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hardier

hardier Sentence Examples

  • A strong tendency to run to red rice (hardier, but not so marketable) has been a second great difficulty to overcome.

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  • The hardier mules are generally employed for draught, carriage, and saddle purposes in every part of the country, and their breeding is a lucrative industry in the southern states.

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  • The sorghum is hardier than the sugar-cane; it comes to maturity in a season; and it retains its maximum sugar content a considerable time, giving opportunity for leisurely harvesting.

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  • The hardier forms of this set thrive in the open border, but the smaller sorts, like Queen Ann's jonquil, are better taken up in autumn and replanted in February; they bloom freely about April or May.

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  • Some of the hardier forms, as N.

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  • Here the reefs are generally less perfect than elsewhere, seldom forming complete central lagoons, and as they were formerly exposed to the constant attacks of the Mopla pirates from India, the people are hardier and more vigorous than their less warlike southern neighbours.

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  • The great advantage of the Confederate - an advantage which he had in a less degree as against the hardier and country-bred Federal of the west - was that he was a hunter and rider born and bred, an excellent shot, and still not infrequently settled his quarrels by the duel.

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  • The mule is more generally used in every part of the country, being hardier, more intelligent and better adapted for service as a draft and pack animal.

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  • The oil is similar to that in the true colza seeds but the plants do not yield so much per acre as the latter: they are, however, hardier and more adapted for cultivation on poor sandy soils.

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  • The Siberian larch has smooth grey bark and smaller cones, approaching in shape somewhat to those of the American hackmatack; it seems even hardier than the Alpine tree, growing up to latitude 68°, but, as the inclement climate of the polar shores is neared, dwindling down to a dwarf and even trailing bush.

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  • The eastern and western aspects are set apart for fruits of a somewhat hardier character.

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  • This allows of the hardier pot plants being removed out of doors while those planted out are in need of the room.

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  • The hardier orchard-house fruits should now be moved outdoors under temporary awnings, to give the choicer fruits more space, - the roots being protected by plunging the pots.

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  • Put in cuttings of all sorts of evergreens, &c. Plant out the hardier sorts of roses.

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  • But little can be done in the northern states except to prepare manure, and get sashes, tools, &c., in working order; but in sections of the country where there is little or no frost the hardier kinds of seeds and plants may be sown and planted, such as asparagus, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, leek, lettuce, onion, parsnip, peas, spinach, turnip, &c. In any section where these seeds can be sown in open ground, it is an indication that hotbeds may be started for the sowing of such tender vegetables as tomatoes, egg and pepper plants, &c.; though, unless in the extreme southern states, hotbeds should not be started before the beginning or middle of February.

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  • - The directions for January will in the main apply to this month, except that now some of the hardier annuals may be sown in hotbed or greenhouse, and also the propagation of plants by cuttings may be done rather better now than in January, as the greater amount of light gives more vitality to the cutting.

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  • Hardier kinds of annuals may be sown; it is best done in shallow boxes, say 2 in.

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  • In localities where the frost is out of the ground, if it is not wet, seeds of the hardier vegetables can be sown.

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  • Due attention must be paid to shifting well-rooted plants into larger pots; and, if space is desired, many kinds of hardier plants can be safely put out in cold frames.

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  • Hardier sorts of vegetable seeds and plants, such as beets, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, lettuce, onions, parsley, parsnips, peas, potatoes, radishes, spinach, turnip, &c., should all be sown or planted by the middle of the month if the soil is dry and warm, and in all cases, where practicable, before the end of the month.

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  • Roses, carnations, camellias, azaleas, pelargoniums and the hardier sorts of plants will do better if placed in a cold frame or pit until the middle of November than they would in an ordinary greenhouse.

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  • A smaller, hardier kind of cattle and large numbers of sheep are kept upon the heath-lands in the eastern provinces, which also favour the rearing of pigs and bee-culture.

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  • above sea-level, the upper limit of the members of the orange tribe; the second ascends to about 3300 ft., the limit of the growth of wheat, the vine and the hardier evergreens; and the third, that of forests, reaches from about 3300 ft.

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  • As the field of existence is limited and preoccupied, it is only the hardier, more robust, better-suited-tocircumstance individuals, who are able to struggle forward to maturity, these inhabiting only the situations to which they have superior adaptation and greater power of occupancy than any other kind; the weaker and less circumstance-suited being prematurely destroyed.

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  • Among cultivated plants, for example, hardier and more tender varieties often arise.

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  • In Italy, as long as orange trees were propagated by grafts, they were tender; but after many of the trees were destroyed by the severe frosts of 1709 and 1763, plants were raised from seed, and these were found to be hardier and more productive than the former kinds.

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  • The peach is believed to have been tender, and to have ripened its fruit with difficulty, when first introduced into Greece; so that (as Darwin observes) in travelling northward during two thousand years it must have become much hardier.

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  • Maule, thinking a hardier blood might be infused into the potato by crossing it with some of the native species, raised hybrids between it and the two common species of Solanum native in this country, S.

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  • Maule also tried the effect of grafting the potato on these two species and, though he succeeded, there is no record to show whether the product was any hardier than the parents.

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  • On the higher plateaus the hardier cereals only are cultivated.

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  • It is much hardier than most plants of the orange tribe, and succeeds well when grafted on the wild species, Citrus trifoliata.

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  • As it is, some varieties are hardier and taller than others, and the straw more solid, varying in colour and having less liability to be "laid"; but in the matter of "tillering," or the production of side-shoots from the base of the stem, there is much difference.

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  • The bearded varieties are supposed to be hardier; at any rate they defy the ravages of predatory birds more completely than the unarmed varieties, and they are preferable in countries liable to storms of wind, as less likely to have their seeds detached.

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  • Charles the Bold, proud, violent, pugnacious, as treacherous as his rival, a hardier soldier, though without his political sagacity, imprisoned Louis in the tower where Charles the Simple ~ja?

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  • The time of sowing, the quantity of seed per acre (about three bushels) and the method of gathering and retting are very similar to those of flax; but, as a rule, it is a hardier plant than flax, does not possess the same pliability, is much coarser and more brittle, and does not require the same amount of attention during the first few weeks of its growth.

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  • allium fistulosum Culinary herb, stronger flavored than the white variety and hardier.

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  • Merlot is often fickle to grow in Northern regions but the arrival of new hardier clones mean it could do quite well in Auckland.

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  • frosty pod is the hardier species, with spores that can travel further in hot, dry conditions.

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  • A still hardier mountaineer is the Sierra juniper (Juniperus occidentalis ), growing mostly on domes and ridges and glacier pavements.

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  • They would have to prepare a more substantial repast for the hardier and more exercised intellects of those who listened to them.

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  • As with some other tree ferns, once trunk height reaches 2 ' or more it seems to become much hardier.

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  • A strong tendency to run to red rice (hardier, but not so marketable) has been a second great difficulty to overcome.

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  • The hardier mules are generally employed for draught, carriage, and saddle purposes in every part of the country, and their breeding is a lucrative industry in the southern states.

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  • The sorghum is hardier than the sugar-cane; it comes to maturity in a season; and it retains its maximum sugar content a considerable time, giving opportunity for leisurely harvesting.

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  • The hardier forms of this set thrive in the open border, but the smaller sorts, like Queen Ann's jonquil, are better taken up in autumn and replanted in February; they bloom freely about April or May.

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  • Some of the hardier forms, as N.

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  • Here the reefs are generally less perfect than elsewhere, seldom forming complete central lagoons, and as they were formerly exposed to the constant attacks of the Mopla pirates from India, the people are hardier and more vigorous than their less warlike southern neighbours.

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  • The great advantage of the Confederate - an advantage which he had in a less degree as against the hardier and country-bred Federal of the west - was that he was a hunter and rider born and bred, an excellent shot, and still not infrequently settled his quarrels by the duel.

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  • The mule is more generally used in every part of the country, being hardier, more intelligent and better adapted for service as a draft and pack animal.

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    0
  • The oil is similar to that in the true colza seeds but the plants do not yield so much per acre as the latter: they are, however, hardier and more adapted for cultivation on poor sandy soils.

    0
    0
  • The Siberian larch has smooth grey bark and smaller cones, approaching in shape somewhat to those of the American hackmatack; it seems even hardier than the Alpine tree, growing up to latitude 68°, but, as the inclement climate of the polar shores is neared, dwindling down to a dwarf and even trailing bush.

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  • The eastern and western aspects are set apart for fruits of a somewhat hardier character.

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  • This allows of the hardier pot plants being removed out of doors while those planted out are in need of the room.

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  • The hardier orchard-house fruits should now be moved outdoors under temporary awnings, to give the choicer fruits more space, - the roots being protected by plunging the pots.

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  • Put in cuttings of all sorts of evergreens, &c. Plant out the hardier sorts of roses.

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  • But little can be done in the northern states except to prepare manure, and get sashes, tools, &c., in working order; but in sections of the country where there is little or no frost the hardier kinds of seeds and plants may be sown and planted, such as asparagus, cabbage, cauliflower, carrot, leek, lettuce, onion, parsnip, peas, spinach, turnip, &c. In any section where these seeds can be sown in open ground, it is an indication that hotbeds may be started for the sowing of such tender vegetables as tomatoes, egg and pepper plants, &c.; though, unless in the extreme southern states, hotbeds should not be started before the beginning or middle of February.

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  • - The directions for January will in the main apply to this month, except that now some of the hardier annuals may be sown in hotbed or greenhouse, and also the propagation of plants by cuttings may be done rather better now than in January, as the greater amount of light gives more vitality to the cutting.

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  • Hardier kinds of annuals may be sown; it is best done in shallow boxes, say 2 in.

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  • In localities where the frost is out of the ground, if it is not wet, seeds of the hardier vegetables can be sown.

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  • Due attention must be paid to shifting well-rooted plants into larger pots; and, if space is desired, many kinds of hardier plants can be safely put out in cold frames.

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    0
  • Hardier sorts of vegetable seeds and plants, such as beets, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, lettuce, onions, parsley, parsnips, peas, potatoes, radishes, spinach, turnip, &c., should all be sown or planted by the middle of the month if the soil is dry and warm, and in all cases, where practicable, before the end of the month.

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  • Roses, carnations, camellias, azaleas, pelargoniums and the hardier sorts of plants will do better if placed in a cold frame or pit until the middle of November than they would in an ordinary greenhouse.

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  • A smaller, hardier kind of cattle and large numbers of sheep are kept upon the heath-lands in the eastern provinces, which also favour the rearing of pigs and bee-culture.

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  • above sea-level, the upper limit of the members of the orange tribe; the second ascends to about 3300 ft., the limit of the growth of wheat, the vine and the hardier evergreens; and the third, that of forests, reaches from about 3300 ft.

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  • As the field of existence is limited and preoccupied, it is only the hardier, more robust, better-suited-tocircumstance individuals, who are able to struggle forward to maturity, these inhabiting only the situations to which they have superior adaptation and greater power of occupancy than any other kind; the weaker and less circumstance-suited being prematurely destroyed.

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  • Among cultivated plants, for example, hardier and more tender varieties often arise.

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  • In Italy, as long as orange trees were propagated by grafts, they were tender; but after many of the trees were destroyed by the severe frosts of 1709 and 1763, plants were raised from seed, and these were found to be hardier and more productive than the former kinds.

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    0
  • The peach is believed to have been tender, and to have ripened its fruit with difficulty, when first introduced into Greece; so that (as Darwin observes) in travelling northward during two thousand years it must have become much hardier.

    0
    0
  • Maule, thinking a hardier blood might be infused into the potato by crossing it with some of the native species, raised hybrids between it and the two common species of Solanum native in this country, S.

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  • Maule also tried the effect of grafting the potato on these two species and, though he succeeded, there is no record to show whether the product was any hardier than the parents.

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  • On the higher plateaus the hardier cereals only are cultivated.

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  • It is much hardier than most plants of the orange tribe, and succeeds well when grafted on the wild species, Citrus trifoliata.

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    0
  • As it is, some varieties are hardier and taller than others, and the straw more solid, varying in colour and having less liability to be "laid"; but in the matter of "tillering," or the production of side-shoots from the base of the stem, there is much difference.

    0
    0
  • The bearded varieties are supposed to be hardier; at any rate they defy the ravages of predatory birds more completely than the unarmed varieties, and they are preferable in countries liable to storms of wind, as less likely to have their seeds detached.

    0
    0
  • Charles the Bold, proud, violent, pugnacious, as treacherous as his rival, a hardier soldier, though without his political sagacity, imprisoned Louis in the tower where Charles the Simple ~ja?

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    0
  • The time of sowing, the quantity of seed per acre (about three bushels) and the method of gathering and retting are very similar to those of flax; but, as a rule, it is a hardier plant than flax, does not possess the same pliability, is much coarser and more brittle, and does not require the same amount of attention during the first few weeks of its growth.

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  • They would have to prepare a more substantial repast for the hardier and more exercised intellects of those who listened to them.

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  • As with some other tree ferns, once trunk height reaches 2 ' or more it seems to become much hardier.

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  • Generally shoes meant for activities will have a stiffer upper and a hardier sole, and these types of casual shoes are usually made from leather or a synthetic material.

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  • A. Emodi is dwarfer and hardier, its pale-red flowers with an orange throat being 2 inches long and held erect.

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  • It is hardier in the shade, its foliage browning badly if caught too suddenly by the sun after hard frosts.

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  • It is hardier in the shade, its foliage browning badly if caught too suddenly by the sun after hard frosts.

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  • B. salicina, a shrub of about 6 feet, from Colorado, comes near halimifolia, but is hardier.

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  • Mexican plants allied to the Agaves, but hardier and more easily grown.

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  • Among the species is Japonica, a dwarf form, but hardier.

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  • It is hardier than L. fulgens, living through the winter in open beds and with little or no protection.

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  • T. crocostemon is even hardier, growing and flowering on a wall at Kew, with protection in severe weather.

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  • Corokia Cotoneaster - Coming from the mountains, this kind is hardier, and easily grown in southern gardens.

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  • It bears smaller flowers than Mooreanum, but is hardier, and with a little care in severe winters will grow well in almost any part of Britain.

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  • It is hardier than any other Dahlia, and plants left in the ground are generally uninjured throughout the winter.

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  • The Chinese P. amurense is the hardier and more vigorous kind, P. japonicum being perhaps a form of it, and P. sachalinense, a promising kind, the last to come.

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  • Ingrami is one of the best, being hardier than E. macrantha, though not so handsome.

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  • Among the hardier kinds are E. globulus, Gunnii, citriodora, amygdalina, cordata.

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  • It is fine in color and hardier than the true Laurel, and has good qualities in all ways for garden or woodland.

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  • The var. rupicola flowers and seeds annually in the Rock Garden at Edinburgh Botanical Gardens, and seems hardier than the type.

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  • The plant seldom exceeds 3 or 4 feet in height, though the branches trail widely, and it is hardier than many New Zealand shrubs, growing in exposed places and without protection in the north of England.

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  • Rubro-vittatum is a variety with a very distinct bulb, the foliage is darker, and it is a hardier, better doer than the type.

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  • We may hope, too, from the latitude and elevation at which many of them grow, that they will prove hardier than the Himalayan species.

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  • In hard winters even strong plants may be injured or cut to the ground, but the roots seldom perish, and by selection hardier forms are now available than those first introduced.

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  • P. Cookianum is hardier than P. tenax and a much smaller plant, with leaves of only 3 to 4 feet and yellow flowers; it also has a variegated variety.

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  • Orange Ball Tree (Buddleia) - B. globosa is a favourite shrub from Chili, often seen in the southern coast gardens, where it is hardier, and in Ireland; the flowers, balls of bright yellow, are showy in early summer.

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  • It is undoubtedly the best of all the Osmanthuses for outdoor work, being much hardier than the variegated forms.

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  • If the young trees are cut back annually they make strong shoots bearing enormous leaves, with the advantage of being much hardier than the tender greenhouse plants used in summer to give such effects.

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  • Asia, it is hardier than the Chinese plant, but does not bloom freely in cold soils.

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  • P. betulinus is also rare, but appears hardier than the last, and has grown very rapidly to a height of 20 feet at Castlewellan.

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  • The hardier kinds are from N.W. America, where the winters are severe.

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  • Grown in tubs in the conservatory in winter, and placed in the open air in summer, it is useful for grouping with the hardier palms.

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  • The Persian varieties are the finest as regards color, compactness, and symmetry of growth; but the Turban varieties are of hardier constitution and of freer growth, and therefore are better suited for beds, lines, and masses.

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  • The hardier varieties are admirable for artistic gardening, their fine forms being very effective when tastefully grouped on the fringe of beds of choice bushes and when touching and seeming to spring out of the grass.

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  • Lifting the fruit off the ground will produce hardier fruit that doesn't get eaten by all the critters in your soil.

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  • They have unique characteristics, are hardier, and often taste much better than the hybrids.

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  • Some people believe that California's climate is too warm for the finicky Pinot Noir grape, however, through the process of cloning, hardier versions have persisted.

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  • Those who owned vineyards sought grape varieties resistant to the diseases and chose hardier grapes than the types hit by the diseases.

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  • We know hydrogenated oils are not good to eat, but the hydrogenation process makes oils solid at room temperature and makes them hardier, so it takes longer for them to go rancid.

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  • The hair sharpened Stephanie's softer edges and gave her a hardier appearance.

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  • Start with the first one and move down the list if you end up needing hardier cleaners.

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