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harz

harz Sentence Examples

  • GOSLAR, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, romantically situated on the Gose, an affluent of the Oker, at the north foot of the Harz, 24 m.

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  • There are four Evangelical churches, a Roman Catholic church, a synagogue, several schools, a natural science museum, containing a collection of Harz minerals, the Fenkner museum of antiquities and a number of small foundations.

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  • foot of the Harz Mountains, 12 m.

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  • In the vicinity is a cliff or ridge of rock called Teufelsmauer (Devil's wall), from which fine views are obtained across the plain and into the deep gorges of the Harz Mountains.

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  • in the Erzgebirge, the Thuringian Forest and the Harz Mountains.

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  • Of continental mines we may mention those in Saxony and in the Harz, Germany; those of Carinthia, Austria; and especially those of the southern provinces of Spain.

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  • In smelting at once in the same blast-furnace ores of different character, the old use of separate processes of precipitation, roasting and reduction, and general reduction prevailing in the Harz Mountains, Freiberg and other places, to suit local conditions, has been abandoned.

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  • The effect of the two processes on the purity of the market lead is clearly shown by the two following analyses by Hampe, which represent lead from Lautenthal in the Harz Mountains, where the Parkes process replaced that of Pattinson, the ores and smelting process remaining practically the same: - It is absolutely necessary for the success of the Parkes process that the zinc and lead should contain only a small amount of impurity.

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  • During his reign silver mines were opened in the Harz Mountains, towns were founded, roads were made, and the general condition of the country was improved.

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  • ALEXISBAD, a spa of Germany, in the duchy of Anhalt, lying under the Harz mountains, 1000 ft.

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  • It may also be accompanied by pyrites, galena, arsenides and antimonides, quartz, calcite, dolomite, &c. It is widely distributed, and is particularly abundant in Germany (the Harz, Silesia), Austro-Hungary, Belgium, the United States and in England (Cumberland, Derbyshire, Cornwall, North Wales).

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  • This method of separating gold from copper, by converting the latter into oxide and sulphate, is also used at Oker in the Harz.

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  • as at Oker in the Harz.

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  • It lies in a fertile country to the north of the Harz.

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  • HILDESHEIM, a town and episcopal see of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, beautifully situated at the north foot of the Harz Mountains, on the right bank of the Innerste, 18 m.

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  • It strictly designates only that district in upper Saxony that is bounded by the Werra, the Harz Mountains, the Saale and the Thuringian Forest; in common parlance, however, it is frequently used as equivalent to the Thuringian states, i.e.

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  • 420 when they occupied the district between the Harz Mountains and the Thuringian Forest.

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  • The northern portion of the kingdom was given to the Saxons who had joined him against Hermannfried; the southern part was added to Austrasia; and the name of Thuringia was confined to the district bounded by the Harz Mountains, the Werra, the Thuringian Forest and the Saale.

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  • Galena is met with at all places where lead is mined; of localities which have yielded finely crystallized specimens the following may be selected for mention: Derbyshire, Alston in Cumberland, Laxey in the Isle of Man (where crystals measuring almost a foot across have been found), Neudorf in the Harz, Rossie in New York and Joplin in Missouri.

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  • Mention may also be made here of clausthalite (lead selenide, PbSe) and altaite (lead telluride, PbTe), which, with their lead-grey colour and perfect cubic cleavage, closely resemble galena in appearance; these species are named after the localities at which they were originally found, namely, Klausthal in the Harz and the Altai mountains in Asiatic Russia.

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  • The southern portion of the province is hilly, and in the district of Klausenburg, containing the Harz, mountainous.

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  • The whole of Hanover dips from the Harz Mountains to the north, and the rivers consequently flow in that direction.

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  • in circuit; the lakes of Bederkesa and some others in the moorlands of the north; the Seeburger See, near Duderstadt; and the Oderteich, in the Harz, 2100 ft.

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  • The climate in the low-lying districts near the coast is moist and foggy, in the plains mild, on the Harz mountains severe and variable.

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  • Apples, pears, plums and cherries are the principal kinds of fruit cultivated, while the wild red cranberries from the Harz and the black bilberries from the Luneburger Heide form an important article of export.

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  • The Harz Mountains are rich in silver, lead, iron and copper; coal is found around Osnabruck, on the Deister, at Osterwald, &c., lignite in various places; salt-springs of great richness exist at Egestorf shall and Neuhall near Hanover, and at Luneburg; and petroleum may be obtained south of Celle.

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  • The iron works are very important: smelting is carried on in the Harz and near Osnabruck; there are extensive foundries and machine factories at Hanover, Linden, Osnabruck, Hameln, Geestemunde, Harburg, Osterode, &c., and manufactories of arms at Herzberg, and of cutlery in the towns of the Harz and in the Sollinger Forest.

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  • AUGUST GOTTLIEB SPANGENBERG (1704-1792), Count Zinzendorf's successor, and bishop of the Moravian Brethren, was born on the 15th of July 1704 at Klettenberg, on the south of the Harz Mountains, where his father, Georg Spangenberg, was court preacher and ecclesiastical inspector of the countship of Hohenstein.

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  • The eastern part of the chain passed from South France through the Vosges, the Black Forest, Thuringia, Harz, the Fichtelgebirge, Bohemia, the Sudetes, and possibly farther east; this constitutes the " Varischen Alps " of Suess.

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  • Granites, porphyries and porphyrites belonging to this period occur in the Saxon Erzgebirge, the Harz, Thiiringerwald, Vosges, Brittany, Cornwall and Christiania.

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  • These are Franconia (Franken), which embraces the districts of Bamberg, Schweinfurt and Wurzburg on the upper Main; Swabia (Schwaben), in which is included Wtirttemberg, parts of Bavaria and Baden and Hohenzollern; the Palatinate (Pfalz), embracing Bavaria west of the Rhine and the contiguous portion of Baden; Rhineland, applied to Rhenish Prussia, Nassau, Hesse-Darmstadt and parts of Bavaria and Baden; Vogtland, the mountainous country lying in the south-west corner of the kingdom of Saxony; Lusatia (Lausitz), the eastern portion of the kingdom of Saxony and the adjacent portion of Prussia watered by the upper Spree; Thuringia (Thulingen), the country lying south of the Harz Mountains and including the Saxon duchies; East Frlesland (Ost Friesland), the country lying between the lower course of the Weser and the Ems, and Westphalia (Westfalen), the fertile plain lying north and west of the Harz Mountains and extending to the North Sea and the Dutch frontier.

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  • The plateau is bounded on the north by the Harz, an isolated group of mountains, rich in minerals, with its highest elevation in the bare summit of the Brocken (3747 ft-).

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  • To the west of the Harz a series of hilly tracts is comprised under the name of the Weser Mountains, out of which above Minden the river Weser bursts by the Porta Westphalica.

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  • With the latter must be included the Frankenwald, the Thuringerwald, and even the Harz.

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  • north, in the Hunsrck, the Taunus, the Eifel and Westerwald, the Harz and the Frankenwald, the ancient floor is composed mainly of Devonian beds.

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  • For the Eifel, Sauerland, Harz, Thuringian Forest, Rhn, Vogelsberg, Spessart, the Black Forest, the Vosges, &c., the annual average may be stated at 34 in.

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  • The population is thickest in upper Silesia around Beuthen (coal-fields), around Ratibor, Neisse and Waldenburg (coal-fields), around Zittau (kingdom of Saxony), in the Elbe valley around Dresden, in the districts of Zwickau and Leipzig as far as the Saale, on the northern slopes of the Harz and around Bielefeld in Westphalia.

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  • Harz, crossing 52 N.

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  • It is extracted from the ores in the mines of Freiburg (Saxony), the Harz Mountains, upper Silesia, Merseburg, Aix-la-Chapelle, Wiesbaden and Arnsberg.

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  • Gold is found in the sand of the rivers Isar, Inn and Rhine, and also, to a limited extent, on the Harz.

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  • Lead is produced in considerable quantities in upper Silesia, the Harz Mountains, in the Prussian province of Nassau, in the Saxon Erzgebirge and in the Sauerland.

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  • Of other minerals (with the exceptions of coal, iron and salt treated below) nickel and antimony are found in the upper Harz; cobalt in the hilly districts of Hesse and the Saxon Erzgebirge; arsenic in the Riesengebirge; quicksilver in the Sauerland and in the spurs of the Saarbrucken coal hills; graphite in Bavaria; porcelain clay in Saxony and Silesia; amber along the whole Baltic coast; and lime and gypsum in almost all parts.

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  • Deposits of less consequence are found in upper Bavaria, upper Franconia, Baden, the Harz and elsewhere.

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  • Among the remaining higher technical schools may be mentioned the three mining academies of Berlin, Clausthal, in the Harz, and Freiberg in Saxony.

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  • To the east of the Franks between the Harz, the Elbe and the Saale lay the kingdom of the Thuringi, the origin of whom is not clear.

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  • of Halberstadt, picturesquely situated on the Holzemme, on the north slopes of the Harz Mountains.

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  • It was discovered in 1861 by Sir William Crookes, who, during a spectroscopic examination of the flue-dust produced in the roasting of seleniferous pyrites occurring at Tilkerode in the Harz, observed a green line foreign to all then known spectra.

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  • it approaches the Harz Mountains, and thus takes its place in the great Sudetic chain of central Germany.

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  • JOSEPH MARIA VON RADOWITZ (1797-1853), Prussian general and statesman, was born at Blankenburg in the Harz Mountains, his family being of Hungarian origin.

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  • At Rammelsberg in the Harz it forms a bed in argillaceous schist, and at Mansfeld in Thuringia it occurs in the Kupferschiefer with ores of nickel and cobalt.

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  • Harz Mountains >>

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  • base of the Harz Mountains, 12 miles S.E.

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  • In the following year he was summoned to Germany to the side of the emperor, and was with him when he died at Botfeld in the Harz on the 5th of October 1056.

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  • SANGERHAUSEN, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Saxony, situated on the Gonna, near the south base of the Harz mountains, 30 m.

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  • It is pleasantly situated under the north-eastern declivity of the Harz mountains.

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  • He early recognized the value of palaeontology in stratigraphical work; and he made important researches in the Rhenish mountains, in the Harz and Alpine districts.

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  • The north-western and higher part of the mass is called the Ober or Upper Harz; the south-eastern and more extensive part, the Unter or Lower Harz; while the N.W.

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  • slopes of the Upper Harz form the Vorharz.

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  • The Brocken group, which divides the Upper and Lower Harz, is generally regarded as belonging to the first.

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  • The highest summits of the Upper Harz are the Brocken (3747 ft.), the Heinrichshohe (3425 ft.), the Konigsberg (3376 ft.) and the Wurmberg (3176 ft.); of the Lower Harz, the Josephshohe in the Auerberg group and the Viktorhohe in the Ramberg, each 1887 ft.

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  • While rendered extensively useful, by various skilful artifices, in working the numerous mines of the district, at other parts of their course they present the most picturesque scenery in the Harz.

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  • The Harz is a mass of Palaeozoic rock rising through the Mesozoic strata of north Germany, and bounded on all sides by faults.

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  • The structure of the Harz is very complicated, but the general strike of the folds, especially in the Oberharz plateau, is N.E.

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  • The whole mass evidently belongs to the ancient Hercynian chain of North Europe (which, indeed, derives its name from the Harz), and is the north-easterly continuation of the rocks of the Ardennes and the Eifel.

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  • Owing to its position as the first range which the northerly winds strike after crossing the north German plain, the climate on the summit of the Harz is generally raw and damp, even in summer.

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  • But while the summer is thus relatively ungenial on the top of the Harz, the usual summer heat of the lower-lying valleys is greatly tempered and cooled; so that, adding this to the natural attractions of the scenery, the deep forests, and the legendary and romantic associations attaching to every fantastic rock and ruined castle, the Harz is a favourite summer resort of the German people.

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  • Some of these, and other places not named, add to their natural attractions the advantage of mineral springs and baths, pine-needle baths, whey cures, &c. The Harz is penetrated by several railways, among them a rack-railway up the Brocken, opened in 1898.

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  • The northern summits are destitute of trees, but the lower slopes of the Upper Harz are heavily wooded with pines and firs.

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  • In the Lower Harz the forests contain a great variety of timber.

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  • The last bear was killed in the Harz in 1705, and the last lynx in 1817, and since that time the wolf too has become extinct; but deer, foxes, wild cats and badgers are still found in the forests.

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  • The Harz is one of the richest mineral storehouses in Germany, and the chief industry is mining, which has been carried on since the middle of the 10th century.

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  • Mining is carried on principally at Klausthal and St Andreasberg in the Upper Harz.

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  • in length, was made from the same neighbourhood to Gittelde, at the west side of the Harz, in 1851-1864.

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  • Much wood is exported for building and other purposes, and in the Harz itself is used as fuel.

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  • Agriculture is carried on chiefly on the plateaus of the Lower Harz; but there is excellent pasturage both in the north and in the south.

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  • In the Lower Harz, as in Switzerland, the cows, which carry bells harmoniously tuned, are driven up into the heights in early summer, returning to the sheltered regions in late autumn.

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  • The boundary line between High and Low German passes through the Harz.

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  • The Harz was the last stronghold of paganism in Germany, and to that fact are due the legends, in which no district is richer, and the fanciful names given by the people to peculiar objects and appearances of nature.

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  • See Zeitschrift des Harzvereins (Wernigerode, annually since 1868); Gunther, Der Harz in GeschichtsKulturand Landschaftsbildern (Hanover, 1885), and "Der Harz" in Scobel's Monographien zur Erdkunde (Bielefeld, 1901); H.

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  • Hoffmann and others, Der Harz (Leipzig, 1899), Harzwanderungen (Leipzig, 1902); Hampe, Flora Hercynica (Halle, 1873); von Groddeck, Abriss der Geognosie des Harzes (2nd ed., Klausthal, 1883); Prbhle, Harzsagen (2nd ed., Leipzig, 1886); Hautzinger, Der Kupferand Silbersegen des Harzes (Berlin, 1877); Hoppe, Die Bergwerke im Oberand Unterharz (Klausthal, 1883); Schulze, Lithia Hercynica (Leipzig, 18 95); Li decke, Die Minerale des Harzes (Berlin, 1896).

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  • ILSENBURG, a village and health resort of Germany, in Prussian Saxony, romantically situated under the north foot of the Harz Mountains, at the entrance to the Ilsethal, 6 m.

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  • Owing to its charming surroundings and its central position in the range, Ilsenburg is one of the most frequented tourist resorts in the Harz Mountains, being visited annually by some 6000 persons.

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  • Native arsenic occurs usually in metalliferous veins in association with ores of antimony, silver, &c.; the silver mines of Freiberg in Saxony, St Andreasberg in the Harz, and Chanarcillo in Chile being well-known localities.

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  • CLAUSTHAL, or Klausthal, a town of Germany, in the Prussian Harz, lying on a bleak plateau, 1860 ft.

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  • Clausthal is the chief mining town of the Upper Harz Mountains, and practically forms one town with Zellerfeld, which is separated from it by a small stream, the Zellbach.

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  • The museum of the Upper Harz is at Zellerfeld.

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  • The western portion of the territory is undulating and in the extreme southwest, where it forms part of the Harz range, mountainous, the Ramberg peak attaining a height of 1900 ft.

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  • From the Harz the country gently shelves down to the Saale; and between this river and the Elbe there lies a fine tract of fertile country.

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  • The major part belongs to the great North-German plain, but the western and south-western districts include parts of the Harz, with the Brocken, its highest summit, and the Thuringian Forest.

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  • The best crop-producing districts lie near the base of the Harz Mountains, such as the "Magdeburger Borde" (between Magdeburg and the Saale) and the "Goldene Aue," and rich pasture lands occur in the river valleys, but the sandy plains of the Altmark, in the!north part of the province, yield but a scanty return.

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  • The beetroot for sugar is grown chiefly in the district to the north of the Harz, as far as the Ohre, and on the banks of the Saale; and the amount of sugar produced is nearly as much as that of all the rest of Prussia together.

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  • Flax, hops and oilseeds are also cultivated, and large quantities of excellent fruit are grown at the foot of the Harz and in the valleys of the Unstrut and the Saale.

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  • The province is comparatively poor in timber, though there are some fine forests in the Harz and other hilly districts.

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  • The copper mines are found chiefly in the Harz district.

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  • Numerous mineral springs occur in the Harz.

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  • GOSLAR, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, romantically situated on the Gose, an affluent of the Oker, at the north foot of the Harz, 24 m.

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  • There are four Evangelical churches, a Roman Catholic church, a synagogue, several schools, a natural science museum, containing a collection of Harz minerals, the Fenkner museum of antiquities and a number of small foundations.

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  • foot of the Harz Mountains, 12 m.

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  • In the vicinity is a cliff or ridge of rock called Teufelsmauer (Devil's wall), from which fine views are obtained across the plain and into the deep gorges of the Harz Mountains.

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  • in the Erzgebirge, the Thuringian Forest and the Harz Mountains.

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  • Of continental mines we may mention those in Saxony and in the Harz, Germany; those of Carinthia, Austria; and especially those of the southern provinces of Spain.

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  • In smelting at once in the same blast-furnace ores of different character, the old use of separate processes of precipitation, roasting and reduction, and general reduction prevailing in the Harz Mountains, Freiberg and other places, to suit local conditions, has been abandoned.

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  • The effect of the two processes on the purity of the market lead is clearly shown by the two following analyses by Hampe, which represent lead from Lautenthal in the Harz Mountains, where the Parkes process replaced that of Pattinson, the ores and smelting process remaining practically the same: - It is absolutely necessary for the success of the Parkes process that the zinc and lead should contain only a small amount of impurity.

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  • Even in his boyhood he had shown symptoms of consumption, the disease that was working such havoc in his family; and now under the strain of work he broke down altogether, and had to retire to the Harz with his friends Ritter and R.

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  • During his reign silver mines were opened in the Harz Mountains, towns were founded, roads were made, and the general condition of the country was improved.

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  • ALEXISBAD, a spa of Germany, in the duchy of Anhalt, lying under the Harz mountains, 1000 ft.

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  • It may also be accompanied by pyrites, galena, arsenides and antimonides, quartz, calcite, dolomite, &c. It is widely distributed, and is particularly abundant in Germany (the Harz, Silesia), Austro-Hungary, Belgium, the United States and in England (Cumberland, Derbyshire, Cornwall, North Wales).

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  • This method of separating gold from copper, by converting the latter into oxide and sulphate, is also used at Oker in the Harz.

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  • as at Oker in the Harz.

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  • It lies in a fertile country to the north of the Harz.

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  • HILDESHEIM, a town and episcopal see of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, beautifully situated at the north foot of the Harz Mountains, on the right bank of the Innerste, 18 m.

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  • It strictly designates only that district in upper Saxony that is bounded by the Werra, the Harz Mountains, the Saale and the Thuringian Forest; in common parlance, however, it is frequently used as equivalent to the Thuringian states, i.e.

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  • 420 when they occupied the district between the Harz Mountains and the Thuringian Forest.

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  • The northern portion of the kingdom was given to the Saxons who had joined him against Hermannfried; the southern part was added to Austrasia; and the name of Thuringia was confined to the district bounded by the Harz Mountains, the Werra, the Thuringian Forest and the Saale.

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  • Galena is met with at all places where lead is mined; of localities which have yielded finely crystallized specimens the following may be selected for mention: Derbyshire, Alston in Cumberland, Laxey in the Isle of Man (where crystals measuring almost a foot across have been found), Neudorf in the Harz, Rossie in New York and Joplin in Missouri.

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  • Mention may also be made here of clausthalite (lead selenide, PbSe) and altaite (lead telluride, PbTe), which, with their lead-grey colour and perfect cubic cleavage, closely resemble galena in appearance; these species are named after the localities at which they were originally found, namely, Klausthal in the Harz and the Altai mountains in Asiatic Russia.

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  • The southern portion of the province is hilly, and in the district of Klausenburg, containing the Harz, mountainous.

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  • The whole of Hanover dips from the Harz Mountains to the north, and the rivers consequently flow in that direction.

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  • in circuit; the lakes of Bederkesa and some others in the moorlands of the north; the Seeburger See, near Duderstadt; and the Oderteich, in the Harz, 2100 ft.

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  • The climate in the low-lying districts near the coast is moist and foggy, in the plains mild, on the Harz mountains severe and variable.

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  • Apples, pears, plums and cherries are the principal kinds of fruit cultivated, while the wild red cranberries from the Harz and the black bilberries from the Luneburger Heide form an important article of export.

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  • The Harz Mountains are rich in silver, lead, iron and copper; coal is found around Osnabruck, on the Deister, at Osterwald, &c., lignite in various places; salt-springs of great richness exist at Egestorf shall and Neuhall near Hanover, and at Luneburg; and petroleum may be obtained south of Celle.

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  • The iron works are very important: smelting is carried on in the Harz and near Osnabruck; there are extensive foundries and machine factories at Hanover, Linden, Osnabruck, Hameln, Geestemunde, Harburg, Osterode, &c., and manufactories of arms at Herzberg, and of cutlery in the towns of the Harz and in the Sollinger Forest.

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  • AUGUST GOTTLIEB SPANGENBERG (1704-1792), Count Zinzendorf's successor, and bishop of the Moravian Brethren, was born on the 15th of July 1704 at Klettenberg, on the south of the Harz Mountains, where his father, Georg Spangenberg, was court preacher and ecclesiastical inspector of the countship of Hohenstein.

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  • The eastern part of the chain passed from South France through the Vosges, the Black Forest, Thuringia, Harz, the Fichtelgebirge, Bohemia, the Sudetes, and possibly farther east; this constitutes the " Varischen Alps " of Suess.

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  • Granites, porphyries and porphyrites belonging to this period occur in the Saxon Erzgebirge, the Harz, Thiiringerwald, Vosges, Brittany, Cornwall and Christiania.

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  • These are Franconia (Franken), which embraces the districts of Bamberg, Schweinfurt and Wurzburg on the upper Main; Swabia (Schwaben), in which is included Wtirttemberg, parts of Bavaria and Baden and Hohenzollern; the Palatinate (Pfalz), embracing Bavaria west of the Rhine and the contiguous portion of Baden; Rhineland, applied to Rhenish Prussia, Nassau, Hesse-Darmstadt and parts of Bavaria and Baden; Vogtland, the mountainous country lying in the south-west corner of the kingdom of Saxony; Lusatia (Lausitz), the eastern portion of the kingdom of Saxony and the adjacent portion of Prussia watered by the upper Spree; Thuringia (Thulingen), the country lying south of the Harz Mountains and including the Saxon duchies; East Frlesland (Ost Friesland), the country lying between the lower course of the Weser and the Ems, and Westphalia (Westfalen), the fertile plain lying north and west of the Harz Mountains and extending to the North Sea and the Dutch frontier.

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  • The plateau is bounded on the north by the Harz, an isolated group of mountains, rich in minerals, with its highest elevation in the bare summit of the Brocken (3747 ft-).

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  • To the west of the Harz a series of hilly tracts is comprised under the name of the Weser Mountains, out of which above Minden the river Weser bursts by the Porta Westphalica.

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  • With the latter must be included the Frankenwald, the Thuringerwald, and even the Harz.

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  • north, in the Hunsrck, the Taunus, the Eifel and Westerwald, the Harz and the Frankenwald, the ancient floor is composed mainly of Devonian beds.

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  • For the Eifel, Sauerland, Harz, Thuringian Forest, Rhn, Vogelsberg, Spessart, the Black Forest, the Vosges, &c., the annual average may be stated at 34 in.

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  • The population is thickest in upper Silesia around Beuthen (coal-fields), around Ratibor, Neisse and Waldenburg (coal-fields), around Zittau (kingdom of Saxony), in the Elbe valley around Dresden, in the districts of Zwickau and Leipzig as far as the Saale, on the northern slopes of the Harz and around Bielefeld in Westphalia.

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  • Harz, crossing 52 N.

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  • It is extracted from the ores in the mines of Freiburg (Saxony), the Harz Mountains, upper Silesia, Merseburg, Aix-la-Chapelle, Wiesbaden and Arnsberg.

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  • Gold is found in the sand of the rivers Isar, Inn and Rhine, and also, to a limited extent, on the Harz.

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  • Lead is produced in considerable quantities in upper Silesia, the Harz Mountains, in the Prussian province of Nassau, in the Saxon Erzgebirge and in the Sauerland.

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  • Of other minerals (with the exceptions of coal, iron and salt treated below) nickel and antimony are found in the upper Harz; cobalt in the hilly districts of Hesse and the Saxon Erzgebirge; arsenic in the Riesengebirge; quicksilver in the Sauerland and in the spurs of the Saarbrucken coal hills; graphite in Bavaria; porcelain clay in Saxony and Silesia; amber along the whole Baltic coast; and lime and gypsum in almost all parts.

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  • Deposits of less consequence are found in upper Bavaria, upper Franconia, Baden, the Harz and elsewhere.

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  • Among the remaining higher technical schools may be mentioned the three mining academies of Berlin, Clausthal, in the Harz, and Freiberg in Saxony.

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  • To the east of the Franks between the Harz, the Elbe and the Saale lay the kingdom of the Thuringi, the origin of whom is not clear.

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  • of Halberstadt, picturesquely situated on the Holzemme, on the north slopes of the Harz Mountains.

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  • It was discovered in 1861 by Sir William Crookes, who, during a spectroscopic examination of the flue-dust produced in the roasting of seleniferous pyrites occurring at Tilkerode in the Harz, observed a green line foreign to all then known spectra.

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  • it approaches the Harz Mountains, and thus takes its place in the great Sudetic chain of central Germany.

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  • Of other events of this period the most notable were two winter journeys, the first in 1777, to the Harz Mountains, the second, two years later, to Switzerland - journeys which gave Goethe scope for that introspection and reflection for which his Weimar life left him little time.

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  • JOSEPH MARIA VON RADOWITZ (1797-1853), Prussian general and statesman, was born at Blankenburg in the Harz Mountains, his family being of Hungarian origin.

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  • At Rammelsberg in the Harz it forms a bed in argillaceous schist, and at Mansfeld in Thuringia it occurs in the Kupferschiefer with ores of nickel and cobalt.

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  • HARZBURG, a town of Germany, in the duchy of Brunswick, beautifully situated in a deep and well-wooded vale at the north foot of the Harz Mountains, at the terminus of the BrunswickHarzburg railway, 5 m.

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  • Harz Mountains >>

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  • base of the Harz Mountains, 12 miles S.E.

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  • In the following year he was summoned to Germany to the side of the emperor, and was with him when he died at Botfeld in the Harz on the 5th of October 1056.

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  • SANGERHAUSEN, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Saxony, situated on the Gonna, near the south base of the Harz mountains, 30 m.

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  • It is pleasantly situated under the north-eastern declivity of the Harz mountains.

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  • He early recognized the value of palaeontology in stratigraphical work; and he made important researches in the Rhenish mountains, in the Harz and Alpine districts.

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  • HARZ MOUNTAINS (also spelt Hartz, Ger.

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  • The north-western and higher part of the mass is called the Ober or Upper Harz; the south-eastern and more extensive part, the Unter or Lower Harz; while the N.W.

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  • slopes of the Upper Harz form the Vorharz.

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  • The Brocken group, which divides the Upper and Lower Harz, is generally regarded as belonging to the first.

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  • The highest summits of the Upper Harz are the Brocken (3747 ft.), the Heinrichshohe (3425 ft.), the Konigsberg (3376 ft.) and the Wurmberg (3176 ft.); of the Lower Harz, the Josephshohe in the Auerberg group and the Viktorhohe in the Ramberg, each 1887 ft.

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  • While rendered extensively useful, by various skilful artifices, in working the numerous mines of the district, at other parts of their course they present the most picturesque scenery in the Harz.

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  • The Harz is a mass of Palaeozoic rock rising through the Mesozoic strata of north Germany, and bounded on all sides by faults.

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  • The structure of the Harz is very complicated, but the general strike of the folds, especially in the Oberharz plateau, is N.E.

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  • The whole mass evidently belongs to the ancient Hercynian chain of North Europe (which, indeed, derives its name from the Harz), and is the north-easterly continuation of the rocks of the Ardennes and the Eifel.

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  • Owing to its position as the first range which the northerly winds strike after crossing the north German plain, the climate on the summit of the Harz is generally raw and damp, even in summer.

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  • But while the summer is thus relatively ungenial on the top of the Harz, the usual summer heat of the lower-lying valleys is greatly tempered and cooled; so that, adding this to the natural attractions of the scenery, the deep forests, and the legendary and romantic associations attaching to every fantastic rock and ruined castle, the Harz is a favourite summer resort of the German people.

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  • Some of these, and other places not named, add to their natural attractions the advantage of mineral springs and baths, pine-needle baths, whey cures, &c. The Harz is penetrated by several railways, among them a rack-railway up the Brocken, opened in 1898.

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  • The northern summits are destitute of trees, but the lower slopes of the Upper Harz are heavily wooded with pines and firs.

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  • In the Lower Harz the forests contain a great variety of timber.

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  • The last bear was killed in the Harz in 1705, and the last lynx in 1817, and since that time the wolf too has become extinct; but deer, foxes, wild cats and badgers are still found in the forests.

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  • The Harz is one of the richest mineral storehouses in Germany, and the chief industry is mining, which has been carried on since the middle of the 10th century.

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  • Mining is carried on principally at Klausthal and St Andreasberg in the Upper Harz.

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  • in length, was made from the same neighbourhood to Gittelde, at the west side of the Harz, in 1851-1864.

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  • Much wood is exported for building and other purposes, and in the Harz itself is used as fuel.

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  • Agriculture is carried on chiefly on the plateaus of the Lower Harz; but there is excellent pasturage both in the north and in the south.

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  • In the Lower Harz, as in Switzerland, the cows, which carry bells harmoniously tuned, are driven up into the heights in early summer, returning to the sheltered regions in late autumn.

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  • The boundary line between High and Low German passes through the Harz.

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  • The Harz was the last stronghold of paganism in Germany, and to that fact are due the legends, in which no district is richer, and the fanciful names given by the people to peculiar objects and appearances of nature.

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  • See Zeitschrift des Harzvereins (Wernigerode, annually since 1868); Gunther, Der Harz in GeschichtsKulturand Landschaftsbildern (Hanover, 1885), and "Der Harz" in Scobel's Monographien zur Erdkunde (Bielefeld, 1901); H.

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  • Hoffmann and others, Der Harz (Leipzig, 1899), Harzwanderungen (Leipzig, 1902); Hampe, Flora Hercynica (Halle, 1873); von Groddeck, Abriss der Geognosie des Harzes (2nd ed., Klausthal, 1883); Prbhle, Harzsagen (2nd ed., Leipzig, 1886); Hautzinger, Der Kupferand Silbersegen des Harzes (Berlin, 1877); Hoppe, Die Bergwerke im Oberand Unterharz (Klausthal, 1883); Schulze, Lithia Hercynica (Leipzig, 18 95); Li decke, Die Minerale des Harzes (Berlin, 1896).

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  • ILSENBURG, a village and health resort of Germany, in Prussian Saxony, romantically situated under the north foot of the Harz Mountains, at the entrance to the Ilsethal, 6 m.

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  • Owing to its charming surroundings and its central position in the range, Ilsenburg is one of the most frequented tourist resorts in the Harz Mountains, being visited annually by some 6000 persons.

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  • Native arsenic occurs usually in metalliferous veins in association with ores of antimony, silver, &c.; the silver mines of Freiberg in Saxony, St Andreasberg in the Harz, and Chanarcillo in Chile being well-known localities.

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  • CLAUSTHAL, or Klausthal, a town of Germany, in the Prussian Harz, lying on a bleak plateau, 1860 ft.

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  • Clausthal is the chief mining town of the Upper Harz Mountains, and practically forms one town with Zellerfeld, which is separated from it by a small stream, the Zellbach.

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  • The museum of the Upper Harz is at Zellerfeld.

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  • The western portion of the territory is undulating and in the extreme southwest, where it forms part of the Harz range, mountainous, the Ramberg peak attaining a height of 1900 ft.

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  • From the Harz the country gently shelves down to the Saale; and between this river and the Elbe there lies a fine tract of fertile country.

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  • The major part belongs to the great North-German plain, but the western and south-western districts include parts of the Harz, with the Brocken, its highest summit, and the Thuringian Forest.

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  • The best crop-producing districts lie near the base of the Harz Mountains, such as the "Magdeburger Borde" (between Magdeburg and the Saale) and the "Goldene Aue," and rich pasture lands occur in the river valleys, but the sandy plains of the Altmark, in the!north part of the province, yield but a scanty return.

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  • The beetroot for sugar is grown chiefly in the district to the north of the Harz, as far as the Ohre, and on the banks of the Saale; and the amount of sugar produced is nearly as much as that of all the rest of Prussia together.

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  • Flax, hops and oilseeds are also cultivated, and large quantities of excellent fruit are grown at the foot of the Harz and in the valleys of the Unstrut and the Saale.

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  • The province is comparatively poor in timber, though there are some fine forests in the Harz and other hilly districts.

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  • The copper mines are found chiefly in the Harz district.

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  • Numerous mineral springs occur in the Harz.

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