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hartford

hartford

hartford Sentence Examples

  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric lines running N., S.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and is primarily a residential suburb of Boston, with which it is connected by electric lines.

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  • MANCHESTER, a township of Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., about 9 m.

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  • of Hartford.

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  • Manchester is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway and by electric line connecting with Hartford, Rockville and Stafford Springs.

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  • Manchester was originally a part of the township of Hartford, and later a part of the township of East Hartford.

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  • The first settlement within its present limits was made about 1672; the land was bought from the Indians in 1676; and the township was separated from East Hartford and incorporated in 1823.

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  • In 1852 Professor Stowe accepted a professorship in the Theological Seminary at Andover, Massachusetts, and the family made its home there till 1863, when he retired wholly from professional life and removed to Hartford.

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  • After the death of her husband in 1886 she passed the rest of her life in the seclusion of her Hartford home, where she died on the 1st of July 1896.

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  • In comparing the figures, it should be noted that main line mileage in the Eastern states, as for example that of the Pennsylvania railroad and the New York, New Haven & Hartford, does not differ greatly in standards of safety or in unit cost from the best British construction, although improvement work in America is charged to income far more liberally than it has been in England.

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  • 2 (1893); William Wright, History of the Big Bonanza (Hartford, Conn., 1876); C. H.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by inter-urban electric lines and in summer by steamers to Boston.

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  • JOHN FISKE (1842-1901), American historical, philosophical and scientific writer, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, on the 30th of March 1842, and died at Gloucester, Massachusetts, on the 4th of July 1901.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.

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  • Salisbury is served by the Central New England, and the New York, New Haven, & Hartford railways.

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  • In 1732 the township was surveyed with its present boundaries, and in 1738 the land (exclusive 'of that held under previous grants) was auctioned by the state at Hartford.

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  • (Hartford, Conn., 1898).

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  • Boston is the terminus of the Boston & Albany (New York Central), the Old Colony system of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Maine railway systems, each of which controls several minor roads once in dependent.

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  • The former (the North, or Union station, 1893) covers 9 acres and has 23 tracks; the latter (the South Terminal, 1898), one of the largest stations in the world, covers 13 acres and has 32 tracks, and is used by the Boston & Albany and by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.

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  • It was the losses entailed upon her commerce by the commercial policy of Jefferson's administration that embittered Boston against the Democratic-Republican party and put her public men in the forefront of the opposition to its policies that culminated in lukewarmness toward the War of 1812, and in the Hartford Convention of 1814.

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  • New Haven is served by the main line and five branches of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by three inter-urban electric lines and by two steamship lines connecting with New York.

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  • From 1701 until 1873 New Haven was the joint capital (with Hartford) of Connecticut.

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  • Blake, Chronicles of New Haven Green (New Haven, 1898); Records of the Colony of New Haven 1638-1665 (2 vols., Hartford, 1857-1858), edited by C. H.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Albany (New York Central & Hudson River) railways, and by two inter-urban electric lines.

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  • There are no steam railways, but an electric line connects South Hadley and South Hadley Falls with the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Maine railways at Holyoke.

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  • He published his defence in An Address to the Free and Independent Citizens of the United States of North America (Hartford, Conn., and London, 1784).

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad and by interurban electric railways.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Rhode Island Suburban railways, and is connected with the island of Rhode Island by ferry.

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  • It contains a borough of the same name and the villages of Cos Cob, Riverside and Sound Beach, all served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railway; the township has steamboat and electric railway connexions with New York City.

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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by interurban electric railways.

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  • The city is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, by interurban electric lines, and by steamboats to New York.

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  • The first settlement in the township was made in 1650 at what is now the village of East Norwalk by a small company from Hartford, and the township was incorporated in the next year.

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  • The New York, New Haven & Hartford railway crosses the town and has stations at its villages of Braintree, South Braintree and East Braintree, which are also served by suburban electric railways.

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  • Watertown is served by the Fitchburg division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Boston, Cambridge, Newton (immediately adjacent and served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway) and neighbouring towns by electric railways.

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  • From 1826 to 1837 he edited the Hartford Times, making it the official organ of the Jacksonian Democracy in southern New England.

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  • He served in the state House of Representatives in 1827,1829-30,1832 and 1834-35, was state comptroller in 1835 and 1842-43, was postmaster at Hartford in 1835-42, and was chief of the bureau of provisions and clothing in the Navy Department at Washington in 1846-1849.

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  • He died at Hartford, Connecticut, on the with of February 1878.

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  • He studied at Yale and Princeton, graduating from the latter in 1766, studied theology for a year, then law, and began to practise at Hartford in 1771.

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  • He was state's attorney for Hartford county from 1777 to 1785, and achieved extraordinary success at the bar, amassing what was for his day a large fortune.

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  • In 1779 he again sat in the assembly, this time representing Hartford.

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  • Grant (3 vols., New York, 1867-1881), and Grant in Peace (Hartford, 1887), are appreciative but lacking in discrimination.

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  • on the 1st of January 1909 (the New York, New Haven & Hartford being the only railway system of any importance in the state).

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  • in area, traversed by the Nashua river, crossed by the Northern Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, and by the Fitchburg Division of the Boston & Maine, and connected with Boston, Worcester and other cities by interurban electric lines.

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  • She was educated at Litchfield Seminary, and from 1822 to 1832 conducted a school for girls at Hartford, Connecticut, with her sister Harriet's assistance, and from 1832 to 1834 conducted a similar school in Cincinnati.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric railway.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric railways.

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  • The city is served by the Boston & Maine, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by an interurban line.

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  • The municipality owns and operates the gas and electric-lighting plants and the water works (the watersupply being derived from natural ponds, some of which are outside the city limits), and owns and leases (to the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad) a railway extending (10.3 m.) to Westfield, Mass.

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  • New England's discontent culminated in the Hartford Convention (Dec. 1814), in which Massachusetts men predominated.

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  • It is traversed by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • In 1901 he delivered a series of lectures at Hartford Theological Seminary, Connecticut, U.S.A., published under the title The Evolution of Congregationalism.

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  • The city is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway (which has other stations in the township at Glenbrook, Springdale and Talmadge Hill), by electric railway to Darien, Greenwich, &c., and by two lines of steamboats to New York City and ports on the Sound.

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  • The following are the seminaries founded since 1800: Andover (1808), Bangor (1816), Hartford (1834), the theological school of Oberlin College (1835), Chicago (1858), Pacific (1869; now at Berkeley, Cal.), and Atlanta (Georgia), 1901.

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  • long, and is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway (which has stations also at East Wallingford and Yalesville) and by an interurban electric line connecting with Meriden and New Haven.

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  • Arriving at Manhattan early in May, a few of the men remained there, another small party established a temporary post (Fort Nassau) on the Delaware river, and still another began a fortified settlement on the site of the present Hartford, Connecticut.

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  • The Dutch had long claimed the whole coast from Delaware Bay to Cape Cod, but by the treaty of Hartford (1650), negotiated between himself and the commissioners of the United Colonies of New England, Stuyvesant agreed to a boundary which on the mainland roughly determined the existing boundary between New York and Connecticut and on Long Island extended southward from the west side of Oyster Bay to the Atlantic Ocean.

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  • The Connecticut Charter of 1662 included in that colony some settlements acknowledged by the treaty of Hartford to belong to New Netherland, and strife was renewed.

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  • The township is traversed by the Boston & Maine, and New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.

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  • 1904), removing a year later to Hartford, where he established his home.

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  • A complete edition of his works was published in twenty-two volumes in1899-1900by the American Publishing Company of Hartford.

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  • HARTFORD, a city and the capital of Connecticut, U.S.A., the county-seat of Hartford county, and a port of entry, coterminous with the township of Hartford, in the west central part of the state, on the W.

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  • Hartford is served by two divisions of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by the Central New England railway, by the several electric lines of the Connecticut Company which radiate to the surrounding towns, and by the steamboats of the Hartford & New York Transportation Co., all of which are controlled by the N.Y., N.H.

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  • A stone arch bridge, with nine arches, built of granite at a cost of $1,700,000 and dedicated in 1908, spans the Connecticut (replacing the old Connecticut river bridge built in 1818 and burned in 1895), and connects Hartford with the village of East Hartford in the township of East Hartford (pop. 1900, 6406), which has important paper-manufacturing and tobacco-growing interests.

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  • The park system of Hartford is the largest in any city of the United States in proportion to the city's population.

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  • Near the Capitol, at the approach of the memorial bridge across the Park river, is the Soldiers' and Sailors' memorial arch, designed by George Keller and erected by the city in 1885 in memory of the Hartford soldiers and sailors who served in the American Civil War.

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  • In Main Street is the present edifice of the First Church of Christ, known as the Centre Congregational Church, which was organized in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1632, and removed to Hartford, under the leadership of Thomas Hooker and Samuel Stone, in 1636.

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  • in memory of loo early residents of Hartford.

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  • Pierpont Morgan in memory of his father, Junius Morgan, a native of Hartford).

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  • In this group of buildings are the Hartford public library (containing 90,000 volumes in 1908), the Watkinson library of reference (70,000 volumes in 1908), the library of the Connecticut historical society (25,000 volumes in 1908) and a public art gallery.

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  • Other institutions of importance in Hartford are the American school for the deaf (formerly the American asylum for the deaf and dumb), founded in 1816 by Thomas H.

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  • Gallaudet; the retreat for the insane (opened for patients in 1824); the Hartford hospital; St Francis hospital; St Thomas's seminary (Roman Catholic); La Salette seminary (Roman Catholic); Trinity college (founded by members of the Protestant Episcopal church, and now non-sectarian), which was chartered as Washington College in 1823, opened in 1824, renamed Trinity College in 1845, and in 1907-1908 had 27 instructors and 208 students; the Hartford Theological seminary, a Congregational institution, which was founded at East Windsor Hill in 1834 as the Theological Institute of Connecticut, was removed to Hartford in 1865, and adopted its present name in 1885; and, affiliated with the last mentioned institution, the Hartford School of Religious Pedagogy.

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  • The Hartford grammar school, founded in 1638, long managed by the town and in 1847 merged with the classical department of the Hartford public high school, is the oldest educational institution in the state.

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  • In Farmington Avenue is St Joseph's cathedral (Roman Catholic), the city being the seat of the diocese of Hartford.

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  • During the 18th century Hartford enjoyed a large and lucrative commerce, but the railway development of the 19th century centralized commerce in New York and Boston, and consequently the principal source of the city's wealth has come to be manufacturing and insurance.

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  • In 1788 the first woollen mill in New England was opened in Hartford; and here, too, about 1846, the Rogers process of electro-silver plating was invented.

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  • As early as 1794 policies were issued by the Hartford Fire Insurance Company (chartered in 1810).

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  • In 1909 Hartford was the home city of six fire insurance and six life insurance companies, the principal ones being the Aetna (fire), Aetna Life, Phoenix Mutual Life, Phoenix Fire, Travelers (Life and Accident), Hartford Fire, Hartford Life, National Fire, Connecticut Fire, Connecticut General Life and Connecticut Mutual Life.

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  • Since the fire insurance business began in Hartford, the companies of that, ,Ity now doing business there have paid about $340,000,000 in losses.

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  • Several large and successful foreign companies have made Hartford their American headquarters.

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  • The Aetna (fire), Aetna Life, Connecticut Fire, Connecticut Mutual Life, Connecticut General Life, Hartford Fire, Hartford Life, Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co., 1"1"-*: ., l Fire, Orient Fire, Phoenix Mutual Life and Travelers Yies have their own homes, some of these being among _it buildings in Hartford.

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  • The first settlement on the site of Hartford was made by the Dutch from New Amsterdam, who in 1633 established on the bank of the Connecticut river, at the mouth of the Park river, a fort which they held until 1654.

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  • The township of Hartford was one of the first three original townships of Connecticut.

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  • In 1636 Hartford was the meeting-place of the first general court of the Connecticut colony; the Fundamental Orders, the first written constitution, were adopted at Hartford in 1639; and after the union of the colonies of New Haven and Connecticut, accomplished by the charter of 1662, Hartford became the sole capital; but from 1701 until 1873 that honour was shared with New Haven.

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  • Hartford was first chartered in 1784, was rechartered in 1856 (the charter of that date has been subsequently revised), and in 1881 was made coterminous with the township of Hartford.

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  • The city was the literary centre of Federalist ideas in the latter part of the 18th century, being the home of Lemuel Hopkins, John Trumbull, Joel Barlow and David Humphreys, the leading members of a group of authors known as the " Hartford Wits "; and in 1814-1815 the city was the meeting-place of the famous Hartford Convention, an event of great importance in the history of the Federalist party.

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  • The War of 1812, with the Embargo Acts (1807-1813), which were so destructive of New England's commerce, thoroughly aroused the Federalist leaders in this part of the country against the National government as administered by the Democrats, and in 1814, when the British were not only threatening a general invasion of their territory but had actually occupied a part of the Maine coast, and the National government promised no protection, the legislature of Massachusetts invited the other New England states to join with her in sending delegates to a convention which should meet at Hartford to consider their grievances, means of preserving their resources, measures of protection against the British, and the advisability of taking measures to bring about a convention of delegates from all the United States for the purpose of revising the Federal constitution.

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  • The legislatures of Massachusetts and Connecticut approved of these proposed amendments and sent commissioners to Washington to urge their adoption, but before their arrival the war had closed, and not only did the amendments fail to receive the approval of any other state, but the legislatures of nine states expressed their disapproval of the Hartford Convention itself, some charging it with sowing "seeds of dissension and disunion."

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  • The cessation of the war brought increased popularity to the Democratic administration, and the Hartford Convention was vigorously attacked throughout the country.

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  • Hartford was the birthplace of Noah Webster, who here published his Grammatical Institute of the English Language (1783-1785), and of Henry Barnard, John Fiske and Frederick Law Olmsted, and has been the home of Samuel P. Goodrich (Peter Parley), George D.

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  • More than ioo periodicals have been established in Hartford, of which the oldest is the Hartford Courant (1764), the oldest newspaper in the United States.

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  • The Congregationalist (afterwards published in Boston) and the Churchman (afterwards published in New York) were also founded at Hartford.

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  • See Scaeva, Hartford in the Olden Times: Its First Thirty Years (Hartford, 1853), edited by W.

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  • Trumbull, Memorial History of Hartford County (Boston, 1886).

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  • For the Hartford Convention see History of the Hartford Convention (Boston, 1833), published by its secretary, Theodore Dwight; H.

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  • Hartford City >>

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  • In September 1650 he came to an agreement with the commissioners of the United Colonies of New England at Hartford upon the boundary between New Netherland and Connecticut, involving the sacrifice of a large amount of territory, the new boundary crossing Long Island from the west side of Oyster Bay to the Atlantic Ocean, and on the mainland north from a point west of Greenwich Bay, 4 m.

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  • SIMSBURY, a township of Hartford (disambiguation)|Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., traversed by the Farmington river and about 10 m.

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  • The township is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and by the Central New England railways, which meet at Simsbury village.

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  • Phelps, History of Simsbury, Granby and Canton from 1642 to 1845 (Hartford, 1845).

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, and by daily steamers to and from New York City.

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  • of Hartford, and including the borough of the same name.

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  • The borough is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad.

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  • The township was incorporated in 1719, was named Litchfield, after Lichfield in England, and was settled by immigrants from Hartford, Windsor, Wethersfield, Farmington and Lebanon (all within the state) in 1720-1721.

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  • Weymouth is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and is connected with Boston, Quincy, Braintree, Hingham, Nantasket and Rockland by electric lines.

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  • Fishkill Landing is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways; by railway ferry and passenger ferries to Newburgh, connecting with the West Shore railway; by river steamboats and by electric railway to Matteawan.

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  • Bingham, A Residence of Twenty-one Years in the Sandwich Islands (Hartford, 1848); Isabella Bird, Six Months in the Sandwich Islands (New York, 1881); Adolf Bastian, Zur Kenntnis Hawaiis (Berlin, 1883); the annual Reports of the governor of Hawaii, of the Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station, of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Experiment Station, of the Board of Commissioners on Agriculture and Forestry, and of the Hawaii Promotion Committee; and the Papers of the Hawaiian Historical Society.

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  • It is served by the main line and the Danbury division (of which it is a terminus) of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by inter-urban electric lines, and by steamboats to New York.

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  • Norwich is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Central Vermont railways, by steamers from New York and New London, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Willimantic, New London and other neighbouring places.

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  • Caulkins, History of Norwich (Hartford, 1866).

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by electric lines to New York City, Yonkers, New Rochelle, &c. The city has various manufactures, but in the main is a residential suburb of New York; the finest residences are in the eastern, central and north-eastern sections, the last being known as Chester Hill; the foreign-born element is largely concentrated in the western part.

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  • It is served by the Boston & Albany, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.

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  • - State Capitol, Hartford, Connecticut.

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  • Manchester, Exeter and Dover in New Hampshire, at Hartford (5th March), New Haven (6th March), Woonsocket (8th March) and Norwich (9th March).

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  • ENFIELD, a township of Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., in the N.

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  • NEW BRITAIN, a city of Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., near the centre of the state, about 9 m.

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  • of the city of Hartford; land area 13.09 sq.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by several inter-urban electric railways.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Albany railways, and by interurban electric lines.

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  • Bacon, The Triple Tradition of the Exodus (Hartford, U.S.A., 1894), and A.

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  • Milford is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, and by an electric line connecting with Bridgeport and New Haven.

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  • (Hartford, 1899).

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  • Hartford >>

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  • Norwood is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.

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  • He was admitted to the bar in 1850, and practised at Hartford, Conn., for six years.

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  • In 1856 he took a leading part in organizing the Republican party in Connecticut, and in 1857 became editor of the Hartford Evening Press, a newly established Republican newspaper.

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  • From April 1866 to April 1867 he was governor of Connecticut, and in 1867 he bought the Hartford Courant, with which he combined the Press, and which became under his editorship the most influential newspaper in Connecticut and one of the leading Republican papers in the country.

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  • Winthrop's Journal, an invaluable record of early Massachusetts history, was printed in part in Hartford in 1790; the whole in Boston, edited by James Savage, as The History of New England from 1630 to 1649, in 1825-1826, and again in 1853; and in New York, edited by James K.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Central Vermont railways, and by electric lines to Baltic, Norwich and New London, and to South Coventry.

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  • Westerly is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Norwich and New London, Conn.

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  • Lowell is served by the Boston & Maine and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by interurban electric lines.

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  • This board was to meet annually in September, two years of every five at Boston, one year of every five at Hartford, one at New Haven, and one at Plymouth; special meetings also might be called by three magistrates of any of the four colonies.

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  • Barnstable is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railway.

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  • Begun in 1693 and finished in 1697, this work was published in London, in 1702, in one volume, and was republished in Hartford in 1820 and in 1853-1855, in two volumes.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway and by an electric line connecting with Winsted.

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  • In 1824-1828 he was professor of belles-lettres in Washington (now Trinity) College, Hartford, Connecticut, and at this time he was one of the editors of the Episcopal Watchman.

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  • The township is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by a steamship line to Boston.

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  • Worcester is served by the Boston & Albany, the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Maine railways, and is connected with Springfield and Boston by interurban electric lines.

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  • Duxbury is served by the Old Colony system of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.

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  • 1; the New York, Ontario & Western (controlled by the New York, New Haven & Hartford), from Weehawken to Oswego; the West Shore (leased by the New York Central), from Weehawken to Buffalo; and the Central railway of New Jersey (controlled by the Philadelphia & Reading), with numerous short lines from Jersey City to the S.

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  • ORSON PRATT (1811-1881), Mormon apostle, was born of humble parents at Hartford, New York.

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  • Here he at first took up the study of law, but in 1831 he entered the theological department of Yale College, and in 1833 was ordained pastor of the North Congregational church in Hartford, Conn., where he remained until 1859, when on account of long-continued ill-health he resigned his pastorate.

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  • Thereafter he had no settled charge, but, until his death at Hartford on the 17th of February 1876, he occasionally preached and was diligently employed as an author.

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  • Dr Bushnell was greatly interested in the civic interests of Hartford, and was the chief agent in procuring the establishment of the public park named in his honour by that city.

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  • Munger's Horace Bushnell, Preacher and Theologian (Boston, 1899); also a series of papers in the Minutes of the General Association of Connecticut (Bushnell Centenary) (Hartford, 1902).

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  • He graduated at Union College in 1826, was ordained a priest of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1828, was rector for several months in Saco, Maine, and in 1828-1833 was professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Washington (now Trinity) College, Hartford, Connecticut.

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  • His father Timothy Edwards (1669-1758), son of a prosperous merchant of Hartford, had graduated at Harvard, was minister at East Windsor, and eked out his salary by tutoring boys for college.

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  • Among them were: his son Pierrepont (1750-1826), a brilliant but erratic member of the Connecticut bar, tolerant in religious matters and bitterly hated by stern Calvinists, a man whose personal morality resembled greatly that of Aaron Burr; his grandsons, William Edwards (1770-1851), an inventor of important leather rolling machinery; Aaron Burr the son of Esther Edwards; Timothy Dwight (1752-1817), son of Mary Edwards, and his brother Theodore Dwight, a federalist politician, a member, the secretary and the historian of the Hartford Convention; his great-grandsons, Tryon Edwards (1809-1894) and Sereno Edwards Dwight, theologian, educationalist and author; and his great-great-grandsons, Theodore William Dwight, the jurist, and Timothy Dwight, second of that name to be president of Yale.

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  • C. King, " Edwards as Philosopher and Theologian," in Hartford Theological Seminary Record, vol.

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  • He was strongly opposed to the War of 1812, and was a leader in the movement culminating in the Hartford Convention, which he defended in a series of open letters published in 1824, and in his inaugural address as mayor of Boston.

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  • He was first a clerk and then a partner in his uncle's store at Hartford, Connecticut, and became head of the New York firm of E.

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  • BRISTOL, a township of Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., in the central part of the state, about 16 m.

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  • Both are situated on the Pequabuck river, and are served by the western branch of the midland division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by electric railway to Hartford, New Britain and Terryville.

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  • Knox, The Life and Work of Henry Ward Beecher (Hartford, Conn., 1887); Frank S.

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  • of Boston, and is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.

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  • The chief village, Northampton, is on the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Maine railways.

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  • Pop. (1900), 13,60 9 (3311 were foreign-born); (1910), 14,J79; it is served by the Boston & Maine and the New York New Haven & Hartford railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • Money had to be earned, and he now secured an editorial post at Hartford, Connecticut, which he sustained until forced by ill-health, early in his twenty-fifth year, to re-seek the Haverhill farm.

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  • While in Hartford Whittier issued in prose and verse his first book, Legends of New England (1831), and edited the writings of the poet John Gardiner C. Brainard.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by an interurban electric line.

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  • Lossing, The Home of Washington: or Mount Vernon and its Associations (Hartford, 1870).

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  • of Boston, served by the Boston & Albany, the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Grafton & Upton railways (the last named having its passenger department operated by electricity and its freight by steam, and connecting Milford with North Grafton), and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • He was rector of St John's Church, Hartford, in 1843-1854, of Grace Church, Baltimore, in 1854-1863, and of Calvary Church, New York City, in 1863.

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  • In 1814-1815 Cabot was the president of the Hartford Convention, and as such was then and afterwards acrimoniously attacked by the Republicans throughout the country.

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  • These were at once accepted; he was requested to sit on the Naval Retiring Board - a board then specially constituted for clearing the navy of unfit or disloyal officers - and a few months later was appointed to the command of the "Western Gulf Blockading Squadron," with the rank of flag-officer, and ordered to proceed forthwith, in the "Hartford," to the Gulf of Mexico, to collect such vessels as could be spared from the blockade, to proceed up the Mississippi, to reduce the defences which guarded the approaches to New Orleans, and to take and hold the city.

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  • of Hartford, Connecticut, on the east bank of the Connecticut river.

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  • Springfield is served by the Springfield division of the New York & New England, the Hartford division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, the Connecticut River division of the Boston & Maine, and the Athol division and the main line of the Boston & Albany railways, and by inter-urban electric railway lines.

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  • WINDSOR, a township of Hartford (disambiguation)|Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., on the Connecticut and Farmington rivers, adjoining the city of Hartford on the N.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway and by electric lines to Hartford and to Springfield, Massachusetts.

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  • In 1639 representatives from Windsor, with those from Wethersfield and Hartford, organized the Connecticut Colony.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the New York, New Haven & Hartford, the West Shore, the Central New England, and the Poughkeepsie & Eastern (merged in the Central New England) railways, and by river steamboat lines on the Hudson.

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  • Woodward, Memoir of General Nathaniel Lyon (Hartford, 1862); James Peckham, Life of Lyon (New York, 1866); and T.

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  • DENISON OLMSTED (1791-1859), American man of science, was born at East Hartford, Connecticut, U.S.A., on the 18th of June 1791, and in 1813 graduated at Yale, where he acted as college tutor from 1815 to 1817.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, and by electric railways to New York City and neighbouring places.

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  • The Connecticut river is navigable as far as Hartford, and the Thames as far as Norwich.

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  • Tinware was manufactured in Berlin, Hartford county, as early as 1770, and tin, steel and iron goods were peddled from Connecticut through the colonies.

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  • In 1768 paper mills were erected at Norwich, and in 1776 at East Hartford.

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  • In 1788 the first woollen mills in New England were established at Hartford, and about 1803 one hundred merino sheep were imported by David Humphreys, who in 1806 built a mill in that part of Derby which is now Seymour and which was practically the first New England factory town; in 1812 steam was first used by the Middletown Woollen Manufacturing Company.

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  • In 1804 the manufacture of cotton was begun at Vernon, Hartford county; mills at Pomfret and Jewett City were established in 1806 and 1810 respectively.

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  • Transportation of products is facilitated by water routes (chiefly coasting), for which there are ports of entry at New Haven, Hartford, Stonington, New London and Bridgeport, and by 1013 m.

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  • One company, the New York, New Haven & Hartford, controlled 87% of this railway mileage in 1904, and practically all the steamboat lines on Long Island Sound.

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  • The principal cities, having a population of more than 20,000, were New Haven (108,027), Hartford (79, 8 5 0), Bridgeport (70,966), Waterbury (45,859), New Britain (2 5,99 8), and Meriden (24,296).

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  • The executive and legislative officials are chosen by the electors for a term of two years; the attorney general for four years; the judges of the supreme court of errors and the superior court, appointed by the general assembly on nomination by the governor, serve for eight, and the judges of the courts of common pleas (in Hartford, New London, New Haven, Litchfield and Fairfield counties) and of the district courts, chosen in like manner, serve for four years.

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  • The bureau of labour statistics has among its duties the giving of information to immigrant labourers regarding their legal rights: it has free employment agencies at Bridgeport, Norwich, Hartford, New Haven and Waterbury.

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  • The state almost entirely supports the Connecticut school for imbeciles, at Lakeville; the American school for the deaf, in Hartford; the oral school for the deaf, 1 The constitution prescribes that " the privileges of an elector shall be forfeited by a conviction of bribery, forgery, perjury, duelling, fraudulent bankruptcy, theft or other offense for which an infamous punishment is inflicted," but this disability may in any case be removed by a two-thirds vote of each house of the general assembly.

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  • at Mystic; the Connecticut institute and industrial home for the blind, at Hartford; Fitch's home for soldiers, at Noroton; ten county jails in the eight counties; and eight county temporary homes for dependent and neglected children.

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  • Supplementing the educative influence of the schools are the public libraries (161 in number in 1907); the state appropriates $200 to establish, and $100 per annum to maintain, a public library (provided the town in which the library is to be established contributes an equal amount), and the Public Library Committee has for its duty the study of library problems. Higher education is provided by Yale University; by Trinity College, at Hartford (nonsectarian), founded in 1823; by Wesleyan University, at Middletown, the oldest college of the Methodist Church in the United States, founded in 1831; by the Hartford Theological Seminary (1834); by the Connecticut Agricultural College, at Storrs (founded 1881), which has a two years' course of preparation for rural teachers and has an experiment station; by the Connecticut Experiment Station at New Haven, which was established in 1875 at Middletown and was the first in the United States; and by normal schools at New Britain (established 1881), Willimantic (1890), New Haven (1894) and Danbury (1903).

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  • The insurance business centres at Hartford.

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  • The first settlement by Europeans in Connecticut was made on the site of the present Hartford in 1633, by a party of Dutch from New Netherland.

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  • The emigrants from Watertown founded Wethersfield in the winter of 1634-1635; those from New Town (now Cambridge) settled at Windsor in the summer of 1635; and in the autumn of the same year people from Dorchester settled at Hartford.

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  • Hartford then became the capital of the united colonies, but shared that honour with New Haven from 1701 until 1873.

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  • The period of most serious friction was that during the administration of the New England colonies by Sir Edmund Andros, who in pursuance of the later Stuart policy both in England and in her American colonies visited Hartford on the 31st of October 1687 to execute quo warranto proceedings against the charter of 1662.

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  • 2 For a good version of the traditionsee Wadsworth or the Charter Oak (Hartford, 1904), by W.

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  • The township of Marlborough, with a population in 1900 of 322, then had one representative, while the city of Hartford, with a population of 79,850, had only two; and the township of Union, with 428 inhabitants, and the city of New Haven, with 108,027, each had two representatives.

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  • - The " Acorn Club " has recently published a list of books printed in Connecticut between 1709 and 1800 (Hartford, 1904), and Alexander Johnston's Connecticut (Boston, 1887) contains a bibliography of Connecticut's history up to 1886.

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  • Connecticut as a Colony and as a State (Hartford, 1904; 4 vols.) is written from secondary sources, as also is G.

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  • Hartford, 1857).

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  • For the sources, see Colonial Records of Connecticut (15 vols., Hartford, 1850-1890); The Records of the Colony and the Plantation of New Haven (2 vols., Hartford, 1857-1858) and Records of the State of Connecticut (2 vols., Hartford, 1894-1895).

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  • The Collections (Hartford 1860 et seq.) of the Connecticut Historical Society contain valuable material, especially the papers of Governor Joseph Talcott; and the Papers (New Haven, 1865 et seq.) of the New Haven Colony Historical Society are extremely valuable for local history; but a vast number of documents relating to the colonial and state periods, now in the state library at Hartford, have never been published.

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  • Dr. Percy is also adjunct Professor of Theology at Hartford Seminary, Connecticut.

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  • Hartford financial service want a warm a seven in redway calif.

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  • A nursing home of Hartford conn stolen burned to.

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  • Morris axles and brakes were used, special springs made, and racy Hartford friction dampers fitted at the rear.

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  • eatery located on Farmington Ave in the retail district of West Hartford, Connecticut.

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  • sneakther good Hartford story referred to the first time he had snuck backstage at the Grand Ole Opry.

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  • Perhaps this dangerous latitude comes of the fact that we never have any temperance " rot " going on in Hartford.

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  • For long-term care hartford can sell up to in York city.

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  • Hartford's spectrum basic a boston car heights insurance simple measure boththe zephyr xport then again blue.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric lines running N., S.

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  • His ancestor, Richard Seymour, a Protestant Episcopal ` clergyman, was an early settler at Hartford, Connecticut, and his father, Henry Seymour, who removed from Connecticut to New York, was prominent in the Democratic party in the state, being a member of the "Albany Regency" and serving as state senator in1816-1819and in 1822, and as canal commissioner in 1819-1831.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and is primarily a residential suburb of Boston, with which it is connected by electric lines.

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  • MANCHESTER, a township of Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., about 9 m.

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  • of Hartford.

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  • Manchester is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway and by electric line connecting with Hartford, Rockville and Stafford Springs.

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  • Manchester was originally a part of the township of Hartford, and later a part of the township of East Hartford.

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  • The first settlement within its present limits was made about 1672; the land was bought from the Indians in 1676; and the township was separated from East Hartford and incorporated in 1823.

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  • At her mother's death in 1815 she came most directly under the influence of her eldest sister Catherine, eleven years her senior, a woman of keen intellect, who a few years later set up a school in Hartford to which Harriet went, first as a pupil, afterwards as teacher.

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  • In 1852 Professor Stowe accepted a professorship in the Theological Seminary at Andover, Massachusetts, and the family made its home there till 1863, when he retired wholly from professional life and removed to Hartford.

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  • After the death of her husband in 1886 she passed the rest of her life in the seclusion of her Hartford home, where she died on the 1st of July 1896.

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  • The township is traversed by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, covers an area of 221 sq.

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  • In comparing the figures, it should be noted that main line mileage in the Eastern states, as for example that of the Pennsylvania railroad and the New York, New Haven & Hartford, does not differ greatly in standards of safety or in unit cost from the best British construction, although improvement work in America is charged to income far more liberally than it has been in England.

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  • 2 (1893); William Wright, History of the Big Bonanza (Hartford, Conn., 1876); C. H.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by inter-urban electric lines and in summer by steamers to Boston.

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  • It took up, too, the Democratic weapon of states' rights, and in New England carried sectionalism dangerously near secession in 1808, and in 1812-1814,during the movement, in opposition to the war of 1812, which culminated in the Hartford Convention (see Hartford).

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  • JOHN FISKE (1842-1901), American historical, philosophical and scientific writer, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, on the 30th of March 1842, and died at Gloucester, Massachusetts, on the 4th of July 1901.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.

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  • Salisbury is served by the Central New England, and the New York, New Haven, & Hartford railways.

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  • In 1732 the township was surveyed with its present boundaries, and in 1738 the land (exclusive 'of that held under previous grants) was auctioned by the state at Hartford.

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  • (Hartford, Conn., 1898).

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  • Boston is the terminus of the Boston & Albany (New York Central), the Old Colony system of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Maine railway systems, each of which controls several minor roads once in dependent.

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  • The former (the North, or Union station, 1893) covers 9 acres and has 23 tracks; the latter (the South Terminal, 1898), one of the largest stations in the world, covers 13 acres and has 32 tracks, and is used by the Boston & Albany and by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.

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  • It was the losses entailed upon her commerce by the commercial policy of Jefferson's administration that embittered Boston against the Democratic-Republican party and put her public men in the forefront of the opposition to its policies that culminated in lukewarmness toward the War of 1812, and in the Hartford Convention of 1814.

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  • New Haven is served by the main line and five branches of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by three inter-urban electric lines and by two steamship lines connecting with New York.

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  • From 1701 until 1873 New Haven was the joint capital (with Hartford) of Connecticut.

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  • Blake, Chronicles of New Haven Green (New Haven, 1898); Records of the Colony of New Haven 1638-1665 (2 vols., Hartford, 1857-1858), edited by C. H.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Albany (New York Central & Hudson River) railways, and by two inter-urban electric lines.

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  • There are no steam railways, but an electric line connects South Hadley and South Hadley Falls with the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Maine railways at Holyoke.

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  • He published his defence in An Address to the Free and Independent Citizens of the United States of North America (Hartford, Conn., and London, 1784).

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  • Hazard, Cuba with Pen and Pencil (Hartford, Conn., 1873) H.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad and by interurban electric railways.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Rhode Island Suburban railways, and is connected with the island of Rhode Island by ferry.

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  • It contains a borough of the same name and the villages of Cos Cob, Riverside and Sound Beach, all served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railway; the township has steamboat and electric railway connexions with New York City.

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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by interurban electric railways.

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  • The city is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, by interurban electric lines, and by steamboats to New York.

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  • The first settlement in the township was made in 1650 at what is now the village of East Norwalk by a small company from Hartford, and the township was incorporated in the next year.

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  • The New York, New Haven & Hartford railway crosses the town and has stations at its villages of Braintree, South Braintree and East Braintree, which are also served by suburban electric railways.

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  • Watertown is served by the Fitchburg division of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected with Boston, Cambridge, Newton (immediately adjacent and served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway) and neighbouring towns by electric railways.

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  • From 1826 to 1837 he edited the Hartford Times, making it the official organ of the Jacksonian Democracy in southern New England.

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  • He served in the state House of Representatives in 1827,1829-30,1832 and 1834-35, was state comptroller in 1835 and 1842-43, was postmaster at Hartford in 1835-42, and was chief of the bureau of provisions and clothing in the Navy Department at Washington in 1846-1849.

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  • He died at Hartford, Connecticut, on the with of February 1878.

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  • He studied at Yale and Princeton, graduating from the latter in 1766, studied theology for a year, then law, and began to practise at Hartford in 1771.

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  • He was state's attorney for Hartford county from 1777 to 1785, and achieved extraordinary success at the bar, amassing what was for his day a large fortune.

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  • In 1779 he again sat in the assembly, this time representing Hartford.

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  • Grant (3 vols., New York, 1867-1881), and Grant in Peace (Hartford, 1887), are appreciative but lacking in discrimination.

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  • on the 1st of January 1909 (the New York, New Haven & Hartford being the only railway system of any importance in the state).

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  • in area, traversed by the Nashua river, crossed by the Northern Division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, and by the Fitchburg Division of the Boston & Maine, and connected with Boston, Worcester and other cities by interurban electric lines.

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  • She was educated at Litchfield Seminary, and from 1822 to 1832 conducted a school for girls at Hartford, Connecticut, with her sister Harriet's assistance, and from 1832 to 1834 conducted a similar school in Cincinnati.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric railway.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric railways.

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  • Derby is the birthplace of David Humphreys (1752-1818), a soldier, diplomatist and writer, General Washington's aide and military secretary from 1780 until the end of the War of Independence, the first minister of the United States to Portugal (1790-1797) and minister to Spain in 1797-1802, and one of the "Hartford Wits."

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  • The city is served by the Boston & Maine, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by an interurban line.

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  • The municipality owns and operates the gas and electric-lighting plants and the water works (the watersupply being derived from natural ponds, some of which are outside the city limits), and owns and leases (to the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad) a railway extending (10.3 m.) to Westfield, Mass.

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  • New England's discontent culminated in the Hartford Convention (Dec. 1814), in which Massachusetts men predominated.

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  • It is traversed by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • In 1901 he delivered a series of lectures at Hartford Theological Seminary, Connecticut, U.S.A., published under the title The Evolution of Congregationalism.

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  • The city is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway (which has other stations in the township at Glenbrook, Springdale and Talmadge Hill), by electric railway to Darien, Greenwich, &c., and by two lines of steamboats to New York City and ports on the Sound.

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  • The following are the seminaries founded since 1800: Andover (1808), Bangor (1816), Hartford (1834), the theological school of Oberlin College (1835), Chicago (1858), Pacific (1869; now at Berkeley, Cal.), and Atlanta (Georgia), 1901.

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  • long, and is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway (which has stations also at East Wallingford and Yalesville) and by an interurban electric line connecting with Meriden and New Haven.

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  • Arriving at Manhattan early in May, a few of the men remained there, another small party established a temporary post (Fort Nassau) on the Delaware river, and still another began a fortified settlement on the site of the present Hartford, Connecticut.

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  • The Dutch had long claimed the whole coast from Delaware Bay to Cape Cod, but by the treaty of Hartford (1650), negotiated between himself and the commissioners of the United Colonies of New England, Stuyvesant agreed to a boundary which on the mainland roughly determined the existing boundary between New York and Connecticut and on Long Island extended southward from the west side of Oyster Bay to the Atlantic Ocean.

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  • The Connecticut Charter of 1662 included in that colony some settlements acknowledged by the treaty of Hartford to belong to New Netherland, and strife was renewed.

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  • The township is traversed by the Boston & Maine, and New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.

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  • 1904), removing a year later to Hartford, where he established his home.

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  • A complete edition of his works was published in twenty-two volumes in1899-1900by the American Publishing Company of Hartford.

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  • of Boston, is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad and by electric lines connecting with Taunton, Boston, New Bedford and Cape Cod, and has a townhouse, a soldiers' monument, and a public library housed in a building erected from a fund (part of which is used as a permanent endowment) bequeathed by Thomas Sprout Peirce (1823-1901), a merchant of the township, who, in addition, bequeathed about $500,000 as a special trust-fund for the use and benefit of the town of Middleboro; the income has been spent largely in the construction of macadam roads, the erection of an almshouse and the installation of special courses in the high school.

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  • HARTFORD, a city and the capital of Connecticut, U.S.A., the county-seat of Hartford county, and a port of entry, coterminous with the township of Hartford, in the west central part of the state, on the W.

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  • Hartford is served by two divisions of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by the Central New England railway, by the several electric lines of the Connecticut Company which radiate to the surrounding towns, and by the steamboats of the Hartford & New York Transportation Co., all of which are controlled by the N.Y., N.H.

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  • A stone arch bridge, with nine arches, built of granite at a cost of $1,700,000 and dedicated in 1908, spans the Connecticut (replacing the old Connecticut river bridge built in 1818 and burned in 1895), and connects Hartford with the village of East Hartford in the township of East Hartford (pop. 1900, 6406), which has important paper-manufacturing and tobacco-growing interests.

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  • The park system of Hartford is the largest in any city of the United States in proportion to the city's population.

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  • Near the Capitol, at the approach of the memorial bridge across the Park river, is the Soldiers' and Sailors' memorial arch, designed by George Keller and erected by the city in 1885 in memory of the Hartford soldiers and sailors who served in the American Civil War.

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  • In Main Street is the present edifice of the First Church of Christ, known as the Centre Congregational Church, which was organized in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1632, and removed to Hartford, under the leadership of Thomas Hooker and Samuel Stone, in 1636.

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  • in memory of loo early residents of Hartford.

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  • Pierpont Morgan in memory of his father, Junius Morgan, a native of Hartford).

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  • In this group of buildings are the Hartford public library (containing 90,000 volumes in 1908), the Watkinson library of reference (70,000 volumes in 1908), the library of the Connecticut historical society (25,000 volumes in 1908) and a public art gallery.

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  • Other institutions of importance in Hartford are the American school for the deaf (formerly the American asylum for the deaf and dumb), founded in 1816 by Thomas H.

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  • Gallaudet; the retreat for the insane (opened for patients in 1824); the Hartford hospital; St Francis hospital; St Thomas's seminary (Roman Catholic); La Salette seminary (Roman Catholic); Trinity college (founded by members of the Protestant Episcopal church, and now non-sectarian), which was chartered as Washington College in 1823, opened in 1824, renamed Trinity College in 1845, and in 1907-1908 had 27 instructors and 208 students; the Hartford Theological seminary, a Congregational institution, which was founded at East Windsor Hill in 1834 as the Theological Institute of Connecticut, was removed to Hartford in 1865, and adopted its present name in 1885; and, affiliated with the last mentioned institution, the Hartford School of Religious Pedagogy.

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  • The Hartford grammar school, founded in 1638, long managed by the town and in 1847 merged with the classical department of the Hartford public high school, is the oldest educational institution in the state.

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  • In Farmington Avenue is St Joseph's cathedral (Roman Catholic), the city being the seat of the diocese of Hartford.

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  • During the 18th century Hartford enjoyed a large and lucrative commerce, but the railway development of the 19th century centralized commerce in New York and Boston, and consequently the principal source of the city's wealth has come to be manufacturing and insurance.

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  • In 1788 the first woollen mill in New England was opened in Hartford; and here, too, about 1846, the Rogers process of electro-silver plating was invented.

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  • As early as 1794 policies were issued by the Hartford Fire Insurance Company (chartered in 1810).

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  • In 1909 Hartford was the home city of six fire insurance and six life insurance companies, the principal ones being the Aetna (fire), Aetna Life, Phoenix Mutual Life, Phoenix Fire, Travelers (Life and Accident), Hartford Fire, Hartford Life, National Fire, Connecticut Fire, Connecticut General Life and Connecticut Mutual Life.

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  • Since the fire insurance business began in Hartford, the companies of that, ,Ity now doing business there have paid about $340,000,000 in losses.

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  • Several large and successful foreign companies have made Hartford their American headquarters.

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  • The Aetna (fire), Aetna Life, Connecticut Fire, Connecticut Mutual Life, Connecticut General Life, Hartford Fire, Hartford Life, Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co., 1"1"-*: ., l Fire, Orient Fire, Phoenix Mutual Life and Travelers Yies have their own homes, some of these being among _it buildings in Hartford.

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  • The first settlement on the site of Hartford was made by the Dutch from New Amsterdam, who in 1633 established on the bank of the Connecticut river, at the mouth of the Park river, a fort which they held until 1654.

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  • The township of Hartford was one of the first three original townships of Connecticut.

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  • In 1636 Hartford was the meeting-place of the first general court of the Connecticut colony; the Fundamental Orders, the first written constitution, were adopted at Hartford in 1639; and after the union of the colonies of New Haven and Connecticut, accomplished by the charter of 1662, Hartford became the sole capital; but from 1701 until 1873 that honour was shared with New Haven.

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  • At Hartford occurred in 1687 the meeting of Edmund Andros and the Connecticut officials (see Connecticut).

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  • Hartford was first chartered in 1784, was rechartered in 1856 (the charter of that date has been subsequently revised), and in 1881 was made coterminous with the township of Hartford.

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  • The city was the literary centre of Federalist ideas in the latter part of the 18th century, being the home of Lemuel Hopkins, John Trumbull, Joel Barlow and David Humphreys, the leading members of a group of authors known as the " Hartford Wits "; and in 1814-1815 the city was the meeting-place of the famous Hartford Convention, an event of great importance in the history of the Federalist party.

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  • The War of 1812, with the Embargo Acts (1807-1813), which were so destructive of New England's commerce, thoroughly aroused the Federalist leaders in this part of the country against the National government as administered by the Democrats, and in 1814, when the British were not only threatening a general invasion of their territory but had actually occupied a part of the Maine coast, and the National government promised no protection, the legislature of Massachusetts invited the other New England states to join with her in sending delegates to a convention which should meet at Hartford to consider their grievances, means of preserving their resources, measures of protection against the British, and the advisability of taking measures to bring about a convention of delegates from all the United States for the purpose of revising the Federal constitution.

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  • The legislatures of Massachusetts and Connecticut approved of these proposed amendments and sent commissioners to Washington to urge their adoption, but before their arrival the war had closed, and not only did the amendments fail to receive the approval of any other state, but the legislatures of nine states expressed their disapproval of the Hartford Convention itself, some charging it with sowing "seeds of dissension and disunion."

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  • The cessation of the war brought increased popularity to the Democratic administration, and the Hartford Convention was vigorously attacked throughout the country.

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  • Hartford was the birthplace of Noah Webster, who here published his Grammatical Institute of the English Language (1783-1785), and of Henry Barnard, John Fiske and Frederick Law Olmsted, and has been the home of Samuel P. Goodrich (Peter Parley), George D.

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  • More than ioo periodicals have been established in Hartford, of which the oldest is the Hartford Courant (1764), the oldest newspaper in the United States.

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  • The Congregationalist (afterwards published in Boston) and the Churchman (afterwards published in New York) were also founded at Hartford.

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  • See Scaeva, Hartford in the Olden Times: Its First Thirty Years (Hartford, 1853), edited by W.

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  • Trumbull, Memorial History of Hartford County (Boston, 1886).

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  • For the Hartford Convention see History of the Hartford Convention (Boston, 1833), published by its secretary, Theodore Dwight; H.

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  • Hartford City >>

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  • In September 1650 he came to an agreement with the commissioners of the United Colonies of New England at Hartford upon the boundary between New Netherland and Connecticut, involving the sacrifice of a large amount of territory, the new boundary crossing Long Island from the west side of Oyster Bay to the Atlantic Ocean, and on the mainland north from a point west of Greenwich Bay, 4 m.

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  • SIMSBURY, a township of Hartford (disambiguation)|Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., traversed by the Farmington river and about 10 m.

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  • The township is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and by the Central New England railways, which meet at Simsbury village.

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  • Phelps, History of Simsbury, Granby and Canton from 1642 to 1845 (Hartford, 1845).

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, and by daily steamers to and from New York City.

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  • of Hartford, and including the borough of the same name.

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  • The borough is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad.

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  • The township was incorporated in 1719, was named Litchfield, after Lichfield in England, and was settled by immigrants from Hartford, Windsor, Wethersfield, Farmington and Lebanon (all within the state) in 1720-1721.

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  • Kilbourne, Sketches and Chronicles of the Town of Litchfield, Connecticut (Hartford, Conn., 1859); George C. Boswell, The Litchfield Book of Days (Litchfield, 1900); and for an account of the Litchfield Female Seminary, Emily N.

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  • Weymouth is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and is connected with Boston, Quincy, Braintree, Hingham, Nantasket and Rockland by electric lines.

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  • Fishkill Landing is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways; by railway ferry and passenger ferries to Newburgh, connecting with the West Shore railway; by river steamboats and by electric railway to Matteawan.

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  • Bingham, A Residence of Twenty-one Years in the Sandwich Islands (Hartford, 1848); Isabella Bird, Six Months in the Sandwich Islands (New York, 1881); Adolf Bastian, Zur Kenntnis Hawaiis (Berlin, 1883); the annual Reports of the governor of Hawaii, of the Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station, of the Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Experiment Station, of the Board of Commissioners on Agriculture and Forestry, and of the Hawaii Promotion Committee; and the Papers of the Hawaiian Historical Society.

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  • It is served by the main line and the Danbury division (of which it is a terminus) of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, by inter-urban electric lines, and by steamboats to New York.

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  • Norwich is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Central Vermont railways, by steamers from New York and New London, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Willimantic, New London and other neighbouring places.

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  • Caulkins, History of Norwich (Hartford, 1866).

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by electric lines to New York City, Yonkers, New Rochelle, &c. The city has various manufactures, but in the main is a residential suburb of New York; the finest residences are in the eastern, central and north-eastern sections, the last being known as Chester Hill; the foreign-born element is largely concentrated in the western part.

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  • It is served by the Boston & Albany, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways.

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  • - State Capitol, Hartford, Connecticut.

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  • Manchester, Exeter and Dover in New Hampshire, at Hartford (5th March), New Haven (6th March), Woonsocket (8th March) and Norwich (9th March).

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  • ENFIELD, a township of Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., in the N.

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  • NEW BRITAIN, a city of Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., near the centre of the state, about 9 m.

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  • of the city of Hartford; land area 13.09 sq.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by several inter-urban electric railways.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Albany railways, and by interurban electric lines.

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  • Bacon, The Triple Tradition of the Exodus (Hartford, U.S.A., 1894), and A.

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  • Milford is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad, and by an electric line connecting with Bridgeport and New Haven.

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  • (Hartford, 1899).

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  • Norwood is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.

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  • He was admitted to the bar in 1850, and practised at Hartford, Conn., for six years.

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  • In 1856 he took a leading part in organizing the Republican party in Connecticut, and in 1857 became editor of the Hartford Evening Press, a newly established Republican newspaper.

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  • From April 1866 to April 1867 he was governor of Connecticut, and in 1867 he bought the Hartford Courant, with which he combined the Press, and which became under his editorship the most influential newspaper in Connecticut and one of the leading Republican papers in the country.

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  • Winthrop's Journal, an invaluable record of early Massachusetts history, was printed in part in Hartford in 1790; the whole in Boston, edited by James Savage, as The History of New England from 1630 to 1649, in 1825-1826, and again in 1853; and in New York, edited by James K.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Central Vermont railways, and by electric lines to Baltic, Norwich and New London, and to South Coventry.

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  • Westerly is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by interurban electric lines connecting with Norwich and New London, Conn.

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  • Lowell is served by the Boston & Maine and the New York, New Haven & Hartford railways, and by interurban electric lines.

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  • This board was to meet annually in September, two years of every five at Boston, one year of every five at Hartford, one at New Haven, and one at Plymouth; special meetings also might be called by three magistrates of any of the four colonies.

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  • After that war, New England was long the most essentially commercial and industrial group of states, and was a stronghold of Federalism; and in the period immediately before and during the War of 1812, when its commercial interests suffered terribly, first from the restrictive measures of the general government and then from warfare, New England was a centre of that opposition to the policy of the National Administration (then Democratic), which culminated in the famous Hartford Convention of1814-1815(see Hartford).

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  • Barnstable is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railway.

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  • Begun in 1693 and finished in 1697, this work was published in London, in 1702, in one volume, and was republished in Hartford in 1820 and in 1853-1855, in two volumes.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway and by an electric line connecting with Winsted.

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  • In 1824-1828 he was professor of belles-lettres in Washington (now Trinity) College, Hartford, Connecticut, and at this time he was one of the editors of the Episcopal Watchman.

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  • The township is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by a steamship line to Boston.

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  • Worcester is served by the Boston & Albany, the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Boston & Maine railways, and is connected with Springfield and Boston by interurban electric lines.

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  • Duxbury is served by the Old Colony system of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.

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  • 1; the New York, Ontario & Western (controlled by the New York, New Haven & Hartford), from Weehawken to Oswego; the West Shore (leased by the New York Central), from Weehawken to Buffalo; and the Central railway of New Jersey (controlled by the Philadelphia & Reading), with numerous short lines from Jersey City to the S.

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  • ORSON PRATT (1811-1881), Mormon apostle, was born of humble parents at Hartford, New York.

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  • Here he at first took up the study of law, but in 1831 he entered the theological department of Yale College, and in 1833 was ordained pastor of the North Congregational church in Hartford, Conn., where he remained until 1859, when on account of long-continued ill-health he resigned his pastorate.

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  • Thereafter he had no settled charge, but, until his death at Hartford on the 17th of February 1876, he occasionally preached and was diligently employed as an author.

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  • Dr Bushnell was greatly interested in the civic interests of Hartford, and was the chief agent in procuring the establishment of the public park named in his honour by that city.

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  • Munger's Horace Bushnell, Preacher and Theologian (Boston, 1899); also a series of papers in the Minutes of the General Association of Connecticut (Bushnell Centenary) (Hartford, 1902).

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  • He graduated at Union College in 1826, was ordained a priest of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1828, was rector for several months in Saco, Maine, and in 1828-1833 was professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Washington (now Trinity) College, Hartford, Connecticut.

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  • His father Timothy Edwards (1669-1758), son of a prosperous merchant of Hartford, had graduated at Harvard, was minister at East Windsor, and eked out his salary by tutoring boys for college.

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  • Among them were: his son Pierrepont (1750-1826), a brilliant but erratic member of the Connecticut bar, tolerant in religious matters and bitterly hated by stern Calvinists, a man whose personal morality resembled greatly that of Aaron Burr; his grandsons, William Edwards (1770-1851), an inventor of important leather rolling machinery; Aaron Burr the son of Esther Edwards; Timothy Dwight (1752-1817), son of Mary Edwards, and his brother Theodore Dwight, a federalist politician, a member, the secretary and the historian of the Hartford Convention; his great-grandsons, Tryon Edwards (1809-1894) and Sereno Edwards Dwight, theologian, educationalist and author; and his great-great-grandsons, Theodore William Dwight, the jurist, and Timothy Dwight, second of that name to be president of Yale.

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  • C. King, " Edwards as Philosopher and Theologian," in Hartford Theological Seminary Record, vol.

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  • Squires, Jonathan Edwards and seine Willenslehre (Leipzig, 1901); Samuel Simpson, " Jonathan Edwards, A Historical Review," in Hartford Seminary Record, vol.

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  • He was strongly opposed to the War of 1812, and was a leader in the movement culminating in the Hartford Convention, which he defended in a series of open letters published in 1824, and in his inaugural address as mayor of Boston.

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  • He was first a clerk and then a partner in his uncle's store at Hartford, Connecticut, and became head of the New York firm of E.

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  • BRISTOL, a township of Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., in the central part of the state, about 16 m.

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  • Both are situated on the Pequabuck river, and are served by the western branch of the midland division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by electric railway to Hartford, New Britain and Terryville.

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  • Knox, The Life and Work of Henry Ward Beecher (Hartford, Conn., 1887); Frank S.

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  • of Boston, and is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway.

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  • The chief village, Northampton, is on the New York, New Haven & Hartford, and the Boston & Maine railways.

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  • Pop. (1900), 13,60 9 (3311 were foreign-born); (1910), 14,J79; it is served by the Boston & Maine and the New York New Haven & Hartford railways, and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • Money had to be earned, and he now secured an editorial post at Hartford, Connecticut, which he sustained until forced by ill-health, early in his twenty-fifth year, to re-seek the Haverhill farm.

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  • While in Hartford Whittier issued in prose and verse his first book, Legends of New England (1831), and edited the writings of the poet John Gardiner C. Brainard.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, and by an interurban electric line.

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  • Lossing, The Home of Washington: or Mount Vernon and its Associations (Hartford, 1870).

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  • of Boston, served by the Boston & Albany, the New York, New Haven & Hartford and the Grafton & Upton railways (the last named having its passenger department operated by electricity and its freight by steam, and connecting Milford with North Grafton), and by inter-urban electric lines.

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  • He was rector of St John's Church, Hartford, in 1843-1854, of Grace Church, Baltimore, in 1854-1863, and of Calvary Church, New York City, in 1863.

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  • In 1814-1815 Cabot was the president of the Hartford Convention, and as such was then and afterwards acrimoniously attacked by the Republicans throughout the country.

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  • These were at once accepted; he was requested to sit on the Naval Retiring Board - a board then specially constituted for clearing the navy of unfit or disloyal officers - and a few months later was appointed to the command of the "Western Gulf Blockading Squadron," with the rank of flag-officer, and ordered to proceed forthwith, in the "Hartford," to the Gulf of Mexico, to collect such vessels as could be spared from the blockade, to proceed up the Mississippi, to reduce the defences which guarded the approaches to New Orleans, and to take and hold the city.

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  • of Hartford, Connecticut, on the east bank of the Connecticut river.

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  • Springfield is served by the Springfield division of the New York & New England, the Hartford division of the New York, New Haven & Hartford, the Connecticut River division of the Boston & Maine, and the Athol division and the main line of the Boston & Albany railways, and by inter-urban electric railway lines.

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  • WINDSOR, a township of Hartford (disambiguation)|Hartford county, Connecticut, U.S.A., on the Connecticut and Farmington rivers, adjoining the city of Hartford on the N.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway and by electric lines to Hartford and to Springfield, Massachusetts.

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  • In 1639 representatives from Windsor, with those from Wethersfield and Hartford, organized the Connecticut Colony.

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  • It is served by the New York Central & Hudson River, the New York, New Haven & Hartford, the West Shore, the Central New England, and the Poughkeepsie & Eastern (merged in the Central New England) railways, and by river steamboat lines on the Hudson.

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  • Woodward, Memoir of General Nathaniel Lyon (Hartford, 1862); James Peckham, Life of Lyon (New York, 1866); and T.

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  • DENISON OLMSTED (1791-1859), American man of science, was born at East Hartford, Connecticut, U.S.A., on the 18th of June 1791, and in 1813 graduated at Yale, where he acted as college tutor from 1815 to 1817.

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  • It is served by the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, and by electric railways to New York City and neighbouring places.

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  • The Connecticut river is navigable as far as Hartford, and the Thames as far as Norwich.

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  • Tinware was manufactured in Berlin, Hartford county, as early as 1770, and tin, steel and iron goods were peddled from Connecticut through the colonies.

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  • In 1768 paper mills were erected at Norwich, and in 1776 at East Hartford.

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  • In 1788 the first woollen mills in New England were established at Hartford, and about 1803 one hundred merino sheep were imported by David Humphreys, who in 1806 built a mill in that part of Derby which is now Seymour and which was practically the first New England factory town; in 1812 steam was first used by the Middletown Woollen Manufacturing Company.

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  • In 1804 the manufacture of cotton was begun at Vernon, Hartford county; mills at Pomfret and Jewett City were established in 1806 and 1810 respectively.

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  • Transportation of products is facilitated by water routes (chiefly coasting), for which there are ports of entry at New Haven, Hartford, Stonington, New London and Bridgeport, and by 1013 m.

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  • One company, the New York, New Haven & Hartford, controlled 87% of this railway mileage in 1904, and practically all the steamboat lines on Long Island Sound.

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  • The principal cities, having a population of more than 20,000, were New Haven (108,027), Hartford (79, 8 5 0), Bridgeport (70,966), Waterbury (45,859), New Britain (2 5,99 8), and Meriden (24,296).

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  • The executive and legislative officials are chosen by the electors for a term of two years; the attorney general for four years; the judges of the supreme court of errors and the superior court, appointed by the general assembly on nomination by the governor, serve for eight, and the judges of the courts of common pleas (in Hartford, New London, New Haven, Litchfield and Fairfield counties) and of the district courts, chosen in like manner, serve for four years.

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  • The bureau of labour statistics has among its duties the giving of information to immigrant labourers regarding their legal rights: it has free employment agencies at Bridgeport, Norwich, Hartford, New Haven and Waterbury.

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  • The state almost entirely supports the Connecticut school for imbeciles, at Lakeville; the American school for the deaf, in Hartford; the oral school for the deaf, 1 The constitution prescribes that " the privileges of an elector shall be forfeited by a conviction of bribery, forgery, perjury, duelling, fraudulent bankruptcy, theft or other offense for which an infamous punishment is inflicted," but this disability may in any case be removed by a two-thirds vote of each house of the general assembly.

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  • at Mystic; the Connecticut institute and industrial home for the blind, at Hartford; Fitch's home for soldiers, at Noroton; ten county jails in the eight counties; and eight county temporary homes for dependent and neglected children.

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  • Supplementing the educative influence of the schools are the public libraries (161 in number in 1907); the state appropriates $200 to establish, and $100 per annum to maintain, a public library (provided the town in which the library is to be established contributes an equal amount), and the Public Library Committee has for its duty the study of library problems. Higher education is provided by Yale University; by Trinity College, at Hartford (nonsectarian), founded in 1823; by Wesleyan University, at Middletown, the oldest college of the Methodist Church in the United States, founded in 1831; by the Hartford Theological Seminary (1834); by the Connecticut Agricultural College, at Storrs (founded 1881), which has a two years' course of preparation for rural teachers and has an experiment station; by the Connecticut Experiment Station at New Haven, which was established in 1875 at Middletown and was the first in the United States; and by normal schools at New Britain (established 1881), Willimantic (1890), New Haven (1894) and Danbury (1903).

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  • The insurance business centres at Hartford.

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  • The first settlement by Europeans in Connecticut was made on the site of the present Hartford in 1633, by a party of Dutch from New Netherland.

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  • The emigrants from Watertown founded Wethersfield in the winter of 1634-1635; those from New Town (now Cambridge) settled at Windsor in the summer of 1635; and in the autumn of the same year people from Dorchester settled at Hartford.

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  • Hartford then became the capital of the united colonies, but shared that honour with New Haven from 1701 until 1873.

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  • The period of most serious friction was that during the administration of the New England colonies by Sir Edmund Andros, who in pursuance of the later Stuart policy both in England and in her American colonies visited Hartford on the 31st of October 1687 to execute quo warranto proceedings against the charter of 1662.

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  • 2 For a good version of the traditionsee Wadsworth or the Charter Oak (Hartford, 1904), by W.

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  • The opposition to the growth of American nationality which characterized the later years of that party found expression in a resolution of the general assembly that a bill for incorporating state troops in the Federal army would be " utterly subversive of the rights and liberties of the people of the state, and the freedom, sovereignty and independence of the same," and in the prominent part taken by Connecticut in the Hartford Convention (see Hartford) and in the advocacy of the radical amendments proposed by it.

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  • The township of Marlborough, with a population in 1900 of 322, then had one representative, while the city of Hartford, with a population of 79,850, had only two; and the township of Union, with 428 inhabitants, and the city of New Haven, with 108,027, each had two representatives.

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  • - The " Acorn Club " has recently published a list of books printed in Connecticut between 1709 and 1800 (Hartford, 1904), and Alexander Johnston's Connecticut (Boston, 1887) contains a bibliography of Connecticut's history up to 1886.

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  • Connecticut as a Colony and as a State (Hartford, 1904; 4 vols.) is written from secondary sources, as also is G.

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  • Hartford, 1857).

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  • For the sources, see Colonial Records of Connecticut (15 vols., Hartford, 1850-1890); The Records of the Colony and the Plantation of New Haven (2 vols., Hartford, 1857-1858) and Records of the State of Connecticut (2 vols., Hartford, 1894-1895).

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  • The Collections (Hartford 1860 et seq.) of the Connecticut Historical Society contain valuable material, especially the papers of Governor Joseph Talcott; and the Papers (New Haven, 1865 et seq.) of the New Haven Colony Historical Society are extremely valuable for local history; but a vast number of documents relating to the colonial and state periods, now in the state library at Hartford, have never been published.

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  • Says robert hunter property and casualty hartford insurance renter s is another option.

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  • Another good Hartford story referred to the first time he had snuck backstage at the Grand Ole Opry.

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  • Perhaps this dangerous latitude comes of the fact that we never have any temperance " rot " going on in Hartford.

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  • For long-term care hartford can sell up to in york city.

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  • Hartford 's spectrum basic a boston car heights insurance simple measure boththe zephyr xport then again blue.

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  • The Mark Twain House & Museum is located in Hartford, Connecticut.

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  • In 1963, the house was declared a National Historic Landmark, thanks to the efforts of The Friends of Hartford.

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  • Mark Twain's home survived as a school, an apartment complex and even the Hartford Public Library.

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  • Clint Walker was born Norman Eugene Walker on May 30, 1927, in Hartford, Illinois.

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  • Hartford Memorial Hospital's Sleep Disorder Center offers help for people who have a number of sleep problems, including sleep apena, narcolepsy and periodic limb movement disorder.

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  • Hartford is one of my favorite Sonoma wineries for Pinot Noir or Zinfandel.

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  • One Financial Plaza, Hartford, CT 06103.

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  • Born Brooke Lisa Burke in Hartford, Connecticut of Jewish, Irish, French and Portuguese ancestry, Brooke first got her start as a swimwear model for Venus Swimwear.

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  • Lorelai's troubled relationship with Emily is the catalyst for her leaving her wealthy home in Hartford for the 'sticks' where she can do it all herself.

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  • Fan fiction writers will delve into the years between Lorelai leaving her parents' home in Hartford and settling in Stars Hollow.

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  • Founded in 1810, Hartford Insurance is one of the largest insurance companies in the United States.

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  • Hartford Insurance serves millions of individuals and businesses worldwide through brokers, independent agents, and the Hartford website.

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  • More than 100,000 brokers and 11,000 independent agencies sell Hartford products.

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  • Although Hartford Insurance is based in the United States, the company also has offices in Japan, Brazil, Ireland, and England.

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  • Almost anyone in the world has access to Hartford products and services.

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  • Hartford has a large number of investment and insurance products designed for individuals and families.

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  • In addition to financial products and services, Hartford offers various forms of insurance coverage.

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  • Currently millions of people are insured through Hartford.

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  • To get a quote on Hartford coverage, visit the company online or contact an agent near you.

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  • To learn more, contact the AARP or call Hartford toll free at 1-888-808-5254.

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  • Hartford has numerous products that can help businesses succeed.

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  • Hartford's goal is to become "America's premier wealth creation and wealth preservation company."

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  • The retirement programs offered to businesses are currently some of Hartford's most popular investment products.

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  • No matter the size of your business, Hartford Insurance can provide for your coverage needs.

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  • Superior claim service ensures that Hartford is there when you need them.Because Hartford offers such a huge range of business insurance products, it is hard to mention them all here.

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  • You will be much better served by visiting the Hartford website to look for the coverage you need.

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  • You can also use Hartford's website to find a Hartford agent near you.

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  • Hartford: This company offers professional liability insurance policies to both individual real estate brokers and to brokers who work independently of a firm.

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  • Established in 1810, the Hartford Insurance Company is known for financial strength, stability, excellent customer service and unceasing operational distinction.

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  • The Hartford services millions of satisfied customers around the world through independent agents, brokers, financial institutions and also online.

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  • The Hartford Insurance Company offers the products and services which are necessary for individuals and families to protect and grow their wealth.

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  • Hartford offers disability, life and accident insurance products for associations and affinity groups.

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  • Hartford Insurance designs business insurance answers specifically for midsize businesses.

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  • This Hartford plan offers protection for business owners who become disabled and cannot work.

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  • This plan is also known as The Hartford's Accident Disability Plan and it supplies 24-hour accident coverage no matter where you are.

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  • Along with their insurance plans and products, The Hartford is also a leading provider of investment products including annuities, mutual funds, and college savings plans.

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  • Whether you turn to The Hartford to meet your insurance or investment needs, the secret to their long-lived success is their ability to keep their customers satisfied.

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  • Long-term customer relationships are the result of The Hartford putting their client's needs first.

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  • The American Association for Retired Persons (AARP) offers homeowners' insurance for their members through the Hartford Insurance Company.

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  • The Hartford through AARP: AARP offers discounted car insurance policies to members through The Hartford.

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  • If information presented in the quote is not deemed accurate or complete by the system, instead of receiving a quote estimate you will receive instructions to call a Hartford agent to complete the quote process.

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  • Hartford is home to many beautiful parks and outdoor attractions.

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  • Hartford has many wonderful eateries with atmospheres as different as the cuisine they serve.

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  • His ancestor, Richard Seymour, a Protestant Episcopal ` clergyman, was an early settler at Hartford, Connecticut, and his father, Henry Seymour, who removed from Connecticut to New York, was prominent in the Democratic party in the state, being a member of the "Albany Regency" and serving as state senator in1816-1819and in 1822, and as canal commissioner in 1819-1831.

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