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hardy

hardy

hardy Sentence Examples

  • They possess a hardy breed of ponies, for which the Dolbahanta country is famed.

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  • The Marsi were a hardy mountain people, famed for their simple habits and indomitable courage.

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  • While Parkside was officially beyond the limits of sensible commuting, enough hardy souls made the long daily trek into Philadelphia to label the town an outlying bedroom community.

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  • For decades, teams of three hardy fools had tried to knock each other senseless with high pressure fire hoses, while the spectators tried to escape the cross fire.

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  • During the seven years of his married life Mill published less than in any other period of his career, but four of his most ' Mrs Taylor (Harriet Hardy) was the wife of John Taylor, a wholesale druggist in the city of London.

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  • 'SHALLOT,' Allium ascalonicum, a hardy bulbous perennial, which has not been certainly found wild and is regarded by A.

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  • The northern provinces had fallen into the power of Holland; the southern, peopled in a great measure by the hardy descendants of the successive colonists who had issued on all sides from the central establishment of Sao Paulo, had learned from their habits of unaided and successful enterprise to court independence.

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  • The northern provinces had fallen into the power of Holland; the southern, peopled in a great measure by the hardy descendants of the successive colonists who had issued on all sides from the central establishment of Sao Paulo, had learned from their habits of unaided and successful enterprise to court independence.

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  • Hardy fruit thrives, and live-stock breeding prospers.

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  • Hardy fruit thrives, and live-stock breeding prospers.

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  • Hardy for the Pali Text Society in 1902; and the Petaka Upadesa.

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  • It took me some time to convince Mr. Hardy you were the best painter in the area for his Cannery Row project.

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  • fritillus, a chess-board, so called from the chequered markings on the petals), a genus of hardy bulbous plants of the natural order Liliaceae, containing about 50 species widely distributed in the northern hemisphere.

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  • A comfortable house for a rude and hardy race, that lived mostly out of doors, was once made here almost entirely of such materials as Nature furnished ready to their hands.

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  • the men of Rus, or Variags, as they were sometimes called, were simply the hardy Norsemen or Normans who at that time, in various countries of Europe, appeared first as armed marauders and then lived in the invaded territory as a dominant military caste until they were gradually absorbed by the native population.

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  • The men are hardy, well built and handsome; and the women are noted for their beauty, the ancient Greek type being well preserved.

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  • In the Eclogues and Georgics Virgil is the idealizing poet of the old simple and hardy life of Italy, as the imagination could conceive of it in an altered world.

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  • The men are hardy, well built and handsome; and the women are noted for their beauty, the ancient Greek type being well preserved.

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  • It was named Sao Paulo, and has been at once the source whence knowledge and civilization have been diffused through Brazil, and the nucleus of a colony of its manliest and hardiest citizens, which sent out successive swarms of hardy adventurers to people the interior.

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  • The cattle are commonly small and hardy, and, like the Mexican cattle, are able to bear unfavourable conditions.

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  • Hardy, and still maintained by Professor Merrill) is hard to reconcile with Pliny's own statement that the Christians had promptly obeyed the emperor's decree against collegia (§ 7).

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  • Those of most interest to English ornithologists naturally refer to Britanny, Normandy and Picardy, and are by Baillon, Benoist, Blandin, Bureau, Canivet, Chesnon, Degland, Demarle, De Norguet, Gentil, Hardy, Lemetteil, Lemonnicier, Lesauvage, Maignon, Marcotte, Nourry and Tasle, while perhaps the Ornithologie parisienne of M.

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  • Lucretius touches on the development of man out of a primitive, hardy, beast-like condition.

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  • These pheasant's-eye narcissi, of which there are several well-marked varieties, as radiiflorus, poetarum, recurvus, &c., blossom in succession during April and May, and all do well in the open borders as permanent hardy bulbs.

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  • The tree is hardy in the.

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  • The tree is hardy in the.

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  • When the weather is not favourable at the fruiting stage, the otherwise hardy cotton plant displays its great weakness in this way.

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  • From its rugged silvery bark and dark-green foliage, it is a handsome tree, quite hardy in Cornwall and Devonshire, where it has grown to a large size.

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  • It is not so hardy as A.

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  • The mountainous country, ill-suited for agricultural purposes, was well adapted for these hardy warriors,whose training was Spartan in its simplicity and severity.

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  • Hardy, Christianity and the Roman Government (1894); J.

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  • Hardy, simple and industrious, fond of music, kind-hearted, and with a strangely artistic taste in dress, these people possess in a wonderful degree the secret of cheerful contentment.

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  • The chief adviser of Theodoric, the East Gothic king in Italy, he accepted with ardour that monarch's great scheme, if indeed, he did not himself originally suggest it, of welding Roman and Goth together into one harmonious state which should preserve the social refinement and the intellectual culture of the Latin-speaking races without losing the hardy virtues of their Teutonic conquerors.

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  • Pigs and a hardy breed of ponies find a good living in the forest; and in spite of an act in 1851 providing for their extermination or removal, a few red deer still survive.

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  • The chief adviser of Theodoric, the East Gothic king in Italy, he accepted with ardour that monarch's great scheme, if indeed, he did not himself originally suggest it, of welding Roman and Goth together into one harmonious state which should preserve the social refinement and the intellectual culture of the Latin-speaking races without losing the hardy virtues of their Teutonic conquerors.

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  • Pigs and a hardy breed of ponies find a good living in the forest; and in spite of an act in 1851 providing for their extermination or removal, a few red deer still survive.

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  • The principal varieties of Egyptian cotton are: Mitafifi, the bestknown and most extensively grown, hardy and but little affected by climatic variation.

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  • He was handsome and eloquent, but licentious; and at the same time active, hardy, courageous, a great general and an able politician.

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  • The Hakkas are a hardy and frugal race, belonging mainly to the hill districts.

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  • Parliament was dissolved in July 1865, and the university elected Mr Gathorne Hardy in his place.

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  • Leslie Stephen advised Thomas Hardy, then an aspiring contributor to the Cornhill, to read George Sand, whose country stories seemed to him perfect.

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  • It is a hardy species, reaching a height of from 80 to boo ft.

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  • The men are well known all over Spain and Portugal as hardy, honest and industrious, but for the most part somewhat unskilled, labourers; indeed the word Gallego has come to be almost a synonym in Madrid for a "hewer of wood and drawer of water."

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  • The plants are hardy herbaceous perennials with narrow tufted radical leaves and an elongated stem bearing a handsome spike of white or yellow flowers.

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  • A hardy and enterprising race of men had sprung from this mixture, and supplies being sent by sea from Holland.

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  • The Dynamics of a Particle was written on the occasion of the contest between Gladstone and Mr Gathorne Hardy (afterwards earl of Cranbrook); and The New Belfry in ridicule of the erection put up at Christ Church for the bells that were removed from the Cathedral tower.

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  • Transplanted into this foreign soil, the monarchy became an absolute despotism, unchecked by a proud territorial nobility and a hardy peasantry on familiar terms with their king.

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  • Amongst hardy species of Nymphaea now much grown are candida, nitida, odorata, pygmaea and tuberosa, all with white, more or less sweet-scented flowers; flava, yellow, and sphaerocarpa, rose-carmine.

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  • Hyphear is useful for fattening cattle if they are hardy enough to withstand the purgative effect it produces at first; viscum is medicinally of value as an emollient, and in cases of tumour, ulcers and the like.

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  • of Irish Periodical Literature from the End of the 17th to the Middle of the Igth Century (2 vols., London, 1867); Francis Hardy, Memoirs of the Earl of Charlemont (2 vols., London, 1812); W.

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  • The tree in England is scarcely hardy, though it will grow freely in some sheltered places.

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  • In Britain the evergreen oak is quite hardy in ordinary winters, and is useful to the ornamental planter from its capacity for resisting the sea gales; but it generally remains of small size.

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  • But it is nearly certain that long before Attila and his Huns swept down upon the Venetian plain the little islands of the lagoon already had a population of poor but hardy fisherfolk living in quasi-independence, thanks to their poverty and their inaccessible site.

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  • The Belgian hare is a large breed of a hardy and prolific character, which closely resembles the hare in colour, and is not unlike it in form.

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  • arabia, the three chief products are maize, wine and hardy fruit, especially plums. Here the climate is temperate and fairly moist, but farther E.

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  • Hardy, Memoirs of J.

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  • The camels make excellent mounts, swift and hardy; and the extensive caravan trade is everywhere carried on exclusively by means of these pack-animals.

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  • As garden plants the aconites are very ornamental, hardy perennials.

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  • A large part of the chaparral consists of the chaparro, a low evergreen oak of hardy characteristics, mixed with mimosa, desmauthus, zonia and others.

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  • In colonial times the llanos were covered with immense herds of cattle and horses and were inhabited by a race of hardy, expert horsemen, the llaneros.

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  • The vine is hardy in Britain so far as regards its vegetation, but not hardy enough to bring its fruit to satisfactory maturity, so that for all practical purposes the vine must be regarded as a tender fruit.

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  • arabia, the three chief products are maize, wine and hardy fruit, especially plums. Here the climate is temperate and fairly moist, but farther E.

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  • They are, and hardy.

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  • And thank you for talking me up to Mr. Hardy.

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  • In connexion with the last, he made a cruise in the Channel fleet, on board the "Victory," as a volunteer under the command of Admiral Sir Charles Hardy.

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  • That found in the works of William of Malmesbury (Hardy's ed.

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  • Hardy's Descriptive Catalogue (Rolls Series), i.

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  • Hardy that the "double aspect of Trajan's rescript, which, while it theoretically condemned the Christians, practically gave them a certain security," explains "the different views which have since been taken of it; but by most of the church writers, and perhaps on the whole with justice, it has been regarded as favourable and as rather discouraging persecution than legalizing it" (Pliny's Correspondence with Trajan, 63, 210-217).

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  • Hardy in the Bodleian in 1888.

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  • Hardy (1889); of Selected Letters, E.

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  • Hardy, Christianity and the Roman Government (1894), reprinted in Studies in Roman History (1906), pp. 1-162; with the literature quoted in these works and in Schanz, Rom.

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  • vulgaris is hardy in the south of England.

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  • hardy race of fishers, who were the first of their craft in Europe to pursue the whale, formerly abundant in the Bay of Biscay.

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  • No better representative of the true old hardy Roman type, little softened by either luxury or education, had come to the head of affairs since the days of Marius.

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  • The rough surroundings of the Frankish court were unfavourable to the acquisition of learning, and Charles grew up almost ignorant of letters, but hardy in body and skilled in the use of weapons.

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  • The hardy species will grow well in dry sandy soil, and are suitable for rockeries,old walls or edgings.

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  • after its conversion in 862, 1 where the struggle between the Eastern and Western churches for the new converts opened a way for the more hardy speculations of a system which had never entirely disappeared, and found a home amongst the Paulicians in Armenia.

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  • Sir Charles Hardy.

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  • It is a hardy race, but owing to the poor quality of the grain is rarely met with in Great Britain.

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  • Barley is the most hardy of all cereal grains, its limit of cultivation extending farther north than any other; and, at the same time, it can be profitably cultivated in sub-tropical countries.

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  • While it is true that the building of railways, the opening of mines, the growth of the lumber industry and the settlement of frontier lands by hardy pioneers was rapidly promoted by this policy, it also resulted naturally in the accumulation of great wealth in the hands of a comparatively few men who were controlling lumber, coal, oil and railway transportation in a way that was believed to be a menace to the public welfare.

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  • Hardy in 1875 (Ber., 8, p. 1594), and is a crystalline, very hygroscopic solid.

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  • On the ground that the aim of every prosperous community should be to have a large proportion of hardy country yeomen, and that horticulture and agriculture demand such a high ratio of labour, as compared with feeding and breeding cattle, that the country population would be greatly increased by the substitution of a fruit and vegetable for an animal dietary.

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  • No winter wheat can be grown, and the climate is too harsh for the larger fruits, such as apples, pears, peaches, plums and grapes; but such hardy small fruits as currants, gooseberries, raspberries, blackberries and strawberries may be grown in abundance.

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  • tenuifolium make up, with those already mentioned, a series of the finest hardy flowers of the summer garden.

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  • If the object of a collection is simply to provide a hardy and popular exhibition, it is neither difficult nor very costly to get together and to maintain.

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  • Formerly the word "herdwick" was applied to the pasture ground under the care of a shepherd, and it is now used of a special hardy breed of sheep in Cumberland and Westmorland.

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  • SIR THOMAS MASTERMAN HARDY, Bart.

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  • (1769-1839), British vice-admiral, of the Portisham (Dorsetshire) family of Hardy, was born on the 5th of April 1769, and in 1781 began his career as a sailor.

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  • Hardy was created a baronet in 1806.

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  • and iii.; Nicolas, Despatches of Lord Nelson; Broadley and Bartelot, The Three Dorset Captains at Trafalgar (1906), and Nelson's Hardy, his Life, Letters and Friends (1909).

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  • Xylosteum, a hardy shrub of dwarfish, erect habit, and L.

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  • Another plant of the same family (Leguminosae) Hedysarum coronarium, a very handsome hardy biennial often seen in old-fashioned collections of garden plants, is commonly called the French honeysuckle.

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  • They are a hardy people, and are the least civilized of the four principal native races.

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  • Those of the northern plateau are small, hardy and long-lived, being bred on extensive ranges in a cooler atmosphere, and accustomed to long journeys in search of water and pasture.

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  • John Hardy Steele Anthony Colby..

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  • In the Atlantic States it does not succeed; and, though nearly hardy in Great Britain, it is planted only as an ornament of the lawn or paddock.

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  • Hardy, brave and slow-witted, obedient to discipline, attached to his officers, he makes the finest soldier of the East.

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  • The climate in the higher districts is raw and the produce is mostly confined to hardy cereals, such as oats.

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  • Shorthorns and polled Angus are the commonest breeds of cattle; the sheep are mostly Cheviots and a Cheviot-Leicester cross, but the native sheep are still reared in considerable numbers in Hoy and South Ronaldshay; pigs are also kept on several of the islands, and the horses - as a rule hardy, active and small, though larger than the famous Shetland ponies - are very numerous, but mainly employed in connexion with agricultural work.

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  • The type form is the Caucasian species roseum of botanists, hardy perennial, with finely cut leaves and large flower heads, having a ray of deep rosecoloured ligulate florets surrounding the yellow centre or disk.

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  • They are as a rule of a very hardy character, thriving best in northern latitudes - the trees having round, slender branches, and serrate, deciduous leaves, with barren and fertile catkins on the same tree, and winged fruits, the so-called seeds.

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  • Muskdeer are hardy, solitary and retiring animals, chiefly nocturnal in habits, and almost always found alone, rarely in pairs and never in herds.

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  • Hardy's Rotuli litterarum clausarum (Rec. Commission, 1835) and Rotuli litterarum patentium (Rec. Commission, 1835) and L.

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  • Hardy's Descriptive Catalogue (" Rolls" series, 1865), ii.

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  • above the sea, the limit of the luxuriant growth of that hardy conifer in Britain; and in moist valleys or on imperfectly drained acclivities Norway spruce is more suitable.

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  • The worms are more hardy than is commonly supposed, and endure variations of temperature from 62° to 78° F.

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  • In the same way the rearing of worms for graine in the open air, and under as far as possible natural conditions, has proved equally valuable towards the development of a hardy, vigorous and untainted stock.

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  • The first Anglo-Norman historiographer is Geoffrey Gaimar, who wrote his Estorie des Angles (between 1147 and 1151) for Dame Constance, wife of Robert Fitz-Gislebert (The Anglo-Norman Metrical Chronicle, Hardy and Martin, i.

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  • (Duffus Hardy, Descr.

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  • They are also more hardy and industrious than those living nearer the equator.

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  • Liliaceae), a hardy bulbous biennial, which has been cultivated in Britain from time immemorial, and is one of the earliest of cultivated species; it is represented on Egyptian monuments, and one variety cultivated in Egypt was accorded divine honours.

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  • The Welsh Onion or Ciboule, Allium fistulosum, is a hardy perennial, native of Siberia.

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  • Cneorum (Europe) is a hardy evergreen trailing shrub, with bright pink sweet-scented flowers.

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  • pontica (Eastern Europe) is a hardy spreading evergreen with greenish-yellow fragrant flowers.

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  • In physique, the Asturians are like the Galicians, a people of hardy mountaineers and fishermen, finely built, but rarely handsome, and with none of the grace of the Castilian or Andalusian.

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  • Hardy, who found that certain colloids did possess electric charges, the sign of which depended on whether the surrounding liquid was slightly acid or slightly alkaline.

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  • This and a noted breed of hardy ponies form the chief articles of export.

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  • That known as the Norfolk breed is the smaller of the two, and is said to be the less hardy.

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  • Hardy) of 3,600 tons.

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  • Henry Hardy), escorted by the Harwich destroyers "Tempest" and "Tetrarch," arrived off the coast.

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  • Hardy in the "Sappho," an old cruiser of the same class as the "Sirius."

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  • 169, 228; Edmund Hardy in Zeitschrift der deutschen morgenlandischen Gesellschaft (1898), pp. 97 foll.; Netti (ed.

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  • Hardy, London, Pali Text Society, 1902), especially the Introduction, passim; Theri Gatha Commentary, Peta Vatthu Commentary, and Vimana Vatthu Commentary, all three published by the Pali Text Society.

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  • The most successful mode of forming roots is to place the cuttings in a mild bottom-heat, which expedites their growth, even in the case of many hardy plants whose cuttings strike roots in the open soil.

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  • When the fruit and vegetable gardens are combined, the smaller and choicer fruit trees only should be admitted, such larger-growing hardy fruits as apples, pears, plums, cherries, &c., being relegated to the orchard.

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  • As walls afford valuable space for the growth of the choicer kinds of hardy fruits, the direction in which they are built is of considerable importance.

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  • It is perhaps of most importance as the principal means of propagating our hardy kinds of fruit, especially the apple and the pear; but the process is the same with most other fruits and ornamental hardy trees and shrubs that are thus propagated.

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  • The best season for grafting apples and similar hardy subjects in the open air is in March and April; but it may be commenced as soon as the sap in the stock is fairly in motion.

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  • In this way hardy rhododendrons of choice sorts, greenhouse azaleas, the varieties of the orange family, camellias, roses, rare conifers, clematises and numerous other plants are increased.

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  • Gooseberries, currants, roses and many hardy 'deciduous trees and shrubs are easily propagated in this way if the cuttings are inserted in welldrained soil about the end of October or early in November.

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  • Hardy plants, such as pinks, pansies, &c., are propagated by cuttings planted a during early summer in light rich soil.

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  • Various hardy ornamental trees are also increased in this way, as the quince, elm, robinia and mulberry, and the rose amongst shrubs.

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  • Hardy's excellent work, Traite" de la taille des arbres fruitiers, will give a good idea how these dwarf trees are to be manipulated, a showing the first year's development from the maiden tree after being headed back, and b the form assumed a year or two later.

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  • Hardy's work, a shows a young, FIG.

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  • The number of variegated and various-coloured hardy shrubs is now so great that a most pleasant plot for a " Winter Garden " may be arrayed with plants.

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  • of this class, with which may be associated hardy subjects which flower during that season or very early spring, as the Christmas rose, and amongst bulbs the crocus and snowdrop. Later the spring garden department is a scene of great attraction; and some of the gardens of this character, as those of Cliveden and Belvoir, are among the most fascinating examples of horticultural art.

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  • Hardy Annuals.

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  • Annuals may be divided into three classes: the hardy, which are sown at once in the ground they are to occupy; the half-hardy, which succeed best when aided at first by a slight hot bed, and then transplanted into the open air; and the tender, which are kept in pots, and treated as greenhouse or stove plants, to which departments they properly belong.

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  • Some of the more popular annuals, hardy and half-hardy, have been very much varied as regards habit and the colour of the flowers, and purchases may be made in the seed shops of such things as China asters, stocks, Chinese and Indian pinks, larkspurs, phloxes and others, amongst which some of the most beautiful of the summer flowers may be found.

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  • The hardy annuals may be sown in the open ground during the latter part of March or beginning of April, as the season may determine, for the weather should be dry and open, and the soil in a free-working condition before sowing is attempted.

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  • Agrostis pulchella : hardy, 6 in.; a most graceful grass for bouquets.

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  • Amberboa moschata atropurpurea (Sweet Sultan): hardy, Li ft., purple; musk-scented.

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  • Antirrhinum majus (Snapdragon): hardy, 6 in.

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  • Arnebia cornuta: hardy, z2 to 2 ft.

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  • Bartonia aurea: hardy, 2 ft., golden yellow; showy and free.

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  • Calliopsis or Coreopsis bicolor (tinctoria) : hardy, 2 to 3 ft., yellow and chestnut-brown.

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  • Calliopsis or Coreopsis Drummondii: hardy, I to 2 ft., golden yellow with red disk.

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  • Campanula Loreyi: hardy, i z ft., purplish-lilac or white.

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  • Campanula macrostyla: hardy, I to 2 ft., purple, beautifully veined.

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  • Centaurea Cyanus: hardy, 3 ft., blue, purple, pink or white; showy.

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  • Centranthus macrosiphon: hardy, t; to 2 ft., rosy-carmine.

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  • Centranthus ruber (known as Pretty Betsy and Red Valerian): hardy, 2 to 3 ft., red.

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  • Clarkia pulchella: hardy, IZ ft., rosy-purple; some varieties very handsome.

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  • Collinsia bicolor: hardy, r i ft., white and purple; pretty.

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  • Collinsia verna: hardy, I ft., white and azure; sow as soon as ripe.

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  • Convolvulus tricolor atroviolacea: hardy, i ft., white, blue and yellow.

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  • Delphinium Ajacis and Delphinium Consolida (Larkspurs): hardy, 3 ft., various colours.

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  • Erysimum Peroffskianum: hardy, 2 ft., deep orange; in erect racemes.

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  • Eschscholtzia californica: hardy, II ft., yellow with saffron eye.

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  • Eschscholtzia crocea flore-pleno: hardy, t 2 ft., orange yellow; double.

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  • Eutoca viscida: hardy, 2 ft., bright blue, with white hairy centre.

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  • Gilia achilleaefolia: hardy, 2 ft., deep blue; in large globose heads.

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  • Godetia Lindleyana: hardy, 2 to 3 ft., rose-purple, with crimson spots.

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  • Godetia Whitneyi: hardy, i ft., rosy-red, with crimson spots.

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  • Gypsophila elegans: hardy, t z ft., pale rose; branched very gracefully.

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  • Helianthus cucumerifolius: hardy, 3 to 4 ft., golden yellow, black disk; branching, free and bold without coarseness.

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  • Hibiscus Trionum (africanus) : hardy, t z ft., cream colour, dark purple centre.

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  • Iberis umbellata (Candytuft): hardy, t ft., white, rose, purple, crimson.

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  • Kaulfussia amelloides: hardy, t ft., blue or rose; the var.

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  • Kochia scoparia (Belvedere or lawn cypress): hardy, graceful green foliage, turning purple in autumn.

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  • Koniga maritima (Sweet Alyssum): hardy, I ft., white; fragrant, compact.

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  • Lathyrus odoratus (Sweet Pea): hardy; there are two races, dwarf and tall, the latter - far and away the most beautiful - requires support; various colours; numerous immensely popular forms. Lavatera trimestris: hardy, 3 ft., pale-rose, showy malvaceous flowers.

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  • Leptosiphon densiflorus: hardy in light soil, i ft., purplish or rosy-lilac.

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  • Leptosiphon roseus: hardy in light soil, 6 in., delicate rose; fine in masses.

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  • Linaria bipartita splendida: hardy, I ft., deep purple.

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  • Linum grandiflorum: hardy, I ft., splendid crimson; var.

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  • Lupinus luteus: hardy, 2 ft., bright yellow, fragrant.

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  • Lupinus mutabilis Cruickshanksii: hardy, 4 ft., blue and yellow; changeable.

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  • Lupinus nanus: hardy, I ft., bluish-purple; abundant flowering.

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  • Lychnis Coeli-rosa: hardy, t2 ft., rosy-purple, with pale centre; pretty.

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  • Lychnis oculata cardinalis: hardy, z 2 ft., rosy-crimson; very brilliant.

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  • Malcolmia maritima (Virginian Stock): hardy, 6 in., lilac, rose or white.

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  • Malope trifida: hardy, 3 ft., rich glossy purplish-crimson; showy.

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  • Stock): hardy, I ft., various as in Stock.

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  • Nemesia floribunda: hardy, I ft., white and yellow; pretty and compact.

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  • Nemophila insignis: hardy, 6 in., azure blue, with white centre.

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  • Nemophila maculata: hardy, 6 in., white, with violet spots at the edge.

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  • Nigella hispanica: hardy, 12 ft., pale blue, white or dark purple.

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  • Oenothera odorata: hardy, 2 to 3 ft., yellow; fragrant.

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  • Omphalodes linifolia (Venus's Navelwort): hardy, I ft., white.

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  • Papaver Rhoeas flore-pleno: hardy, 2 ft., scarlet and other colours; showy.

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  • Papaver somniferum flore-pleno: hardy, 3 ft., white, lilac, rose, &c.; petals sometimes fringed.

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  • Pharbitis hispida: hardy, 6 ft., various; the many-coloured twining Convolvulus major.

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  • Platystemon californicus: hardy, i ft., sulphur yellow; neat and distinct.

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  • Reseda odorata (Mignonette): hardy, I ft., greenish, but exquisitely fragrant; there are some choice new sorts.

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  • Saponaria calabrica: hardy, 6 to 8 in., bright rose pink or white; continuous blooming, compact-growing.

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  • Scabiosa atropurpurea: hardy, I to 2 ft., rose, white, lilac, crimson, &c.

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  • Schizanthus pinnatus: hardy, I to 2 ft., purple-lilac, prettily blotched; curiously lobed flowers.

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  • Schizopetalon Walkeri: hardy, i ft., white, sweet-scented at night; curiously fringed petals.

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  • Silene pendula: hardy, i ft., bright rose pink; very showy in masses; var.

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  • Silene Pseudo-Atocion: hardy, i ft., rose pink; free-flowering.

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  • Specularia Speculum: hardy, 6 in., reddish-violet; free-flowering.

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  • Tropaeolum majus (the nasturtium of gardens): hardy.

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  • Xeranthemum annuum flore-pleno: hardy, 2 ft., lilac-purple; floriferous.

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  • Hardy Biennials.

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  • They require to be sown in the summer months, about June or July, in order to get established before winter; they should be pricked out as soon as large enough, and should have ample space so as to become hardy and stocky.

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  • Those that are perfectly hardy are best planted where they are to flower in good time during autumn.

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  • The number of biennials is not large, but a few very desirable garden plants, such as the following, occur amongst them: Agrostemma coronaria (Rose Campion): hardy, I ft., bright rose-purple or rose and white.

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  • Beta Cicla variegata: hardy, 2 ft., beautifully coloured leaves and midribs, crimson, golden, &c.

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  • Campanula Medium calycanthema: hardy, 2 ft., blue or white; hose-in-hose flowered.

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  • Catananche coerulea: hardy, 2 to 3 ft., blue or white.

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  • Celsia cretica: hardy, 4 to 5 ft., yellow, with two dark spots near centre; in spikes.

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  • Cheiranthus Cheiri (Wallflower): hardy, 11 to 2 ft., red, purple, yellow, &c.; really a perennial but better as a biennial.

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  • Coreopsis grandiflora: hardy, 2 to 3 ft., bright yellow; the finest member of the genus.

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  • Dianthus barbatus (Sweet William): hardy, I to I i ft., crimson, purple, white or parti-coloured.

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  • Digitalis purpurea (Foxglove): hardy, 3 to 5 ft., rosy-purple or' white; beautifully spotted; the variety called gloxinioides has regular, erect flowers.

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  • Echium pomponium: hardy, 4 ft., rosy-pink.

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  • Hedysarum coronarium (French Honeysuckle): hardy, 2 to 3 ft., scarlet or white; fragrant.

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  • Hesperis tristis (Night-scented Rocket): hardy, 3 ft., dull purplish; fragrant at night.

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  • Lunaria biennis (Honesty): hardy, 2 to 3 ft., purple; the silvery dissepiment attractive among everlastings.

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  • Matthiola incana (two groups, the Brompton and the Queen stocks): hardy, 2 to 21 ft., white, red and purple.

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  • Lamarckiana (Evening primrose): hardy, 5 ft., bright yellow; large.

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  • Scabiosa caucasica: hardy, 3 ft., blue, white.

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  • Verbascum Blattaria: hardy, 3 to 4 ft., yellowish, with purple hairs on the filaments; in tall spikes.

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  • Hardy Herbaceous Perennials.

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  • - ThiS term includes not only those fibrous-rooted plants of herbaceous habit which spring up from the root year after year, but also those old-fashioned subjects known as florists' flowers, and the hardy bulbs.

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  • Some of the most beautiful of hardy flowering plants belong to this class.

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  • Most of the hardy bulbs will do well enough in the border, care being taken not to disturb them while leafless and dormant.

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  • Only a section of some of the best of the decorative hardy perennials can be noted, before we pass on to those popular subjects of this class which have been directly influenced by the hybridizer and improver.

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  • Hardy bulbs of the garlic family, some species of which are ornamental; the inflorescence is umbellate.

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  • Charming dwarf hardy bulbous plants of the liliaceous order, blooming in the early spring in company with Scilla sibirica, and of equally easy cultivation.

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  • Pretty early-blooming bulbs, quite hardy.

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  • P. capensis from South Africa is hardy south of the Thames and in favoured localities.

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  • pratensis, 2 ft., blue, a showy native species, is quite hardy; the variety lupinoides has the centre of the lower lip white.

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  • The Speedwell family, containing many ornamental members; all the hardy species are of the easiest cultivation in ordinary garden soil.

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  • Hardy Trees And Shrubs.

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  • Hardy Deciduous Trees.

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  • Hardy Evergreen Trees.

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  • Hardy Deciduous Shrubs.

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  • Hardy Evergreen Shrubs.

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  • Of late years, however, more attention has been bestowed on arrangements of brilliant flowering plants with those of fine foliage, and the massing also of hardy early-blooming plants in parterre fashion has been very greatly extended.

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  • - For this description of bedding, hardy plants only must be used; but even then the choice is tolerably extensive.

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  • Hardy British ferns belonging to such genera as Asplenium, Nephrodium, Aspidium, Scolopendrium, have become fairly popular of late years, and many charming varieties are now used in borders and rockeries.

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  • towards the end; Early Seville and Early Longpod beans; and short-topped radish in two or three sowings, at a week's interval, all on a warm border; also Hardy Green and Brown cos lettuce in a frame or on south border.

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  • A supply of roses, kalmias, rhododendrons, &c., and of hardy flowers and bulbs, as lily of the valley, hyacinths, tulips, daffodils, &c., should be kept up by forcing.

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  • Sow mignonette, stocks, &c., in pots; sow sweet peas and a few hardy annuals on a warm border.

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  • In dry open weather plant dried roots, including most of the finer florists' flowers; continue the transplanting of hardy biennial flowers and herbaceous plants.

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  • Sow in the last week mignonette, and hardy annuals, in a warm border, for subsequent transplanting.

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  • In the last week, sow hardy annuals in the borders, with biennials that flower the first season, as also perennials.

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  • Turn out hardy plants about the middle, and the more tender at the latter end of the month.

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  • Sow tender annuals for succession, potting and shifting those sown at an earlier period; sow cinerarias for succession; and a few hardy annuals and tenweek stock, &c., for late crops.

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  • Plant out, during the last week, dahlias, hardy pelargoniums, stocks and calceolarias, protecting the dahlias from slight frosts.

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  • In the first fortnight of the month, plant hardy cucumbers for pickling, in a warm border, placing handglasses over them towards the end of the month.

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  • These will now be occupied with tender greenhouse plants and annuals, and the more hardy plants from the stove.

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  • - Sow winter and spring spinach in the beginning and about the end of the month; parsley and winter onions, for a full crop, in the first week; cabbages about the middle of the month, for planting out in spring; cauliflower in the first half (Scotland) and in the second half (England) of the month; Hardy Hammersmith and Brown Cos lettuce in the first and last week; small salads occasionally; and Black Spanish radish, for winter crops.

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  • Sow in the second and the last week, on a warm border of a light sandy soil, with an east aspect, any free-flowering hardy annuals as Silene pendula, Nemophila, &c., for planting in spring; and auricula and primula seeds in pots and boxes.

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  • Fill the pits with pots of stocks, mignonette and hardy annuals for planting out in spring, along with many of the hardy sorts of greenhouse plants; the whole ought to be thoroughly ventilated, except in frosty weather.

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  • Sow a few pots of hardy annuals in a frame, or on a sheltered border, for successional spring use if required.

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  • Transplant all sorts of hardy evergreens and shrubs, especially in dry soils, giving abundance of water.

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  • All herbaceous plants and hardy shrubs may be planted in the garden.

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  • Sow seeds of sweet alyssum, candytuft, daisies, mignonette, pansies, &c. Visit the roadsides and woods for interesting plants to put in the hardy borders.

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  • In consequence of the success of these early enterprises his following largely increased, several of the more patriotic nobles - including the steward of Scotland, Sir Andrew Moray, Sir John de Graham, Douglas the Hardy, Wishart, bishop of Glasgow, and others - having joined him.

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  • It is perhaps the largest collection of hardy trees and shrubs known, comprising some 4500 species and botanical varieties.

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  • Neuer Botanischer Garten has been laid out with a view to the accommodation of a very large collection of hardy trees and shrubs.

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  • There are now many large collections of hardy trees and shrubs in private parks and gardens throughout the British Islands, the interest taken in them by their proprietors having largely increased in recent years.

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  • Hardy, Memoirs of Lord Charlemont (London, 1812); Warden Flood, Memoirs of Henry Flood (London, 1838); Francis Plowden, Historical Review of the State of Ireland (London, 1803); Alfred Webb, Compendium of Irish Biography (Dublin, 1878); Sir Jonah Barrington, Rise and Fall of the Irish Nation (London, 18 33); W.

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  • Swarms of hardy and desperate men now joined the rebels, and when the praetor Publius Varinius took the field against them he found them entrenched like a regular army on the plain.

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  • The Bohea variety is hardy, and capable of thriving under many different conditions of climate and situation, while the indigenous plant is tender and difficult of cultivation, requiring for its success a close, hot, moist and equable climate.

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  • It is very hardy and prolific, but somewhat coarse in the bone.

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  • inbred, and is not so hardy and prolific as most breeds.

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  • It is hardy, active and prolific, and nearly related to the wild boar.

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  • The docile, yet robust and hardy peasants, under their foreign leaders, gained an unbroken series of successes in the first Syrian.

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  • Hans also received in fief the territory of Dietmarsch from the emperor, but, in attempting to subdue the hardy Dietmarschers, suffered a crushing defeat in which the national banner called " Danebrog " fell into the enemy's hands (1500).

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  • He was brought up with extreme rigour, his father devising a scheme of education which was intended to make him a hardy soldier, and prescribing for him every detail of his conduct.

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  • Manuals, Monographs, &c. - Buddhism, by Rhys Davids, 12mo, 10th thousand, 1903; Buddha, sein Leben, seine Lehre and seine Gemeinde, by Oldenberg, 5th edition, 1906; Der Buddhismus and seine Geschichte in Indien, by Kern, 1882; Der Buddhismus, by Edmund Hardy, 1890; American Lectures, Buddhism, by Rhys Davids, 1896; Inscriptions de Piyadasi, by Senart, 2 vols., 1881-1886; Mara and Buddha, by Windisch, 1895; Buddhist India, by Rhys Davids, 1903.

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  • These last are more hardy than ordinary cattle; their charactot is maintained by crossing the cows with wild bulls, and their milk yields the best ghi or clarified butter.

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  • But the fertility of the soil, the warm and genial climate, the mingling of races and the absence of opposition, combined to render the Messenians no match for their hardy and warlike neighbours of Sparta.

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  • NASTURTIUM, or Indian Cress, Tropaeolum majus, a perennial climber, native of Peru, but in cultivation treated as a hardy annual.

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  • Above the firs come the tamarack, constituting the bulk of the lower Alpine forest; the hardy long-lived mountain pine; the red cedar or juniper, growing even on the baldest rocks; the beautiful hemlock spruce; the still higher white pine, nut pine, needle pine; and finally, at io,000 to 12,000 ft., the dwarf pine, which grows in a tangle on the earth over which one walks, and may not show for a century's growth more than a foot of height or an inch of girth.

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  • It is a hardy deciduous shrub, native of North America, which bears a profusion of rich yellow flowers in autumn and winter when the plant is leafless.

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  • They are a rough and hardy people, and are.

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  • Good mules can be obtained in several districts, and small hardy oxen are largely bred for ploughing and transport.

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  • The inhabitants are mostly of Swedish descent, and are hardy seamen and fishermen.

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  • The plants are rapidly-growing, hardy, ornamental climbers, which flourish in common garden soil, and are readily propagated by cuttings.

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  • Philosophy had attempted to free itself from the trammels of theological orthodoxy in the hardy speculations of some schoolmen, notably of Scotus Erigena and Abelard.

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  • On the other hand, the replanting of some of the French vineyards (after the ravages due to the phylloxera) with American vines, or, as was more generally the case, the grafting of the old French stock on the hardy American roots, resulted, after a time, in many cases, in the production of wines practically indistinguishable from those formerly made.

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  • Originally nomads (hunters and fishers), all the Finnic people except the Lapps and Ostyaks have long yielded to the influence of civilization, and now everywhere lead settled lives as herdsmen, agriculturists, traders, &c. Physically the Finns (here to be distinguished from the Swedish-speaking population, who retain their Scandinavian qualities) are a strong, hardy race, of low stature, with almost round head, low forehead, flat features, prominent cheek bones, eyes mostly grey and oblique (inclining inwards), short and flat nose, protruding mouth, thick lips, neck very full and strong, so that the occiput seems flat and almost in a straight line with the nape; beard weak and sparse, hair no doubt originally black, but, owing to mixture with other races, now brown, red and even fair; complexion also somewhat brown.

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  • We have a proof of this in the fact that so few, comparatively, of our perfectly hardy garden plants ever run wild; and even the most persevering attempts to naturalize them usually fail.

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  • Alphonse de Candolle (Geographic botanique, p. 798) informs us that several botanists of Paris, Geneva, and especially of Montpellier, have sown the seeds of many hundreds of species of exotic hardy plants, in what appeared to be the most favourable situations, but that in hardly a single case has any one of them become naturalized.

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  • Even a plant like the potato, so largely cultivated and so perfectly hardy, has not established itself in a wild state in any part of Europe.

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  • The same species can thus endure a great difference of temperature; but the important fact is, that the individuals have become acclimatized to the altitude at which they grow, so that seeds gathered near the upper limit of the range of a species will be more hardy than those gathered near the lower limit.

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  • Merino sheep bred at the Cape of Good Hope have been found far better adapted for India than those imported from England; and while the Chinese variety of the Ailanthus silk-moth is quite hardy, the variety found in Bengal will only flourish in warm latitudes.

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  • It is almost a certainty that a number of trees would be found to be quite hardy.

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  • Mock-privet is Phillyrea, a member of the same order and a small genus of ornamental hardy evergreen shrubs, natives of the Mediterranean region and Asia Minor.

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  • Both cattle and horses are of a small and hardy breed.

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  • Merchant-ships were allowed to sail direct to Chile, trade with France was sometimes permitted, and a large batch of hardy emigrants was sent out from the Biscay provinces of Spain.

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  • In plantations its bright foliage, with the orange cones and young shoots, render it an ornamental tree, hardy in southern Britain.

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  • This fine pine has been planted in the south-west of England, but is scarcely hardy.

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  • The Bhotan pine is quite hardy in southern England, and has been largely planted of late as an ornamental tree.

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  • The soil is thin and porous and does not retain moisture, consequently the long, dry season turns the country into a barren desert, relieved only by vegetation along the river courses and mountain ranges, and by the hardy, widelydistributed carnahuba palm (Copernicia cerifera),which in places forms groves of considerable extent.

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  • In the mountainous districts of Kandahar and Kabul the hardy tribes of Afghans had for centuries led a wild and almost independent life.

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  • Internally, however, it was rapidly declining, the once chaste and hardy Vandals being demoralized by the fervid climate of Africa and the sinful delights of their new capital, and falling ever lower into sloth, effeminacy and vice.

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  • Hardy (Mainz, 1878); and an interesting English biography by Miss K.

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  • - Wild Potato-plant in hardy but produces abundance bloom.

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  • A number of species of bamboo are hardy under cultivation in the British Isles.

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  • nitida, " by far the daintiest and most attractive of all its genus, and remarkably hardy"; Bambusa palmata, with leaves a foot or more long and three inches broad; B.

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  • Large bodies of emigrants, chiefly recruited from the sober, hardy and industrious peasantry of the northern provinces, annually leave Portugal to seek fortune in America.

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  • In fresh-water culture the eggs thus fertilized may be at once distributed to the waters to be stocked, or they may be kept in special receptacles provided with a suitable stream of water until the fry are hatched, and then distributed, or again they may be reared in the hatchery for several months until the fry are active and hardy.

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  • In Britain the plant is a hardy evergreen, and can only be looked upon as a large shrub or low tree.

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  • Here he imbibed in his earlier years a good measure of the hardy simplicity and strong seriousness which the later Romans attributed to the men of the early republic - characteristics which were supposed to linger in the Sabine land after they had fled from the rest of Italy.

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  • Hardy has shown that such a destruction of part of the filament may be effected by the attacks of another organism.

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  • The better types are hardy, orderly and agriculturally industrious.

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  • Hardy edited the Gesta regum and Historia novella for the English Historical Society in 1840, and put the criticism of the manuscripts on a sound basis.

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  • Josiah Hardy .

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  • The state of Chitral (see also Hindu Kusx) is somewhat larger than Wales, and supports a population of about 35, 000 rough, hardy hillmen.

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  • Ritson pointed out in 1784 that the so-called ancient ballads were some of them of modern date, and Pinkerton confessed that he was the author of the second part of Hardy Kanute and partauthor of some others.

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  • Contrary, however, to the once universal belief, the experiments of the department of agriculture of the United States have definitely proved that hardy vegetables in great variety can readily be produced in the coastal region and at various stations in the Yukon valley; and presumably, therefore, all over the interior S.

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  • Large areas are covered by the kussa, a hardy member of the rose family, which grows from 8 to 10 ft.

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  • Leopards, both spotted and black, are numerous and often of great size; hyaenas are found everywhere and are hardy and fierce; the lynx, wolf, wild dog and jackal are also common.

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  • On Clericis laicos: Gee and Hardy, Documents Illustrative of English Church History (London, 1896), 87 ff.

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  • Both alike are hardy, though rarely tall; both, when of the peasant class, frugal and inured to toil amid the rigours of their native climate.

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  • These plains include the extensive llanos of the Orinoco tributaries where coarse, hardy grasses and occasional clumps of palms are almost the only vegetation to be seen.

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  • Farther up, on the cold, bleak paramos, only stunted and hardy trees are to be found.

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  • Hardy.

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  • p. 99, with Hardy, M.B.

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  • Morris and Hardy (Pali Text Society, 1888-1900), vol.

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  • (2) Sinhalese; episodes collected and translated by Spence Hardy from Sinhalese texts of the 12th and later centuries, in Manual of Buddhism (London, 1897, 2nd edition), pp. 138-359.

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  • Of fine physique and hardy constitution, they are of strongly independent character; patriarchal in their family life; shrewd, slim and courageous; in religion Protestants of a somewhat austere type.

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  • The mutton of the Cotswolds is not of high quality except at an early age, but the sheep are useful for crossing purposes to impart size, and because they are exceptionally hardy.

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  • They are hardy and prolific, but do not quite equal the Cotswolds in size.

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  • They are hardy, whitefaced sheep, with a close-coated longwool fleece.

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  • The Cheviot is a hardy sheep with straight wool, of moderate length and very close-set, whilst wiry white hair covers the face and legs.

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  • The Welsh Mountain is a small, active, soft-woolled, whitefaced breed of hardy character.

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  • The Dartmoor, a hardy local Devonshire breed, is a large hornless, longwool, white-fleeced sheep, with a long mottled face.

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  • They are very hardy, and yield mutton of choice flavour.

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  • This is a hardy breed, in size somewhat exceeding the Southdown.

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  • The hardy and ubiquitous sunflower has been chosen as the Kansas state flower or floral emblem.

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  • The attractions of the Spanish Main converted the seafaring folk of south-west England into hardy Protestants, who could on conscientious as well as other grounds contest a papal allocation the of new worlds to Spain and Portugal.

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  • The ridicule that greeted the revelation of the Pop-gun Plot marked the beginning of a reaction that found a more serious expression in the trials of Thomas Hardy, John Home Tooke and John Theiwall (October and November 1794).

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  • The same circumstances which had emboldened the Boers to declare war in the autumn of 1899, induced them to renew a guerilla warfare in the autumn of 1900the approach of an African summer supplying the Boers with the grass on which they were dependent for feeding their hardy horses.

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  • In the production of the hardy cereals, barley, rye and buckwheat, Wisconsin ranks high among the states of the Union; but oats and Indian corn are the largest cereal crops in the state.

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  • Hardy, Descriptive Catalogue (1862), I.

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  • With the fall of Antwerp, for Malines and Brussels were already in the hands of Farnese, the whole of the southern Netherlands was brought once more to recognize the authority of Philip. But Holland and Zeeland, whose geographical position made them unassailable except by water, were by the courage and skill of their hardy seafaring population, with the help of English auxiliaries sent by Queen Elizabeth, able to defy his further advance.

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  • Hardy, a railway official, who planned a town at the intersection of the New Orleans & NorthEastern (which built a round house and repair shops here in 1885) and the Gulf & Ship Island railways.

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  • Hardy, Bishop Stubbs and Professor Liebermann; but the results of the discussion are negative.

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  • Baxter, who is known as a writer on art by the pseudonym of Leader Scott; and a notice by Thomas Hardy in the Athenaeum (16th of October 1886).

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  • Hardy, "may be briefly stated as follows: The notion of time, which seems at first sight to enter into (5) and (6), should be eliminated.

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  • fare, and exposed to the rigour of the seasons, he was probably the little hardy thing we yet see him; but in the marshes of the Nen and the Witham, and on the borders of the Tees and the Clyde, there would be as much proportionate development of frame and strength as we find at the present day."

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  • Cereals and hardy fruits grow on the higher ground, whilst rice is cultivated in the hot, well-watered valley of the Araxes.

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  • The rugged mountains have always been the home of hardy mountaineers impatient of control, and the sanctuary to which the lowlanders fled for safety in times of invasion.

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  • Hardy, Descriptive Catalogue (1862), vol.

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  • It is a handsome greenhouse plant, which is hardy in the south of England and Ireland if protected from severe frosts.

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  • Why the Thyrostraca, so hardy, so widely dispersed and multitudinous, and with a history so prolonged, should not have made more extended and more independent incursions into fresh water remains a problem.

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  • CHIVE (Allium Schoenoprasum), a hardy perennial plant, with small narrow bulbs tufted on short root-stocks and long cylindrical hollow leaves.

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  • During the War of Independence the hardy mountaineers under John Sevier and Evan Shelby did valiant service against both the royal troops and the Loyalists in South Carolina, chiefly as partisan rangers under Charles McDowell (1743-1815).

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  • They are, and hardy.

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  • For decades, teams of three hardy fools had tried to knock each other senseless with high pressure fire hoses, while the spectators tried to escape the cross fire.

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  • The roads, if you could charitably call them such, had been cut a hundred years past by men who knew only their boots or a burro for transportation and had never seen a motorized vehicle, even one as hardy as a Jeep.

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  • It was strewn with loose gravel and stone, with occasional clumps of hardy vegetation mixed with larger boulders.

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  • It took me some time to convince Mr. Hardy you were the best painter in the area for his Cannery Row project.

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  • And thank you for talking me up to Mr. Hardy.

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  • While Parkside was officially beyond the limits of sensible commuting, enough hardy souls made the long daily trek into Philadelphia to label the town an outlying bedroom community.

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  • acclimatepecies are very hardy with almost all individuals easily acclimating to home tanks.

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  • I. decora f. alba Flowers white, slightly more hardy.

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  • Hardy amies followed this tradition, embroidering Californian poppies on a dress created for The Queen's visit to America in 1983.

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  • Fishless Cycle: Instead of using a few hardy fish to start off the cycle, there is an option to use liquid ammonia.

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  • For the novice aquarist the hardy species are best.

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  • These hardy garden auriculas are perfect for the front of a mixed, herbaceous or cottage-garden border.

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  • Situated near the Peak District they stock a wide range of hardy bamboos.

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  • hardy biennials can be sown this month, into a nursery bed or pots stored in a greenhouse or cold frame.

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  • Spreading growth, hardy, and sometimes biennial bearing.

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  • They are, however, quite hardy and have large well scented blooms.

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  • blueberryng on variety, highbush blueberries are hardy from Zones 4 through 11.

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  • Ailments The Norwich Terrier is a healthy and quite hardy breed of dog.

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  • December 25 th 1869 Died on the 20th inst Thomas Hardy for many years bricklayer on the Melford Hall estate.

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  • In the meantime a young lieutenant Thomas Hardy had succesfully cut out a French brig from the harbor at Santa Cruz, Tenerife.

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  • Then get me the ship's carpenter without delay, Hardy.

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  • stinking chamomile is frost hardy at the rosette stage and can grow as a winter annual in Britain.

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  • chirrup of some hardy bird, braving the midday sun.

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  • Chris Furness Introducing your new parish councilors: My name is Brian Hardy recently co-opted on to the Parish Council.

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  • coreopsis grandiflora ' Astolot '2 (Tickseed) HARDY PERENNIAL.

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  • Lamb's lettuce Also called corn salad, very hardy winter salad with a soft texture and mild flavor.

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  • A stroll around many of the UK gardens open to the public will reveal in the autumn, drifts of hardy cyclamen.

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  • A tall hardy perennial, fennel has delicate, bright green foliage and yellow flowers.

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  • Gray leaved plants like Santolina, lavender and Artemesia contrast beautifully with bright blue delphiniums and purple and white hardy geraniums.

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  • Can you see any escapism in Hardy's In the Time of 'The Breaking Nations '?

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  • Salad Burnet Sanguisorba minor is a hardy evergreen perennial which forms a low mound to about 18 " in well drained soil.

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  • tender exotics are not frost hardy and need to be over-wintered in order for the plant to survive.

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  • The range was immense - a reflection of the passionate, even fanatical, interest of the Hillier family in hardy plants.

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  • Tiny mosses, hardy ferns or miniature bulbs will add extra interest.

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  • fleshy leaves, these hardy little plants will need next to no watering yet create a stunning display throughout the summer.

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  • Carole will be planting a variety of hardy annual foliage plants to create a foliage plants to create a foliage border.

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  • frost hardy.

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  • With the exception of the pastel colored varieties, all half hardy fuchsias flourish better outdoors through the summer.

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  • The standard work on the genus of hardy geraniums.

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  • Many ornamental gourds (Cucumis pepo) are hardy enough to be grown outside once the danger of frost is past.

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  • graphic novel loosely based on Hardy`s FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD.

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  • Aspect: Full sun to partial shade hardiness: Fully hardy, may be subject to frost damage.

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  • Aspect: full sun hardiness: Fully hardy to half hardy.

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  • A real beauty of a shrub, although not reliably hardy.

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  • It might be fully hardy in a mild winter.

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  • Extremely hardy, thrive in moist, heavy clay soil in cool, humid climate.

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  • A perfectly hardy plant may have been raised in a polythene tunnel or greenhouse to bring it on quicker.

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  • These make really attractive flowering displays through summer and are also reasonably hardy as long as they are kept dry over winter.

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  • It is fairly hardy, living in areas where the temperature doesn't fall below 10?

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  • hardy enough to withstand temperatures of 113 degrees.

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  • hardy enough to survive the winter.

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  • hardy geraniums by Peter Yeo Normal Price £ 20.00 The standard work on the genus of hardy geraniums.

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  • Small plants & hardy perennials, many bulbs & ferns, hardy perennials, many bulbs & ferns, hardy orchids & dwarf trees & shrubs.

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  • hardy fuchsias flourish better outdoors through the summer.

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  • hardy cyclamen should be left undisturbed for many years.

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  • hardy Underwriting Group is the holding company for the group.

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  • hardy ferns or miniature bulbs will add extra interest.

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  • A ll alliums are fully to frost hardy in all parts of the country.

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  • It has not proved hardy in the UK, and is known to be seriously affected by anthracnose in cool climates.

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  • hardy in most areas, this foliage plant only asks for a sheltered spot to prevent wind damage to its leaves.

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  • hardy in all parts of the country.

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  • hardy in northern climate gardens.

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  • hardy in this country.

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  • Results See the photos Harrogate Town Center 10km, 30 July A hardy band of 11 male harriers (where were all the ladies?

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  • An example of anapestic heptameter is The Lacking Sense by Thomas Hardy.

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  • big leaf hydrangeas (Hydrangea macrophylla) are very popular for their large colorful flowers but unfortunately they are the least hardy.

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  • William Robinson banished bedding systems, and turned to planting with native species and hardy exotics, creating informal, wild and woodland gardens.

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  • It's Laurel and Hardy stuff particularly when they've drunk the beer keg dry.

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  • They may include hardy kiwis [Actinidia spp ], and grapes [Vitis spp] .

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  • lilyke hardy water lilies, they, too, will warrior it through the winter.

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  • lilyke hardy water lilies, they, too, will warrior it through the winter.

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  • lonesome pine also survives in the title of a song made famous by Laurel and Hardy.

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  • long-playing record on music associated with Thomas Hardy.

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  • Hardy was a pure mathematician who hoped his mathematics could never be applied.

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  • Hardy to USDA Zone 7. Leaf stem eaten cooked or raw, Rhizome considered medicinal.

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  • From the landing stage here the hardy tourist can either walk the mile and a half track into the mountains or hire a mule.

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  • Opposes the conventional notion that Hardy is a pessimistic thinker.

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  • Full details and photos will be added Hardy Pilot Red Pepper was a 20ft Hardy Pilot with a Suzuki 50hp four stroke outboard.

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  • In summer our displays of half hardy plants are quite overpowering.

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  • In reality there are no truly hardy palms, particularly when they are small.

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  • Put it this way: some people praise Thomas Hardy's novels for their descriptive passages of nature.

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  • Small plants & hardy perennials, many bulbs & ferns, hardy orchids & dwarf trees & shrubs.

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  • All the species are hardy, semi-evergreen to evergreen clump-forming rhizomatous perennials retaining their leaves throughout the winter.

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  • ponyastonbury Tor There is a breed of hardy ponies peculiar to the Exmoor district; red deer are also found there.

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  • In summer, it has pretty bright yellow flowers. £ 3.75 (Papaver orientalis) Oriental poppy A hardy perennial poppy.

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  • Behavior The Campbell is a very practical, hardy duck which is a prolific egg layer.

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  • Penstemons originated on the North American prairies, so they come in half hardy and fully hardy varieties.

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  • presumed dead in the sinking of the HMS Hardy at Narvik in Norway on 10 April 1940.

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  • Hardy: The rum ration has been abolished, Admiral.

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  • Remove any reverted green shoots on hardy variegated evergreens, to prevent reversion taking over.

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  • British saddlebacks are hardy and noted for their mothering ability.

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  • The tricks of the trade used by garden centers to tempt even the most hardy shopper to impulse buy.

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  • A few hardy souls went off for an early morning run, I personally had a cup of coffee in bed.

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  • stinking chamomile is frost hardy at the rosette stage and can grow as a winter annual in Britain.

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  • Bearing that in mind I should touch on the persistent and often torrential downpour that we hardy souls had to endure.

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  • Just visible in the top left-hand corner is Gunnera manicata, a huge perennial which looks really tropical, although it's quite hardy.

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  • unkind remarks were made about Standard managing director Bert Hardy.

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  • Belted Galloways are a hardy rare breed which originated on the expose uplands of Galloway in the south west of Scotland.

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  • They are a hardy breed therefore veterinary costs should be low.

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  • Hardy's employed him as research and development officer and he became their head winemaker.

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  • small rough winkles and the occasional hardy barnacles gain enough shelter here to survive.

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  • Hardy, Memoirs of the earl of Charlemont (2 vols., 2nd.

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  • Many beautiful Nymphaea hybrids have been raised between the tender and hardy varieties of different colours, and there are now in commerce lovely forms having not only white, but also yellow, rose, pink and carmine flowers.

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  • Amongst hardy species of Nymphaea now much grown are candida, nitida, odorata, pygmaea and tuberosa, all with white, more or less sweet-scented flowers; flava, yellow, and sphaerocarpa, rose-carmine.

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  • Leslie Stephen advised Thomas Hardy, then an aspiring contributor to the Cornhill, to read George Sand, whose country stories seemed to him perfect.

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  • Hyphear is useful for fattening cattle if they are hardy enough to withstand the purgative effect it produces at first; viscum is medicinally of value as an emollient, and in cases of tumour, ulcers and the like.

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  • It is not so hardy as A.

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  • 'SHALLOT,' Allium ascalonicum, a hardy bulbous perennial, which has not been certainly found wild and is regarded by A.

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  • of Irish Periodical Literature from the End of the 17th to the Middle of the Igth Century (2 vols., London, 1867); Francis Hardy, Memoirs of the Earl of Charlemont (2 vols., London, 1812); W.

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  • The tree in England is scarcely hardy, though it will grow freely in some sheltered places.

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  • In Britain the evergreen oak is quite hardy in ordinary winters, and is useful to the ornamental planter from its capacity for resisting the sea gales; but it generally remains of small size.

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  • From its rugged silvery bark and dark-green foliage, it is a handsome tree, quite hardy in Cornwall and Devonshire, where it has grown to a large size.

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  • One of these under Humbert succeeded in landing a force in Killala Bay, and gained some success in Connaught before it was subdued by Lake and Cornwallis, Wolfe Tone's brother Matthew being captured, tried by court-martial, and hanged; a second, accompanied by Napper Tandy (q.v.), came to disaster on the coast of Donegal; while Wolfe Tone took part in a third, under Admiral Bompard, with General Hardy in command of a force of about 3000 men, which encountered an English squadron near Lough Swilly on the 12th of October 1798.

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  • Lucretius touches on the development of man out of a primitive, hardy, beast-like condition.

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  • Hardy for the Pali Text Society in 1902; and the Petaka Upadesa.

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  • Hardy has discussed in the Zeitschrift der deutschen morgenlaindischen Gesellschaft (1897), pp. 105-127, all that is known about him.

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  • Hardy, Christianity and the Roman Government (1894), pp. 1 45 sqq., which criticizes both Neumann and Ramsay; Leonard Alston, Stoic and Christian of the 2nd century (1906); J.

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  • Finally the mountain valley, with its patches of cultivable soil on the alluvial fans of tributary torrents, its narrow pastures on the uplands only left clear of snow in summer, its intensified extremes of climates and its isolation, almost equal to that of an island, has in all countries produced a special type of brave and hardy people, whose utmost effort may bring them comfort, but not wealth, by honest toil, who know little of the outer world, and to whom the natural outlet for ambition is marauding on the fertile plains.

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  • the men of Rus, or Variags, as they were sometimes called, were simply the hardy Norsemen or Normans who at that time, in various countries of Europe, appeared first as armed marauders and then lived in the invaded territory as a dominant military caste until they were gradually absorbed by the native population.

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  • It is a hardy species, reaching a height of from 80 to boo ft.

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  • The Marsi were a hardy mountain people, famed for their simple habits and indomitable courage.

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  • Hardy, Memoirs of J.

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  • The mountainous country, ill-suited for agricultural purposes, was well adapted for these hardy warriors,whose training was Spartan in its simplicity and severity.

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  • Hardy, Christianity and the Roman Government (1894); J.

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  • During the seven years of his married life Mill published less than in any other period of his career, but four of his most ' Mrs Taylor (Harriet Hardy) was the wife of John Taylor, a wholesale druggist in the city of London.

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  • Those of most interest to English ornithologists naturally refer to Britanny, Normandy and Picardy, and are by Baillon, Benoist, Blandin, Bureau, Canivet, Chesnon, Degland, Demarle, De Norguet, Gentil, Hardy, Lemetteil, Lemonnicier, Lesauvage, Maignon, Marcotte, Nourry and Tasle, while perhaps the Ornithologie parisienne of M.

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  • But it is nearly certain that long before Attila and his Huns swept down upon the Venetian plain the little islands of the lagoon already had a population of poor but hardy fisherfolk living in quasi-independence, thanks to their poverty and their inaccessible site.

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  • The principal varieties of Egyptian cotton are: Mitafifi, the bestknown and most extensively grown, hardy and but little affected by climatic variation.

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  • When the weather is not favourable at the fruiting stage, the otherwise hardy cotton plant displays its great weakness in this way.

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  • He was handsome and eloquent, but licentious; and at the same time active, hardy, courageous, a great general and an able politician.

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  • In connexion with the last, he made a cruise in the Channel fleet, on board the "Victory," as a volunteer under the command of Admiral Sir Charles Hardy.

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  • Transplanted into this foreign soil, the monarchy became an absolute despotism, unchecked by a proud territorial nobility and a hardy peasantry on familiar terms with their king.

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  • The Belgian hare is a large breed of a hardy and prolific character, which closely resembles the hare in colour, and is not unlike it in form.

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  • The camels make excellent mounts, swift and hardy; and the extensive caravan trade is everywhere carried on exclusively by means of these pack-animals.

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  • They possess a hardy breed of ponies, for which the Dolbahanta country is famed.

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  • That found in the works of William of Malmesbury (Hardy's ed.

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  • The Dynamics of a Particle was written on the occasion of the contest between Gladstone and Mr Gathorne Hardy (afterwards earl of Cranbrook); and The New Belfry in ridicule of the erection put up at Christ Church for the bells that were removed from the Cathedral tower.

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  • Hardy, Journal of Physiology, 1899, vol.

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  • The men are well known all over Spain and Portugal as hardy, honest and industrious, but for the most part somewhat unskilled, labourers; indeed the word Gallego has come to be almost a synonym in Madrid for a "hewer of wood and drawer of water."

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  • As garden plants the aconites are very ornamental, hardy perennials.

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  • It was named Sao Paulo, and has been at once the source whence knowledge and civilization have been diffused through Brazil, and the nucleus of a colony of its manliest and hardiest citizens, which sent out successive swarms of hardy adventurers to people the interior.

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  • A hardy and enterprising race of men had sprung from this mixture, and supplies being sent by sea from Holland.

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  • The species of crocus are not very readily obtainable, but those who make a specialty of hardy bulbs ought certainly to search them out and grow them.

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