Harvard sentence example

harvard
  • Jeans, sneakers and a Harvard tee shirt made up her attire.
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  • We have someone from Harvard here who can't figure out the generator.
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  • He entered Harvard College in the autumn of 1811, but almost at the outset his career was interrupted by an accident which affected the subsequent course of his life.
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  • Gallatin tried to earn a living by teaching French in Harvard College, apparently not without success, but the cold and rigid civilization of New England repelled him, and he made his way to the South.
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  • I could barely make out the emblem on the front of the Harvard Tee shirt it was so drenched in blood.
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  • In 1870-71 he lectured on psychology at Harvard.
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  • From 1863 to 1870 he was secretary and recorder to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and in the last year of his life he lectured on mathematical physics at Harvard.
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  • Excavations under the auspices of Harvard University began here in 1908.
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1863, continuing to study languages and philosophy with zeal; spent two years in the Harvard law school, and opened an office in Boston; but soon devoted the greater portion of his time to writing for periodicals.
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  • In 1869 he gave a course of lectures at Harvard on the Positive Philosophy; next year he was history tutor; in 1871 he delivered thirty-five lectures on the Doctrine of Evolution, afterwards revised and expanded as Outlines of Cosmic Philosophy (1874); and between 1872 and 1879 he was assistant-librarian.
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  • He graduated from Harvard in 1880 (in the class with Theodore Roosevelt), and the following year entered the banking house of Lee, Higginson & Co., in Boston.
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  • Graduating from Harvard in 1841, he was a schoolmaster for two years, studied theology at the Harvard Divinity School, and was pastor in1847-1850of the First Religious Society (Unitarian) of Newburyport, Massachusetts, and of the Free Church at Worcester in 1852-1858.
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  • His father, a farmer, also named John, was of the fourth generation in descent from Henry Adams, who emigrated from Devonshire, England, to Massachusetts about 1636; his mother was Susanna Boylston Adams. Young Adams graduated from Harvard College in 1755, and for a time taught school at Worcester and studied law in the office of Rufus Putnam.
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  • He was assistant librarian of Harvard University from 1856 to 1872, and planned and perfected an alphabetical card catalogue, combining many of the advantages of the ordinary dictionary catalogues with the grouping of the minor topics under more general heads, which is characteristic of a systematic catalogue.
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  • From 1872 until his death he was Bussey Professor of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation in the Harvard Divinity School.
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  • from Harvard in 1872, and that of D.D.
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  • The most brilliant star of this constellation, a-Aquilae or Altair, has a parallax of 0.23", and consequently is about eight times as bright as the sun; q-Aquilae is a short-period variable, while Nova Aquilae is a " temporary " or " new " star, discovered by Mrs Fleming of Harvard in 1899.
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  • Olmsted, still other groups have formed - among others those of the marble buildings of the Harvard medical school; Fenway Court, a building in the style, internally, of a Venetian palace, that houses the art treasures of Mrs. J.
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  • Among musical organizations may be mentioned the Handel and Haydn Society (1815), the Harvard Musical Association (1837), the Philharmonic (1880) and the Symphony Orchestra, organized in 1881 by the generosity of Henry Lee Higginson.
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  • Simmons College and Harvard University maintain the Boston school for social workers (1904).
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  • In 1782 King's chapel (Episcopal) became Unitarian, and in 1805 one of that faith was made professor of divinity in Harvard.
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  • He was also the founder of the Rumford medal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of the Rumford professorship in Harvard University.
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  • Near East (1921), p. 71, ff.; (31) Lyon, Harvard Theol.
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  • (1914), p. 1 59, ff.; (42) Harvard African Studies, II.; Boston Museum Bulletin, Feb.
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  • Of those in the United States of America, the chief, formed by Asa Gray, is the property of Harvard university; there is also a large one at the New York Botanical Garden.
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  • At school and at Harvard University he in nowise distinguished himself, though he was an intelligently receptive student; he became, however, proficient enough in Greek, Latin, and the more general acquirements to enable him to act for a time as a master.
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  • Francis Dana graduated at Harvard in 1762, was admitted to the bar in 1767, and, being an opponent of the British colonial policy, became a leader of the Sons of Liberty, and in 1774 was a member of the first provincial congress of Massachusetts.
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  • He was educated at Harvard in the class of 1808.
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  • He re-entered Harvard in December 1836 and graduated in June 1837.
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  • He was a student at the Harvard law school from 1837 to 1840, and from January 1839 to February 1840 he was also an instructor in elocution in the college.
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  • As an authority on the Inquisition he stood in the highest rank of modern historians, and distinctions were conferred on him by the universities of Harvard, Princeton, Pennsylvania, Giessen and Moscow.
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  • Richard graduated at Harvard in 1826, and, after studying law at Newburyport, was admitted to the bar at Boston in 1830.
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  • At the age of seventeen he became himself a winter schoolmaster, and in his twentieth year he entered himself at Harvard, working on the farm as usual (until 1831) while he followed his.
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  • from Harvard college.
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  • Chadwick, Studies on Anglo-Saxon Institutions (1905); P. Vinogradoff, "Folcland" in the English Historical Review, 1893; "Romanistische Einflasse im Angelsachsischen Recht: Das Buchland" in the Mélanges Fitting, 1907; "The Transfer of Land in Old English Law" in the Harvard Law Review, 1907.
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  • In 1879-1882 he lectured on theology at Andover Theological Seminary, and in 1883 at Harvard, where in 1895-1896 he conducted a graduate seminary in ethics.
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  • (1888); Essays on the Higher Education (1899), defending the "old" (Yale) system against the Harvard or "new" education, as praised by George H.
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1727, then became an apprentice in his father's counting-room, and for several years devoted himself to business.
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1858, and from 1861 to 1868 was private secretary to his father.
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  • From 1870 to 1877 he was assistant professor of history at Harvard and from 1870 to 1876 was editor of the North American Review.
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  • His elder brother, John Quincy Adams (1833-1894), a graduate of Harvard (1853), practised law, and was a Democratic member for several terms of the Massachusetts general court.
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  • Another brother, Charles Francis Adams, Jr. (1835-), born in Boston on the 27th of May 1835, graduated at Harvard in 1856, and served on the Union side in the Civil War, receiving in 1865 the brevet of brigadier-general in the regular army.
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  • Another brother, Brooks Adams (1848-), born in Quincy, Massachusetts, on the 24th of June 1848, graduated at Harvard in 1870, and until 1881 practised law.
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1796, and in 1798 was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church at West Newbury.
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  • Alva Woods (1794-1887), a nephew of the elder Leonard and the son of Abel Woods (1765-1850), a Baptist preacher, graduated at Harvard in 1817 and at Andover Theological Seminary in 1821, and was ordained as a Baptist minister.
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  • was conferred upon him by Harvard University, and his scientific attainments were recognized by the American Philosophical Society and the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences.
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  • Harvard (1890-1891), xx.
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  • of Harvard in 1872, S.T.D.
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  • [Harvard Univ.] 1876); Cat.
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  • After acting for a short time as assistant in Harvard College Observatory, he was appointed assistant professor of mathematics in the U.S. Naval Academy in 1866, and in the following year became director of the Allegheny Observatory at Pittsburg, a position which he held until his selection in 1887 as secretary of the Smithsonian.
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  • from Harvard University in 1868.
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  • Subsequently he took a degree in divinity at the Harvard Divinity School.
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  • This charge he resigned to take the Bussey professorship of theology at Harvard University, and, in 1878, became dean of the faculty of theology.
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  • His greatgrandfather, Ebenezer Parkman, a graduate of Harvard in 1721, was for nearly sixty years minister of the Congregational Church in Westborough, and was noted for his devotion to the study of history.
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  • Samuel's son, Francis Parkman, a graduate of Harvard in 1807, was one of the most eminent of the Boston clergymen, a pupil and friend of Channing, and noted among Unitarians for a broadly tolerant disposition.
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  • In 1844 he graduated at Harvard with high rank.
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  • lie was professor of horticulture in the agricultural school of Harvard in 1871-1872, and published a few books on the subject of gardening.
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  • Young Adams graduated from Harvard College in 1740, and three years later, on attaining the degree of A.M., chose for his thesis, "Whether it be Lawful to resist the Supreme Magistrate, if the Commonwealth cannot otherwise be preserved."
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  • He graduated at Amherst in 1839 and at the Harvard Divinity School in 1842.
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  • In 1842-1855 he was pastor of the South Congregational Church of Boston, and in 1855-1860 was preacher to the university and Plummer professor of Christian Morals at Harvard; he then left the Unitarian Church, with which his father had been connected as a clergyman at Hadley, resigned his professorship and became pastor of the newly established Emmanuel Church of Boston.
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1817, was tutor in mathematics there in 1820-1821, was admitted to practice in the court of common pleas in December 1821, and began the practice of law in Newburyport, Mass., in 1824.
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  • He had been made a Master of Arts at Harvard and at Yale in 1753, and at the college of William and Mary in 1756; and in 1762 he received the degree of D.C.L.
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  • The leading educational institution of the state, as it is the oldest and most famous of the country, is Harvard University (founded 1636) at Cambridge.
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  • Of various institutions for the education of women, Mount Holyoke (1837) at South Hadley, Smith College (1875) at Northampton, Wellesley College (1875) at Wellesley near Boston, Radcliffe College (1879) in connexion with Harvard at Cambridge and Simmons College (1899) at Boston, are of national repute.
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  • For agricultural students the state supports a school at Amherst (1867), and Harvard University the Bussey Institution.
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  • There are schools, of theology at Cambridge (Protestant Episcopal), Newton (Baptist) and Waltham (New Church), as well as in connexion with Boston University (Methodist), Tufts College (Universalist) and Harvard (non-sectarian, and the affiliated Congregational Andover Theological Seminary at Cambridge).
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  • Law and medical schools are maintained in Boston and Harvard universities.
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  • The Boston public library, exceeded in size in the United States by the library of Congress at Washington - and probably first, because of the large number of duplicates in the library of Congress - and the largest free municipal library in the world; the library of Harvard, extremely well chosen and valuable for research; the collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society (1791); the Boston Athenaeum (1807); the State Library (1826); the New England Historic Genealogical Society (1845); the Congregational Library; the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1780); and the Boston Society of Natural History (1830), all in Boston, leave it easily unrivalled, unless by Washington, as the best research centre of the country.
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  • Exceptionally honourable to the early colonists was their devotion to education (see Harvard University and Boston).
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  • Bush, History of Higher Education in Massachusetts (Washington, U.S. Bureau of Education, 1891); article on Harvard University.
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  • Harding, Contest over the Ratification of the Federal Constitution in Massachusetts (Harvard University Studies, New York, 1896); and on the Shays Rebellion compare J.
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  • He graduated from Harvard in 1747, engaged in trade, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1770.
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  • After a visit to England, in 1842, he started with two English associates, Charles Lane and Henry C. Wright, at "Fruitlands," in the town of Harvard, Massachusetts, a communistic experiment at farm-living and nature-meditation as tending to develop the best powers of body and soul.
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  • As early as 1636 they founded Harvard College, and in 1701 Yale College was established.
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  • Ten years after the foundation of Harvard, missionary work among the Indians was undertaken by John Eliot and Thomas Mayhew.
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  • The loss of Harvard College compelled the provision of new seminaries, and missionary work both home and foreign was vigorously carried on.
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  • After graduating at Harvard College in 1852 and at the law school of Harvard University in 1854, he was admitted first to the Massachusetts (1855) and then (1856) to the New York bar, and entered the law office of Scudder & Carter in New York City.
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  • JEREMY BELKNAP (1744-1798), American author and clergyman, was born at Boston on the 4th of June 1744, and was educated at Harvard College, where he graduated in 1762.
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  • He is recognized as the founder of the Massachusetts Historical Society, and in 1792 became an overseer of Harvard.
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  • In 1882 he was called to Harvard where he taught as instructor in philosophy, assistant professor (1885-92), professor of the history of philosophy (1892-1914) and Alford professor of religion, moral philosophy, and civil polity (after 1914).
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  • degrees from Harvard, Yale, Johns Hopkins, Aberdeen, St.
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  • That his early outdoor life furnished a definite training for his after career is indicated by the fact that when he was about fourteen years of age he went with his father on a tour up the Nile as far as Luxor, and on this journey he made a collection of Egyptian birds found in the Nile valley, which is now in the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C. Mr Roosevelt was educated at Harvard University, where he graduated in the class of 1880; 2 his record for scholarship was creditable, and his interest in sports and athletics was especially manifest in his skill as a boxer.
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  • Stephen was graduated at Harvard in 1782.
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  • After graduating from Harvard in 1754, he entered the mercantile house of his uncle, Thomas Hancock of Boston, who had adopted him, and on whose death, in 1764, he fell heir to a large fortune and a prosperous business.
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  • He graduated at Yale in 1863, studied law at Harvard, and practised with success in New York City.
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  • Born at Baltimore on the 9th of June 1851 and educated at Harvard University, he became a lawyer in 1874 and has been president of the National Municipal League and has filled other public positions.
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  • Her father, William Mitchell (1791-1869), .was a school teacher and self-taught astronomer, who rated chronometers for Nantucket whalers, was an overseer of Harvard University (1857-1865), and for a time was employed by the United States Coast Survey.
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  • He graduated at Harvard College in 1871 and at the Harvard Law School in 1875; was admitted to the Suffolk (Massachusetts) bar in 1876; and in 1876-1879 was instructor in American history at Harvard.
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  • In 1884-1890 he was an overseer of Harvard College.
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  • His doctoral thesis at Harvard was published with essays by Henry Adams, L.
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  • 1898; see also his article English Law in this encyclopaedia), Domesday Book and Beyond (1897), Township and Borough (1898), Canon Law in England (1898), English Law and the Renaissance (1901), the Life of Leslie Stephen (1906), besides important contributions to the Cambridge Modern History, the English Historical Review, the Law Quarterly Review, Harvard Law Review and other publications.
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  • Sandys, Harvard Lectures on the Revival of Learning (1905); also P. de Nolhac, Pe'trarque et l'humanisme (2nd ed., 1907).
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  • Lane, of Harvard, that a reformed pronunciation of Latin was adopted in all the colleges and schools of the United States.
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  • The position of Greek as an " elective " or " optional " subject (notably at Harvard), an arrangement regarded with approval by some eminent educational authorities and with regret by others, probably has some effect on the high schools in the small number of those who learn Greek, and in their lower rate of increase, as compared with those who learn Latin.
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1745, and was a member of the lower house of the general court of Massachusetts in 1753-1756, and from 1757 to 1774 of the Massachusetts council, in which, according to Governor Thomas Hutchinson, he "was without a rival," and, on the approach of the War of Independence, was "the principal supporter of the opposition to the government."
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  • His son, James Bowdoin (1752-1811), was born in Boston on the 22nd of September 1752, graduated at Harvard in 1771, and served, at various times, as a representative, senator and councillor of the state.
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  • At seventeen Edward Everett graduated from Harvard College, taking first honours in his class.
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  • Everett's tastes, however, were then, as always, those of a scholar; and in 1815, after a service of little more than a year in the pulpit, he resigned his charge to accept a professorship of Greek literature in Harvard College.
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  • From January 1846 to 1849, as the successor of Josiah Quincy, he was president of Harvard College.
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  • He graduated in 1865 at the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard, where for the next two years he was a teacher of mathematics.
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  • Subsequently he became professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and in 1876 he was appointed professor of astronomy and director of the Harvard College observatory.
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  • The third of these was Arequipa, at which a permanent branch of the Harvard Observatory is now located.
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  • In 1886 the widow of Henry Draper, one of the pioneers of stellar spectroscopy, made a liberal provision for carrying on spectroscopic investigations at Harvard College in memory of her husband.
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  • At its May session in 1742 the General Court of Massachusetts forbade itinerant preaching save with full consent from the resident pastor; in May 1743 the annual ministerial convention, by a small plurality, declared against "several errors in doctrine and disorders in practice which have of late obtained in various parts of the land," against lay preachers and disorderly revival meetings; in the same year Charles Chauncy, who disapproved of the revival, published Seasonable Thoughts on the State of Religion in New England; and in 1744-1745 Whitefield, upon his second tour in New England, found that the faculties of Harvard and Yale had officially "testified" and "declared" against him and that most pulpits were closed to him.
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  • Harvard, XXI I I.
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1749, and was admitted to the bar in 1759.
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  • His best known productions are Adams and Liberty, a once popular song written in 1798, The Invention of Letters (1795), and The Ruling Passion, the Harvard Phi Beta Kappa poem of 1797.
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  • Graduating at Harvard College in 1829, he became mathematical tutor there in 1831 and professor in 1833.
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  • CHARLES CHAUNCY (1592-1672), president of Harvard College, was born at Yardley-Bury, Hertfordshire, England, in November 1592, and was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, of which he became a fellow.
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  • He was the pastor at Scituate, Massachusetts, from 1641 until 1654, and from 1654 until his death was president of Harvard College, as the successor of the first president Henry Duns ter (c. 1612-1659).
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  • President Chauncy's great-grandson, Charles Chauncy (1705-1787), a prominent American theologian, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on the 1st of January 1705, and graduated at Harvard in 1721.
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  • Edward C. Pickering carried on his study of stellar spectra with the funds of the Henry Draper Memorial at Harvard, endowed by his widow (née Mary Anna Palmer) .
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  • He received his first education in the common schools, graduated in 1842 at Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, and was a student at the law school of Harvard University from 1843 until his graduation in 1845.
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  • Several of the largest and finest sugar estates in the world are situated in the vicinity, including the Soledad (with a botanical experiment station maintained by Harvard University), the Terry and others - most of them connected with the city by good driveways.
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  • GEORGE BURROUGHS (c. 1650-1692), American congregational pastor, graduated at Harvard in 1670, and became the minister of Salem Village (now Danvers) in 1680, a charge which he held till 1683.
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  • 1855, professor of philosophy, Harvard) believes in the absolute like Green and Bradley, in " the unity of a single self-consciousness, which includes both our own and all finite conscious meanings in one final eternally present insight," as he says in The World and the Individual (1900; see also later works).
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  • He was offered, but declined, the professorship of mathematics and astronomy at Harvard.
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  • Harvard is a twilled cloth similar to the Oxford.
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  • He graduated from Harvard College in 1763 and was admitted to the bar in 1768.
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  • His son, John Pickering (1777-1846), graduated at Harvard in 1796, studied law and was private secretary to William Smith, United States minister to Portugal, in 1797-1799, and to Rufus King, minister to Great Britain, in 1799-1801.
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  • Timothy Pickering's grandson, Charles Pickering (1805-1878), graduated at Harvard College in 1823 and at the Harvard Medical School in 1826, practised medicine in Philadelphia, was naturalist to the Wilkes exploring expedition of 1838-1842, and in1843-1845travelled in East Africa and India.
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  • Roscher's Lexikon der Mythologie; Campbell Bonner, in Harvard Studies, xiii.
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  • She was educated at an academy in her native town and by her brother Con y ers Francis (1795-1863), a Unitarian minister and from 1842 to 1863 Parkman professor in the Harvard Divinity School.
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  • A lineal descendant, William Crowninshield Endicott (1826-1900), graduated at Harvard in 1847, was a justice of the Massachusetts supreme court in 1873-1882, and was secretary of war in President Cleveland's cabinet from 1885 to 1889.
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  • Phillips Brooks prepared for college at the Boston Latin school and graduated at Harvard in 1855.
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  • He was for many years an overseer and preacher of Harvard University, his influence upon the religious life of the university being deep and wide.
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  • had been conferred upon him by the universities of Harvard (1877), and of Columbia (1887),(1887), and the degree of D.D.
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  • Having graduated at Harvard College in 1844, he studied mathematics and astronomy under C. F.
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  • In 1638 allotments of land between the Mystic Pond and the present Woburn were made to various Charlestown settlers, including John Harvard and Increase Nowell (1590-1655), secretary of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1644-1649, and the new settlement was called Waterfield.
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1857, studied law at the Harvard Law School and in 1861 was admitted to the bar.
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  • In 1902 he became president of the Board of Overseers of Harvard College.
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  • The son was educated at Phillips Academy, Exeter, at Harvard University, at Heidelberg, Göttingen and Berlin.
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  • His first position was that of tutor in Harvard.
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  • Instinctively a humanist, he had little patience with the narrow curriculum of Harvard in his day and the rather pedantic spirit with which classical studies were there pursued.
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  • 1843), who graduated at Harvard in 1864, served as a captain on the staff of General Grant in 1865, was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1867, was secretary of war in the cabinets of Presidents Garfield and Arthur in 1881-1885, and United States Minister to Great Britain in 1889-1893, and was prominently connected with many large corporations, becoming in 1897 president of the Pullman Co.
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  • John Lowell graduated at Harvard in 1760, was admitted to the bar in 1763, represented Newburyport (1776) and Boston (1778) in the Massachusetts Assembly, was a member of the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention of1779-1780and, as a member of the committee appointed to draft a constitution, secured the insertion of the clause, "all men are born free and equal," which was interpreted by the supreme court of the state in 1783 as abolishing slavery in the state.
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  • His son, John Lowell (1769-1840), graduated at Harvard in 1786, was admitted to the bar in 1789 (like his father, before he was twenty years old), and retired from active practice in 1803.
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  • Another son of the first John Lowell, Francis Cabot Lowell (1775-1817), the founder in the United States of cotton manufacturing, was born in Newburyport on the 7th of April 1775, graduated at Harvard in 1793, became a merchant in Boston, and, during the war of 1812, with his cousin (who was also his brother-in-law), Patrick Tracy Jackson, made use of the knowledge of cotton-spinning gained by Lowell in England (whither he had gone for his health in 1810) and devised a power loom.
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  • Charles Lowell (1782-1861), brother of the last named, was born in Boston, graduated at Harvard in 1800, studied law and then theology, and after two years in Edinburgh and one year on the Continent was from 1806 until his death pastor of the West Congregational (Unitarian) Church of Boston, a charge in which Cyrus A.
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  • 1855), who endowed the Plummer Professorship of Christian Morals at Harvard.
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  • At the age of nine he came to America and was educated at Harvard (A.B.
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  • Harvard, xxi.
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  • Peirce in discussions with William James at Harvard University, and its meaning was expounded by him in an article on "How to make our Ideas clear" in the Popular Science Monthly for January 1878.
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  • After graduating from Harvard in 1879 he was engaged in business for 20 years.
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  • He gave his books to Harvard College.
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  • He came to the United States with his father in 1846; graduated at Harvard in 1855, subsequently studying engineering and chemistry, and taking the degree of bachelor of science at the Lawrence scientific school of the same institution in 1857; and in 1859 became an assistant in the United States Coast Survey.
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  • Thenceforward he became a specialist in marine ichthyology, but devoted much time to the investigation, superintendence and exploitation of mines, being superintendent of the Calumet and Hecla copper mines, Lake Superior, from 1866 to 1869, and afterwards, as a stockholder, acquiring a fortune, out of which he gave to Harvard, for the museum of comparative zoology and other purposes, some $500,000.
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  • In 1904 it was stated that the system was gaining favour in the east,' and that it had been adopted more or less by all the eastern colleges and universities with the exception of Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Columbia.
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  • He graduated from Brown University in 1856, and from the Law School of Harvard University in 1858.
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  • Harvard, xxxii.
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  • Instead of accompanying his father to London, he, of his own choice, returned to Massachusetts, graduated at Harvard College in 1787, three years later was admitted to practise at the bar and at once opened an office in Boston.
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  • From 1806 to 1809 Adams was professor of rhetoric and oratory at Harvard.
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  • Harvard conferred upon him the honorary degree of A.M.
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  • Fish, The Civil Service and the Patronage (Harvard Historical Studies, New York, 1905), ch.
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  • He had for schoolmaster an Englishman who held by the traditions of English schools, so that before he entered Harvard College he had a more familiar acquaintance with Latin verse than most of his fellows - a familiarity which showed itself later in his mock-pedantic accompaniment to The Biglow Papers and his macaronic poetry.
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  • He was a wide reader, but a somewhat indifferent student, graduating at Harvard without special honours in 1838.
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  • He decided at last to practise law, and after a course at the Harvard law school, was admitted to the bar.
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  • This first formal appearance as a critic and historian of literature at once gave him a new standing in the community, and was the occasion of his election to the Smith Professorship of Modern Languages in Harvard College, then vacant by the retirement of Longfellow.
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  • In 1868 he issued the next collection in Under the Willows and other Poems, but in 1865 he had delivered his "Ode recited at the Harvard Commemoration," and the successive centennial historical anniversaries drew from him a series of stately odes.
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  • His public life had made him more of a figure in the world; he was decorated with the highest honours Harvard could pay officially, and with degrees of Oxford, Cambridge, St Andrews, Edinburgh and Bologna.
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  • The systematic search made at Harvard Observatory is responsible for a large proportion of the recent discoveries.
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  • Thus the cluster Messier 5 was found at Harvard to contain 185 variables out of 900 stars examined.
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  • In the case of this star there is evidence that the outburst must have been extremely rapid, for the region where Nova Persei appeared had been photographed repeatedly at Harvard during February, and in particular no trace of the star was found on a plate taken on the 19th of February, which showed eleventh magnitude stars.
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  • xvi., is now very incomplete; Harvard Annals, vol.
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  • He graduated from the Harvard Medical School in 1884, was appointed assistant surgeon with the rank of first-lieutenant in the U.S. army in 1886, and at once joined Capt.
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  • He graduated at Harvard College in 1880, studied at Paris, Berlin and Freiburg, and received the degree of Ph.D.
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  • He was instructor in history at Harvard in 1883-1887, assistant professor in 1887-1897, and became professor in 1897.
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  • Graduating at Harvard in 1825, he was a teacher till 1835, was an actuary in 1835-1845, and then became assistant at the Washington observatory.
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  • at the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard University in 1858,.
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  • He also received the first Bruce medal of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, awarded by the directors of the Berlin, Greenwich, Harvard, Lick, Paris and Yerkes observatories.
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  • The son graduated at Harvard in 1762 and entered his father's business.
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  • Harvard (14,375, Hayden), and La Plata Peak (14,342); in Pitkin county, Grizzly Peak (13,956, Hayden); in Lake county, Elbert Peak (14,421), and Massive mountain (14,424), the highest peak in the state; on the boundary between Summit and Park counties, Mt.
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  • She studied the remains of Indian civilization in the Ohio and Mississippi valleys, became a member of the Archaeological Institute of America in 1879, and worked and lived with the Omahas as a representative of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University.
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  • Henry Dunster (1612-1659), the first president of the college at Cambridge (Harvard), had by 1653 become convinced that "visible believers only should be baptized."
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  • After studying under the famous Ezekiel Cheever (1614-1708), he entered Harvard College at twelve, and graduated in 1678.
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  • In 1690 he became a member of the Corporation (probably the youngest ever chosen as Fellow) of Harvard College, and in 1707 he was greatly disappointed at his failure to be chosen president of that institution.
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  • Harvard College was now controlled by the Liberals of the B rattle Street Church, and as it grew farther and farther away from Calvinism, Mather looked with increasing favour upon the college in Connecticut; before September 1701 he had drawn up a "scheme for a college," the oldest document now in the Yale archives; and finally (Jan.
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  • His later years were clouded with many sorrows and disappointments; his relations with Governor Joseph Dudley were unfriendly; he lost much of his former prestige in the Church - his own congregation dwindled - and in the college; his uncle John Cotton was expelled from his 8 8 4 _ Mather, Increase charge in the Plymouth Church; his son Increase turned out a ne'er-do-well; four of his children and his second wife died in November 1713; his wife's brothers and the husbands of his sisters were ungodly and violent men; his favourite daughter Katherine, who "understood Latin and read Hebrew fluently," died in 1716; his third wife went mad in 1719; his personal enemies circulated incredible scandals about him; and in 1724-1725 he saw a Liberal once more preferred to him as a new president of Harvard.
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  • Cotton Mather's son, Samuel Mather (1706-1785), also a clergyman, graduated at Harvard in 1723, was pastor of the North Church, Boston, from 1732 to 1742, when, owing to a dispute among his congregation over revivals, he resigned to take charge of a church established for him in North Bennett Street.
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  • He entered Harvard in 1651, and graduated in 1656.
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  • He was at heavy expense throughout his stay, and even greater than his financial loss was his loss of authority and control in the church and in Harvard College because of his absence.
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  • Mather had been acting president of Harvard College in 1681-1682, and in June 1685 he again became acting president (or rector), but still preached every Sunday in Boston and would not comply with an order of the General Court that he should reside in Cambridge.
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  • That Mather's administration of the college was excellent is admitted even by his harsh critic, Josiah Quincy, in his History of Harvard University.'
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  • The Liberal party, which now came into control in the college repeatedly disappointed the hopes of Cotton Mather that he might be chosen president, and by its ecclesiastical laxness and its broader views of Church polity forced the Mathers to turn from Harvard to Yale as a truer school of the prophets.
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  • Sibley's Biographical Sketches of Graduates of Harvard University (Cambridge, 1873), with an exhaustive list of Mather's works (about 150 titles); there is much valuable matter in Williston Walker's Ten New England Leaders (New York, 1901) and in his Creeds and Platforms of Congregationalism (New York, 1893); for literary criticism of the Mathers see ch.
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  • 1877) and at the Harvard Law School (LL.B.
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  • He graduated from Harvard College in 1843 and from the Divinity School in 1846.
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  • His father, John Phillips (1770-1823), a man of wealth and influence, graduated at Harvard College in 1788, and became successively "town advocate and public prosecutor," and in 1822 first mayor of Boston, then recently made into a city.
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  • Wendell Phillips himself attended the public Latin school, entered Harvard College before he was sixteen, and graduated in 1831 in the same class with the historian John Lothrop Motley.
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  • He graduated at the Harvard law school in 1834, and was admitted to the bar in Boston.
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  • It is conceded on all hands that Livy in this decade makes con For Livy's debt to Valerius Antias, see A A Howard in Harvard Studies Classical Philology, xvii (1906), pp 161 sqq.
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  • He graduated first in his class at Harvard in 1823.
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  • JOHN LOTHROP MOTLEY (1814-1877), American historian, son of Thomas Motley, was born on the 15th of April 1814 at Dorchester (now a part of Boston), Massachusetts, and graduated at Harvard in 1831.
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  • Harvard Coll.
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  • In 1817 he entered Harvard College, and graduated in 1821.
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  • His Phi Beta Kappa oration at Harvard College in August 1837, on "The American Scholar," was an eloquent appeal for independence, sincerity, realism, in the intellectual life of America.
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  • In 1866 Harvard College conferred upon him the degree of LL.D., and in 1867 he was elected an overseer.
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  • 42 (1903) of Bulletin of the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology; S.
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  • He graduated at Harvard College in 1838, and at the Harvard law school in 1840, and was admitted to the bar in Franklin county, Mass., where he practised from 1841 to 1849.
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  • His father Timothy Edwards (1669-1758), son of a prosperous merchant of Hartford, had graduated at Harvard, was minister at East Windsor, and eked out his salary by tutoring boys for college.
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  • Young Otis graduated from Harvard College in 1783, was admitted to the bar in 1786, and soon became prominent as a Federalist in politics.
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  • In 1835 Longfellow was chosen to succeed George Ticknor as professor of modern languages and belles-lettres in Harvard.
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  • On his return to America in December 1836, Longfellow took up his residence in Cambridge, and began to lecture at Harvard and to write.
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  • of Bowdoin College in 1828, at the age of twenty-one, of Harvard in 1859 and of Cambridge (England) in 1868, and D.C.L.
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  • Once, when the present writer proposed to the president of the Harvard University Visiting Committee that Longfellow should be placed on that committee, the president replied: "What would be the use?
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  • He graduated in 1830 at Harvard College, and in 1834 graduated at the Harvard Law School.
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  • But gradually he devoted less of his time to practice and more to lecturing in the Harvard Law School, to editing court reports and to contributions to law journals, especially on historical and biographical lines, in which his erudition was unsurpassed.
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  • On Franklin's recommendation he was made a doctor of divinity by the university of Edinburgh in 1765; he had received a master's degree at Harvard in 1754, and was made doctor of divinity in 1780 by Dartmouth and in 1784 by the college of New Jersey (now Princeton University) .
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  • Springer in the Proceedings (1879, 1881, 1885, 1886), of the Philadelphia Academy and the Memoirs (1897) of the Harvard Museum.
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1798, was admitted to the bar at Salem, Mass., in 1801, and soon attained eminence in his profession.
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  • In 1829 he became the first Dane Professor of Law at Harvard University, and continued until his death to hold this position, meeting with remarkable success as a teacher and winning the affection of his students, whom he imbued with much of his own enthusiasm.
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  • In 1838-1841 he studied in one of the "branches" of the university of Michigan, and in 1846 graduated at the Harvard law school.
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  • 1848) was educated at Harvard and at Heidelberg, was a member of the editorial staff of the New York Tribune in 1871-1872 and of the American Cyclopaedia in 1872-1876, and in 1886 became the editor of Scribner's Magazine.
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  • He graduated at Harvard College in 1774, and began the practice of the law at Dedham in 1781, but eventually abandoned that profession for the more congenial pursuit of politics.
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  • Four years before his death he was chosen president of Harvard College, an honour which his broken state of health obliged him to decline.
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  • Old Cambridge is noted as the seat of Harvard University and as a literary and scientific centre.
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  • Radcliffe College (1879), for women, practically a part of Harvard; an Episcopal Theological School (1867), and the New Church (Swedenborgian or New Jerusalem) Theological School (1866) are other educational institutions of importance.
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  • The seminary is now affiliated with Harvard University, though it remains independent and autonomous.
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  • There are many reminders of the long history of Harvard, and of the War of Independence.
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  • wide, was in the process of construction in 1907; and an extension of the Boston subway into Cambridge to the grounds of Harvard University, a distance of about 3 m., was projected.
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  • The oldest college in America (Harvard) was founded here in 1636.
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  • of Harvard Studies and Notes in Philology and Literature), is a most useful summary.
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  • As early as the middle of the 18th century Harvard College represented the most advanced thought of the time, and a score or more of clergymen in New England were preaching what was essentially Unitarianism.
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  • The first distinctive manifestation of the change was the inauguration of Henry Ware (1764-1845) as professor of divinity at Harvard College, in 1805.
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  • Many of its clergymen have been trained in other denominations; but the Harvard Divinity School was distinctly Unitarian from its formation, in 1816, to 1870, when it became an unsectarian department of the university.
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1806, taking the highest honours of his year, though the youngest member of his class.
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  • 28, pp. 151-285, of the Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology of Harvard College; E.
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  • Harvard College, vol.
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  • Massachusetts (Harvard University Studies, New York, 1896); and authorities on political and constitutional history in the article United States.
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  • He studied at Harvard from 1766 to 1768, when he went to sea as a cabin boy.
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  • He graduated as valedictorian of his class at Dartmouth College in 1819, was a tutor there in 1819-1820, spent a year in the law school of Harvard University, and studied for a like period at Washington, in the office of William Wirt, then attorney-general of the United States.
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  • The Harvard Photometry of 4260 lucid stars was issued by Professor E.
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  • The instrument used at Harvard was a " meridian photometer," constructed on the principle of polarization; while the " method of extinctions," by means of a wedge of neutral-tinted glass, served for the Oxford determinations.
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  • Kempf with a polarizing photometer; but by far the most comprehensive work of the kind is the Harvard Photometric Durchmusterung (1901-1903), embracing all stars to 7.5 magnitude, and extended to the southern pole by measurements executed at Arequipa.
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  • Bond at the Harvard observatory, De la Rue in England, and Rutherford in New York, produced lunar photographs of remarkable accuracy and beauty.
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  • P. Bond at Harvard and F.
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  • Her son graduated at Harvard in 1854, worked in an iron mill in Trenton, New Jersey, for a few months in 1855, spent two years abroad, and in 1858-1860 was local treasurer of the Burlington & Missouri river railroad.
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  • Harvard University >>
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  • On the Hudson here is the course for the intercollegiate boat-races in which the American college crews (save those of Yale and Harvard, which row on the Thames at New London) have rowed annually, beginning in 1895, except in 1896, when the race was rowed at Saratoga.
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  • Ford, The Old Spanish Sibilants in Studies and Notes in Philology (Harvard University, Cambridge, Mals., 1900).
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1828, studied law with Daniel Webster and in 1831 was admitted to the bar.
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  • p. 135, and Annals of the Harvard Observatory, vol.
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  • He graduated from Harvard College in 1769, was a schoolmaster at Falmouth (now Portland), Maine, in 1770-1773, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1774.
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  • His SOn Theophilus Parsons (1797-1882), who was Dane professor of law at Harvard from 1848 to 1870, is remembered chiefly as the author of a series of useful legal treatises, and some books in support of Swedenborgian doctrines; he wrote a life of his father (Boston, 1859).
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  • He received a common school education, graduated at the Harvard Law School in 1839, and was soon afterwards admitted to the bar.
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  • He was a drummer boy with the Union forces in the Civil War; graduated from Harvard College in 1869; and in 1871 entered the Royal Academy of Fine Arts, Antwerp, where he studied under Van Lerius and De Keyser.
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  • in the Harvard University Library are described and listed in Library of Harvard University, Bibliographical Contributions, No.
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  • accredited mediator under the ADR Chambers / Harvard Law Project scheme.
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  • Harvard biological anthropologist, Richard Wrangham, believes that humanity may have been launched by an ape learning to cook.
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  • In 1963 Sagan was hired by Harvard to teach astronomy.
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  • The programs basil and sybil have been developed mainly at Monash University since 1988, and before that at ANU and Harvard.
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  • compile bibliographies in a range of styles e.g. Harvard Referencing.
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  • The original calibration and corroboration of the SPA model was against long-term eddy covariance data from the Harvard Forest, Massachusetts.
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  • Regular coffee drinkers have about 1/3 less asthma symptoms than those of non-coffee drinkers according to a Harvard researcher who studied 20,000 people.
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  • eddy covariance data from the Harvard Forest, Massachusetts.
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  • The Harvard researchers urge further trials of fish oils in the treatment of depression and manic-depressive illness.
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  • We were able to tag along and visit the command bunker and then watch a fly past by a P51 mustang and a Harvard.
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  • The Harvard physiologist L. J. Henderson developed a nomogram to represent the physiology of blood.
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  • pedagogy of multiliteracies: Designing social futures ', Harvard Educational Review, vol.
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  • He completed an extra year at Harvard, studying playwriting, but he never had any luck selling his plays in New York.
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  • postdoctoral position at the Harvard Medical School.
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  • The Harvard Business Review reported on a survey which related employe satisfaction to profitability.
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  • Subsequently he studied theology at the Harvard Divinity School, and graduated at Andover Theological Seminary in 1857.
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  • He was professor of sacred literature in Andover Seminary in 1864-82, and in 1884 succeeded Ezra Abbot as Bussey professor of New Testament criticism in the Harvard Divinity School.
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  • Cass," National Hall of Statuary, Washington; "Dr Gallaudet and his First Deaf-Mute Pupil," Washington; the colossal "Statue of the Republic," for the Columbian Exposition at Chicago; statues of Rufus Choate (Boston), John Harvard (Cambridge, Mass.), and Thomas Starr King (San Francisco, California), a memorial to the architect Richard M.
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  • There are other large quarries at Dorset and East Dorset, Bennington county; the finest marbles from this region are the white, slightly marked with pale brown and with greenish lines; they are commonly used for building, the Harvard Medical School and the office of the U.S. Senate being examples.
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  • Harvard, xxxvi.
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  • Hill in Harvard College Museum of Comparative Zoology, Bulletin, vol.
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  • Harvard, vol.
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  • He entered Harvard in the class of 1835, but at the beginning of his junior year an illness affecting his sight necessitated a suspension of his college work, and in August 1834 he shipped before the mast for California, returning in September 1836.
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  • Chadwick, Studies on Anglo-Saxon Institutions (1905); P. Vinogradoff, "Folcland" in the English Historical Review, 1893; "Romanistische Einflasse im Angelsachsischen Recht: Das Buchland" in the Mélanges Fitting, 1907; "The Transfer of Land in Old English Law" in the Harvard Law Review, 1907.
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  • In 1841, while a student at Harvard, he made a rough journey of exploration in the woods of northern New Hampshire, where he had a taste of adventure slightly spiced with hardship. About this time he made up his mind to write a history of the last French war in America, which ended in the conquest of Canada, and some time afterwards he enlarged the plan so as to include the whole course of the American conflict between France and Great Britain; or, to use his own words, "The history of the American forest; for this was the light in which I regarded it.
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  • As early as 1805 it was recognized as predominant in Harvard College, and in 1815 it had become a distinct denomination under the new title "Unitarian" (see Unitarianism) .
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  • Edward C. Pickering carried on his study of stellar spectra with the funds of the Henry Draper Memorial at Harvard, endowed by his widow (née Mary Anna Palmer) .
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  • He was educated at Groton, Harvard (A.B.
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  • Fernald, a botanist of Harvard University, published a paper in Rhodora, vol.
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  • The son was educated at Phillips Academy, Exeter, at Harvard University, at Heidelberg, Göttingen and Berlin.
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  • The mean range of 75 long-period variables observed at Harvard (Harvard Annals, vol.
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  • The " Draper Catalogue," Harvard Annals, vol.
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  • xxvii., gives the classification according to spectrum of over 10,000 stars; for the brighter stars Harvard Annals, vol.
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  • Sibley, Biographical Sketches of Graduates of Harvard University, vol.
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  • He studied at the Harvard College Observatory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (B.S.
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  • The progress of this survey was marked by a number of important discoveries of " new " and variable stars and of spectroscopic binaries, mainly through the acumen of Mrs Williamina Paton Fleming of Harvard College in scrutinizing the negatives forming the data for the great catalogue.
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  • From 1888 to 1891 he was superintendent of schools at Spartanburg, S.C., and from 1891 to 1894 was a student in the Harvard Graduate School (A.M.
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  • Ballentine, "Some Phases of the Cult of the Nymphs" in Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, xv.
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  • On the other end of the education spectrum, college degrees are up: A recent Harvard University study reports that 6.7 percent of the world has a college degree, up from 5.9 percent in 2000.
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  • This was the nearest approach I could get to Harvard and to the fulfillment of my childish declaration.
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  • The examination papers were given out at nine o'clock at Harvard and brought to Radcliffe by a special messenger.
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  • In the finals, no one read my work over to me, and in the preliminaries I offered subjects with some of which I was in a measure familiar before my work in the Cambridge school; for at the beginning of the year I had passed examinations in English, History, French and German, which Mr. Gilman gave me from previous Harvard papers.
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  • Two days before the examinations, Mr. Vining sent me a braille copy of one of the old Harvard papers in algebra.
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  • The "examinations" mentioned in this letter were merely tests given in the school, but as they were old Harvard papers, it is evident that in some subjects Miss Keller was already fairly well prepared for Radcliffe.
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  • They were the entrance examinations for Harvard College; so I feel pleased to think I could pass them.
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  • Colonel Roosevelt was there, on Harvard's side; but bless you, he wore a white sweater, and no crimson that we know of!
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  • Mr. Wilson, a teacher at Florence, and a friend of the Kellers', studied at Harvard the summer before and went to the Perkins Institution to learn if anything could be done for his friend's child.
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  • The late John Rawls, the Harvard philosopher used a tool called " the veil of ignorance ".
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  • Harvard researchers point to vigilant prenatal care, including the avoidance of alcohol and cigarette use.
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  • A study by Harvard scientists showed that if melanocyte stem cells (MSCs) fail, you can begin to gray.
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  • The same Harvard scientists feel if your parents or grandparents went gray prematurely, the chances you will are much stronger.
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  • They have varying levels of experience and formal education...and they include twin brothers and three Harvard educated designers.
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  • According to a 2010 study published by Harvard Business School, the beauty industry earns $330 billion globally.
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  • You can obtain all kinds of knowledge on novels, poetry, non-fiction pieces about writing and biographies as well as download eBooks for various eReaders based on the Harvard Classics & Shelf of Fiction.
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  • Granted, this is coming from a girl whose parents took her to Boston and put her on the freshman introductory tour at Harvard when she was EIGHT YEARS OLD.
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  • High school letterman jackets actually started as a way for colleges, such as Harvard, to recognize exceptional players.
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  • Obama studied at Columbia University and Harvard Law School, and served as a senator for the state of Illinois before being elected to the Presidency.
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  • He gave the 2004 Class Day address at Harvard University (as Ali G).
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  • This Harvard graduate and former NBC medical correspondent inspires contestants to lose weight in a safe, healthy and effective way.
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  • Conan O'Brien took his Harvard degree and ran -- becoming an award-winning writer for Saturday Night Live and The Simpsons.
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  • After graduating from Brookline High School, O'Brien attended Harvard University, where he was the president of the Harvard Lampoon humor magazine.
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  • After graduating from Harvard, O'Brien moved to Los Angeles, California, where his first job was as a writer for HBO's Not Necessarily the News.
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  • He, along with Harvard classmate Greg Daniels (now executive producer for King of the Hill and The Office), wrote for a show called Wilton North Report, but it only lasted four weeks.
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  • After graduation Damon headed off to Harvard University to pursue a degree in English, but left in 1992 to focus on his career as an actor.
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  • It's not every day that socialite Paris Hilton gets invited to Harvard University, but she will soon grace the campus to accept an honored award.
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  • At first glance, Paris Hilton and Harvard are not much of a synonymous pairing, but further details uncover the method to the madness.
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  • Harvard University's comedy magazine is honoring Paris Hilton with their "Hastiest Pudding of the Lampoon" title.
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  • She heads to Harvard on February 6 to pick up the award and will likely be subjected to some good hearted razzing (here's hoping!).
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  • Hilton's Harvard appearance is perfectly timed with her film release.
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  • It wasn't enough for Natalie Portman to be a talented actress, and in 1999, she began attending Ivy League school Harvard University.
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  • True to her word, Natalie earned her Bachelor's Degree in Psychology and graduated from Harvard in 2003.
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  • Damon participated in community and school theater productions through the end of high schoo, and began studying at Harvard where he focused on English courses.
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  • He dropped out of Harvard, however, to pursue his acting career.
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  • Harvard Business School is a world renowned institution of higher learning and frequently ranks as one of the top business schools in the United States.
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  • Applicants who are accepted to Harvard rarely decide to go anywhere else.
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  • Harvard Business School (HBS) has a solid reputation and is considered to have one of the best and most prestigious business programs in the country.
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  • The cornerstone of Harvard's general management approach is the method of teaching that is employed.
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  • In a two year span, students of Harvard Business School complete an analysis of approximately 500 cases.
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  • Although the reputation of this business program is almost unbeatable, anyone who is interested in attending Harvard must be prepared to dedicate themselves to their education.
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  • Harvard Business School's full-time program accepts approximately 900 students each year.
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  • Harvard estimates that it accepts only 12 percent of applicants into its business school program each year.
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  • One of the best ways to learn more about the Harvard Business School program involves visiting the school.
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  • To learn more about Harvard Business School, visit the HBS website.
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  • To learn more about careers at Harvard, visit the Harvard University Employment website.
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  • And many well-known physical universities, like Harvard and Georgetown University, have instituted online education programs that lead to degrees or that will lead to degrees in the future.
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  • Harvard University was the first university founded in what would eventually become the United States.
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  • Located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard enrolls close to 20,000 students who will some day join more than 270,000 other living alumni.
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  • For instance, in U.S. News and World Report's America's Best Colleges 2006, Harvard and Princeton are tied for first, followed by Yale and University of Pennsylvania.
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  • The same U.S. News and World Report rankings list Yale, Harvard, Columbia, and Princeton as the schools with the lowest acceptance rates, ranging from 10 to 13 percent.
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  • For some awards, only a student's last name is significant - Harvard University, for example, has awards for students with specific last names, including Downer, Thayer, and Hudson.
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  • Harvard University is located in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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  • For instance, in U.S. News and World Report's America's Best Colleges, Harvard and Princeton are tied for first, followed by Yale and University of Pennsylvania.
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  • Harvard now provides full financial aid to students with family incomes of less than $41,000 per year, while Yale has a similar policy for students with family incomes of less than $45,000 per year.
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  • It doesn't have to be Harvard dissertation material.
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  • Many small- to medium-sized institutions offer distance learning programs, but large universities with hefty reputations to uphold, including Harvard and Yale, also offer programs.
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  • A Harvard University study in 2005 also revealed that approximately 50 percent of bankruptcies filed were due in part to large medical expenses.
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  • The latest study from the Harvard Medical School and National Institute of Aging looked at the effect of the resveratrol in red wine on a diet high in calories.
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  • Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy: The Harvard Medical School Guide to Healthy Eating.
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  • "Allergies." Harvard Medical School Consumer Information.
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  • The TAT is a projective personality test that was designed at Harvard University in the 1930s by Christiana D.
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  • Skerrett. Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy: The Harvard Medical School Guide to Healthy Eating.
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  • Harvard Medical Schools Consumer Health Education.
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  • Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1982.
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  • Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2003.
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  • Boston, MA: Harvard Health Publications, 2004.
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  • Harvard Mental Health Letter 19 (December 2002): 6.
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  • Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2005.
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  • In the late 1990s and early 2000s, home-schooled students have gained admission and scholarships to such prestigious universities as Harvard, Yale, Stanford, and MIT.
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  • In 1973 Harvard University pediatrician T.
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  • "Vitamins." Harvard School of Public Health.
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  • Allan Hobson, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.
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  • Another widely used projective test for people ages 14 to 40 is the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT), developed at Harvard University in the 1930s.
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  • J., et al. The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health.
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  • Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2004.
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  • The American Academy of Pediatrics, the Harvard School of Public Health, and the National Association of School Nurses recommend their elimination, although many healthcare professionals disagree.
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  • Fanta, Christopher H., et al. The Harvard Medical School Guide to Taking Control of Asthma.
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  • He graduated from Harvard Law in 2006 after transferring from Columbia University, where he majored in cognitive neuroscience.
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  • OKCupid was founded by a couple of smart kids from Harvard.
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  • Moreover, the Chapmon carries an old Harvard flair that imbibes trust and responsibility into its owner.
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  • These are not the shoes for up and coming sophisticates, but with an additional six or seven inches on your side, you might be willing to toss your Harvard Law degree momentarily and embrace a new kinkier you.
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  • Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, PhD, an instructor at Harvard Medical School's Sleep Medicine Division, published a study that indicated a mere 30-45 minutes of daily yoga practice helped those with severe insomnia sleep through the night.
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  • Schlorholtz is the principal yoga instructor for the Harvard University Center for Wellness.
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  • A 2004 study conducted by the Division of Sleep Medicine at the Harvard Medical School shows preliminary results that daily simple yoga can help in the treatment of some insomnia.
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  • Blaxill is a graduate of Princeton University and Harvard Business School.
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  • According to Harvard Medical School, babies who are less active and more passive at six months, but more irritable and demanding around their first birthday, are more likely to be diagnosed with autism later in childhood.
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  • In 2008, researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and the Autism Consortium conducted a genome-wide scan that identified a region of genome that is either missing or duplicated in some people with autism.
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  • Schools like Harvard, Wharton, Stanford, Kellogg, Tuck, and Columbia, are considered top business schools.
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  • Car Talk is recorded at the "Dewey, Cheetham, and Howe" office building in Harvard Square.
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  • Healthy Eating for Type 2 Diabetes: A booklet from Harvard Health Publications that focuses on how diabetic diets are similar to regular healthy diets.
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  • Aside from keeping you full, the Harvard School of Public Health reports fiber may reduce your risks of developing various conditions, such as heart disease, constipation and diabetes.
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  • According to the Harvard School of Public Health, these fats are actually beneficial to the body.
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  • Several European countries and American cities have already banned trans fats from restaurant menus, and health experts from Harvard medical school are now urging jurisdictions in the United Kingdom to follow suit.
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  • Eric Friedman boasts undergraduate and graduate computer science degrees from Yale and his partner, James Park, never even bothered to finish his computer science degree at Harvard.
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  • According to the Harvard School of Public Health, over 105,000 work-related injuries occurred in 2003.
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  • Harvard Pilgrim Health Care estimates a total of up to a 13% increase in health insurance premiums for 2007.
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  • Their perfect scores gain the two entrance into Harvard.
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  • They manage to stay ahead of the curve at Harvard as long as they smoke the marijuana grown from Ivory's ashes, but when that is stolen and smoked by another student, they fall behind.
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  • They are kicked out of Harvard, and the ghost of Ivory and the ghost of Benjamin Franklin appeal the admissions board on their behalf.
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  • After high school, Raitt moved from California to Massachusetts to attend Harvard.
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  • Waterman introduced her to several other blues musicians in the community around Harvard, and Raitt became more and more heavily involved in the music scene.
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  • Everyone from the Supreme Court to the European Union to Harvard Law has traced Happy Birthday's copyright journey.
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  • Eventually he became an Assistant Professor at Harvard in 1962, and then Professor of Astronomy at Cornell University in 1968.
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  • Zinc: Harvard University suggests that to fight aging you should boost your immunity with zinc.
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  • According to a study by Harvard Medical School, brittle nails are a common condition.
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  • He started a site called Facemash that compared pictures of Harvard students, asking who was hotter.
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  • From that, Zuckerberg used the same idea to create what was originally "thefacebook.com" that provided a social network for Harvard students.
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  • Whether they're attending Harvard, another Ivy League school, or any university across the country, these students are fresh out of high school and living away from the comforts of home for the first time.
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  • Originally Facebook was only open to people from Harvard, then the Ivy League schools, and slowly all universities and high schools had access to the site.
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  • Facebook however was founded in 2004 by one person, Mark Zuckerberg, a former Harvard University student.
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  • The social networking platform was originally developed in 2004 as a platform for students at Harvard University.
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  • Facebook was launched in February of 2004 and was initially developed for Harvard students.
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  • Facebook was originally designed as a place for Harvard students, past and present, to keep in touch.
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  • She was dressed in her Harvard tee shirt and pajama bottoms.
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  • The Harvard guy didn't!
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  • In 1852 he graduated at Harvard, and became computer to the American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac. He made his name by contributions on mathematical and physical subjects in the Mathematical Monthly.
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  • He studied at the Boston Latin School, and graduated at Harvard in 1850.
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  • He entered Harvard in 1882 but left after three years without finishing his course.
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  • Here he became an instructor in German at Harvard in 1825, and in 1830 obtained an appointment as professor of German language and literature there; but his anti-slavery agitation having given umbrage to the authorities, he forfeited his post in 1835, and was ordained Unitarian minister of a chapel at Lexington in Massachusetts in 1836.
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  • FLOWERS Imitations of natural flowers are sometimes made for scientific purposes (as the collection of glass flowers at Harvard University, which illustrates the flora of the United States), but more often as articles of decoration and ornament.
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  • In 1869-1879 he was professor of Hebrew in the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (first in Greenville, South Carolina, and after 1877 in Louisville, Kentucky), and in 1880 he became professor of Hebrew and Oriental languages in Harvard University, where until 1903 he was also Dexter lecturer onzbiblical literature.
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  • Harvard, xxiii.
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  • A beautiful house of the 16th century belonged to one Thomas Rogers, whose daughter was mother of John Harvard, the founder of Harvard College, U.S.A. Among public buildings are the town hall, originally dated 1633, rebuilt 1767, and altered 186 3; market house, corn exchange and three hospitals.
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  • The first settlement here was made about 1659 in a part of Marlboro called Chauncy (because of a grant of Soo acres here to Charles Chauncy, president of Harvard College, made in 1659 and revoked in 1660 by the General Court of Massachusetts).
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  • He graduated at Harvard in 1777, read law at Newburyport, Mass., with Theophilus Parsons, and was admitted to the bar in 1780.
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  • P. McKinlay in Harvard Classical Studies, 1907; M.
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  • It was founded by Dr John Phillips (1719-1795), a graduate of Harvard College, who acquired considerable wealth as a merchant at Exeter and gave nearly all of it to the cause of education.
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