Hardly Sentence Examples

hardly
  • I can hardly wait for the fun to begin!

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  • He hardly knew how it tasted.

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  • Hardly had they spoken these words when the door opened and Arion himself stood before them.

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  • I could hardly believe it.

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  • I believe that I have hardly begun yet to know what is possible.

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  • There was hardly anyone in the streets.

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  • She hardly knows me.

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  • I can hardly wait to go to sleep!

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  • Lydia Larkin was bent over at the waist, hardly able to stand, clutching her mid-section.

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  • It was hardly fair to shift that responsibility solely to him.

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  • Sofia could hardly sit still.

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  • I can hardly wait.

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  • I can hardly walk let alone lift a weapon.

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  • She's such a little beauty I can hardly wait for the sun to set.

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  • This girl's code, if it is in fact a code, is mostly one continuous line, with hardly any punctuation.

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  • Glancing down at her sandaled feet, it occurred to her that she was hardly dressed for a walk in the woods.

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  • As for men, they will hardly fail one anywhere.

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  • Fine. I can hardly wait to get elected so I can get rid of those two winners you hired before you bailed out.

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  • I hardly recognized him.

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  • I can hardly wait patiently for the time to come when I shall see my dear English friends, and their beautiful island home.

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  • They could hardly say she hadn't tried.

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  • He could hardly be blamed if he chose to make her walk home.

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  • Nowadays they cart them off to some baby sitter they hardly know, just to get the kids out of their hair.

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  • Baffled. He really hardly knew her but thinks he's supposed act like he's grieving.

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  • Martha showed little interest and had said hardly a word.

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  • He could hardly wait for tomor­row's challenge.

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  • Considering the problems they presented, she could hardly blame him for that.

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  • There is hardly a page of Ovid which does not show obligations to his poems, while other writers made a more sparing use of his stories.

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  • The vendetta, too, is now hardly ever heard of.

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  • He hardly crosses the river to our side before we recross to the other.

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  • If he intended her harm, he would hardly have fixed the door so it would lock from the inside.

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  • Dean could hardly keep his eyes open as he rose to go to bed.

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  • You'd hardly recognize him.

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  • He was dressed in a spotless white pocket T-shirt and white sneakers - hardly clothes for a farm hand.

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  • Sure, only three weeks of her vacation remained, and it would be fun to have someone to enjoy them with, but she was hardly looking for a serious relationship.

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  • It is totally different in appearance from the pasture mushroom, and, like it, its characters are so distinct that there is hardly a possibility of making a mistake when its peculiarities are once comprehended.

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  • Modern equity, it need hardly be said, does not profess to soften the rigour of the law, or to correct the errors into which it falls by reason of its generality.

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  • Snow hardly ever falls near the coast, but is abundant in the higher parts of the island, though none remains throughout the summer.

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  • Public security is considerably improved, and regular brigandage (as distinct from casual robbery) hardly exists.

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  • If the Puritans regarded bowls with no friendly eye, as Lord Macaulay asserts, one can hardly wonder at it.

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  • But guilt of that sort would hardly be consistent with his character as it appears in those early days.

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  • He had hardly restored Macedonian prestige in this quarter when he heard that Greece was aflame.

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  • As her health failed she hardly ever left the convent of the Carmelites in which she had been educated.

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  • But it is hardly fair to contrast his practical counsel with the more ethical and spiritual teaching of the earlier Hebrew prophets.

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  • I feel terrible making him sleep in the lab room, but really, Quinn's equipment hardly makes a sound.

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  • The first important recorded act of Pericles falls in 463, when he helped to prosecute Cimon on a charge of bribery, after the latter's Thasian campaign; but as the accusation could hardly have been meant seriously Pericles was perhaps put forward only as a lay-figure.

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  • Pericles now seemed to have made up his mind that war with Sparta, the head of that ' The date can hardly be fixed; probably it was after 440.

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  • But he could hardly be said seriously to have oppressed the subject cities, and technically all the League money was spent on League business, for Athena, to whom the chief monuments in Athens were reared, was the patron goddess of the League.

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  • So complete is the watershed that no streams pass through these ranges, and there is hardly any communication in this direction between the interior of Asia Minor and the coast.

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  • Hardly a noble house of Spain or Italy was not represented in the fleet, and the princes headed the boarders.

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  • Other writers again have placed the Acra on the eastern side of the hill upon which the church of the Holy Sepulchre now stands, but as this point was probably quite outside the city at the time of Antiochus Epiphanes, and is at too great a distance from the Temple, it can hardly be accepted.

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  • But this gives no correct idea of the true character of the Darling, for it can hardly be said to drain its own watershed.

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  • In seasons of drought they are hardly more than swamps and mud flats, which for a time may become a grassy plain, or desolate coast encrusted with salt.

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  • Hardly of less scientific interest is the Port Jackson shark (Heterodontus).

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  • Hardly a leaf is visible to the height of one's head; but above, a crown of thick leather-like leaves shuts out the sunlight.

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  • It is seen as a clump of wire-like leaves, a few feet in diameter, surrounding a stem, hardly thicker than a walking-stick, rising to a height of Jo or 12 ft.

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  • The water was rising so rapidly in the hold that with four pumps constantly going the crew could hardly keep it in check.

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  • Lowe was a rather cut-anddry economist, who prided himself that during his four years of office he took twelve millions off taxation; but later opinion has hardly accepted his removal of the shilling registration duty on corn (1869) as good statesmanship, and his failures are remembered rather than his successes.

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  • Until his fiery energy made itself felt, hardly any army on either side actually suffered rout; but at Marston Moor and Naseby the troops of the defeated party were completely dissolved, while at Worcester the royalist army was annihilated.

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  • On the other hand it is hardly likely that all his comedies (which greatly exceeded in number the extant twenty) were produced during the last twenty years of his life.

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  • The city was burnt, we are told, with the exception of the temples of Vulcan and Juno - the massive Etruscan terrace-walls, naturally, can hardly have suffered at all - and the town, with the territory for a mile round, was allowed to be occupied by whoever chose.

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  • It is hardly mentioned except by the geographers until the middle of the 6th century, when it was captured by Totila after a long siege.

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  • There is hardly one of Wagner's orchestral innovations which is not inseparably connected with his adaptation of music to the re q uirements of drama; and modern conductors, in treating Wagner's orchestration, as the normal standard by which all previous and contemporary music must be judged, are doing their best to found a tradition which in another fifty years will be exploded as thoroughly as the tradition of symphonic additional accompaniments is now exploded in the performances of Bach and Handel.

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  • The Code does not say what would be the penalty of murder, but death is so often awarded where death is caused that we can hardly doubt that the murderer was put to death.

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  • This might possibly be true to a small extent; but, considering the small capacity of the circuits he used and the nature of his receiving instrument, it is hardly probable that duration of contact sensibly influenced the result.

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  • The cura tori or curatoli (factors) receive 40 a year, with a slight interest in the profits; the stockmen hardly earn in money and kind 13; the muleteers and underworkmen get between 5 to 8, plus firewood, bread and oil; irregular workmen have even lower wages, with a daily distribution of bread, salt and oil.

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  • They receive a small and hardly sufficient, allowance for food of 50 centesimi a day, which they are at liberty to supplement by work if they can find it or care to do it.

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  • The demands for reimbursement at par represented a sum of only 187,588 and the market value of the stock was hardly affected; while the saving to the Treasury was to be 800,000 per annum for the first five years and about double the amount afterwards.

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  • Can Grande della Scalas death in the next year inflicted on, the Lombard Ghibellines a loss hardly inferior to that of Castruccios on their Tuscan allies.

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  • Formed for mercenary warfare, they proved a perilous instrument in the hands of those who used them, and were hardly less injurious to their friends than to their foes.

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  • Here he would willingly have stopped, but he soon realized that he had hardly begun.

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  • Even the coup detat of the 16th of May 1877 (when Macmahon dismissed the Jules Simon cabinet for opposing the Clerical petition) hardly availed to change the attitude of Depretis.

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  • Hardly had he assumed office when the unexpected death of Victor Emmanuel II.

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  • Notwithstanding this prospective loss of revenue, parliament showed great reluctance to vote any new impost, although hardly a year previously it had sanctioned (3oth June 1879) Depretiss scheme for spending during the next eighteen years 43,200,000 in building 5000 kilometres of railway, an expenditure not wholly justified by the importance of the lines, and useful principally as a source of electoral sops for the constituents of ministerial deputies.

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  • In the spring of 1908 there were agrarian strikes at Parma; the labor contracts had pressed hardly on the peasantry, who had cause for complaint; but while some improvement had been effected in the new contracts, certain unscrupulous demagogues, of whom Alceste De Ambris, representing the syndacalist wing of the Socialist party, was the chief, organized a widespread agitation.

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  • The ministerial majority was over three hundred, and although the Extreme Left was somewhat increased in numbers it was weakened in tone, and many of the newly elected reds were hardly more than pale pink.

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  • The two governments frequently discussed the situation, but although they had agreed to a selfdenying ordinance whereby each bound itself not to occupy any part of Albanian territory, Austrias declarations and promises were hardly borne out by the activity of her agents in the Balkans.

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  • He set practically no limits to the ecclesiastical authority of kings; they were as fully the representatives of the church as the state, and Cranmer hardly distinguished between the two.

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  • One could hardly expect that a colourless deity of this description, so completely the product of priestly speculation, could ever have found a place in the hearts of the people generally.

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  • As long as the battle of the philosophies endures, theism can hardly be unified.

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  • It reasserts them, with resolute loyalty; but if philosophy ought to vindicate, to explain, perhaps incidentally to modify, even, it may be, to purify our primary beliefs, intuitionalism is hardly a philosophy at all.

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  • Free will is shaping itself towards discussion in Aristotle's Ethics, but is hardly yet a formulated problem.

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  • The more Spinozistic side of Leibnitz's thought - God as Monad of Monads - is a theistic postulate if hardly a theistic proof.

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  • If the God of the Design argument seems a limited being, working as an artist upon given materials,' he is hardly God at all.

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  • Magna Carta can hardly be said to have introduced any new ideas.

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  • The Normans in Sicily could hardly be said to become Sicilians, for there assuredly was no Sicilian nation for them to be absorbed into.

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  • And the circumstances of his conquest were such that the true Normans among his following could not possibly lose themselves among the existing inhabitants of the island, while everything tended to make them lose themselves among their fellow-adventurers of other races, among whom, by the time the conquest was ended, they could hardly have been even a dominant element.

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  • Such a state of things might seem degradation to the Mussulman, but it was deliverance to the native Christian, while to settlers of every kind from outside it was an opening such as they could hardly find elsewhere.

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  • In Sicily and southern Italy there is hardly any visible Norman influence, except the great historic fact which we may call the creation of Sicily and southern Italy in their modern sense.

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  • It is hardly needful to prove that nobility does not imply wealth, though nobility without wealth runs some risk of being forgotten.

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  • We hardly look on the Spartans as a nobility among the other Lacedaemonians; Sparta rather is a ruling city bearing sway over the other Lacedaemonian towns.

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  • The noble of the large country, on the other hand, the rural noble, as he commonly will be, is a member of an order, but he is hardly a member of a corporation; he is isolated; he acts apart from the rest of the body and wins powers for himself apart from the rest of the body.

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  • The notion of holding land of the king became more prominent than the notion of personal service done to the king; but, as the land was held by the tenure of personal service, the actual relation hardly changed.

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  • But the principle is hardly ever carried out to the end.

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  • In the governments of the black-earth region the state of matters is hardly better.

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  • How many years elapsed from beginning to end can hardly be said.

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  • The Quezal is hardly so big as a Turtle-Dove.

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  • The rainfall is very scanty, and running waters are hardly known, excepting among the mountains which form the scarps of the elevated country.

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  • The parapodia, as in the Capitellidae, are hardly developed.

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  • Eyes are present, but hardly so complex as in certain genera of Polychaetes.

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  • It can hardly be doubted that the function of these avicularia is the protection of the tentacles and compensation-sac. The suggestion that they are concerned in feeding does not rest on any definite evidence, and is probably erroneous.

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  • The Italians could hardly claim a university of their own on grounds of population (in 19to they numbered 783,000), but they claimed it all the more on grounds of their ancient culture.

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  • The political characteristics of these ministers are hardly distinguishable one from another; they all took their stand on a middle course of loyalty to the state and party impartiality.

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  • So soon as State control was applied to any article it could be taken as a sign that the supplies would soon come to an end, or at any rate were very restricted; and thus it was impossible to prevent the equipment of the army from becoming gradually more inadequate, and the provision both of the army and of the population behind the lines with all kinds of necessaries from being altogether insufficient; only wholly unsatisfactory substitutes could be provided, and the available provisions could hardly be made to go round.

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  • His extravagance, cruelty and profligacy can hardly be explained except on the assumption that he was out of his mind.

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  • This is a universal trait of primitive Christian writings; so that to speak of primitive Christian "literature" at all is hardly accurate, and tends to an artificial handling of their contents.

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  • A statesman of firmer mould than Lord Melbourne would hardly have succeeded so well as he did in making rough places smooth for Prince Albert.

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  • The British government were on the point of demanding reparation for this act in a peremptory manner which could hardly have meant anything but war, but Prince Albert insisted on revising Lord Russell's despatch in a way which gave the American government an opportunity to concede the surrender of the prisoners without humiliation.

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  • Hardly had this contest been brought to an end favourable to the papacy (May 1235) when Gregory came into fresh conflict with Frederick II.

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  • Hardly knowing anything of music, he attempted to give lessons and a concert at Lausanne; and he actually taught at Neuchatel.

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  • This being so, he could hardly complain when on returning he found that his official position in Madame de Warens's household had been taken by a person named Vintzenried.

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  • In his time orthodoxy at once generous and intelligent hardly existed in France.

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  • The reader, as it has been said, may think he might have done something else with advantage, but he can hardly think that he could have done this thing better.

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  • But the materials for his biography are so controversial and so personal - his own Confessions and the memoirs of associates whose accuracy and honesty are disputed - that the correct historical view can hardly be said yet to be standardized.

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  • While the Austrian officials in Dalmatia, with hardly a pretence of concealment, were assisting the insurgents, Russian volunteers were flocking to Servia with the connivance of the Russian and Austrian governments, and General Ignatiev, as ambassador in 3 The names are vocalized to suggest the fanciful interpretations "victim" and "protection withheld."

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  • It hardly finds a place in the British civil system, and was condemned for hospitals in Germany, where it is at its best, by so eminent an authority as Professor Virchow.

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  • But throughout his life he concealed his purposes even from his closest friends; sometimes it seems as if he were hardly conscious of them himself.

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  • The Old Testament, however, only prepares the way for the Christian doctrine of the atonement; this is clear, inasmuch as its teaching is largely concerned with the nation, and hardly touches on the future life.

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  • A great general could hardly fail to become the foremost man in the state.

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  • Some have supposed the circle of slabs to be the retaining wall of a tumulus; but its structure is not solid enough for such a purpose, and it can hardly be anything but a sacred enclosure.

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  • Though Spener has been justly called "the father of Pietism," hardly any of the errors and none of the extravagances of the movement can be ascribed to him personally.

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  • The Territory had hardly been organized before its settlement was impeded by the Civil War without and by Indian troubles within.

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  • This was in 1511, after the conquest of Malacca by D'Albuquerque, and the intimacy lasted over a century, the tradition of their greatness having hardly yet died out.

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  • As monk in the neighbouring monastery of Euprepius, and afterwards as presbyter, he became celebrated in the diocese for his asceticism, his orthodoxy and his eloquence; hostile critics, such as the church historian Socrates, allege that his arrogance and vanity were hardly less conspicuous.

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  • But the journey was abandoned, and after some months Erasmus found that even with occasional chances to read at Groenendael, the life of a court was hardly more favourable to study than that of Steyn.

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  • He is at his weakest in defending free will against Luther, and indeed he can hardly he said to enter on the metaphysical question.

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  • It could hardly have been thought of before Sir Isaac Newton's discovery of the actual facts regarding universal gravitation.

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  • These results constitute a far-reaching development of the modern or electrodynamic theory of the aether, of which the issue can hardly yet be foreseen.

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  • But hardly had this settlement been reached when a fresh element of discord threatened to wholly upset matters - the adoption of Protestant principles by the city.

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  • All this meant a mighty exaltation of the Church, which ruled the minds of men as she had hardly ever done before.

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  • In point of fact, in Greece and Rome the priest never attained to any considerable independent importance; we cannot speak of priestly power and hardly even of a distinct priestly class.

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  • The Romans, it need hardly be said, had no hereditary priests.'

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  • But the highest developments of priestly influence are hardly separable from something of magical superstition, the opus operatum of the priest has the power of a sorcerer's spell.

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  • In the divided state of the nation, indeed, this sanctuary was hardly visited from beyond Mt Ephraim; and every man or tribe that cared to provide the necessary apparatus (ephod, teraphim, &c.) and hire a priest might have a temple and oracle of his own at which to consult Jehovah (Judges xvii., xviii.); but there was hardly another sanctuary of equal dignity.

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  • Private sacrifices, too, could hardly be offered without some priestly aid now that ritual was more complex; the provision of Deut.

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  • The influence of the Hebrew priesthood on the thought and organization of Christendom was the influence not of a living institution, for it hardly began till after the fall of the Temple, but of the theory embodied in the later parts of the Pentateuch.

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  • Bailey can hardly be classed as belonging either to the strictly empirical or to the idealist school, but his general tendency is towards the former.

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  • This absolute scepticism, indeed, can hardly be regarded as more than empty words; the position which they would indicate is not one which has ever existed.

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  • The decemvirate, one of the triumphs of the plebs, could hardly have been abolished by that body, but would naturally have been overthrown by the patricians.

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  • In Poland itself the tsar left much of the current civil administration in the hands of the nobles, whose power over their peasants was hardly diminished and was misused as of old.

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  • But hardly had this alliance been formed when a secret arrangement was come to between the two Indian powers, the result of which was that Colonel Smith's small force was met with a united army of 80,000 men and 100 guns.

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  • There can be no doubt that the Indian conquests of Alexander were the means of making the parrot better known in Europe, and it is in reference to this fact that another Eastern species of Palaeornis now bears the name of P. alexandri, though from the localities it inhabits it could hardly have had anything to do with the Macedonian hero.

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  • With political matters she hardly meddled as yet.

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  • Fleury had economized in the army and navy, as elsewhere, and when in 1733 war was forced upon him he was hardly prepared.

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  • Fresh Jesuit victories were followed sooner or later by fresh revolt, and Roman rule hardly triumphed when once for all it was overthrown.

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  • There is hardly a library in Europe that did not and does not contain a copy of his great work, and there are about a thousand MSS.

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  • It was recognized, however, that Latin itself (as Vives had said) was " in no small need of Greek," and that, " unless Greek was learnt in boyhood, it would hardly ever be learnt at all."

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  • Buell's failure to appreciate political considerations as a part of strategy justified his recall, but the value of his work, like that of McClellan, can hardly be measured by marches and victories.

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  • Grant's other forces were split up into detachments, and when Van Dorn, boldly marching right round Rosecrans, descended upon Corinth from the north, Grant could hardly stir to help his subordinate.

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  • There is hardly a branch of mathematical physics which is independent of these functions.

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  • Hence it is hardly doubtful that the form in which we now possess the Hebrew text was already fixed by the beginning of the 2nd century.

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  • The names, it need hardly be remarked, belong to the prehistoric period, and equally with the figures are destitute of historical value.

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  • The former class of proposals will as a rule hardly affect the chronology of the Gospel; the latter will affect it vitally.

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  • But (i.) Nero 2 is really September 56-September 57; (ii.) it is doubtful whether Eusebius had any authority to depend on here other than Josephus, who gives no precise year for Festus - Julius Africanus is, hardly probable, since we know that his chronicle was very jejune for the Christian period - and if so, Eusebius had to find a year as best he could.'

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  • In other areas, however, there is still volcanic activity, and in many cases volcanoes to which only tradition attributes eruptions can hardly be classified as extinct.

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  • Not long after the death of Columbus, and when the Portuguese traders, working from the west, had hardly reached the confines of the Malay Archipelago, the Spaniard Vasco Nunez de Balboa crossed America at its narrowest part and discovered the great ocean to the west of it (1513).

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  • The well-established doctrine that the House of Lords could not amend, though it might reject, a money-bill, coupled with the fact that it never had gone so far as to reject a budget, was relied on by the extremists as dictating the obvious party tactics; and before the year 1909 opened, the possibility of the Lords being driven to compel a dissolution by standing on their extreme rights as regards the financial provision for the year was already canvassed in political circles, though it was hardly credited that the government would precipitate a constitutional crisis of such magnitude.

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  • Hardly, however, had the battle been arrayed when the King's death in May upset all calculations.

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  • In the result these troops were repulsed with a loss of 6000 men, a circumstance hardly to be wondered at, since McClellan had entrenched eight divisions on the strongest position in the country, and was aided by his siege artillery and also by a flanking fire from his gunboats on the river near Haxall's Landing.

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  • Charles V.'s ambassador, Chapuys, hardly deigned to mention the fact that the king's amie had given birth to a daughter, and both her parents were bitterly disappointed with her sex.

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  • Elizabeth thus lost all hereditary title to the throne, and her early years of childhood can hardly have been happier than Mary's.

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  • She hardly rivalled Lady Jane Grey as the ideal Puritan maiden, but she swam with the stream, and was regarded as a foil to her stubborn Catholic sister.

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  • She respected the bishops only as supporters of her throne; and, although the well-known letter beginning "Proud Prelate" is an 18th-century forgery, it is hardly a travesty of Elizabeth's attitude.

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  • Elizabeth could hardly be expected to go out of her way and ask parliament to repeal its own acts for Mary's sake; probably it would have refused.

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  • That period was one of gradual transition to the conditions of Stuart times; during it practically every claim was put forward that was made under the first two Stuarts either on behalf of parliament or the prerogative, and Elizabeth's attitude towards the Puritans was hardly distinguishable from James I.'s.

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  • Bananas are grown over a large and increasing area; rice, maize, barley, potatoes and beans are cultivated to some extent in the interior; cocoa, vanilla, sugar-cane, cotton and indigo are products of the warm coast-lands, but are hardly raised in sufficient quantities to meet the local demand.

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  • Distanced though he may have been by Raphael, Francia is rightly regarded as the greatest painter of the earlier Bolognese school, and hardly to be surpassed as representing the art termed "antico-moderno," or of the "quattrocento."

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  • More than this hardly lies in the expression "a divine spirit" (a'r5K min), which is used not only of the prophetic afflatus but of the evil frenzy that afflicted Saul's later days.

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  • In fact the presence of an orgiastic character is as marked a feature in Canaanite religion as the absence of it is in the oldest religion of Israel; but the new Hebrew enthusiasts had at least an external resemblance to the devotees of the Canaanite sanctuaries and this would be enough to determine the choice of a name which in the first instance seems hardly to have been a name of honour.

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  • Yes, I have heard of his scheme for perpetual peace, and it is very interesting but hardly feasible.

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  • Of course, Clara would hardly miss the fact that her skin was lighter where Denton's ring had been.

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  • But no - if his intentions were ill willed, he would hardly have expressed his interest to an obvious town gossip.

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  • The laundry was one place she hadn't been yet and her wardrobe had dwindled down to a few clean items - none of them appropriate for a ride around the countryside with a man she hardly knew.

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  • It wasn't Clara's problem and she could hardly leave it to her to handle.

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  • Her right hand hardly worked.

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  • I can hardly handle the two I have.

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  • The cock, in his plumage of yellowish-green and yellow is one of the most finely coloured of common English birds, but he is rather heavily built, and his song is hardly commended.

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  • Verres may not have been quite so black as he is painted by Cicero, on whose speeches we depend entirely for our knowledge of him, but there can hardly be a doubt that he stood pre-eminent among the worst specimens of Roman provincial governors.

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    0
  • The Thysanoptera are probably world-wide in their range, but they have hardly been studied outside Europe and North America.

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    0
  • The height of the walls in the various observatories, the height of the collectors, and the distance they project from the wall vary largely, and sometimes electrometer, and they sometimes leave hardly a trace on the photographic paper.

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    0
  • On stormy days, as already mentioned, the irregular changes hardly admit of satisfactory treatment.

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    0
  • They are agglutinative in nature, show hardly any signs of syntactical growth though every indication of long etymological growth, give expression to only the most direct and the simplest thought, and are purely colloquial and wanting in the modifications always necessary for communication by writing.

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    0
  • Of the followers of Hegel who have worked out his peculiar idea of evolution it is hardly necessary to speak.

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  • Erasmus Darwin (Zoonomia, 17 94), though a zealous evolutionist, can hardly be said to have made any real advance on his predecessors; and, notwithstanding the fact that Goethe had the advantage of a wide knowledge of morphological facts, and a true insight into their signification, while he threw all the power of a great poet into the expression of his conceptions, it may be questioned whether he supplied the doctrine of evolution with a firmer scientific basis than it already possessed.

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  • This is hardly the case elsewhere in the Western Church, though some exceptions are noted below.

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    0
  • By the middle of the, 5th century there was hardly an active inquisitor left in the kingdom.

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    0
  • It is largest in the Galli and some of the Cuculi, in others it is hardly indicated.

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    0
  • It needs hardly to be pointed out why such a purely mechanical scheme was doomed to Jiletapatag.

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    0
  • That is to say, the distribution of forms in time is a subject so much connected with the distribution of forms in space, that the one can hardly be separated from the other.

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  • Thus it befell that, of the chiefs of the Howards born since the great Mowbray alliance, two had died by the axe and one in the prison from which a fourth had hardly escaped.

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  • The French school of the Ilth century was hardly less important.

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    0
  • But harmony was not thus to be restored; hardly had the council dissolved when the church was plunged into the Monophysite controversy.

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    0
  • But Geoffrey hardly did justice to the Normans if he meant to imply that they were simple imitators of others.

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    0
  • The fashion could hardly have taken root except in a land where the tradition had gone before it.

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    0
  • The authorship of the epistles is in many cases a matter of subordinate importance; at least for Protestants or for those surrendering Bible infallibility, which Rome can hardly do.

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    0
  • The number of described species can now hardly be less than 10o,000, but there is little agreement as to the main principles of a natural classification.

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    0
  • In the Coleoptera we have to do with an ancient yet dominant order, in which there is hardly a family that does not show specialization in some point of structure or life-history.

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  • There remain two other dramatic works, of very different kinds, in which Ford co-operated with other writers, the mask of The Sun's Darling (acted 1624, printed 1657), hardly to be placed in the first rank of early compositions, and The Witch of Edmonton (printed 1658, but probably acted about 1621), in which we see Ford as a joint writer with Dekker and Rowley of one of the most powerful domestic dramas of the English or any other stage.

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  • Had Shakespeare treated it, he would hardly have contented himself with investing the hero with the nobility given by Ford to this personage of his play, - for it is hardly possible to speak of a personage as a character when the clue to his conduct is intentionally withheld.

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  • The nest, contrary to the habits of most Limicolae, is generally placed under a ledge of rock which shelters the bird from observation,' and therein are laid four eggs, of a light olive-green, closely blotched with brown, and hardly to be mistaken for those of any other bird.

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    0
  • The copper industry has greatly declined since the 18th century; whereas then it kept 20 smelting works employed, now one-tenth of that number can hardly be kept going.

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    0
  • Manufacturing industry in the modern sense can hardly be said to have existed in Russia ' See Russian Journal of Financial Statistics, in English (2 vols., St Petersburg, 1901).

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    0
  • Already Dimitri of the Don was called the grand-prince of all Russia, but the assumption of such an ambitious title was hardly justified by facts, because there were still in his time principalities with grand princes who claimed to be independent.

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  • Count Agenor de Gasparin, in his Tables tournantes (Paris, 1854), gives an account of what seem to have been careful experiments, though they are hardly described in sufficient detail to enable us to form an independent judgment.

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  • Marillier further argues that if, on the other hand, there was no bond between god and people but that of the common meal, it does not appear that the god is a totem god; there is no reason why the animal should have been a totem; and in any case this idea of sacrifice can hardly have been anything but a slow growth and consequently not the origin of the practice.

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  • At Deir el Bahri we see that the animal had its throat cut in Mahommedan fashion; it lay on its side, the legs tied together; the heart was taken out, then the liver; the burnt sacrifice was hardly known.

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  • Perhaps he was as wise as his critics; at any rate the rigour which he repudiated hardly brought peace or strength to the Church when practised by his successors, and London, which was always a difficult see, involved Bishop Sandys in similar tronbles when Grindal had gone to York.

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  • Moreover, it is hardly probable that a great leader like Moses remained unaffected by the higher conceptions tending towards monotheism which prevailed in the great empires on the Nile and on the Euphrates.

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  • Such a universal God of the world would hardly make Israel His exclusive concern.

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  • It is hardly possible that all the high places were suppressed.

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  • Gibbon was eight-and-thirty when he entered parliament; and the obstacles which even at an earlier period he had not had courage to encounter were hardly likely to be vanquished then.

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    0
  • It is hardly fair perhaps to add a reference to Suard's highly-coloured description of the short Silenus-like figure, not more than 56 in.

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    0
  • In the immense region which Gibbon surveyed there is hardly a section which has not been submitted to the microscopic examination of specialists.

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    0
  • To the first part unstinted praise must be accorded; it may be said that, with the materials at the author's disposition, it hardly admitted of improvement, except in trifling details.

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    0
  • The Avon finally enters the estuary of the Severn at Avonmouth, though it can hardly be reckoned as a tributary of that river.

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  • The Federalists were charged by the Republicans with being aristocrats and monarchists, and it is certain that their leaders 1 Even the Democratic party has generally been liberal; although less so in theory (hardly less so in practice) than its opponents.

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    0
  • Treating the breeding-ponds with petroleum or similar preparations seems to be hardly applicable on a large scale, and in any case can only be a temporary expedient.

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  • There can be hardly a doubt about the time and general circumstances of its origin.

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  • At a later period, when the Church had learnt to look with suspicion upon devotional books likely to provoke the scoffing of some and lead others into heresy, a work of this kind could hardly meet with her approval.

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  • Moreover, the account of the joint undertaking by Judah (under Jehoshaphat) and Israel against Syria at Ramoth-Gilead at the time of Ahab's death, and again (under Ahaziah) when Jehoram was wounded, shortly before the accession of Jehu, are historical doublets, and they can hardly be harmonized either with the known events of 854 and 842 or with the course of the intervening years.

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  • There are no signs of an extensive coalition as in the days of Shalmaneser; Ammon is probably included under Damascus; the position of Moab - which had freed itself from Jehoram of Israel - can hardly be calculated.

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  • Yahwism presents itself under a variety of aspects, and the history of Israel's relations to the God Yahweh (whose name is not necessarily of Israelite origin) can hardly be disentangled amid the complicated threads of the earlier history.

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    0
  • Although Judah was always closely connected with the south, these " southern " features (once clearly more extensive and complete) are found in the Deuteronomic and priestly compilations, and their presence in the historical records can hardly be severed from the prominence of " southern " families in the vicinity of Jerusalem, some time after the fall of Jerusalem.

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    0
  • The true inwardness of this movement, its extent and its history, can hardly be recovered at present, but it is noteworthy that the evidence generally involves the Levites, an ecclesiastical body which underwent an extremely intricate development.

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    0
  • Precepts such as these could hardly fail to effect some modification of the reckless zeal of the Galileans in the pupils of the synagogue.

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    0
  • But Domitian, according to pagan historians, bore hardly on them.

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    0
  • We can hardly any longer hesitate to recognize in this vast building, with its winding corridors and subterranean ducts, the Labyrinth of later tradition; and as a matter of fact a maze pattern recalling the conventional representation of the Labyrinth in Greek art actually formed the decoration of one of the corridors of the palace.

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  • The sense of sin can hardly be said to enter into these exercises - that is, they are not undertaken as penance for personal transgression.

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    0
  • It is only in such situations that cultivated lands are found, and beyond them trees are hardly to be seen.

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  • They seem almost entirely to have exhausted their northward velocity by the time they have reached the northern extremity of the great Indian plain; they are not felt on the table-lands of Afghanistan, and hardly penetrate into the Indus basin or the ranges of the Himalaya, by which mountains, and those which branch off from them into the Malay peninsula, they are prevented from continuing their progress in the direction originally imparted to them.

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    0
  • In the interior of the chain the rain is far less, and the quantity of precipitation is so small in Tibet that it can be hardly measured.

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    0
  • The cedar or deodar is hardly indigenous east of the sources of the Ganges, and at about the same point the forms of the west begin to be more abundant, increasing in number as we advance towards Afghanistan.

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    0
  • South China, therefore, seems, botanically, hardly distinct from the great Indian region, into which many Chinese forms penetrate, as before noticed.

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    0
  • The identification of existing peoples with the various Scythic, Persian and Arab races who have passed from High Asia into the Indian borderland, has opened up a vast field of ethnographical inquiry which has hardly yet found adequate workers for its investigation.

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    0
  • The nation hardly came into existence till China and India had passed their prime, and remained secluded and free from the continual struggle against barbarian invaders, which drained the energies of its neighbours.

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    0
  • It is still one of the least known parts of the globe, and has hardly any political link with the outside, for the Arabs of northern Africa form separate states.

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    0
  • Parapod.ia hardly projecting; palps of prosomium forming branched gills; no pharynx or eversible buccal region; no septa in thorax, septa in abdomen regularly disposed.

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  • He knew from his English experiences that such a veto would be hardly ever used unless the king felt the people were on his side, and that if it were used unjustifiably the power of the purse possessed by the representatives of the people would, as in England in 1688, bring about a bloodless revolution.

    0
    0
  • We can hardly overestimate the influence which Rufinus exerted on Western theologians by thus putting the great Greek fathers into the Latin tongue.

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  • Whether or no he can be said to have founded a school, his doctrines have become so far part of the common thought of the time, that there is hardly an educated man who does not accept as too clear for argument truths which were invisible till Bentham pointed them out.

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    0
  • In the Roman Church to-day the office of archdeacon is merely titular, his sole function being to present the candidates for ordination to the bishop. The title, indeed, hardly exists save in Italy, where the archdeacon is no more than a dignified member of a chapter, who takes rank after the bishop. The ancient functions of the archdeacon are exercised by the vicar-general.

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  • We can hardly doubt that the intention of the Graeco-Roman custom was similar.

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  • This has taken the form of inoculating the soil with the particular organism required by the particular kind of leguminous crop. To this end the endeavour has been made to produce preparations which shall contain in portable form the organisms required by the several plants, and though, as yet, it can hardly be claimed that they have been generally successful, the work done justifies hopes that the problem will eventually be solved in a practical direction.

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  • It is hardly necessary to say that the Shire Horse Society has never received a penny of public money, nor has any other of the voluntary breeders' societies.

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  • Mill could now feel that his main work was accomplished; he remained, however, on the alert for opportunities of useful influence, and pressed on with hardly diminished enthusiasm in his search for useful truth.

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    0
  • He had, however, hardly crossed into the Chersonese when he was assassinated by Ptolemy Ceraunus near Lysimachia (281).

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  • This conclusion can hardly entail less than a belief that, at any rate, the mass of those who possessed this civilization continued racially the same.

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  • In the 17th century, according to the old travellers, they numbered about 20,000 families, but at the present day they hardly number more than 1200 souls.

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    0
  • Of the ancient Forum Livii, which lay on the Via Aemilia, hardly anything is known.

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    0
  • The compound eyes of insects resemble so closely the similar organs in Crustaceans that there can hardly be reasonable doubt of their homology, and the primitively appendicular nature of the eyes in the latter class suggests that in the Hexapoda also they represent the appendages of an anterior (protocerebral) segment.

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  • The many different arrangements that have been proposed can hardly be referred to in this article.

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  • But a survey of the Hexapoda as a whole, and especially a comparative study of the tracheal system, can hardly leave room for doubt that this system is primitively adapted for atmospheric breathing, and that the presence of tracheal gills in larvae must be regarded as a special adaptation for temporary aquatic life.

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    0
  • Specialized as they are in form, development and habit, they retain mandibles for biting, and in their lower sub-order - the Symphyta - the maxillae are hardly more modified than those of the.Orthoptera.

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    0
  • His opportunities of becoming acquainted with birds were hardly inferior to Brisson's, for during Latham's long lifetime there poured in upon him countless new discoveries from all parts of the world, but especially from the newly-explored shores of Australia and the islands of the Pacific Ocean.

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    0
  • It is almost certain that more than half the zoologists of the British Islands for many years past have been infected with their love of the study of Gilbert White; and it can hardly be supposed that his influence will cease.

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  • Yet it must be confessed that its author was hardly an ornithologist, but for the accident of his calling.

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  • It is hardly possible to name any book that has been more conscientiously executed than this.

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  • The scheme could hardly fail to be a crude performance - a fact which nobody would know better than its author; but it must have presented much that was objectionable to the opinions then generally prevalent.

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  • The numerous errors in these assertions hardly need pointing out.

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  • Otherwise the scheme would hardly need notice here.

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  • Starting from the basis " that the phrase `birds are greatly modified reptiles' would hardly be an exaggerated expression of the closeness " of the resemblance between the two classes, which he had previously brigaded under the name of Sauropsida (as he had brigaded the Pisces and Amphibia as Ichthyopsida), he drew in bold outline both their likenesses and their differences, and then proceeded to inquire how the A y es could be most appropriately subdivided into orders, suborders and families.

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  • In addition to an enormous body of new information chiefly on the shoulder girdle, the alar muscles and the nerve plexuses of birds, this work contained a critical and descriptive summary of practically the whole pre-existing literature on the structure of birds, and it is hardly necessary for the student of ornithology to refer to earlier literature at first hand.

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  • It is rich, ornate, yet hardly florid, distinguished by splendid effects of light and shade, obtained by a far bolder use of projections than had hitherto been found in the somewhat fiat design of Venetian façades.

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  • Of the two-score or so of families most prominent in the first century hardly one retained place in the similar list for the early years of the second.

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    0
  • An Arabian merchant city is thus necessarily aristocratic, and its chiefs can hardly be other than pure Arabs of good blood.

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    0
  • Of these iron and ammonium citrate is much used as a haematinic, and as it has hardly any tendency to cause gastric irritation or constipation it can be taken when the ordinary forms of iron are inadmissible.

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  • To what extent or in how many cases what is called illness is due to moral springs having been used amiss, whether by being over-used, or by not being used sufficiently, we hardly at all know, and we too little inquire.

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  • It is very probable that the versions of this letter which we possess, and which are to be found only in later writings like Guibert de Nogent, are apocryphal; Alexius can hardly have held out the bait of the beauty of Greek women, or have written that he preferred to fall under the yoke of the Latins rather than that of the Turks.

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  • In any case the native Frank, accustomed to commercial intercourse and diplomatic negotiations with the Mahommedans, could hardly share the unreasoning passion to make a dash for the "infidel."

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  • There was hardly any regular succession to the throne; and Jerusalem, as Stubbs writes, "suffered from the weakness of hereditary right and the jealousies of the elective system" at one and the same time.

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    0
  • Isolated enterprises somewhat of the character of a Crusade, but hardly serious enough to be dignified by that name, recur during the 14th century.

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    0
  • But carriage roads in the Ottoman dominions are seldom completely made, and hardly ever kept in repair.

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  • In addition to the nerves starting from the brain-lobes just now especially mentioned, there is a double apparatus which can hardly be treated of in conjunction with the sense organs, because its sensory functions have not been sufficiently made out, and which will therefore rather be considered along with the brain and central nervous system.

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  • Such could hardly be obtained in any other way by those worms that have no special respiratory apparatus, and that live in mud and under stones where the natural supply of freshly oxygenated sea-water is practicaily limited.

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  • Unfortunately the island has hardly a regular harbour on any part of the coast; from its situation at the meeting, as it were, of seas, the currents in the neighbourhood are strong, and storms are very frequent.

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  • God for him is the creator and ruler of the world, but hardly more; he is the master of a vast machine that grinds out human destinies without sympathy with man and without visible regard for what man deems justice - a being to be acknowledged as lord, not one to be loved.

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  • The pastures are everywhere luxuriant, and the wooded heights and winding glens, in which the tangled shrubbery is here and there broken up by open glades and flat meadows of green turf, exhibit a beauty of vegetation such as is hardly to be seen in any other district of Palestine.

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  • Her achievements in literature are hardly less great.

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  • He was of medium height and carried himself so well that his lameness was hardly noticeable.

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  • The horse is hardly known, and his place is taken by the ox, which is regularly bridled and saddled and ridden with all dignity.

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  • But it was hardly adapted to teach a people utterly without political experience the essential elements of self-government.

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  • The value of Dalton's generalizations can hardly be overestimated, notwithstanding the fact that in several cases they needed correction.

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  • Wagner had hardly finished the score of Lohengrin before he was at work upon the poem of Der Ring des Nibelungen.

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  • The faults make analysis exceptionally difficult, for they are no longer commonplace; indeed, the gravest dangers of modern Wagnerism arise from the fact that there is hardly any non-musical aspect in which Wagner's later work is not important enough to produce a school of essentially non-musical critics who have no notion how far Wagner's mature music transcends the rest of his thought, nor how often it rises where his philosophy falls.

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  • It matters little that Parsifal requires two nameless attendant characters in a long opening scene, for the sole purpose of telling the antecedents of the story, when a situation is thereby revealed which for subtlety and power has hardly a parallel since Greek tragedy.

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  • The overwhelming love-tragedy of Tristan and Isolde is hardly less perfect, though the simplicity of its action exposes its longueurs to greater notoriety than those which may be found in Die Meistersinger.

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    0
  • If the Hittites were Aryans, one can hardly suppose a primeval Aryan element in Anatolia.

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  • The Indo-Europeans whom we find in Mesopotamia (the Kassites and Mitannians) * and in Palestine about 1400 B.C. can hardly have entered western Asia before 2000 B.C. or thereabouts, and it is probable that the Hittites belonged to the same wandering.

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  • Hardly provinces proper, but rather client principalities, were the two native kingdoms to which Alexander had left the conquered land beyond the Indus - the kingdoms of Taxiles and Porus.

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  • The United States Geographic Board acts upon rules practically identical with those indicated, and compiles official lists of place-names, the use of which is binding upon government departments, but which it would hardly be wise to follow universally in the case of names of places outside America.

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    0
  • They can, however, hardly be described as maps, while in age they are surpassed by several cartographical clay tablets discovered in Babylonia.

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  • It need hardly be said that hydrographic surveys have been of great service to compilers of maps.

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  • Although Caesar could hardly have expected the bill to pass, the aristocratic party would be saddled with the odium of rejecting a popular measure, and the people themselves would be more ready to welcome a proposal by Caesar himself, an expectation fulfilled by the passing of the lex Julia in 59, whereby Caesar at least partly succeeded where Rullus had failed.

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    0
  • John Wilkinson and John Story of Westmorland, together with William Rogers of Bristol, raised a party against Fox concerning the management of the affairs of the society, regarding with suspicion any fixed arrangement for meetings for conducting church business, and in fact hardly finding a place for such meetings at all.

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  • This schism lasted fully ten years, although the antipope found hardly any adherents outside of his own hereditary states, those of Alphonso of Aragon, of the Swiss confederation and certain universities.

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    0
  • Our book had hardly been published, when Hyrcanus, owing to an injury done him by the Pharisees, broke with their party, and, joining the Sadducees, died a year or two later.

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  • Grave and serious in manner, speaking slowly, but with energetic gestures, simple and abstemious in his life - his daily bill of fare being reckoned as hardly costing a couple of francs - Leo XIII.

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    0
  • The repressive measures following on the Test Act bore hardly upon him, and in December 1678 he was imprisoned in Dublin Castle for six weeks.

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  • A ceremonial worship is hardly mentioned.

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  • The importance of his work in organizing and building up the American Lutheran Church, of which he has been called the Patriarch, can hardly be exaggerated; but his example in preaching in English as well as in German was, unfortunately for the growth of the Lutheran Church, not followed by his immediate successors.

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    0
  • In 1194 another conflagration laid waste the new building then hardly completed; but clergy and people set zealously to work, and the main part of the present structure was finished by 1240.

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    0
  • Of the ancient city, which occupied the same site as the modern town, hardly anything is now visible, and the discoveries of the ancient street pavement have not been noted with sufficient care to enable us to recover the plan.

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  • It is hardly mentioned in imperial times, except as a station on the road (Via Amerina) which diverged from the Via Cassia near the modern Settevene and ran to Ameria and Tuder.

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    0
  • It was estimated officially in 1904 that the wooded lands of the island comprised 3,628,434acres, of which one-third were in Oriente province, another third in Camaguey, and hardly any in Havana province.

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    0
  • In these respects the finest Cuban tobacco crops, produced in the sun, hardly rival the finest Sumatra product; but produced under cheese-cloth they do.

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    0
  • The cessation of the trade was marked,, however, by hardly any disturbance; there were no local failures,.

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  • His services in the regeneration of the Turkish power can hardly be over-estimated; all agree in recognizing his great qualities and the charm of his character; even Timur is said to have admired him so much as to offer him his daughter in marriage.

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    0
  • Charles VI., weary of the war for the Spanish succession, had shortly before concluded the peace of Rastadt (1715) and was anxious that Venice should not be too hardly pressed.

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  • Had this act been ratified by the government at Athens, a war between Greece and the Ottoman Empire could hardly have been avoided; but a royal rescript was issued by the king of the Hellenes on the 30th of September 1910, declaring vacant the three seats to which the Cretan representatives had been elected; the immediate danger was thus averted.

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    0
  • Marmont and Davout were deficient in horses for cavalry and artillery, and the troops in Boulogne, having been drawn together for the invasion of England, had hardly any transport at all, as it was considered this want could be readily supplied on landing.

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    0
  • To this Napoleon consented, but hardly had the agreement been signed than he succeeded in introducing a number of individual French soldiers into the fortress, who began rioting with the Austrian soldiery.

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    0
  • The emperor gathered little from the confused reports of their purposeless manoeuvres, but, secure in the midst of his " battalion square " of 200,000 men, he remained quite indifferent, well knowing that an advance straight on Berlin must force his enemy to concentrate and fight, and as they would bring at most 127,000 men on to the battlefield the result could hardly be doubtful.

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  • With these numbers it was impossible to attain the high degree of individual efficiency required for the old line tactics, hence they were compelled to adopt the French methods of skirmishers and columns, but as yet they had hardly realized the increased density necessary to be given to a line of battle to enable it to endure the prolonged nervous strain the new system of tactics entailed.

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  • Oudinot's and Victor's men were relatively fresh and may have totalled 20,000, whilst Ney can hardly have had more than 6000 of all corps fighting under him.

    0
    0
  • Thus after six weeks' fighting the allies were hardly more advanced than at the beginning.

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    0
  • The Kaibals, or Koibals, can hardly be distinguished from the Minusinsk Tatars, and support themselves by rearing cattle.

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    0
  • One of the most singular facts concerning the geographical distribution of Enteropneusta has recently been brought to light by Benham, who found a species of Balanoglossus, sensu stricto, on the coast of New Zealand hardly distinguishable from one occurring off Japan.

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    0
  • They speak the Buriat language as often as Russian, and in a Buriat dress can hardly be distinguished from the Buriats.

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    0
  • Van Buren was not an orator, but... the oft-repeated charge that he refrained from declaring himself on crucial questions is hardly borne out by an examination of his senatorial career.

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    0
  • The great variety of views amongst competent critics is significant of the difficulty of the problem, which can hardly be regarded as yet solved; this divergence of opinion perhaps points to the impossibility of maintaining the unity of chs.

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  • Mention should also be made of a third method which has hardly yet been tried, namely, that of endeavouring to isolate one of the three "directions" by the method of suggestion or even hypnotic trance observations.

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  • In geography he found a field hardly touched since Samuel Bochart, in whose footsteps he followed in the Spicilegium geographiae hebraeorum exterae post Bochartum (1769-1780); and to his impulse we owe the famous Eastern expedition conducted by Carsten Niebuhr.

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  • It can be shown 3 that in a uniform field an elongated piece of any non-crystalline material is in stable equilibrium only when its length is parallel to the lines of force; for diamagnetic substances, however, the directing couple is exceedingly small, and it would hardly be possible to obtain a uniform field of sufficient strength to show the effect experimentally.

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  • It would hardly be safe to generalize from these observations; the effects may possibly be dependent upon the physical condition of the metals.

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    0
  • A sample of Hadfield's manufacture, containing 1 2.36% of manganese, differed hardly at all from a non-magnetic substance, its permeability being only 1.27.

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    0
  • It is hardly possible to form any classification which is not open to some objection.

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    0
  • But he was excessively timid and cautious, and hardly mentions events, like the murder of Becket, which were subjects of controversy.

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  • The offence of shedding innocent blood charged on them by Joel is natural after these events, but hardly so in connexion with the revolt against Joram.

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  • But the traffic in this direction hardly became extensive till a later date.

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  • The style of Joel is clear (which hardly favours an early date), and his language presents peculiarities which are evidences of a late origin.

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  • Hardly anything is known of his life.

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  • The capture of Constantinople he rightly regarded as an historical event of far-reaching importance, although the comparison of it to the fall of Troy is hardly appropriate.