further observations, it is not possible to say which of the smaller birds actually breed in Korea and which only make it a halting-place in their annual migrations.

  • Various hawks and owls are common; the golden eagle nests on the mountain crags and the burrowing owl on the plains.

  • 48) how wizards acquired the mantic powers of certain birds, such as ravens and hawks, by swallowing their hearts.

  • Among birds are found bustard and species of sand-grouse and partridge; water-fowl in great variety, which breed on the lakes in summer and migrate to the plains of India in winter; the raven, hawks, eagles and owls, a magpie, and two kinds of chough; and many smaller birds of the passerine order, amongst which are several finches.

  • Geese, ducks and other water fowl frequent the lakes and bays in the migratory season, and eagles, gulls, hawks, kingfishers, owls, plover, woodcock, " partridge " (ruffed grouse), robins, orioles, bobolinks, blue birds, swallows, sparrows, and many other insectivorous birds are common.

  • Herons, hawks, terns, Egyptian geese, fishing eagles (Gypohierax), the weaver and the whydah bird are found in the lower and middle Congo.

  • Great numbers of eagles, vultures, hawks, bustards and other birds of prey are met with; and partridges, duck, teal, guinea-fowl, sand-grouse, curlews, woodcock, snipe, pigeons, thrushes and swallows are very plentiful.

  • The California vulture is very rare; various species of hawks and golden and bald eagles are common.

  • These spiders are very much larger and more venomous than the largest of the Lycosidae, and in the Southern states of North America the species of wasps that destroy them have been called tarantula hawks.

  • Birds of prey include the bearded vulture, aasvogel and several varieties of eagles, hawks, falcons and owls.

  • They rode on mules with gilded bridles, rich saddles and housings, carrying hawks on their wrist, followed by an immense train of attendants.

  • Antelopes, hares and occasionally the lynx, fox, deer, rats, vultures, crows, ravens, hawks, with lizards are other denizens of the borders of the deserts.

  • Hawks and turkey buzzards are common types of the larger birds, and the wild turkey, prairie chicken and quail are the principal game birds.

  • Common among birds of prey are owls, hawks and kites, and there are many turkey buzzards.

  • Eagles and hawks are common, and many kinds of singing birds.

  • There is a large variety of perching birds, including several species of brilliant plumage - sun-birds, kingfishers, rollers and flycatchers, &c.; kites, hawks and owls are numerous, and the lakes and marshes abound with water-fowl and herons, ibises, &c.

  • FRANCIS LISTER HAWKS (1798-1866), American clergyman, was born at Newbern, North Carolina, on the 10th of June 1798, and graduated at the university of his native state in 1815.

  • Among game-birds there are a few wild turkeys, wild geese and bob-white (locally " partridge "), and greater numbers of grouse and various ducks; among song-birds the robin, bluebird and mocking-bird are common; and there are also woodpeckers, whippoorwills, blackbirds, hawks, owls, crows and buzzards.

  • We have four sparrow hawks in a seclusion aviary at the moment, lets hope they pair up.

  • Red backed hawks and crested caracara competed for perches in the few yew trees I was camping in the shelter of.

  • ferruginous hawks have nested in the vicinity of Downey Lake.

  • Mill Green and Hawks Green are particularly important for their grassland habitats.

  • hawks were again noted hawking overhead by those arriving a fraction early.

  • Without Blair, Chirac will remain exposed to all sorts of petty revenge by American hawks.

  • hawks owls and song birds sat on the wire.

  • I think we should send all war lovin chicken hawks to Iraq.

  • Many believe that if Iraq once again allows inspections it may create a substantial diplomatic obstacle between Bush administration hawks and an Iraqi invasion.

  • hawks in the administration show no enthusiasm at all for reining in their rogue ally.

  • Hawks in particular hated the way Gary Cooper's sheriff showed indecision and needed the help of other people, even his wife.

  • intemperate remarks by administration hawks have damaged long-term American interests.

  • low-level sortie with the Hawks in the Welsh hills.

  • hawks owls and song birds sat on the wire.

  • Without Blair, Chirac will remain exposed to all sorts of petty revenge by American hawks.

  • soaring buzzards and hawks in the wild, private Leny glen.

  • These Alpha Jets were captured by Martin Cole on a low-level sortie with the Hawks in the Welsh hills.

  • The skies above heave with eagles, hawks, buzzards and turkey vultures.

  • Tony Hawks accepts a wager to go on a mission to reach the top of the charts in just six months.

  • They have many predators including weasels, stoats, foxes, cats, owls, hawks, crows and even pheasants.

  • The staff officers bore similar titles, relics of the time when the order existed only for amusement: Genii, Hydras, Furies, Goblins, Night Hawks, Magi, Monks and Turks.

  • Vultures and hawks are well represented, but perhaps the most numerous of all are the parrots, of which there are six or seven species.

  • Birds of prey comprise several species of hawks and owls, and a few eagles.

  • The birds are similar to those of central Europe; in the mountains vultures, eagles, buzzards, kites, falcons and hawks are found.

  • Pandionidae, ospreys or fish hawks, cosmopolitan.

  • Hawks, History of North Carolina (2 vols.

  • The birds of prey are the same as those of central Europe, and include the sea eagle, alpine vulture (Gyps fulvus), buzzard, kites (Gypaetus barbatus and Milvus ater), hawks (e.g.

  • Fisher, Hawks and Owls of the United States in their Relation to Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bull.

  • Throughout their history they appear as a rude people, the tribute they brought to the Chinese court consisting of stone arrow-heads, hawks, gold, 4 and latterly ginseng.

  • Mountain hares, partridges and quails afford good sport; baboons and great hawks live in the mountains.

  • The avifauna is varied and abundant, comprising eagles, vultures (protected by law), hawks, owls, pelicans, cranes, turkeys, geese, partridges " (called quail or " Bob White " elsewhere), ducks, &c., besides numerous smaller species, many of which are brilliant of plumage but harsh of voice.

  • There are many varieties of birds to be found in the woods of the Bahamas; they include flamingoes and the beautiful hummingbird, as well as wild geese, ducks, pigeons, hawks, green parrots and doves.

  • Among the larger birds are cranes, herons, the ibis, storks, eagles, vultures, falcons, hawks, kites, owls, the secretary birds, pelicans, flamingoes, wild duck and geese, gulls, and of game birds, the paauw, koraan, pheasant, partridge, guinea fowl and quail.

  • The more important wild animals are a large wild sheep (Ovis poli), foxes, wolves, jackals, bears, boars, deer and leopards; amongst birds, there are partridges, pheasants, ravens, jays, sparrows, larks, a famous breed of hawks, &c.

  • By some authors it is referred to the eagles, by others to the buzzards, and by others again to the hawks; but possibly the first of these alliances is the most likely to be true.

  • In the cultivated parts of Yemen and Tehama small birds are very numerous, so also are birds of prey, vultures, kites and hawks.

  • The birds include eagles - some are called lammervangers from their occasional attacks on young lambs - vultures, hawks, kites, owls, crows, ravens, the secretary bird, cranes, a small white heron, quails, partridges, korhaans, wild geese, duck, and guineafowl, swallows, finches, starlings, the mossie or Cape sparrow, and the widow bird, noted for the length of its tail in summer.

  • In the Virginia Blue Ridge the following are the highest peaks east of New river: Mount Weather (about 1850 ft.), Mary's Rock (3523), Peaks of Otter (4001 and 3875), Stony Man (4031), Hawks Bill (4066).

  • Of birds, eagles, vultures, hawks, owls and quails are common; snipe, curlews, plovers, storks and herons frequent the marshy parts; and the ostrich the desert.

  • militaris), toucans, trogons, herons, egrets, ibis, spoonbills, boat-bills (Cancroma), ducks, pelicans, cormorants, bitterns, stilts, sandpipers, curlews, grackles, kingfishers, motmots, " Chachalacas " (Ortalida poliocephala), woodpeckers, jays, cuckoos, " garrapateros " (Crotophaga sulcirostris), the ingenious weaver-bird (Icterus), and another species (Cassicus), whose curiously woven, sack-like nests are suspended from the slender limbs of trees, and sometimes even from telegraph-wires, scarlet-crested fly-catchers (Muscivora mexicana), tanagers, mocking-birds (called " zenzontl "), turkeys, partridge, quail (Colinus, Lophortyx, Callipepla and Cyrtonyx), doves, pigeons, eagles, caracara hawks (Polyborus), fishhawks, falcons, crows, and turkey-buzzards (both the red-faced " aura " of North America and the black-faced " zopilote " of the tropics), which are the scavengers of the country.

  • The golden eagle, bald-headed eagle, osprey and a large variety of hawks are common in Canada, as are the snowy owl, the horned owl and others inhabiting northern climates.

  • Besides these we find reference in charters of the 9th century to the keeping of the king's hunters, horses, dogs and hawks, and the entertaining of messengers and other persons in the king's service.

  • It is clear from the frequent references to dogs and hawks in the charters that hunting and falconry were keenly pursued by the kings and their retinues.

  • and birds of prey, as bears, wolves, foxes, dogs, wild cats, stoats, weasels, eagles, hawks and owls, and never spared by man; even domestic animals, as cattle, goats and reindeer, join in the destruction, stamping them to the ground with their feet, and even eating their bodies.

  • At human sacrifices, however, dogs and hawks were often offered with the men.

  • To gamekeepers and those interested in the preservation of game, all animals such as the pole-cat, weasel, stoat, hawks, owls, &c., which destroy the eggs or young of preserved birds, are classed as "vermin," and the same term includes rats, mice, &c. It is also the collective name given to all those disgusting and objectionable insects that infest human beings, houses, &c., when allowed to be in a filthy and unsanitary condition, such as bugs, fleas, lice, &c.

  • The fact that both sexes of the cuckoo resemble the hawk does not necessarily prove this suggested explanation to be false; but if it be true that the smaller passerine birds are duped by the similarity to the bird of prey, it may be that the cuckoos themselves escape molestation from larger hawks on account of their resemblance to the sparrowhawk.

  • Some observations, however, of Guy Marshall on the inedibility of certain birds suggest that the resemblance between cuckoos a'nd hawks on the one hand and cuckoos and drongos on the other may be susceptible of another explanation in full agreement with the theory of mimicry as propounded by Bates.

  • It is clearly possible, therefore, that cuckoos which mimic drongos and hawks may be protected from those enemies which find these birds distasteful.

  • The friar-birds are noisy and pugnacious species of the group of honeyeaters, and mob hawks and other birds of prey, which leave them unmolested.

  • Among birds of prey are the golden eagle, bald eagle, hawks and owls.

  • The birds include the ostrich, marabout, vultures, kites, hawks, ground hornbill, great bustard, guinea fowl, partridge, lesser bustard, quail, snipe, duck, widgeon, teal, geese of various kinds, paraquets, doves, blue, bronze and green pigeons, and many others.

  • There are many kinds of kites, falcons and hawks, kestrel being numerous.

  • The addiction of the Franks in later centuries to the chase is evidenced by the frequency with which not only the laity but also the clergy were warned by provincial councils against expending so much of their time and money on hounds, hawks and falcons; and we have similar proof with regard to the habits of other Teutonic nations subsequent to the introduction of Christianity.

  • 4 Of his grandson Athelstan it is related by William of Malmesbury that after the victory of Brunanburgh he imposed upon the vanquished king of Wales a yearly tribute, which included a certain number of "hawks and sharp-scented dogs fit for hunting wild beasts."

  • The carrion hawks are represented by the Polyborus tharus, popularly called the " caracara," and the Phalcobaenus carunculatus; the falcons by the Aesalon columbarius; and the kites by the Gampsonyx swainsoni.

  • jugger), which are all trained by the natives for hawking; of hawks, the shikara (Astur badius), the goshawk (A.

  • There are deer (at least five species), boars, bears, antelopes, beavers, otters, badgers, tiger-cats, marten, an inferior sable, striped squirrels, &c. Among birds there are black eagles, peregrines (largely used in hawking), and, specially protected by law, turkey bustards, three varieties of pheasants, swans, geese, common and spectacled teal, mallards, mandarin ducks white and pink ibis, cranes, storks, egrets, herons, curlews, pigeons, doves, nightjars, common and blue magpies, rooks, crows, orioles, halcyon and blue kingfishers, jays, nut-hatches, redstarts, snipe, grey shrikes, hawks, kites, &c. But, pending further observations, it is not possible to say which of the smaller birds actually breed in Korea and which only make it a halting-place in their annual migrations.

  • Various hawks and owls are common; the golden eagle nests on the mountain crags and the burrowing owl on the plains.

  • 48) how wizards acquired the mantic powers of certain birds, such as ravens and hawks, by swallowing their hearts.

  • Among birds are found bustard and species of sand-grouse and partridge; water-fowl in great variety, which breed on the lakes in summer and migrate to the plains of India in winter; the raven, hawks, eagles and owls, a magpie, and two kinds of chough; and many smaller birds of the passerine order, amongst which are several finches.

  • Geese, ducks and other water fowl frequent the lakes and bays in the migratory season, and eagles, gulls, hawks, kingfishers, owls, plover, woodcock, " partridge " (ruffed grouse), robins, orioles, bobolinks, blue birds, swallows, sparrows, and many other insectivorous birds are common.

  • Herons, hawks, terns, Egyptian geese, fishing eagles (Gypohierax), the weaver and the whydah bird are found in the lower and middle Congo.

  • Great numbers of eagles, vultures, hawks, bustards and other birds of prey are met with; and partridges, duck, teal, guinea-fowl, sand-grouse, curlews, woodcock, snipe, pigeons, thrushes and swallows are very plentiful.

  • The California vulture is very rare; various species of hawks and golden and bald eagles are common.

  • These spiders are very much larger and more venomous than the largest of the Lycosidae, and in the Southern states of North America the species of wasps that destroy them have been called tarantula hawks.

  • Birds of prey include the bearded vulture, aasvogel and several varieties of eagles, hawks, falcons and owls.

  • They rode on mules with gilded bridles, rich saddles and housings, carrying hawks on their wrist, followed by an immense train of attendants.

  • Antelopes, hares and occasionally the lynx, fox, deer, rats, vultures, crows, ravens, hawks, with lizards are other denizens of the borders of the deserts.

  • Hawks and turkey buzzards are common types of the larger birds, and the wild turkey, prairie chicken and quail are the principal game birds.

  • Common among birds of prey are owls, hawks and kites, and there are many turkey buzzards.

  • Eagles and hawks are common, and many kinds of singing birds.

  • There is a large variety of perching birds, including several species of brilliant plumage - sun-birds, kingfishers, rollers and flycatchers, &c.; kites, hawks and owls are numerous, and the lakes and marshes abound with water-fowl and herons, ibises, &c.

  • FRANCIS LISTER HAWKS (1798-1866), American clergyman, was born at Newbern, North Carolina, on the 10th of June 1798, and graduated at the university of his native state in 1815.

  • Among game-birds there are a few wild turkeys, wild geese and bob-white (locally " partridge "), and greater numbers of grouse and various ducks; among song-birds the robin, bluebird and mocking-bird are common; and there are also woodpeckers, whippoorwills, blackbirds, hawks, owls, crows and buzzards.

  • Share your days with gentle deer, scampering squirrels, secretive badgers, soaring buzzards and hawks in the wild, private Leny glen.

  • The skies above heave with eagles, hawks, buzzards and turkey vultures.

  • Tony Hawks accepts a wager to go on a mission to reach the top of the charts in just six months.

  • They have many predators including weasels, stoats, foxes, cats, owls, hawks, crows and even pheasants.

  • Chuck Hawks - an explanation of how GPS systems help fishers.

  • If you love Eagle Eye sunglasses, thank NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) for figuring out just how birds, like eagles and hawks, can pinpoint their prey so easily.

  • Gattsu (a.k.a Guts) and Casca survived a brutal supernatural attack against their band of mercenaries called The Hawks.

  • Guts' love for her can do nothing so they are forced to roam the land in search of his destiny, a cure for Casca, and to seek vengeance against the clan that struck down The Hawks.

  • The trails pass through wooded areas and marshland, offering glimpses of a variety of plants and animals, such as great blue herons, barred and great horned owls, redheaded woodpeckers, red-tailed hawks, kestrels and turkey vultures.

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