Hanover sentence example

hanover
  • In 1836 he was appointed to the chair of chemistry in the medical faculty at Göttingen, holding also the office of inspector-general of pharmacies in the kingdom of Hanover.
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  • The trouble was again revived by the repeal in 1790 of the confirming act 2 Several Scotch-Irish families from Lancaster (disambiguation)|Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, accepted Connecticut titles and settled at Hanover under Captain Lazarus Stewart.
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  • (Hanover, 1866); Simeon of Durham (" Rolls " series), ed.
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  • For the kingdom of Hanover; maintained.
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  • Pertz, Geschichte der merowingischen Hausmeier (Hanover, 1819); H.
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  • Kurze (Hanover, 1889); and has been translated into German by J.
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  • When he died three years later Lauenburg passed to his nephew, George Louis, elector of Hanover, afterwards king of Great Britain as George I., whose rights were recognized by the emperor Charles VI.
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  • It reverted to Hanover after the battle of Leipzig in 1813, and in 1816 was ceded to Prussia, the greater part of it being at once transferred by her to Denmark in exchange for Swedish Pomerania.
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  • He was born at Hanover on the 10th of March 1772.
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  • (Hanover, 1827); Kihn, Die Bedeutung der antioch.
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  • He went first to Hanover, and afterwards to Cassel to study architecture, for which he seems to have had little inclination.
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  • LINGEN, a town in the Prussian province of Hanover, on the Ems canal, 43 m.
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  • After the death of the English king, William III., in 1702, it passed to Frederick I., king of Prussia, and in 1815 the lower county was transferred to Hanover, only to be united again with Prussia in 1866.
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  • (Hanover and Berlin, 1826 fol.); Lettres de Gerbert, edited by J.
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  • After acting as assistant in pharmacies at Quedlinburg, Hanover, Berlin and Danzig successively he came to Berlin on the death of Valentin Rose the elder in 1771 as manager of his business, and in 1780 he started an establishment on his own account in the same city, where from 1782 he was pharmaceutical assessor of the Ober-Collegium Medicum.
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  • by the Prussian province of Hanover.
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  • ASHLAND, a village of Hanover county, Virginia, U.S.A., 17 m.
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  • 2 Lehrbuch der Geographie (Hanover and Leipzig, 1900), Bd.
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  • In these circumstances the Act of Settlement was passed, enacting that, in default of issue to either William or: Anne, the crown of England, France 4 and Ireland was to pass to "the most excellent princess Sophia, electress and duchess dowager of Hanover," a grand-daughter of James I., and "the heirs of her body being Protestants."
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  • The act is thus responsible for the accession of the house of Hanover to the British throne.
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  • GEORG HEINRICH PERTZ (1795-1876), German historian, was born at Hanover on the 28th of March 1795.
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  • In 1823 he had been made secretary of the archives, and in 1827 principal keeper of the royal library at Hanover; from 1832 to 1837 he edited the Hannoverische Zeitung, and more than once sat as a representative in the Hanoverian second chamber.
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  • That admiration for an empire of more than two hundred millions of men, where not one had the right to call himself free; that effeminate philosophy which has more praise for luxury and pleasures than for all the virtues; that style always elegant and never energetic, reveal at the most the elector of Hanover's slave."
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  • FREDERICK LOUIS (1707-1751), prince of Wales, eldest son of George II., was born at Hanover on the 10th of January 1707.
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  • PATRICK HENRY (1736-1799), American statesman and orator, was born at Studley, Hanover county, Virginia, on the 29th of May 1736.
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  • Then in 1763 was delivered his speech in "The Parson's Cause" - a suit brought by a clergyman, Rev. James Maury, in the Hanover County Court, to secure restitution for money considered by him to be due on account of his salary (16,000 pounds of tobacco by law) having been paid in money calculated at a rate less than the current market price of tobacco.
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  • What gave Bennigsen his importance not only in Hanover, but throughout the whole of Germany, was the foundation of the National Verein, which was due to him, and of which he was president.
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  • It united the moderate Liberals throughout Germany, and at once became a great political power, notwithstanding all the efforts of the governments, and especially of the king of Hanover to suppress it.
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  • In 1866 Bennigsen used all his influence to keep Hanover neutral in the conflict between Prussia and Austria, but in vain.
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  • He used his influence to procure as much autonomy as possible for the province of Hanover, but was a strong opponent of the Guelph party.
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  • Kiepert (2nd ed., Hanover, 1902), and E.
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  • Schreck (Hanover, 1894).
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  • CAROLINE LUCRETIA HERSCHEL (1750-1848), English astronomer, sister of Sir William Herschel, the eighth child and fourth daughter of her parents, was born at Hanover on the 16th of March 1750.
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  • Though she returned to Hanover in 1822 she did not abandon her astronomical studies, and in 1828 she completed the reduction, to January 1800, of 2500 nebulae discovered by her brother.
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  • GOSLAR, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, romantically situated on the Gose, an affluent of the Oker, at the north foot of the Harz, 24 m.
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  • In 1807 it was joined to Westphalia, in 1816 to Hanover and in 1866 it was, along with Hanover, re-united to Prussia.
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  • It is noteworthy that a similar bone bed has been traced on the same geological horizon in Brunswick, Hanover and Franconia.
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  • He was chosen Fourth of July orator in Hanover, the college town, in 1800, and in his speech appears the substance of the political principles for the develop - ment of which he is chiefly famous.
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  • In the same year in which the British Association held its first meeting, Brewster received the honour of knighthood and the decoration of the Guelphic order of Hanover.
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  • Disregarding the neutrality of the Germanic System, Napoleon sent a strong French corps to overrun Hanover, while he despatched General Gouvion St Cyr to occupy Taranto and other dominating positions in the south-east of the kingdom of Naples.
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  • Exactions at the expense of Hanover and Naples helped to lighten the burdens of French finance; Napoleon's sale of Louisiana to the United States early in 1803 for 60,000,000 francs brought further relief to the French treasury; and by pressing hard on his ally, Spain, he compelled her to exchange the armed help which he had a right to claim, for an annual subsidy of 2,880,000.
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  • Military affairs in this period are dealt with under Napoleonic Campaigns; but it may be noted here that during the anxious days which Napoleon spent at the camp of Boulogne in the second and third weeks of August 1805, uncertain whether to risk all in an attack on England in case Villeneuve should arrive, or to turn the Grand Army against Austria, the only step which he took to avert a continental war was the despatch of General Duroc to Berlin to offer Hanover to Prussia on consideration of her framing a close alliance with France.
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  • When modified in February 1806, after Prussia's demobilization, they comprised the occupation of Hanover by Prussia, with the proviso, however, that she should exclude British ships and goods from the whole of the northwest coast of Germany.
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  • What was more, Prussia, finding that Napoleon had secretly offered to the British Hanover (that gilded hook by which he caught her early in the year), now resolved to avenge this, the last of several insults.
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  • Nelson's crowning triumph rendered impossible for the present all other means of attack on those elusive foes; and Napoleon's sense of the importance of that battle may be gauged, not by his public utterances on the subject, but by his persistence in forcing Prussia to close Hanover and the whole coastline of north-west Germany against British goods.
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  • The royal riding school was removed hence to Hanover in 1867.
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  • - Spain, Italy, Albania ., Croatia, Hungary, Hesse, Hanover, Transcaspia, Algeria, Florida, Alabama, California, Mexico, Peru, Victoria, New Zealand.
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  • Holland, France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Hungary, Silesia, Moravia, Westphalia, Brunswick, Hanover, Schleswig-Holstein, (German) Silesia, Poland, Kutais, Uralsk, Turkestan, Armenia, Syria, Arabia, Persia, Tunis, Egypt, West Africa, British Columbia, Alberta, Assiniboia, Athabasca, Manitoba, New Jersey, South Dakota, Washington, Montana, Oklahoma, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, California, New Mexico, Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mexico, Hayti, Trinidad, Colombia, Argentina [?], New Zealand.
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  • Sussex, France, Switzerland, Spain, Hungary, Transylvania, Bukowina, Galicia, Hesse, Baden, Hanover, Brunswick, California, Texas, Mexico, Bolivia, Argentina.
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  • Yorkshire, Somerset, Buckingham, France, Switzer land, Spain, Italy, Lower Austria, Baden, Elsass, Hesse, Hanover, Brunswick, Sizran, Tiflis, Siberia, Persia, Madagascar, Alaska, Wyoming, Colorado, Mexico, Argentina.
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  • Scotland, Devonshire, Spain, Hanover, Archangel, Vitebsk, Athabasca, Mackenzie, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Newfoundland, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Kentucky.
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  • The authorities for the Crusades have been collected in Bongars, Gesta Dei per Francos (Hanover, 1611) (incomplete); Michaud, Bibliotheque des croisades (Paris, 1829) (containing translations of select passages in the authorities); the Recueil des historiens des croisades, published by the Academie des Inscriptions (Paris, 1841 onwards) (the best general collection, containing many of the Latin, Greek, Arabic and Armenian authorities, and also the text of the assizes; but sometimes poorly edited and still .incomplete); and the publications of the Societe de l'Orient Latin (founded in 1875), especially the Archives, of which two volumes were published in 1881 and 1884, and the volumes of the Revue, published yearly from 1893 to 1902, and containing not only new texts, but articles and reviews of books which are of great service.
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  • In 1848 he received an appointment at the supreme court of appeal for the kingdom of Hanover, which sat at Celle.
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  • In 1851 he was elected president of the chamber, and In the same year minister of justice, being the first Catholic who had held so high an office in Hanover.
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  • Windthorst took no part in the critical events of 1866; contrary to the opinion of many of his friends, after the annexation of Hanover by Prussia he accepted the fait accompli, took the oath of allegiance, and was elected a member both of the Prussian parliament and of the North German diet.
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  • He took a leading part in the formation of the party of the Centre in 1870-1871, but he did not become a member of it, fearing that his reputation as a follower of the king of Hanover would injure the party, until he was formally requested to join them by the leaders.
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  • He was buried in the Marienkirche in Hanover, which had been erected from the money subscribed as a testimonial to himself.
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  • Levison has edited the Vitae sancti Bonifatii (Hanover, 1905).
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  • HARBURG, a seaport town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, on the left bank of the southern arm of the Elbe, 6 m.
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  • It is pleasantly situated at the foot of a lofty range of hills, which here dip down to the river, at the junction of the main lines of railway from Bremen and Hanover to Hamburg, which are carried to the latter city over two grand bridges crossing the southern and the northern arms of the Elbe.
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  • In 1376 it was united to the principality of Luneburg, along with which it fell in 1705 to Hanover, and in 1806 to Prussia.
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  • He graduated at Hanover College, Hanover, Indiana, in 1841, and began in 1843 a successful career at the bar.
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  • Hampden-Sidney is the seat of Hampden-Sidney College, founded by the presbytery of Hanover county as HampdenSidney Academy in 1776, and named in honour of John Hampden and Algernon Sidney.
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  • She had thirteen children - Frederick Henry, drgwned at sea in 1629; Charles Louis, elector palatine, whose daughter married Philip, duke of Orleans, and became the ancestress of the elder and Roman Catholic branch of the royal family of England; Elizabeth, abbess and friend of Descartes; Prince Rupert and Prince Maurice, who died unmarried; Louisa, abbess; Edward, who married Anne de Gonzaga, "princesse palatine," and had children; Henrietta Maria, who married Count Sigismund Ragotzki but died childless; Philip and Charlotte, who died childless; Sophia, who married Ernest Augustus, elector of Hanover, and was mother of George I.
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  • (Hanover and Berlin, 1826-1892).
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  • (Hanover and Berlin, 1826 fol.); E.
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  • Wagner's Lehrbuch (Hanover, 1908, pp. 241-252) refers to numerous authorities who deal fully with the whole question of measurement.
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  • fuller of information - was discovered in 1830 in the old monastery of Ebstorf in Hanover.
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  • HENRY MELCHIOR MUHLENBERG (1711-1787), GermanAmerican Lutheran clergyman, was born in Einbeck, Hanover, on the 6th of September 1711.
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  • Bernadotte's corps in Hanover was almost in the position of a beleaguered garrison, and the marshal could only obtain his transport by giving out that he was ordered to withdraw to France.
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  • The Hamburg stations, connected with the other by the Verbindungs-Bahn (or metropolitan railway) crossing the Lombards-Brucke, are those of the Venloer (or Hanoverian, as it is often called) Bahnhof on the south-east, in close proximity to the harbour, into which converge the lines from Cologne and Bremen, Hanover and Frankfort-on-Main, and from Berlin, via Nelzen; the Klostertor-Bahnhof (on the metropolitan line) which temporarily superseded the old Berlin station, and the Lubeck station a little to the north-east, during the erection of the new central station, which occupies a site between the Klostertor-Bahnhof and the Lombards-Brucke.
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  • HITZACKER, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover at the influx of the Jeetze into the Elbe, 33 m.
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  • Among his charges was John Parke Custis, the step-son of George Washington, with whom he began a long and intimate friendship. Returning to England, he was ordained by the bishop of London in March 1762, and at once sailed again for America, where he remained until 1775 as rector of various Virginia and Maryland parishes, including Hanover, King George's county, Virginia, and St Anne's at Annapolis, Maryland.
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  • Ii]] 1826, at Breselenz, near Dannenberg in Hanover.
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  • In 1840 he went to Hanover, where he attended the lyceum, and two years later he entered the Johanneum at Luneburg.
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  • This unsightly mass of rubbish lay for a while as an eyesore, until the happy thought arose of converting it into a broad way joining the new .oNd at Hanover Street with the Old Town at the Lawnmarket.
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  • There are also about 4500 Natalians of German extraction, settled mainly in the New Hanover and Umzimkulu districts.
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  • A violent article, in which he demanded the annexation of Hanover and Saxony, and attacked with great bitterness the Saxon royal house, led to an estrangement from his father, who enjoyed the warm friendship of the king.
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  • HAMBURG, a state of the German empire, on the lower Elbe, bounded by the Prussian provinces of Schleswig-Holstein and Hanover.
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  • m., and consists of the city of Hamburg with its incorporated suburbs and the surrounding district, including several islands in the Elbe, five small enclaves in Holstein; the communes of Moorburg in the Luneburg district of the Prussian province of Hanover and Cuxhaven-Ritzebuttel at the mouth of the Elbe, the island of Neuwerk about 5 m.
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  • Pertz in the Scriptores Rerum Germanicarum, Band xix., Hanover, 1866) for the latter part of the reign.
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  • C. Trieber, Pheidon von Argos (Hanover, 1880), and J.
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  • between bank and bank, travels on between the green marshes of Holstein and Hanover until it becomes merged in the North Sea off Cuxhaven.
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  • But the number of tolls was only reduced to one, levied at Wittenberge, in 1863, about one year after Hanover was induced to give up the Stade or Brunsbiittel toll in return for a compensation of 2,857,340 thalers.
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  • SEVEN WEEKS' WAR, the name given to the war of 1866 between Prussia on the one side, and Austria, Bavaria, Hanover, Saxony and allied German states on the other.
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  • In western Germany the Prussian forces, depleted to the utmost to furnish troops for the Bohemian campaign, were opposed to the armies of Hanover and Bavaria and the 8th Federal corps (the last consisting of Hessians, Wurttembergers, Badensers and Nassauers with an Austrian division drawn from the neutralized Federal fortresses), which were far superior in number.
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  • Hanover and Hesse-Cassel, which were nearest to Prussia and therefore immediately dangerous, were dealt with promptly and without waiting for the decision in the main theatre of war.
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  • On the 15th and 16th of June Beyer moved on Cassel, while the two other Prussian generals converged on Hanover.
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  • Such are that of the London Necropolis Company at Brookwood near Woking, Surrey, and that of the parishes of St Mary Abbots, Kensington, and St George, Hanover Square, at Hanwell, Middlesex.
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  • Music. - The principal educational institutions are - the Royal Academy of Music, Tenterden Street, Hanover Square; the Royal College of Music, South Kensington; Guildhall School, City, near the Victoria Embankment; London College, Great Marlborough Street; Trinity College, Manchester Square; Victoria College, Berners Street; and the Royal College of Organists, Bloomsbury.
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  • (14) St George's Hanover Square.
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  • It falls into three distinct parts: (1) the largest portion, with the city of Bremen, lying on both banks, but chiefly on the right, of the lower course of the Weser, surrounded by the Prussian province of Hanover and the grandduchy of Oldenburg, and consisting in the main of lowland country intersected by canals and dykes; (2) the town and district of Vegesack, lying separate from, but immediately north of the main portion, on the right bank of the river; (3) the port of Bremerhaven, 46 m.
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  • The population is shown as follows: - Of the inhabitants, who belong to the Lower Saxon (NiederSachsen) race and in daily intercourse mostly speak the Low German (Plattdeutsch) dialect, about two-thirds are natives of the state and one-third immigrants from other parts of Germany, chiefly from Hanover and Oldenburg.
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  • The preface was translated into German by Theodor Noldeke in his Beitrage (Hanover, 1864), pp. 1-51.
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  • Peter the Great, in 1 712, attached him to Prince Kurakin at the Utrecht Congress that he might learn diplomacy, and for the same reason permitted him in 1713 to enter the service of the elector of Hanover.
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  • HolderEgger (Hanover, 1894) See H.
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  • HAMELN, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, at the confluence of the Weser and Hamel, 33 m.
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  • of Hanover, on the line to Altenbeken, which here effects a junction with railways to Lohne and Brunswick.
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  • Delbriick in 1851 induced Hanover, Oldenburg and SchaumburgLippe to join the Zollverein; and the southern states, which had agreed to admit Austria to the union, found themselves forced in 1853 to renew the old union, from which Austria was excluded.
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  • HEINRICH FRIEDRICH WILHELM GESENIUS (1786-1842), German orientalist and biblical critic, was born at Nordhausen, Hanover, on the 3rd of February 1786.
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  • of Berlin on the main line of railway to Hanover and at the junction of lines to Bremen, Magdeburg and Wittenberge.
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  • EINBECK, or Em2BECK, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, on the Ilm, 50 m.
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  • of Hanover.
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  • Noldeke's Beitrage zur Kenntniss der Poesie der alten Araber (Hanover, 1804); and W.
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  • Then, and on two subsequent occasions, he was returned by the city of Hanover as a member of the North German and German parliaments.
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  • SCHAUMBURG-LIPPE, a principality forming part of the German Empire, consisting of the western half of the old countship of Schaumburg, and surrounded by Westphalia, Hanover and the Prussian part of Schaumburg.
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  • (Hanover and Berlin, 1826); E.
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  • He collected the works of several French writers who as contemporaries described the crusades, and published them under the title Gesta Dei per Francos (Hanover, 1611).
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  • (Hanover and Berlin, 1826 fol.); Die Urkunden des Kaisers Ottos I., edited by Th.
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  • Diplomata (Hanover, 1879); W.
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  • UELZEN, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, on the Ilmenau, east of the famous Liineburger Heide, at the junction of the railway connecting Hamburg, Hanover, Bremen and Stendal, 52 m.
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  • See Jaenicke, Geschichte der Stadt Uelzen (Hanover, 1889).
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  • He preached in the Presbyterian church at East Hampton, Long Island (1798-1810, being ordained in 1 799); in the Congregational church at Litchfield, Connecticut (1810-1826), in the Hanover Street church of Boston (1826-1832), and in the Second Presbyterian church of Cincinnati, Ohio (1833-1843); was president of the newly established Lane Theological Seminary at Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, and was professor of didactic and polemic theology there (1832-1850), being professor emeritus until his death.
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  • EMDEN, a maritime town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, near the mouth of the Ems, 49 m.
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  • In 1810 Emden became the chief town of the French department of Ems Oriental; in 1815 it was assigned to Hanover, and in 1866 was annexed with that kingdom by Prussia.
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  • The queen's health was visibly breaking, and the Tory ministers could only look forward to their own downfall on the accession of the elector of Hanover.
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  • At the same time he spoke of the treachery of Marlborough and Berwick, and of one other, presumably Oxford, whom he refused to name, all of whom were in communication with Hanover.'
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  • The tax was abolished in 1267 by the Hanseatic League, but it was revived by the Swedes in 1688, and confirmed by Hanover.
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  • The dues were fostered by the growing trade of Hamburg, and in 1861, when they were redeemed (for 427,600) by the nations trading in the Elbe, the exchequer of Hanover was in the yearly receipt of about L45,000 from this source.
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  • " northern island"), an island of Germany, in the North Sea, the largest of the East Friesland group, belonging to the Prussian province of Hanover.
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  • HANOVER, a borough of York county, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., 36 m.
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  • Hanover was laid out in 1763 or 1764 by Col.
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  • On the 30th of June 1863 there was a cavalry engagement in and near Hanover between the forces of Generals H.
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  • This engagement is commemorated by an equestrian statue erected in Hanover by the state.
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  • (Hanover and Berlin, 1826 seq.); "Die Urkunde des deutschen Konigs Heinrichs I.," edited by T.
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  • For a few years he was a teacher at Leer and at Osnabruck; but in 1858 he settled at Hanover, where he became intimate with King George V., who made him his Archivrat.
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  • Thoroughly disliking Prussia, he was in hearty accord with George in resisting her aggressive policy; and after the annexation of Hanover in 1866 he accompanied the exiled king to Hietzing.
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  • and seine Politik (Schaffhausen, 1867) and Geschichte Ostfrieslands (Hanover, 1854-1858) show his dislike of Prussia.
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  • (Hanover, 1878); Phillipp Melanchthon (Berlin, 1897).
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  • and his claim to Hanover, including the Offizieller Bericht fiber die Kriegsereignisse zwischen Hannover and Preussen im Juni 1866 (Vienna, 1867), and he edited the works of Leibnitz in eleven volumes (1861-1884).
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  • Pertz (Hanover and Berlin, 1826-1892).
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  • Schroder (Hanover, 1892).
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  • HANOVER, the capital of the Prussian province of the same name, situated in a sandy but fertile plain on the Leine, which here receives the Ihme, 38 m.
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  • in height (the highest in Hanover).
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  • Close to it lies the famous Herrenhausen, the summer palace of the former kings of Hanover, with fine gardens, an open-air theatre, a museum and an orangery, and approached by a grand avenue over a mile in length.
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  • Hanover has a number of colleges and schools, and is the seat of several learned societies.
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  • Hanover is the headquarters of the X.
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  • Hanover was the first German town that was lighted with gas.
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  • Close by, on the left bank of the Leine, lies the manufacturing town of Linden, which, though practically forming one town with Hanover, is treated under a separate heading.
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  • The town of Hanover is first mentioned during the 12th century.
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  • It joined the Hanseatic League, and was later the residence of the branch of the ducal house, which received the title of elector of Hanover and ascended the British throne in the person of George I.
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  • One or two important treaties were signed in Hanover, which from 18ro to 1813 was part of the kingdom of Westphalia, and in 1866 was annexed by Prussia, after having been the capital of the kingdom of Hanover since its foundation in 1815.
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  • Hanover, Indiana >>
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  • LEVI PARSONS MORTON (1824-), American banker and politician, was born at Shoreham, Vermont, on the 16th of May 1824.1 He was in business at Hanover, New Hampshire, in1843-1849and in Boston in 1849-1854.
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  • New Pomerania, New Mecklenburg, with New Hanover and the Admiralty Islands and the Solomon Islands (Bougainville and Buka).
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  • the county of Waldeck, embedded in Prussian territory between the provinces of Westphalia and Hesse-Nassau, and the principality of Pyrmont, farther to the north, between Lippe, Brunswick, Westphalia and Hanover.
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  • As regards the administration of justice, Waldeck and Pyrmont belong to the districts of Cassel and Hanover respectively.
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  • In 1867 he became director of the Prussian archives, with which it was his task to incorporate those of Hanover, Hesse and Nassau.
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  • HILDESHEIM, a town and episcopal see of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, beautifully situated at the north foot of the Harz Mountains, on the right bank of the Innerste, 18 m.
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  • of Hanover by railway, and on the main line from Berlin, via Magdeburg to Cologne.
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  • It is connected with Hanover by an electric tram line, 19 m.
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  • In 1801 the bishopric was secularized and in 1803 was granted to Prussia; in 1807 it was incorporated with the kingdom of Westphalia and in 1813 was transferred to Hanover.
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  • In 1866, along with Hanover, it was annexed by Prussia.
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  • Hoogeweg (Leipzig and Hanover, 1896-1903); C. Bauer, Geschichte von Hildesheim (Hildesheim, 1892); A.
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  • (Hanover, 1886).
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  • (Hanover, 1826-1829), and J.
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  • Waitz, has been published separately (Hanover, 1880).
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  • Turning to mints in British Dominions beyond the Seas, Ruding enumerates twenty-six mints in France and Flanders used by British monarchs between 1186 and 1513, and Anglo-Hanoverian coins were struck at Clausthal, Zellerfeld and Hanover in the period 1714-1837.
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  • Visurgis), one of the chief rivers of Germany, formed by the union of the Werra and the Fulda at Minden, in the Prussian province of Hanover, flowing generally north and entering the North Sea below Bremerhaven, between Jade Bay and the estuary of the Elbe.
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  • Nearly the entire course of the Weser lies in Prussia, but it also touches part of Brunswick and Lippe, and after flowing through Bremen expands into an estuary separating the duchy of Oldenburg from the Prussian province of Hanover.
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  • In 1823, however, a treaty was made establishing a fixed toll and a uniform system of management; this was further improved in 1856 and 1865; and when Prussia took possession of Hanover and Hesse-Nassau in 1866 the chief difficulties in the way of organizing the river-trade disappeared.
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  • Haydn, thus released from his official duties, forthwith accepted a commission from Salomon, the London concertdirector, to write and conduct six symphonies for the concerts in the Hanover Square Rooms. He arrived in England at the beginning of 1791 and was welcomed with the greatest enthusiasm, receiving among other honours the degree of D Mus.
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  • Five centuries later Lauenburg was incorporated with Hanover, and Wittenberg is the nucleus of modern Saxony, the name being thus transferred from the west to the east of Germany.
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  • Since that date its history has been identified with that of Hanover (q.v.).
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  • The bond with Prussia now became closer, and Frederick entered with Prussia and Hanover into the temporary " alliance of the three kings."
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  • that between Austria and Hungary; (b) personal unions, distinguished from the above-named forms - for example, the union of Great Britain and Hanover.
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  • On graduating at Berlin in August 1836, Waitz went to Hanover to assist Pertz in the great national work of publishing the Monumenta Germaniae historica; and the energy and learning he displayed in that position won him a summons to the chair of history at Kiel in 1842.
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  • (Berlin, 1837, 3rd ed., 1885); fiber das Leben and die Lehre des Ulfila (Hanover, 1840); Das alte Recht der salischen Franken (Kiel, 1846); and Deutsche Kaiser von Karl dem Grossen bis Maximilian (Berlin, 1872).
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  • in 1827 made her a baroness of Hanover, and she continued as lady-inattendance after the duchess of Northumberland was appointed official governess in 1830, but actually performed the functions first of governess and then of private secretary till 1842, when she left the court and returned to Germany, where she died in 1870.
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  • By the death of William IV., the duke of Cumberland had become King Ernest of Hanover, and immediately after the ceremony he made haste to reach his kingdom.
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  • The birth of the princess royal, on the 21st of November 1840, removing the unpopular King Ernest of Hanover from the position of heir-presumptive to the British crown, Birth of the was a subject of loud congratulations to the people.
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  • BERNHARDUS VARENIUS [BERNHARD] (1622-1650), German geographer, was born at Hitzacker on the Elbe, in the Luneburg district of Hanover.
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  • NORTHEIM, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, on the Ruhme, 12 m.
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  • Pertz (Hanover, 1826).
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  • (Hanover and Berlin, 1826 seq.); E.
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  • From St George 's Channel at the south, separating it from New Pomerania, it sweeps north and then north-west, being divided from New Hanover at the other extremity by Byron Strait.
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  • The Evangelical Lutheran Free Church of Hanover has a membership of 3050 under io ordained pastors.
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  • to Hanover from here, and his return, in 1821.
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  • In the same century the monastery of Gandersheim, south of Hanover, was the retreat of the learned nun Hroswitha, who celebrated the exploits of Otho in leonine hexameters, and composed in prose six moral and religious plays in imitation of Terence.
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  • Schulze's period of prominence in Berlin closely corresponded to that of Herbart at Konigsberg (1809-1833) and Göttingen (1833-1841), who insisted that for boys of eight to twelve there was no better text-book than the Greek Odyssey, and this principle was brought into practice at Hanover by his distinguished pupil, Ahrens.
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  • On the introduction of the empire he was made one of the eighteen marshals of France, and, from June 1804 to September 1805, acted as governor of the recentlyoccupied Hanover.
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  • During the campaign of 1805, Bernadotte with an army corps from Hanover co-operated in the great movement which resulted in the shutting up of Mack in Ulm.
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  • Within fourteen years the following Bible societies were in active operation: the Basel Bible Society (founded at Nuremberg, 1804), the Prussian Bible Society (founded as the Berlin Bible Society, 1805), the Revel Bible Society (1807), the Swedish Evangelical Society (1808), the Dorpat Bible Society (1811), the Riga Bible Society (1812), the Finnish Bible Society (1812), the Hungarian Bible Institution (Pressburg, 1812), the Wurttemberg Bible Society (Stuttgart, 1812), the Swedish Bible Society (1814), the Danish Bible Society (1814), the Saxon Bible Society (Dresden, 1814), the Thuringian Bible Society (Erfurt, 1814), the Berg Bible Society (Eberfeld, 1814), the Hanover Bible Society (1814), the Hamburg-Altona Bible Society (1814), the Lubeck Bible Society (1814), the Netherlands Bible Society (Amsterdam, 1814).
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  • The principal institutions of higher learning in the state are Dartmouth College (non-sectarian, opened in 1769), at Hanover, and Saint Anselm's College (Roman Catholic, opened in 1893), at Manchester.
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  • by Hanover, E.
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  • by Schaumburg-Lippe, Hanover, LippeDetmold, Brunswick, Hesse-Nassau and Waldeck, S.
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  • In January 1810 most of Hanover was added, but at the end of the same year half the latter, together with the city of Minden, was annexed to the French empire.
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  • PEINE, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, 16 m.
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  • of Brunswick, on the railway to Hanover and Hamburg.
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  • CALENBERG, or Kalenberg, the name of a district, including the town of Hanover, which was formerly part of the duchy of Brunswick.
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  • The district was given to various cadets of the ruling house of Brunswick, one of these being Ernest Augustus, afterwards elector of Hanover, and the ancestor of the Hanoverian kings of Great Britain and Ireland.
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  • appeared at Stockholm in 1615), the best at Hanover, 1846 (by Lappenberg, in Scriptores Rerum Germanicarum; reissued by L.
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  • DUDERSTADT, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, situated in a beautiful and fertile valley (formerly called Goldene Mark) watered by the Hahle, and on the railway Wulften-Leinefelde.
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  • It was taken by Duke William of Weimar in 163 2; in 1761 its walls were dismantled, and, after being alternately Prussian and Hanoverian, it passed finally in 1866 with Hanover to Prussia.
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  • LOUISE [AUGUSTE WILHELMINE AMALIE LUISE] (1776-1810), queen of Prussia, was born on the 10th of March 1776 in Hanover, where her father, Prince Charles of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, was field-marshal of the household brigade.
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  • - Von der Decken, Philosophisch-historisch-geographische Untersuchungen fiber die Insel Helgoland, oder Heiligeland, and ihre Bewohner (Hanover, 1826); Wiebel, Die Insel Helgoland, Untersuchungen fiber deren Grosse in Vorzeit and Gegenwart vom Standpunkte der Geschichte and Geologie (Hamburg, 1848); J.
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  • HANOVER, a township of Grafton county, New Hampshire, U.S.A., on the Connecticut river, 75 m.
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  • The village of Hanover, the principal settlement of the township, occupies Hanover Plain in the S.W.
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  • P. Storrs (Hanover, 1905).
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  • See Frederick Chase, A History of Dartmouth College and the Town of Hanover (Cambridge, 1891).
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  • Hanover, Pennsylvania >>
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  • by Brandenburg and Hanover, and E.
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  • On his return home he was immediately sent on the abortive expedition to Hanover.
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  • These boundaries include the grand-duchy of Oldenburg and the free state of Bremen, the former stretching southward from the North Sea nearly to the southern boundary of Hanover.
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  • A small portion of the province in the south is separated from Hanover proper by the interposition of part of Brunswick.
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  • The greater part of Hanover is a plain with sandhills, heath and moor.
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  • The main feature of the northern plain is the so-called Luneburger Heide, a vast expanse of moor and fen, mainly covered with low brushwood (though here and there are oases of fine beech and oak woods) and intersected by shallow valleys, and extending almost due north from the city of Hanover to the southern arm of the Elbe at Harburg.
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  • The whole of Hanover dips from the Harz Mountains to the north, and the rivers consequently flow in that direction.
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  • The mean annual temperature is about 46° Fahr.; in the town of Hanover it is higher.
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  • In this connexion it is noticeable that in Hanover, almost alone among German states and provinces, there is a considerable proportion of male births over female.
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  • The province is divided into the six Regierungsbezirke (or departments) of Hanover, Hildesheim, Luneburg, Stade, Osnabruck and Aurich, and these again into Kreise (circles, or local government districts)-76 in all.
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  • The chief towns - containing more than 10,000 inhabitants - are Hanover, Linden, Osnabruck, Hildesheim, Geestemunde, Wilhelmshaven, Harburg, Luneburg, Celle, Göttingen and Emden.
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  • Hanover returns 19 members to the Reichstag (imperial diet) and 36 to the Abgeordnetenhaus (lower house) of the Prussian parliament (Landtag).
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  • There are, besides, a technical college in Hanover, an academy of forestry in Munden, a mining college in Clausthal, a military school and a veterinary college (both in Hanover), 26 gymnasia (classical schools), 18 semi-classical, and 14 commercial schools.
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  • - Hanover is renowned for its cattle and live stock generally.
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  • Horses famous for their size and quality are reared in the marshes of Aurich and Stade, in Hildesheim and Hanover; and, for breeding purposes, in the stud farm of Celle.
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  • The Harz Mountains are rich in silver, lead, iron and copper; coal is found around Osnabruck, on the Deister, at Osterwald, &c., lignite in various places; salt-springs of great richness exist at Egestorf shall and Neuhall near Hanover, and at Luneburg; and petroleum may be obtained south of Celle.
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  • The iron works are very important: smelting is carried on in the Harz and near Osnabruck; there are extensive foundries and machine factories at Hanover, Linden, Osnabruck, Hameln, Geestemunde, Harburg, Osterode, &c., and manufactories of arms at Herzberg, and of cutlery in the towns of the Harz and in the Sollinger Forest.
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  • Linen yarn and cloth are largely manufactured, especially in the south about Osnabruck and Hildesheim, and bleaching is engaged in extensively; woollen cloths are made to a considerable extent in the south about Einbeck, Göttingen and Hameln; cotton-spinning and weaving have their principal seats at Hanover and Linden.
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  • Although the carrying trade of Hanover is to a great extent absorbed by Hamburg and Bremen, the shipping of the province counted, in 1903, 750 sailing vessels and 86 steamers of, together, 55,498 registered tons.
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  • Hanover is intersected by important trunk lines of railway; notably the lines from Berlin to Cologne, from Hamburg to Frankfort-onMain, from Hamburg to Bremen and Cologne, and from Berlin to Amsterdam.
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  • The name Hanover (Hohenufer = high bank), originally confined to the town which became the capital of the duchy of Luneburg-Calenberg, came gradually into use to designate, first, the duchy itself, and secondly, the electorate of Brunswick-Luneburg; and it was officially recognized as the name of the state when in 1814 the electorate was raised to the rank of a kingdom.
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  • The early history of Hanover is merged in that of the duchy of Brunswick (q.v.), from which the duchy of Brunswick-Liineburg and its offshoots, the duchies of LUneburg-Celle and Luneburg-Calenberg have sprung.
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  • (1497-1546), duke of Brunswick-Luneburg, who introduced the reformed doctrines into Luneburg, obtained the whole of this duchy in 1539; and in 1569 his two surviving sons made an arrangement which was afterwards responsible for the birth of the kingdom of Hanover.
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  • In 1617 he aided his brother, Duke Christian, to add Grubenhagen to Luneburg, and after the extinction of the family of BrunswickWolfenbuttel in 1634, he obtained Calenberg for himself, making Hanover the capital of his small dukedom.
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  • His father, Ernest Augustus, had taken a step of great importance in the history of Hanover when he married Sophia, daughter of the elector palatine, Frederick V., and grand-daughter of James I.
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  • in 1837, Luneburg or Hanover, was ruled by the same sovereign as Great Britain, and this personal union was not without important results for both countries.
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  • Hanover joined the alliance against Charles XII.
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  • of Prussia, and his nephew Frederick the Great; and in 1729 war between Prussia and Hanover was only just avoided.
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  • Induced by political exigencies George allied himself with Frederick the Great when the Seven Years' War broke out in 1756; but in September 1757 his son William Augustus, duke of Cumberland, was compelled after his defeat at Hastenbeck to sign the convention of Klosterzeven and to abandon Hanover to the French.
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  • English money, however, came to the rescue; in 1758 Ferdinand, duke of Brunswick, cleared the electorate of the invader; and Hanover suffered no loss of territory at the peace of 1763.
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  • preferred Hanover to England as a place of residence, and it was a frequent and perhaps justifiable cause of complaint that the interests of Great Britain were sacrificed to those of the smaller country.
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  • Two main considerations dominated the fortunes of Hanover during the period of the Napoleonic wars, the jealousy felt by Prussia at the increasing strength and prestige of the electorate, and its position as a vulnerable outpost of Great Britain.
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  • From 1793 the Hanoverian troops fought for the Allies against France, until the treaty of Basel between France and Prussia in 1795 imposed a forced neutrality upon Hanover.
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  • At the instigation of Bonaparte Hanover was occupied by the Prussians for a few months in 1801, but at the settlement which followed the peace of Luneville the secularized bishopric of Osnabruck was added to the electorate.
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  • The formation of the third coalition against France in 1805 induced Napoleon to purchase the support of Prussia by allowing her troops to seize Hanover; but in 1807, after the defeat of Prussia at Jena, he incorporated the southern part of the electorate in the kingdom of Westphalia, adding the northern portion to France in 1810.
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  • Represented at the congress of Vienna by Ernest, Count Munster, the elector was granted the title of king; but the British ministers wished to keep the interests of Great Britain distinct from those of Hanover.
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  • Like those of the other districts of Germany, the estates of the different provinces which formed the kingdom of Hanover had met for many years in an irregular fashion to exercise their varying and ill-defined authority; and, although the elector Ernest Augustus introduced a system of administrative councils into Celle, these estates, consisting of the three orders of prelates, nobles and towns, together with a body somewhat resembling the English privy council, were the only constitution which the country possessed, and the only check upon the power of its ruler.
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  • When the elector George Louis became king of Great Britain in 1714 he appointed a representative, or statthalter, to govern the electorate, and thus the union of the two countries was attended with constitutional changes in Hanover as well as in Great Britain.
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  • The revolution of that year compelled George's brother and successor, William, to dismiss Count Munster, who had been the actual ruler of the country, and to name his own brother, Adolphus Frederick, duke of Cambridge, a viceroy of Hanover; one of the viceroy's earliest duties being to appoint a commission to draw up a new constitution.
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  • By the law of Hanover a woman could not ascend the throne, and accordingly Ernest Augustus, duke of Cumberland, the fifth son of George III., and not Victoria, succeeded William as sovereign in 1837, thus separating the crowns of Great Britain and Hanover after a union of 123 years.
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  • To save the constitution an appeal was made to the German Confederation, which Hanover had joined in 1815; but the federal diet declined to interfere, and in 1840 Ernest altered the constitution to suit his own illiberal views.
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  • During this reign the foreign policy of Hanover both within and without Germany had been coloured by jealousy of Prussia and by the king's autocratic ideas.
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  • Refusing to join the Prussian Zollverein, Hanover had become a member of the rival commercial union, the Steuerverein, three years before Ernest's accession; but as this union was not a great success the Zollverein was joined in 1851.
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  • George V., the new king of Hanover, who was unfortunately blind, sharing his father's political ideas, at once appointed a ministry whose aim was to sweep away the constitution of 1848.
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  • After a period of vacillation Hanover threw in her lot with Austria, the decisive step being taken when the question of the mobilization of the federal army was voted upon in the diet on the 14th of June 1866.
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  • At once Prussia requested Hanover to remain unarmed and neutral during the war, and with equal promptness King George refused to assent to these demands.
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  • By the terms of this surrender the king was not to reside in Hanover, his officers were to take no further part in the war, and his ammunition and stores became the property of Prussia.
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  • The decree of the 10th of September 1866 formally annexed Hanover to Prussia, when it became a province of that kingdom, while King George from his retreat at Hietzing appealed in vain to the powers of Europe.
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  • These and other elaborate efforts, however, failed to bring about the return of the king to Hanover, though the Guelph party continued to agitate and to hope even after the Franco-German War had immensely increased the power and the prestige of Prussia.
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  • His son, Ernest Augustus, duke of Cumberland, continued to maintain his claim to the crown of Hanover, and refused to be reconciled with Prussia.
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  • In 1867 King George had agreed to accept Prussian bonds to the value of about 1,600,000 as compensation for the confiscation of his estates in Hanover.
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  • In 1885 measures were taken to incorporate the province of Hanover more thoroughly in the kingdom of Prussia, and there is little doubt but that the great majority of the Hanoverians have submitted to the inevitable, and are loyal subjects of the king of Prussia.
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  • Hiine, Geschichte des Konigreichs Hannover and des Herzogtums Braunschweig (Hanover, 1824-1830); A.
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  • Schaumann, Handbuch der Geschichte der Lande Hannover and Braunschweig (Hanover, 1864); G.
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  • Grotefend, Geschichte der allgemeinen landstcindischen Verfassung des Konigreichs Hannover, 1814-1848 (Hanover, 1857); H.
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  • von Hassell, Das Kurfiirstentum Hannover vom Baseler Frieden bis zur preussischen Okkupation (Hanover, 1894); and Geschichte des Konigreichs Hannover (Leipzig, 1898-1901); H.
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  • Hanover, Prussia (Capital) >>
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  • Diplomata (Hanover; 1879); L.
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  • He studied theology at Jena, and eventually became (1841) pastor, member of the consistory, and superintendent at Hanover.
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  • They left no issue, and the Act of Settlement passed in 1701, excluding Roman Catholics from the throne, secured the succession to Anne, second daughter of James II., and on her death without issue to the Protestant house of Hanover, descended from the princess Elizabeth, daughter of James I., wife of Frederick V., count palatine of the Rhine.
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  • On the death of Anne in 1714, George, elector of Hanover, eldest son of Sophia (youngest child of the princess Elizabeth), and Ernest, elector of Brunswick-Luneburg, or Hanover, consequently became sovereign of Great Britain and Ireland, and, notwithstanding somewhat formidable attempts in behalf of the elder Stuart line in 1715 and 1745, the Hanoverian succession has remained uninterrupted and has ultimately won universal assent.
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  • representatives of the royal Stuarts who are senior to the house of Hanover, for Philip, duke of Orleans (brother of Louis XIV.3, married, as his first wife, Henrietta daughter of Charles I., and, as his second, Charlotte, granddaughter and heiress of the princess Elizabeth (daughter of James I.).
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  • JOHANN BECKMANN (1739-1811), German scientific author, was born on the 4th of June 1739 at Hoya in Hanover, where his father was postmaster and receiver of taxes.
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  • He endeavoured to reconcile the Protestant churches with the Roman Catholic, and at a conference at Hanover in 1683 presented his Regulae circa Christianorum omnium ecclesiasticum reunionem.
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  • Pfannenschmid, Germanische Erntefeste (Hanover, 1878) V.
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  • Scriptores rerum langobardicarum (Hanover, 1878).
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  • The Napoleonic reverses of 1813 brought him back to politics, and in November he published at Hanover his De l'esprit de conquete et de l'usurpation dans leurs rapports avec la civilisation europeenne, directed against Napoleon.
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  • The largest island is New Pomerania, and the archipelago also includes New Mecklenburg, New Hanover, with small attendant islands, the Admiralty Islands and a chain of islands off the coast of New Guinea, the whole system lying in the form of a great amphitheatre of oval shape.
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  • Hanover, Prussia (Province) >>
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  • (Hanover and Berlin, 1826-1892); A.
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  • He occupied himself with writing several historical works, the most important of which was Original Papers, containing the Secret History of Great Britain from the Restoration to the Accession of the House of Hanover; to which are prefixed Extracts from the Life of James II., as written by himself (1775).
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  • Langerfeldt, Kaiser Otto der Vierte (Hanover, 1872); R.
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  • Hanover.
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  • in 1839 as the family order of the house of Hanover; the Royal Guelphic Order (three classes) by George, prince regent, afterwards George IV.
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  • of Hanover in 1865.
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  • These orders have not been conferred since 1866, when Hanover ceased to be a kingdom, and the Royal Guelphic Order, which from its institution was more British than Hanoverian, not since the death of William IV.
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  • to S.E., along the borders of the Prussian provinces of Hanover and Westphalia and through the principality of Lippe, for a .distance of 70 m., with a width of 2 to 6 m.
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  • The main chain is pierced by several deep gaps or "doors," through some of which important railways have been carried; e.g., the line connecting Paderborn and Hanover, and that connecting Herford and Hamm.
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  • FRANCIS BROWN (1849-), American Semitic scholar, was born in Hanover, New Hampshire, on the 26th of December 1849, the son of Samuel Gilman Brown (1813-1885), president of Hamilton College from 1867 to 1881, and the grandson of Francis Brown (1784-1820), whose removal from the presidency of Dartmouth College and later restoration were incidental to the famous "Dartmouth College case."
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  • The Berlin Society and the Rhenish Society labour in South Africa and China, the Hermannsburg Mission (Hanover) in South Africa and India; Gossner's Mission (Berlin) and the Leipzig Lutherans in India.
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  • WILMINGTON, a city, a port of entry and the county-seat of New Hanover (disambiguation)|Hanover county, North Carolina, U.S.A., on the Cape Fear river, about 30 m.
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  • It is built on a tract of territory ceded to Bremen by Hanover in 1826, and further increased by treaty with Prussia in 1869.
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  • from Hanover on the main line to Cologne.
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  • Conze, Reise auf den Inseln des Thrakischen Meeres (Hanover, 1860); Conze, Hauser and Niemann, Archdologische Untersuchungen auf Samothrake (Vienna, 1875 and 1880); H.
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  • In 1836 he was appointed to the chair of chemistry in the medical faculty at Göttingen, holding also the office of inspector-general of pharmacies in the kingdom of Hanover.
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  • It has also direct railway communication with Berlin via Uelzen, Hanover and Bremerhaven.
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  • When, however, in 1720 the elector of Hanover (George I.
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  • 502-508 (Hanover, 1866); Asser, Life of King Alfred, edited by W.
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  • Four years later the pleasure grounds and gardens at Kew occupied by the king of Hanover were given to the nation and placed under the care of Sir William for the express purpose of being converted into an arboretum.
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  • ANDREAS PETER, COUNT VON BERNSTORFF (1735-1797), Danish statesman, was born at Hanover on the 28th of August 17 3 5.
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  • - Texts of the liturgical poems are to be found in the prayer-books: others in Dukes and Edelmann, Treasures of Oxford (Oxford, 1850); Dukes, Shire Shelomoh (Hanover, 1858); S.
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  • JOHANN HARTWIG ERNST BERNSTORFF, COUNT VON (1712-1772), Danish statesman, who came of a very ancient Mecklenburg family, was the son of Joachim Engelke, Freiherr von Bernstorff, chamberlain to the elector of Hanover, and was born on the 13th of May 1712.
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  • HERMANN SCHULTZ (1836-), German Protestant theologian, was born at Liichow in Hanover on the 30th of December 1836.
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  • There is a 16th-century Jesse window from Mechlin in St George's, Hanover Square, London.
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  • There is more than one meaning of Hanover discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
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  • Westward lies as the last link of this series the Luneburger Heide or Heath, between the Weser and Elbe, north of Hanover.
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  • The plain contains, however, a few districts of the Utmost fertility, particularly the tracts on the central Elbe, and the marsh lands on the west coast of Holstein and the north coast of Hanover, Oldenburg and East Frisia, which, within the last two centuries, the inhabitants have reclaimed from the sea by means of immense dikes.
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  • The Fulda, navigable for 63 m., and the Werra, 38 m., above the point where they unite, form by their junction the Weser, which has a course of 271 m., and receives as navigable tributaries the Aller, the Leine from Hanover, and some smaller streams. Oceangoing steamers, however, cannot get as far as Bremen, and unload at Bremerhaven.
    0
    0
  • northwest of Hanover, and the Dummersee on the southern frontier of Oldenburg.
    0
    0
  • Between the old rocks of the Rhine on the west and the ancient inassif of Bohemia on the east a vast area of Triassic beds extends from Hanover to Basel and from Metz to Bayreuth.
    0
    0
  • Towards the north, in Hanover and Westphalia, the Triassic beds are followed by Jurassic and Cretaceous deposits, the latter being here the more important.
    0
    0
  • Hanover, , 250,032
    0
    0
  • The greater number of the more recent emigrants was from the agricultural provinces of northern GermanyWest Prussia, Posen, Pomerania, Mecklenburg, Schleswiz-Holstein and Hanover, and sometimes the emigration reached 1, ~ of the total population of these provinces.
    0
    0
  • There are two centres of the beet sugar production: Magdeburg for the districts Prussian Saxony, Hanover, Brunswick, Anhalt and Thuringia, and Frankfort-on-Oder at the centre of the group Silesia, Brandenburg and Pomerania.
    0
    0
  • The provinces of Schleswig-Holstein, Pomerania, Hanover Li stock (especially the marsh-lands near the sea) and the grand- ye duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin are particularly remarkable in this respect.
    0
    0
  • m., of which 2000 are in the north of Hanover.
    0
    0
  • The provinces of Saxony and Hanover, with Thuringia and Anhalt, produce half the whole amount.
    0
    0
  • Cotton spinning and weaving are not confined to one district, but 60 are prosecuted in upper Alsace (MUihausen, Gebweiler, 25, 0 Colmar), in Saxony (Zwickau, Chemnitz, Annaberg), in 35,700 Silesia (Breslau, Liegnitz), in the Rhine province (Dssel 44,700 dorf, Mflnster, Cologne), in Erfurt and Hanover, in 50,900 Wrttember~ (Reutlingen, Cannstatt), in Baden, Bavaria 52, 00 - (Augsburg, Bamberg, Bayreuth) and in the Palatinate.
    0
    0
  • Since 1868 all German ships have carried a common flagblack, white, red; but formerly Oldenburg, Hanover, Bremen, Hamburg, LUbeck, Mecklenburg and Prussia had each its own flag, and Schleswig-Holstein vessels sailed under the Danish flag.
    0
    0
  • The state which was most self-seeking in its railway politics was Hanover, which separated the eastern and western parts of the kingdom of Prussia.
    0
    0
  • The difficulties arising to Prussia from this source were experienced in a still greater degree by the seaports of Bremen and Hamburg, which were severely hampered by the particularism displayed by Hanover.
    0
    0
  • Saale, Hanover, Cassel, Kattowitz, Cologne, Konigsberg, Magdeburg, Munster, Posen, Saarbrucken and Stettin.
    0
    0
  • A project was sanctioned ir 1905 for a canal, adapted for vessels up to 600 tons, from th Rhine to the Weser at Hanover, utilizing a portion of the Dort mund-Ems canal; for a channel accommodating vessels of simila:
    0
    0
  • Hanover and Thuringia have long been distinguished for the excellence of their roads, but some districts suffer even still from the want of good highways.
    0
    0
  • Hanover) is peculiar to Prussia.
    0
    0
  • The province of Hanover retains its system as emended in 1858, and Hesse-Nassau, with the exception of Frankfort-on-Main, received a special corporate system in 1897.
    0
    0
  • In all the remaining territory the Roman Catholic creed is professed only in the Eichsfeld on the southern border of the province of Hanover and around Hildesheim.
    0
    0
  • In i866 Prussia annexed Hanover and Schleswig-Holstein, where the Protestants were Lutherans, ~r and Hesse where the Reformed Church had ans.
    0
    0
  • These schools are as follows: Berlin (Charlottenburg), Munich, Darmstadt, Karlsruhe, Hanover, Dresden, Stuttgart, Aix-la-Chapelle, Brunswick and Danzig; in 1908 they were attended by 14,149 students (2531 foreigners), and had a teaching staff of 753.
    0
    0
  • near Stuttgart, Brunswick, Eisenach, Giessen and Books - 229 Karlsruhe, Other technical schools are again the five veterinary academies of Berlin, Hanover, Munich, Dresden and Stuttgart, the commercial colleges (Handclshochschulen) of Leipzig, Aix-la-Chapelle, Hanover, Frankfurt-on-Main and Cologne, in addition to 424 commercial schools of a lesser degree, ioo schools for textile manufactures and numerous schools for special metal industries, wood-working, ceramic industries, naval architecture and engineering and navigation.
    0
    0
  • Hanover (Hanover); XI.
    0
    0
  • Hanover is second only to East Prussia in output of horses.
    0
    0
  • Towards the end of the period the inhabitants of north Germany erect megalithic graves, and in Hanover especially the passage-graves.
    0
    0
  • The contempt of Napoleon for the Empire was illustrated by his occupation of Hanover in 1803, and by his seizure of the duke of Enghien on imperial territory in 1804.
    0
    0
  • This attitude had been dictated partly by -his constitutional timidity, partly by the desire to annex Hanover, to which Austria and Russia at .jena.
    0
    0
  • For the rest the sovereigns of Wflrttemberg and Saxony retained the title of king bestowed upon them by Napoleon, and this title was also given to the elector of Hanover; the dukes of Weimar, Mecklenburg and Oldenburg became grand dukes; and LUbeck, Bremen, Hamburg and Frankfort were declared free cities.
    0
    0
  • In the so-called narrower assembir (Engere Versammlung), for the transaction of ordinary business, Austria, Prussia, Bavaria, Saxony, Hanover, Wurttemberg, Baden, Hesse-Cassel, Hesse-Darmstadt, Holstein and Luxemburg had one vote each; while the remaining twenty-eight states were divided into six curiae, of which each had but a single vote.
    0
    0
  • Of the German states represented in it even Prussia, by the acquisition of Posen, had become a non-German power; the Habsburg monarchy was predominantly non-German; Hanover was attached to the crown of Great Britain, Holstein to that of Denmark, Luxemburg to that of the Netherlands.
    0
    0
  • In Hanover, Brunswick, Saxony and Hesse-Cassel popular movements led to the granting i&~o.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile, alarmed at this tendency, and hopeless of obtaining any general system from the federal diet, the middle states had drawn together; by a treaty signed on the 18th of January 1828 Wurttemberg and Bavaria formed a tariff union, which was joined in the following year by the Hohenzollern principalities; and on the 24th of September 1828 was formed the so-called Middle German Commercial Union (Handelsverein) between Hanover, HesseCassel, the Saxon duchies, Brunswick, Nassau, the principalities of Reuss and Schwarzburg, and the free cities of Frankfort and Bremen, the object of which was to prevent the extension of the Prussian system and, above all, any union of the northern Zollverein with that of Bavaria and WUrttemberg.
    0
    0
  • Outside this, though not in hostility to it, Hanover, Brunswick, Oldenburg and Schaumburg-Lippe formed a separate customs-union, (Steuerverein) by treaties signed on the 1st of May 1834 and the 7th of May 1836, and to this certain Prussian and Hessian enclaves were attached.
    0
    0
  • He invited the states to send representatives to Berlin to discuss the condiui~~ tion of Germany; and he concluded a treaty with the kings of Saxony and Hanover.
    0
    0
  • Encouraged by her, Hanover and Saxony had severed themselves from the Union, and Saxony, WUrttemberg and Bavaria arrived at an understanding as to a wholly new constitution.
    0
    0
  • The Bund interfered in a like spirit in Hanover, although with less disastrous results, after the accession of George V.
    0
    0
  • ZC1 IC ~ The other unfortunate North German states which had sided with Austria were left to their fate, and on the 20th of September King William issued a decree annexing Hanover, Hesse-Cassel, Nassau and the free city of Frankfort to the Prussian monarchy, and bringing them under the Prussian constitution.
    0
    0
  • The elector of Hesse and the duke of Nassau have formally relinquished their claims. Hanover.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, the royal family of Hanover has never ceased to protest against the acts by which they were deprived of their dominions.
    0
    0
  • His attention had been drawn to the bad moral effect of the use to which the Welfen-Fond was applied, and on the duke of Cumberland writing him a letter, in which, while maintaining his claims to the throne of Hanover, he recognized the empire and undertook not to support any enterprise against the empire or Prussia, with the consent of the Prussian parliament the sequestration of his property was removed.
    0
    0
  • On the death of Prince Albert in September 1906, the Brunswick diet petitioned the Bundesrat to allow the youngest son of the duke of Cumberland to succeed to the duchy on renouncing his personal claims to the crown of Hanover.
    0
    0
  • Essentially a German, not a Prussian, party, they were joined by the Nationalists from the annexed provinces of Hanover and Hesse; in 1871 they were greatly strengthened by the addition of the National representatives from the southern states; out of fourteen representatives from Baden twelve belonged to them, seventeen out of eighteen Wurttemberger, and a large majority of the Bavarians.
    0
    0
  • The close connection with the Poles, the principle of federalism which they maintained,the support given to them by the Bavarian patriots, their protest against the revolution from above as represented equally by the annexation of Hanover and the abolition of the papal temporal power, threw them into strong opposition to the prevailing opinion, an opposition which received its expression When Hermann von Mallincrodt (182 I 1874), the most respected of their parliamentary leaders, declared that justice was not present at the birth of the empire.
    0
    0
  • Of these the most important were the so-called Guelphs (Welf en), described by themselves as the Hannoverische Rechtspartei, member of the old Hanoverian nobility who represented the rural districts of Hanover and still regarded the deposed King George V.
    0
    0
  • In Baden, Wurttemberg and Hanover the railways were almost entirely the property of the state, but in all other parts public and private lines existed side by side, an arrangement which seemed to combine the disadvantages of both systems. In 1871 threequarters of the railway lines belonged to private companies, and the existence of these powerful private corporations, while they were defended by many of the Liberals, was, according to the national type of thought, something of an anomaly.
    0
    0
  • The Prussian government also planned a great scheme by which the Westphalian coal-fields should be directly connected with the Rhine in one direction and the Elbe in the other by a canal which would join together Minden, Hanover and Magdeburg.
    0
    0
  • In 1904 it was once more introduced in the modified form of a proposal of a canal from the Rhine to Leine in Hanover, with a branch from Datteln to Ham, and also of a canal from Berlin to Stettin.
    0
    0
  • Mecklenburg and Hanover, the purely agricultural states, had, until their entrance into the Customs Union, followed a completely Free Trade policy.
    0
    0
  • The two chief collections which were issued by the philosopher are the Accessiones historicae (1698-1700) and the Scriptores reruni Brunsvicensium; the latter of these, containing documents centring round the history of the Weif family, was published in three volumes at Hanover (1707-1711).
    0
    0
  • Leibnitz worked at another collection, the Origines Guelficae, which was completed and issued by his pupils (Hanover, 1750-1780), and also at A nnales imperii occidentis Brunsmicenses, which, although the most valuable collection of the kind yet made, was not published until editedby G.
    0
    0
  • Pertz (Hanover, 1843-1846).
    0
    0
  • Much has also been done in Prussia, in Brandenburg, in Bavaria, in Hanover, in Wurttemberg and in Baden, and collections of authorities have been made by competent scholars, of which the Geschichtsquellen der Provinz Sachsen und angrenzender Gebiete (Halle, 1870, f 01.), which extends to forty volumes, the smaller Scrip/ores rerum Prussicarum (Leipzig, 1861-1874), and the seventy-seven volumes of the Publikationen aus den koniglichen preussischen Slaatsarchiven, veranlasst und unterstutzt durch die konigliche Archivverwaltung (Leipzig, 1878, fol.), may be cited as examples.
    0
    0
  • (Hanover, 1845), may be consulted.
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    0
  • BORKUM, an island of Germany, in the North Sea, belonging to the Prussian province of Hanover, the westernmost of the East Frisian chain, lying between the east and west arms of the estuary of the Ems, and opposite to the Dollart.
    0
    0
  • The conventual estates were of great extent, and among the feudatories who could be summoned to the court of the abbess were the elector of Hanover and the king of Prussia.
    0
    0
  • Though reckoned a part of the Prussian province of Hanover it is completely surrounded on the landward side by Oldenburg territory.
    0
    0
  • In 5855 he received back his possessions, which were mediatized by the congress of Vienna, Recklinghausen falling to Prussia and Meppen to Hanover.
    0
    0
  • On account of the one portion he became a peer of the Westphalian estates, and by the other a member of the upper house in Hanover.
    0
    0
  • A large party wished indeed that nothing should be left but a purely personal union similar to that between England and Hanover.
    0
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  • by the Prussian province of Hanover, S.
    0
    0
  • By the peace of Fontainebleau Denmark had been sacrificed to the interests of France and Sweden; forty-one years later she was sacrificed to the interests of Hanover and Prussia by the peace of Copenhagen (1720), which ended the Northern War so far as the German powers were concerned.
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    0
  • The bishoprics of Bremen and Verden, the province of Farther Pomerania and the isle of Riigen which her armies had actually conquered, and which had been guaranteed to her by a whole catena of treaties, went partly to the upstart electorate of Hanover and partly to the upstart kingdom of Prussia, both of which states had been of no political importance whatever at the beginning of the war of spoliation by which they were, ultimately, to profit so largely and so cheaply.
    0
    0
  • Hausmann, Diirers Kupferstiche, Radirungen, Holzschnitte und Zeichnungen (Hanover, 1861); R.
    0
    0
  • JOHANN VON MIQUEL (1829-1901), German statesman, was born at Neuenhaus, Hanover, on the 19th of February 1829, being descended from a French family which had emigrated during the Revolution.
    0
    0
  • He accepted the annexation of Hanover by Prussia without regret, and was one of the Hanoverians whose parliamentary abilities at once won a commanding position in the Prussian parliament, which he entered in 1867.
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    0
  • AURICH, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, chief town of the district of East Friesland, on the Ems-Jade canal, 18 m.
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    0
  • ALFELD, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, 10 m.
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    0
  • (Hanover, 1883).
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    0
  • LEER, a town and river port in the Prussian province of Hanover, lying in a fertile plain on the right bank of the Leda near its confluence with the Ems, and at the junction of railways to Bremen, Emden and Minster.
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  • BARRIER TREATY, the name given first to the treaty signed on 29th of October 1709 between Great Britain and the statesgeneral of the United Netherlands, by which the latter engaged to guarantee the Protestant succession in England in favour of the house of Hanover; while Great Britain undertook to procure for the Dutch an adequate barrier on the side of the Netherlands, consisting of the towns of Furnes, Nieuport, Ypres, Menin, Lille, Tournai, Conde, Valenciennes, Maubeuge, Charleroi, Namur, Halle, Damme, Dendermond and the citadel of Ghent.
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  • Wolf Goethe (Weimar, 1889) is a sympathetic appreciation by Otto Mejer, formerly president of the Lutheran consistory in Hanover.
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    0
  • of Hanover, on the left bank of the Weser, which is spanned by two bridges.
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    0
  • STADE, a town of Germany in the Prussian province of Hanover, situated on the navigable Schwinge, 3a m.
    0
    0
  • It carries on a number of small manufactures and has some shipping trade, chiefly with Hamburg, but the rise of Harburg has deposed it from its former position as the chief port of Hanover.
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    0
  • In 1648 Stade became the capital of the principality of Bremen under the Swedes; and in 1719 it was ceded to Hanover, the fate of which it has since shared.
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  • George's, Hanover Square.
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  • LUNEBURG, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, situated near the foot of a small hill named the Kalkberg, on the navigable Ilmenau, 14 m.
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  • of Hamburg by the main line to Hanover.
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    0
  • Bodemann, Die dlteren Zunfturkunden der Stadt Luneburg (Hanover, 1883); O.
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    0
  • Meyer (Hanover, 1904); A.
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    0
  • Reinecke, Liineburgs dltestes Stadtbuch and Verf asstungsregrster (Hanover, 1903).
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    0
  • The extensive cemeteries of St Mary Abbots, Kensington, and St George, Hanover Square, London, are here.
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    0
  • Miller's position at Gottingen being rendered unpleasant by the political troubles which followed the accession of Ernest Augustus (duke of Cumberland) to the throne of Hanover in 1837, he applied for permission to travel; and in 1839 he left Germany.
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    0
  • Romani imperii (Hanover and Frankfort, 1612-1614, xa.
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    0
  • PAPENBURG, a town in the Prussian province of Hanover, 27 m.
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    0
  • 2 She had maintained a friendly correspondence with the court of Hanover since 1 For their names see Hume and Smollett's Hist.
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    0
  • On the 27th of April Anne gave a solemn assurance of her fidelity to the Hanoverian succession to Sir William Dawes, archbishop of York; in June she sent Lord Clarendon to Hanover to satisfy the elector.
    0
    0
  • The elector of Hanover, George Louis, son of the electress Sophia (daughter of Elizabeth, daughter of James I.), peacefully succeeded to the throne as George I.
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  • (Hanover and Berlin, 1826-1892); C. Griinhagen, Adalbert Erzbischof von Hamburg and die Idee eines Nordischen Patriarchats (Leipzig, 1854).
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    0
  • When the clergy, refusing to acknowledge the authority of the Burgesses in reducing their stipends, and, appealing to the king against the Assembly, entered the courts to recover damages from the vestries, Patrick Henry at Hanover court in 1763 easily convinced the jury and the people that the old church was wellnigh worthless.
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  • The commentaries of Barnes, Clarke and Ernesti are practically superseded; but Heyne's Iliad (Leipzig, 1802) and Nitzsch's commentary on the Odyssey (books i.-xii., Hanover, 1826-1840) are still useful.
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  • The antiquities of Homer - using the word in a wide sense - may be studied in the following books: Volcker, Ober homerische Geographie and Weltkunde (Hanover, 1830); Nagelsbach's Homerische Theologie (2nd ed., Nuremberg, 1861); H.
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    0
  • Scriptores (Hanover and Berlin, 1826-1892); Otto Morena of Lodi, Historia rerum Laudensium, continued by his son, Acerbus, also in the Monumenta; Ansbert, Historia de expeditione Friderici, 1187-1196, published in the Fontes rerum Austriacarum.
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  • Tension was increased by the fact that the Centre, or Catholic, party in the Reichstag was led by Windhorst, formerly prime minister to the dispossessed king of Hanover, and thus naturally became identified with the opposition of the smaller German states to the supremacy of Prussia.
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  • (Hanover, 1854); A.
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    0
  • The rationalization of the story is to be found in Oscar Schade, Die Sage von der heiligen Ursula (Hanover, 1854)+ of which there is a short résumé in S.
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    0
  • BARDOWIEK, a village of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, 3 m.
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    0
  • 1023); a fine silver paten, decorated with figures in niello, attributed to his hand, still exists among the many rich treasures in the church of Hanover Palace.
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    0
  • HENRY CLAY (1777-1852), American statesman and orator, was born in Hanover county, Virginia, on the 12th of April 1777, and died in Washington on the 29th of June 1852.
    0
    0
  • Presbytery, being loyal to the house of Hanover, while Episcopacy was Jacobite, was now in enjoyment of the royal favour and was treated as a firm ally of the government.
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    0
  • NIENBURG ON THE WESER, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, situated on the Weser, 33 m.
    0
    0
  • from Hanover by the railway to Bremen.
    0
    0
  • In 1711 the Princess Palatine wrote to the Electress Sophia of Hanover, and suggested that he was an English nobleman who had taken part in a plot of the duke of Berwick against William III.
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    0
  • 683-725 (Hanover, 1829); King Alfred's translation of Orosius i.
    0
    0
  • When, on the 14th of September 1714, he suddenly returned to his dominions, Stralsund and Wismar were all that remained to him of his continental possessions; while by the end of 1715 Sweden, now fast approaching the last stage of exhaustion, was at open war with England, Hanover, Russia, Prussia, Saxony and Denmark, who had formed a coalition to partition her continental territory between them.
    0
    0
  • At the beginning of 1719 pacific overtures were made to England, Hanover, Prussia and Denmark.
    0
    0
  • I, 1 20 Hanover Stockholm > 7) and obtained the bishoprics of Bremen and Verden for Frederiks- herself and Stettin for her confederate Prussia.
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  • with such a hatred of Napoleon that European when a general coalition was formed against the Coalition, French emperor he was one of the first to join it 1804 (Dec. 3, 1804), pledging himself to send an army corps to cooperate with the English and Russians in driving the enemy out of Holland and Hanover.
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  • Among the islands which thickly fringe this part of the coast, the largest are Azopardo (lying within Baker Inlet), Prince Henry, Campana, Little Wellington, Great Wellington and Mornington (of the Wellington archipelago), Madre de Dios, Duke of York, Chatham, Hanover, Cambridge, Contreras, Rennell and the Queen Adelaide group of small barren rocks and islands lying immediately north of the Pacific entrance to the Straits of Magellan.
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    0
  • MUNDEN, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, picturesquely situated at the confluence of the Fulda and the Werra, 21 m.
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    0
  • 1814); Geschichte der Literatur von ihrem Anfange bis auf die neuesten Zeiten (5 vols., Gott., 1805-1812); Ubersicht der FranzOsischen Revolution (2 vols., Gott., 1797); Weltgeschichte (3rd ed., 5 vols., Gott., 1819-1820); Geschichte der drei letzten Jahrhunderte (3rd ed., 6 vols., Hanover, 1817-1818); Urgeschichte des erlauchten Hauses der Welfen (Hanover, 1817).
    0
    0
  • From 1708 to 1712 he represented Russia at London, Hanover, and the Hague successively, and, in 1713, was the principal Russian plenipotentiary at the peace congress of Utrecht.
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    0
  • (Hanover, 1827); Baur, Epochen (1852); Harnack, "Socrates u.
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    0
  • The heir to the throne, as was usually the case in the house of Hanover, if not in reigning families generally, was the patron of the opposition, and the ex-cornet became groom of the bed-chamber to the prince of Wales.
    0
    0
  • Possibly he was embittered at the time by the fact that, owing to the strong personal dislike of the king, caused chiefly by the contemptuous tone in which he had spoken of Hanover, he did not by obtaining a place in the new ministry reap the fruits of the victory to which he had so largely contributed.
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    0
  • CELLE, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, on the left bank of the navigable Aller, near its junction with the Fuse and the Lachte, 23 m.
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    0
  • of Hanover, on the main Lehrte-Hamburg railway.
    0
    0
  • Here rest the remains of Sophia Dorothea, wife of the elector George of Hanover, afterwards George I.
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    0
  • Celle is the seat of the court of appeal from the superior courts of Aurich, Detmold, Göttingen, Hanover, Hildesheim, Luneburg, Osnabruck, Stade and Verden.
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    0
  • Christophorus (Hanover, 1868); and other literature cited in Herzog-Hauck, Realencyk..
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    0
  • by the lower course of the Elbe (separating it from Hanover).
    0
    0
  • HOFFMANN VON FALLERSLEBEN, German poet, philologist and historian of literature, was born at Fallersleben in the duchy of Luneburg, Hanover, on the 2nd of April 1798, the son of the mayor of the town.
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    0
  • This category includes German places in the Prussian provinces of Hanover and Schleswig-Holstein, in the Duchy of Brunswick, in the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, and in the Free Cities of Hamburg, Bremen, and Lübeck.
    0
    0
  • from Minden by the main line of railway from Hanover to Cologne, with a station on the Lane-Hameln line.
    0
    0
  • Sunderland continued to take part in public life, and was active in communicating with the court of Hanover about the steps to be taken in view of the approaching death of the queen.
    0
    0
  • in Hanover he secured in April 1717 the position of secretary of state for the northern department.
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    0
  • Rivers now met with marked favour at court, being entrusted with a delicate mission to the elector of Hanover in 1710, which was followed by his appointment in 1711 as master-general of the ordnance, a post hitherto held by Marlborough himself.
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    0
  • In 1701 Toland spent a few weeks at Hanover as secretary to the embassy of the earl of Macclesfield, and was received with favour by the electress Sophia in acknowledgment of his book Anglia Libera, a defence of the Hanoverian succession.
    0
    0
  • The Account of the Courts of Prussia and Hanover (1705) was used by Carlyle in his Life of Frederick the Great.
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    0
  • His brother, Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg (1750-1801), became his father's assistant in Philadelphia in 1770; was pastor of the Christ (or Swamp) German Lutheran Church of New York City from 1773 to 1776; and in1777-1779was assistant to his father at New Hanover.
    0
    0
  • The vital differences among the friends of the Hanover succession were not political, but ecclesiastical.
    0
    0
  • In any event the occupants of office could merely have had the choice of risking their heads in an attempt to exclude the elector of Hanover, or of waiting patiently till he should come and eject them from their posts; yet they might have remained formidable could they have remained united.
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  • Dr .Hermann Adler was born in Hanover in 1839, graduated at Leipzig, and received honorary degrees from Scotch and English universities, including Oxford.
    0
    0
  • The city comprises the parliamentary boroughs of the Strand, Westminster and St George's, Hanover Square, each returning one member.
    0
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  • by the Prussian provinces of Hanover and Westphalia respectively; area 1291 sq.
    0
    0
  • Of these the most noteworthy is the abbey of Lokkum in Hanover, founded as a Cistercian house in 1163 by Count Wilbrand of Hallermund, and reformed in 1593.
    0
    0
  • The abbot of Lokkum, who still carries a pastoral staff, takes precedence of all the clergy of Hanover, and is ex officio a member of the consistory of the kingdom.
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  • Other educational institutions of college rank include Vincennes University (non-sectarian), at Vincennes; Hanover College (1833, Presbyterian), at Hanover; Wabash College (1832, non-sectarian), at Crawfordsville; Franklin College (1837, Baptist), at Franklin; De Pauw University (1837, Methodist Episcopal), at Greencastle; Butler University (1855, Christian), at Indianapolis; Earlham College (1847, Friends), at Richmond; Notre Dame University (1842, Roman Catholic), at Notre Dame; Moore's Hill College (r856, Methodist Episcopal), at Moore's Hill; the University of Indianapolis (nonsectarian), a loosely affiliated series of schools at Indianapolis, centring around Butler University; and Rose Polytechnic Institute (1883, non-sectarian), at Terre Haute.
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  • His memoirs are to be found in his works Vier Jahre in Spanien (Hanover, 1841), Reise-und Lagerbriefe aus Spanien and vom spanischen Heere in Marokko (Hanover, 1863) and in the Darmstadt Allgemeine Militarzeitung.
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  • (Hanover, 1876 seq.).
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  • C Hanover, daughter of James I.s daughter Elizabeth, to the exclusion of all Roman Catholic claimants, though it imposed several fresh restrictions on.
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  • So far, indeed, as it only came about through the incapacity of the first two kings of the house of Hanover, it might be undone, and was in fact to a great extent undone by a more active successor.
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  • Her accession gave them a new interest in the house of Hanover.
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  • Following up words with acts, it decided on occupying Holstein, and it delegated the duty of carrying out its order to Hanover and Saxony.
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  • The two first kings of the house of Hanover could only keep the crown on their own heads by conciliating the Revolution families and accepting Revolution principles.
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  • EMS, a river of Germany, rising on the south slope of the Teutoburger Wald, at an altitude of 358 ft., and flowing generally north-west and north through Westphalia and Hanover to the east side of the Dollart, immediately south of Emden.
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  • See Zeitschrift des Harzvereins (Wernigerode, annually since 1868); Gunther, Der Harz in GeschichtsKulturand Landschaftsbildern (Hanover, 1885), and "Der Harz" in Scobel's Monographien zur Erdkunde (Bielefeld, 1901); H.
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  • GOTTINGEN, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, pleasantly situated at the west foot of the Hainberg (1200 ft.), in the broad and fertile valley of the Leine, 67 m.
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  • from Hanover, on the railway to Cassel.
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  • the Germanist, Wilhelm Eduard Albrecht (1800-1876); the historian, Friedrich Christoph Dahlmann (1785-1860); the orientalist, Georg Heinrich August Ewald (1803-1875); the historian, Georg Gottfried Gervinus (1805-1875); the physicist, Wilhelm Eduard Weber (1804-1891); and the philologists, the brothers Jacob Ludwig Karl Grimm (1785-1863), and Wilhelm Karl Grimm (1786-1859), - for protesting against the revocation by King Ernest Augustus of Hanover of the liberal constitution of 1833, further reduced the prosperity of the university.
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  • The events of 1848, on the other hand, told somewhat in its favour; and, since the annexation of Hanover in 1866, it has been carefully fostered by the Prussian government.
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  • was superintendent at Burgdorf near Hanover.
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  • (Hanover, 1868), and have been translated into German by H.
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  • WILHELMINA (SOPHIA FRIDERIKA WILHELMINA) (1709-1758), margravine of Baireuth, was born in Berlin on the 3rd of July 1709, the daughter of Frederick William I., crown prince, afterwards king of Prussia, and of Sophia Dorothea, daughter of the elector of Hanover (George I.
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  • Liebermann in Einleitung in den Dialogus de Scaccario (Göttingen, 1875); in Ostenglische Geschichtsquellen (Hanover, 1892); and in Pertz's Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Scriptores, vol.
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  • At Berlin Jablonski worked hard to bring about a union between the followers of Luther and those of Calvin; the courts of Berlin, Hanover, Brunswick and Gotha were interested in his scheme, and his principal helper was the philosopher Leibnitz.
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  • In 1864 he became closely connected with the Augustenburg party in Schleswig-Holstein, but after 1866 he transferred his services to the Prussian government, and was employed in a semi-official capacity in the newly conquered province of Hanover.
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  • LUNEBURGER HEIDE, a district of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, lying between the Aller and the Elbe and intersected by the railways Harburg-Hanover and BremenStendal.
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  • See Rabe, Die Luneburger Heide and die Bewirthschaftung der Heidhofe (Jena, 1900); Kniep, Fuhrer durch die Luneburger Heide (Hanover, 1900); Linde, Die Luneburger Heide (Luneburg, 1905), and Kuck, Das alte Bauernleben der Luneburger Heide (Leipzig, 1906).
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  • Scriptores (Hanover and Berlin, 1826-1892).
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  • Bresslau, was published at Hanover in 1878.
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  • To conceal his plan he aroused French colonial aspirations against England, and also the memory of the spoliations of 1763, exasperating English jealousy of France, whose borders now exteiided to the Rhine, and laying hands on Hanover, Hamburg and Cuxhaven.
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  • Prussia alone remained outside the Confederation of the Rhine, of which Napoleon was Protector, and to further her decision he offered her English Hanover.
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  • Ostfrieslands (3 vols., Hanover, 1854-1858); Hooft van Iddekinge, Friesland en de Friezen in de Middeleeuwen (Leiden, 1881); A.
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  • There are a number of residences of 18th century architecture, and the names of several of the streets - such as King George's, Prince George's, Hanover, and Duke of Gloucester - recall the colonial days.
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  • On the other hand, in order to secure the complete control of North Germany, which was his immediate object, he required that the whole of Hanover, Hesse-Cassel, Hesse-Nassau and the city of Frankfort, as well as the Elbe duchies, should be absorbed in Prussia.
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  • of England, was imprisoned before she was taken to Hanover.
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  • Scriptores1 (Hanover and Berlin, 1826-1892).
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  • of Dusseldorf, on the main line of railway to Hanover and Berlin, and at the centre of an important network of lines radiating hence into the extensive Westphalian coal and iron fields.
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  • Three years later he removed to Göttingen as professor of physics, and remained there till 1837, when he was one of the seven professors who were expelled from their chairs for protesting against the action of the king of Hanover (duke of Cumberland) in suspending the constitution.
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  • by Hesse-Nassau, Hanover and Brunswick, N.
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  • by Hanover and Brandenburg, E.
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  • Intel inside CeBit clashes with Intel's Developer Forum in California, so the chipmaker might not deliver too many bombshells in Hanover.
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  • Why did he have to pay deference to Hanover in his foreign policy?
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  • Builders who took 99-year leases included James Nicoll from Marylebone and William Selby from Hanover Square (Westm.
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  • GERMANY Prince Ernst-August of Hanover Being a Prince does not entitle you to act like a boorish lout.
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  • Like many of the old houses of Europe, the future for Hanover is rather murky at best.
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  • Hanover have good design and great content with minimum corporate puffery.
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  • Caroline Herschel was rescued by William from a life of domestic servitude under her mother in Hanover.
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  • (Hanover and Berlin, 1826 fol.).
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  • The first group arrived on the 8th of February, the first division of the larger body on the 12th of May, and the five original towns of WilkesBarre (q.v.), Kingston, Hanover, 2 Plymouth and Pittston were soon founded.
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  • He also wrote The House of Austria in the Thirty Years' War (1869), Great Britain and Hanover (1899),(1899), The Electress Sophia and the Hanoverian Succession (1903); he edited Crabbe's Poems (2 vols., 1905-1906) and Pope's Poetical Works (1869); he wrote the volumes on Chaucer and Dickens in the "English Men of Letters" series, translated Curtius's History of Greece (5 vols., 1868-1873); he was one of the editors of the Cambridge Modern History, and with A.
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  • Different views on subscription and discipline, and the arbitrary act of excision were the barriers to union, but these were removed; in 1758 the adopting act was re-established in its original breadth, the "Synod of New York and Philadelphia" was formed, and the reunion was signalized by the formation of the presbytery of Hanover in Virginia.
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  • Rocha Golfo de Pen ds Welling Scale, I:16,500,000 English Miles 59 Madre de Dios l Archipelago Falkland Islands Bahia Grande Hanover kland,  ?,r9e°yness G Cvn4 Straits of Magellan he Pt.
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  • It lies on the right bank of the Elbe, is bounded by the territories of Hamburg, Lubeck, Mecklenburg-Strelitz and the province of Hanover, and comprises an area of 453 sq.
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  • and W., successively by Westphalia, Waldeck, Hanover, the province of Saxony, the Thuringian States, Bavaria, Hesse and the Rhine Province.
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  • was to appoint him president of the province of Hanover.
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  • Asche, Die Kaiserpfalz zu Goslar (1892); Neuburg, Goslars Bergbau bis 1 55 2 (Hanover, 1892); and the Urkundenbuch der Stadt Goslar, edited by G.
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  • The result, too, vindicating as it did the supremacy of the Constitution of the United States, was a substantial gain for that nationalism which Webster advocated in his first Fourth of July oration at Hanover, and the promotion of which was for the remainder of his career his principal service to his country.
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  • But the defects which had rendered him unable to baffle the intrigues of Walpole made him equally unable to contend with the Pelhams. His support of the king's policy was denounced as subservience to Hanover.
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  • Yorkshire, Staffordshire, France, Portugal, Spain, Italy, Montenegro, Upper Austria, Tyrol, Bavaria, Wurttemberg, Baden, Elsass, Lothringen, Rhenish Bavaria, Rhenish Prussia, Hanover, Brunswick, Sweden, Spitzbergen, Punjab, China, Transvaal, Cape Colony, Connecticut, New Jersey, Virginia, North Carolina, Wyoming, Argentina, New South Wales, Queensland.
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  • The various treaties of Prague, Berlin and Vienna which followed the armistice secured the annexation by Prussia of Hanover, the Elbe duchies, the electorate of Hesse, Nassau and Frankfurt, the dissolution of the existing confederation and the creation of a new North German Confederation under the hegemony of Prussia, and the payment of war indemnities to Prussia (the Austrian share being 6,000,000).
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  • His principal work is The English Colonies in America, in five volumes, as follows: Virginia, Maryland and the Carolinas (1 vol., 1882), The Puritan Colonies (2 vols., 1886), The Middle Colonies (1 vol., 1907), and The Colonies under the House of Hanover (i vol., 1907), the whole work dealing with the history of the colonies from 1607 to 1759.
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  • Conze, Reise auf den Inseln des thrakischen Meeres (Hanover, 1860); for inscriptions see Inscr.
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  • Schulze's period of prominence in Berlin closely corresponded to that of Herbart at Konigsberg (1809-1833) and Göttingen (1833-1841), who insisted that for boys of eight to twelve there was no better text-book than the Greek Odyssey, and this principle was brought into practice at Hanover by his distinguished pupil, Ahrens.
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  • REPSOLD, JOHANN GEORG (1771-1830), German instrument maker, was born at Wremen in Hanover on the 23rd of September 1771, and became an engineer and afterwards chief of the fire brigade in Hamburg, where he started business as an instrument maker early in the 19th century.
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  • The mean annual temperature is about 46° Fahr.; in the town of Hanover it is higher.
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  • The chief towns - containing more than 10,000 inhabitants - are Hanover, Linden, Osnabruck, Hildesheim, Geestemunde, Wilhelmshaven, Harburg, Luneburg, Celle, Göttingen and Emden.
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  • Linen yarn and cloth are largely manufactured, especially in the south about Osnabruck and Hildesheim, and bleaching is engaged in extensively; woollen cloths are made to a considerable extent in the south about Einbeck, Göttingen and Hameln; cotton-spinning and weaving have their principal seats at Hanover and Linden.
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  • George Louis married his cousin Sophia Dorothea, the only child of George William of LUneburg-Celle; and on his uncle's death in 1705 he united this duchy, together with Saxe-Lauenburg, with his paternal inheritance of Calenberg or Hanover.
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  • In 1743 George took up arms on behalf of the empress Maria Theresa; but in August 1745 the danger in England from the Jacobites led him to sign the convention of Hanover with Frederick the Great, although the struggle with France raged around his electorate until the peace of Aix-la-Chapelle in 1748.
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