Havana sentence example

havana
  • Cattle and pine lumber are sent to Cuba, and Havana tobacco and fine grades of Cuban timber are imported.
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  • Dr Kane died at Havana on the 16th of February 1857, at the age of thirty-seven.
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  • Her unease grew as they reached a seedy neighborhood outside of Little Havana.
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  • By the treaty of Paris in 1763 Florida was ceded to England in return for Havana.
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  • Five were put to death and others were imprisoned at Havana.
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  • The caves of Cotilla near Havana, of Bellamar near Matanzas, of Monte Libano near Guantanamo, and those of San Juan de los Remedios, are the best known, but there are scores of others.
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  • At Guantanamo and Trinidad are other valleys, and between Mariel and Havana is the fine valley of Ariguanabo.
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  • The best buildings in Havana are constructed of a very rich white limestone, soft and readily worked when fresh, but hardening and slightly darkening with age.
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  • Those near San Diego, Guanabacoa and Santa Maria del Rosario (near Havana) and Madruga (near Gaines) are the best known.
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  • It was estimated officially in 1904 that the wooded lands of the island comprised 3,628,434acres, of which one-third were in Oriente province, another third in Camaguey, and hardly any in Havana province.
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  • The mean rainfall at Havana is about 40 6 in.
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  • In 1846, 300 vessels and 2000 houses were destroyed at Havana; in 1896 the banana groves of the N.E.
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  • Yellow fever (which first appeared in Cuba in 1647) was long the only epidemic disease, Havana being an endemic focus.
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  • Three-fourths of all are in the jurisdictions of Cienfuegos, Cardenas, Havana, Matanzas and Sagua la Grande, which are the great sugar centres of the island (three-fourths of the crop coming from Matanzas and Santa Clara provinces).
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  • Some " caf e tales " were established by the newcomers near Havana, but the industry has always been almost exclusively one of Santiago province; with Santa Clara as a much smaller producer.
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  • The tobacco industries are very largely concentrated in Havana, and there are factories in Santiago de las Vegas and Bejucal.
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  • The first railroad in Cuba (and the first in Spanish lands) was opened from Havana to Gaines in 1837.
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  • Havana, Santiago and Cienfuegos are cable ports.
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  • The average of settlement per square mile varied from 169.7 in Havana province to 11.8 in Camaguey, and was 46.4 for all of Cuba; the percentage of urban population (in cities, that is, with more than 1000 inhabitants) in the different provinces.
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  • Foreigners constituted 25.6% of the population in the city of Havana; only 7% in Pinar del Rio province.
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  • Justice is administered by courts of various grades, with a supreme court at Havana as the head; the members of this being appointed by the president and senate.
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  • There are six provinces - Pinar del Rio, Havana, Matanzas, Santa Clara, Camaguey or Puerto Principe, and Oriente.
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  • Because of the isolation of the eastern part of the island, the dangers from pirates, and the important considerations which had caused Santiago de Cuba (q.v.) to be the first capital of the island, Cuba was divided in 1607 into two departments, and a governor, subordinate in military matters to the captain-general at Havana, was appointed to rule the territory east of Puerto Principe.
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  • Two chief courts of justice (audiencias) sat at Havana (after 1832) and Puerto Principe (1800-1853); appeals could go to Spain; below the audiencias were "alcaldes mayores " or district judges and ordinary " alcaldes " or local judges.
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  • More than half of the revenue was derived from customs duties (two-thirds of the total being collected at Havana).
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  • In 1907 the number of students was 554 Below the university there are six provincial institutes, one in each province, in each of which there is a preparatory department, a department of secondary education, and (this due to peculiar local conditions) a school of surveying; and in that of Havana commercial departments in addition.
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  • In Havana, also, there is a school of painting and sculpture, a school of arts and trades, and a national library, all of which are supported or subventioned by the national government, as are also a public library in Matanzas, and the Agricultural Experiment Station at Santiago de las Vegas.
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  • Independent of the government are various schools and learned societies in Havana (q.v.).
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  • Baracoa (the landing point), Bayamo, Santiago de Cuba, Puerto Principe, Sancti Spiritus, Trinidad and the original Havana were all founded by 1515.
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  • In 1762 Havana was captured after a long resistance by a British force under Admiral Sir George Pocock and the earl of Albemarle, with heavy loss to the besiegers.
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  • Among the governors of the 19th century Miguel Tacon, governor in 1834-1839, a forceful and high-handed soldier, deserves mention, especially in the annals of Havana; he ruled as a tyrant, made many reforms as regarded law and order, and left Havana, in particular, full of municipal improvements.
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  • The Spanish volunteers committed horrible excesses in Havana and other places; the rebels also burned and killed indiscriminatingly, and the war became increasingly cruel and sanguinary.
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  • The American people had sent food to the reconcentrados; President McKinley, while opposing recognition of the rebels, affirmed the possibility of intervention; Spain resented this attitude; and finally, in February 1898, the United States battleship " Maine " was blown up - by whom will probably never be known - in the harbour of Havana.
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  • A constitutional convention sat at Havana from the 5th of November 1900 to the 21st of February 1901.
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  • Also: Leandro Garcia y Gragitena, Guia del empleado de hacienda (Havana, 1860), with very valuable historical data; Carlos de Sedano y Cruzat, Cuba desde 18 5 0 a 1873.
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  • But the buccaneers or pirates who had made their retreat here offered heavy opposition; in 1680 there was an attack by the Spaniards, and in July 1703 the French and Spaniards made a descent on New Providence, blew up the fort, spiked the guns, burnt the church and carried off the governor, with the principal inhabitants, to Havana.
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  • Until the middle of the 1 8th century Baracoa was almost without connexion with Havana and Santiago.
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  • The other tobacco-producing provinces in order of importance are Havana, Santa Clara and Santiago de Cuba.
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  • Havana cigars are, as regards form, classification, method of putting up and nomenclature, the models followed by manufacturers of all classes of the goods.
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  • Genuine (" legitimas ") Havana cigars are such only as are made in the island; and the cigars made in Europe and elsewhere from genuine Cuban tobacco are classed as " Havanas."
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  • When we come to the inferior classes of cigars, it can only be said that they may be made from any kind of leaf, the more ambitious imitations being treated with various sauces designed to give them a Havana flavour.
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  • In addition to the axis-railway of the island, which connects it with Havana and Santiago, the city has connexion by a branch line with Nuevitas.
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  • As early as the beginning of the 17th century Havana depended on this supply to furnish the fleets of royal ships which monopolized trade between Spain and America.
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  • A superior audiencia was created for Havana in 1838, but the older court continued to exist throughout the Spanish period.
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  • They were arrested en masse on the night of the 26th of June; their goods were sequestrated, and they themselves deported to Havana, then to Cadiz, Genoa, and eventually Corsica.
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  • The first went on to Havana, the second to San Domingo.
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  • In April 1896 he was appointed by President Cleveland consul-general at Havana, with duties of a diplomatic and military character added to the usual consular business.
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  • He was military governor of Havana and Pinar del Rio in 1899, subsequently commanded the department of the Missouri, and retired as a brigadier-general U.S. Army in 1901.
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  • From 1868 to 1872 he served also brilliantly against the Cuban rebels, and commanded a corps of volunteers specially raised for him in Havana.
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  • From 1898 to 1902 he was in charge of Cuban customs and collector for the port of Havana.
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  • It is connected by the Cuba railway with Havana, 540 m.
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  • In the cathedral, which is in better taste than the cathedral of Havana, Diego Velazquez (c. 1460-1524), conqueror of Cuba, was buried.
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  • In 1589 Havana became the capital.
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  • The bishopric became an archbishopric in 1788, when a suffragan bishopric was established at Havana.
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  • The most important fisheries on the Illinois river and its tributaries were at Havana, Pekin and Peoria, which in 2907-1908 were represented by a total catch of about 10,000,000 lb, out of a total for this river system of 27,570,000 lb.
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  • The Havana side of the bay has a sea-wall and an excellent drive.
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  • Under Spanish rule, Havana was reputed to be a city of noises and smells.
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  • The general characteristics of the climate of Havana are described in the article Cuba.
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  • Havana is famous for its promenades, drives and public gardens.
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  • Of the newspapers of Havana the most notable is the El Diario de la Marina (established in 1838; under its present name, 1844 morning and evening), which was almost from its foundation an official organ of the Spanish government, and generally the mouthpiece of the most intransigent peninsular opinion in all that concerned the politics of the island.
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  • Havana commands the wholesale trade of all the western half of the island, and is the centre of commercial and banking interests.
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  • In spite of high tariffs and civil wars, and the competition of Matanzas, Cardenas, Cienfuegos and other Cuban ports opened to foreign trade in modern times, the commerce of Havana has steadily increased.
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  • The chief manufacturing industry of Havana is that of tobacco.
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  • Besides the making of boxes and barrels and other articles necessarily Involved in its sugar and tobacco trade, Havana also, to some extent, builds carriages and small ships, and manufactures iron and machinery; but the weight of taxation during the Spanish period was always a heavy deterrent on the development of any business requiring great capital.
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  • Havana has frequent steam-boat communication with New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Tampa, Mobile, New Orleans and other ports of the United States; and about as frequent with several ports in England, Spain and France.
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  • The population of Havana was reported as 51,307 in 1791; 96,304 in 1811; 94,023 in 1817; 184,508 in 1841.
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  • In 1899 the American census showed 235,981, of whom about 25% were foreign (20% Spanish); and the census of 1907 showed 297,159 (not including the attached country districts) and 302,526 (including these country districts), the last being for the "municipio" of Havana.
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  • Owing to this, as well as to the entire lack of proper sanitary customs among the people, the horrible condition of sewerage and the prevalence of yellow fever (first brought to Havana, it is thought, in 1761, from Vera Cruz), the reputation of the city as regards health was long very bad.
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  • The entire administrative system of the island, when a Spanish colony, was centred at Havana.
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  • Havana, originally founded by Diego Velasquez in 1514 on an unhealthy site near the present Bataban6 (pop. in 1907, 15,435, including attached country districts), on the south coast, was soon removed to its present position, was granted an ayuntam.iento (town council), and shortly came to be considered one of the most important places in the New World.
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  • In the same year the residence of the governor of the island was moved from Santiago de Cuba to Havana.
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  • In the course of the 17th century the port became the great 1 Dr Carlos Finlay of Havana, arguing from the coincidence between the climatic limitation of yellow fever and the geographical limitation of the mosquito, urged (1881 sqq.) that there was some relation between the disease and the insect.
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  • By the treaty of the 10th of February 1763, at the close of the Seven Years' War, Havana was restored to Spain in exchange for the Floridas.
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  • The gradual removal of obstacles from the commerce of the island from 1766 to 1818 particularly benefited Havana.
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  • In 1789 a bishopric was created at Havana suffragan to the archbishopric at Santiago.
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  • From the end of the 18th century Havana, as the centre of government, was the centre of movement and interest.
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  • During the administration of Miguel Tacon Havana was improved by many important public works; his name is frequent in the nomenclature of the city.
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  • The railway from Havana to Gaines was built between 1835 and 1838.
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  • Like the rest of Cuba, Havana has frequently suffered severely from hurricanes, the most violent being those of 1768 (St Theresa's), 1810 and 1846.
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  • The destruction of the U.S. battleship "Maine" in the harbour of Havana on the 15th of February 1898 was an influential factor in causing the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, and during the war the city was blockaded by a United States fleet.
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  • Bachiller y Morales, Monografia historica (Habana, 1883), minutely covering the English occupation (the best account) of 1762-1763; Maria de los Mercedes, comtesse de Merlin, La Havana (3 vols., Paris, 1844); and the works cited under Cuba.
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  • Towards the close of the 19th century this industry suffered from labour troubles, from the competition of Tampa, Florida, and from the commercial improvement of Havana, Cuba; but soon after 1900 the tobacco business of Key West began to recover.
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  • Sailing from San Lucar in April 1538, he first went to Havana, his advanced base of operations; starting thence on the 12th of May 1539 he landed in the same month in Espiritu Santo Bay, on the west coast of the present state of Florida.
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  • The colony gave many proofs of its loyalty to the mother country: it furnished three companies of troops for Admiral Vernon's unfortunate expedition against Cartagena in 1741; in King George's War it raised £ 2000 for supplies, furnished troops for the capture of Louisburg and sent over six hundred men to Albany; and in the French and Indian (or Seven Years') War its militia participated in the capture of both Quebec and Havana.
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  • It is served by railway to the S.S.W., to Holguin and Cacocum (where it connects with the main line between Santiago and Havana), and is a port of call for the American Munson Line.
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  • The Colombian product is best known through the Ambalema, Girardot, and Palmira tobacco, especially the Ambalema cigars, which are considered by some to be hardly inferior to those of Havana, but the plant is cultivated in other places and would probably be an important article of export were it possible to obtain labourers for its cultivation.
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  • Guanabacoa is served by railway to Havana, with which it is connected by the Regla ferry across the bay.
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  • Already at the end of the 17th century Guanabacoa was the fashionable summer residence of Havana.
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  • He made war on England in 1761, with disastrous results to Spain, which for the time lost both Havana and Manila.
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  • Insurrec- Idarshal Jovellar was sent out to Havana as governorthin, general, with Marshal Martinez Campos as commander-in-chief of the forces.
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  • In the place of Maura he found a more pliant minister for the colonies, Seor Abarzuza, who framed a Cuban Reform Bill so much short of what his predecessor had thought an irreducible minimum of concessions, that it was censured in Havana by all the colonial Liberals and home rulers, and by their representatives in Madrid.
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  • But the blowing up of the American cruiser Maine in the port of Havana added fuel to the agitation in the United States against Spanish rule in Cuba.
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  • Several Brothers to the Rescue planes violated Cuban airspace over the City of Havana.
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  • The School Our partner school in Havana is unique in that it is not centralized in a physical building!
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  • The UN's envoy has urged Havana to release imprisoned dissidents and to allow freedom of expression.
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  • A wordless, visual tapestry full of magical images that captures the sometimes joyful, sometimes melancholic mood of present-day Havana.
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  • In 1762, he survived a shipwreck during a campaign against the Spanish that led to the capture of Havana, Cuba.
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  • Castro then marched into Havana to fill the vacuum.
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  • The finest is Lake Ariguanabo, near Havana, 6 sq.
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  • There were five cities having populations above 25,000 - Havana, 297,159; Santiago, 45,470; Matanzas, 36,009; Cienfuegos, 30,100; Puerto Principe (or Camaguey), 29,616; and fourteen more above 8000 - Cardenas, Manzanillo, Guanabacoa, Santa Clara, Sagua la Grande, Sancti Spiritus, Guantanamo, Trinidad, Pinar del Rio, San Antonio de los Banos, Jovellanos, Marianao, Caibarien and Gaines.
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  • Mitjans, Estudio sobre el movimiento cientifico y literario de Cuba (Havana, 1890); biographies of Varela and Luz Caballero by Rodriguez (see below); files of La Revista de Cuba (16 vols., Havana, 1877-1884) and La Revista Cubana (21 vols., Havana, 1885-1895).
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  • Ramsay, The Island of Cuba (New York, 1896); Coleccion de reales ordenes, decretos y disposiciones (Havana, serial, 1857-1898); Spanish Rule in Cuba.
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  • The works (see above) of Sagra, Humboldt and Arango are indispensable; also those of Francisco Calcagno, Diccionario biogrdfico Cubano (ostensibly, New York, 1878); Vidal Morales y Morales, Iniciadores y primeros mdrtires de la revolucion Cubana (Havana, 1901); Jose Ahumada y Centurion, Memoria historica politica de.
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  • Would a college at Havana not be the noblest and most enduring monument that could be raised to the brave men of the "Maine," as well as a source of infinite good to all concerned?
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  • A sizable proportion of the human genome has been manually annotated by the Havana group.
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  • Planes flown from the US bombed sugar mills, strafed trains and dropped incendiary devices and leaflets on Havana.
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  • By Roselli 's cryptic account, Castro learned the identity of the underworld contacts in Havana who had been trying to knock him off.
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  • Blondes and redheads should opt for lighter frames in neutral tones such as havana or brown.
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  • The Havana: These edgy aviators have gunmetal frames and oval lenses.
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  • This one is available in light Havana/brown gradient, silver/black Saffiano gray, brown camel/brown gradient, Havana brown, and shiny gunmetal/gray gradient.
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  • It comes in colors such as violet, black or Havana.
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  • They have crystal brown lenses and a Havana frame.
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  • Originating in Havana among the slaves early in the 19th century, it was considered a "low" form of dance until the 1930s, when it began to appear in upper-class ballrooms.
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  • In 1947 a British dance teacher named Pierre Margolie visited Havana and categorized the steps into the form that eventually became adopted by the competitive dance world.
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  • There are different collections in the men's division, including Havana and the Signature series.
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  • From the bright orange, pink and yellow on 1986 Havana to the bold color blocks on Delinquent, these swim trunks are made to stand out.
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  • NexTag offers a wide selection of suede footwear from many name brand label makers, like Alden and Havana Joe of Spain.
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  • It sports a beautiful Havana colored dial and retails at $4,935.
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  • Belonging to the Breilting Montbrillant line, this version features a Havana colored dial and a stainless steel bracelet.
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  • For example, there's the glass effect seam, the shimmer seam, the Cuban heel, the Havana heel, the Manhattan heel and more.
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  • After the Clash broke up, Simonon formed Havana 3 A.M. The band recorded one album in Japan, and did a few tours, but broke up after the death of Nigel Dickinson, who was diagnosed with cancer.
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  • As captain of the "Cornwall" (80),(80), the flagship of Sir Charles Knowles, he was in the battle with the Spaniards off Havana on the 2nd of October 1748.
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  • It is said that more clear Havana cigars are manufactured in Tampa than in Havana.
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