Hampshire sentence example

hampshire
  • I'll get the New Hampshire detective.
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  • Howie only came to New Hampshire a couple of times.
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  • by the Connecticut river, which separates it from New Hampshire, S.
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  • We spent our remaining time in New Hampshire with no mention of his visions.
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  • I've set up the same old power sources as New Hampshire and I managed to gather up about a third of the same plants.
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  • In the later years of his life in New Hampshire he was the most prominent of the local Republican leaders and built up his party by partisan appointments.
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  • His mother pushed him off on us because he stayed up here in New Hampshire because he stayed here a couple of summers growing and she thought visiting might jar something loose.
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  • I asked my mother about visiting the country or a farm and she insisted I'd never travelled anywhere but here in New Hampshire until I left for the seminary.
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  • The conversation slipped back to our New York life with our sojourn in New Hampshire relegated to a fun, if bizarre weekend with friends.
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  • When we were shown a 1792 restored Inn in the nearby village of Surry, New Hampshire, it was love at first sight.
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  • Claire Elizabeth LeBlanc, all seven pounds, six ounces of her, came into the world at Dartmouth-Hitchcok Medical Center, in Keene, New Hampshire on June third.
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  • It was summer, a wonderful time of year in New Hampshire and on Friday, three weeks after her first visit, Julie returned to Keene.
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  • While he yearned to return to New Hampshire I sensed he possessed a strong guilt, locking him to his mother's bedside.
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  • There is on one to connect me to New Hampshire though this little group who thought they were so clever hiding in that silly business in Keene might suspect that the one they hunted is now hunting them!
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  • In New Hampshire, I watched as another tried to mimic me and failed while no one even knew I was nearby.
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  • My dear, do I have the honor of finally meeting the famous psychic tipster or were you but the helper of the young mother who died so suddenly in that delightful New Hampshire town?
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  • We tried to duplicate our New Hampshire activities; even recording our efforts but fixing the settings proved to be hit and miss.
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  • Tears come to my eyes these months later as I pen these words, sitting in the comfort of our Surry, New Hampshire home with Betsy by my side.
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  • At sixteen, while vacationing at a New Hampshire camp for girls, she had become involved with a local boy, Donald Ryland.
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  • But there were exceptions: Irish Presbyterians from Ulster formed a church at Londonderry, New Hampshire, which, about 1729, grew into a presbytery; the Boston presbytery, organized in 1745, became in 1774 the synod of New England with three presbyteries and sixteen ministers; and there were two independent presbyteries, that of "the Eastward" organized at Boothbay, Maine, in 1771, and that of Grafton, in New Hampshire, founded by Eleazar Wheelock and other ministers interested in Dartmouth College.
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  • DANIEL CHESTER FRENCH (1850-), American sculptor, was born at Exeter, New Hampshire, on the 20th of April 1850, the son of Henry Flagg French, a lawyer, who for a time was assistant-secretary of the United States treasury.
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  • North of Massachusetts the Connecticut river is wholly within New Hampshire - Vermont's eastern boundary is low-water mark on the W.
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  • Of the inhabitants born in the United States, 19,974 were natives of New York, 9675 were natives of New Hampshire and 9111 were natives of Massachusetts.
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  • The territory in which these settlements had been made was involved in the boundary dispute between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, which was settled in 1741 by a decision of the king in council favourable to New Hampshire (q.v.).
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  • From 1761 to 1763 Governor John Wentworth of New Hampshire issued 108 grants, and settlements were established in Brattleboro, Putney, Westminster, Halifax, Marlborough, Wilmington, New Fane, Rockingham, Townshend, Vernon (Hinsdale) and Dummerston (all in Windham county, except Vernon, which is in Cheshire county).
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  • As a result, New York and New Hampshire formed a secret agreement to divide the state between themselves, the mountains to be the line of division.
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  • The difficulties with New Hampshire were adjusted in 1782, the west bank of the Connecticut being accepted as the final boundary, but New York refused to abandon her claims until 1790.
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  • Cromwell was present at the sieges of Bridgwater, Bath, Sherborne and Bristol; and later, in command of four regiments of foot and three of horse, he was employed in clearing Wiltshire and Hampshire of the royalist garrisons.
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  • JOHN LANGDON (1741-1819), American statesman, was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on the 25th of June 1741.
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  • In December 1774, as a militia captain he assisted in the capture of Fort William and Mary at New Castle, New Hampshire, one of the first overt acts of the American colonists against the property of the crown.
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  • Alfred Langdon Elwyn has edited Letters by Washington, Adams, Jefferson and Others, Written During and After the Revolution, to John Langdon of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1880), a book of great interest and value.
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  • EXETER, a town and one of the county-seats of Rockingham county, New Hampshire, U.S.A., on the Squamscott river, about 12 m.
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  • There was disagreement from the first, however, with regard to the measure of loyalty to the king, and in 1643, when Massachusetts had asserted her claim to this region and the other three New Hampshire towns had submitted to her jurisdiction, the majority of the inhabitants of Exeter also yielded, while the minority, including the founder, removed from the town.
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  • The first two years after his return to England he spent principally at his father's country seat at Buriton, in Hampshire, only nine months being given to the metropolis.
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  • In an hour of patriotic ardour he became (June 12, 1 759) a captain in the Hampshire militia, and for more than two years (May io, 1760, to December 23, 1762) led a wandering life of " military servitude."
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  • Hampshire, Kent, Wiltshire and Dorsetshire formed the successive theatres of what he calls his " bloodless and inglorious campaigns."
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  • LYMINGTON, a municipal borough and seaport in the New Forest parliamentary division of Hampshire, England, 98 m.
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  • I set both similar to my New Hampshire test but frankly; I didn't pay much attention to precise accuracy.
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  • My name is Ben Gustefson and I'm living in Keene, New Hampshire with my wife Betsy.
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  • Keene, New Hampshire - Greenbriar Road.
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  • He's been stalking us all the way from New Hampshire where he killed two friends of ours.
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  • ANTHONY ASHLEY COOPER SHAFTESBURY, 1ST EARL OF (1621-1683), son of Sir John Cooper of Rockbourne in Hampshire, and of Anne, the only child of Sir Anthony Ashley, Bart., and was born at Wimborne St Giles, Dorset, on the 22nd of July 1621.
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  • After the close of the war there was an influx of settlers from Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire and Vermont; a town was laid out on the Van der Heyden farm, and in 1789 the name of Troy was selected in town meeting; and in 1791 the town of Troy was formed from part of Rensselaerwyck.
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  • This body is not, however, a special board, as in Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts, but a kind of administrative cabinet as in Iowa, consisting of the secretary of state, the auditor, the treasurer, and the superintendent of 2 The changes made in 1875 were adopted in a convention, were ratified in 1876, and were so numerous that the amended constitution is frequently referred to as the Constitution of 1876.
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  • New Hampshire claimed that her territory extended as far to the west as those of Massachusetts and Connecticut, whereas New York, under the charter of 1664, claimed eastward to the Connecticut river.
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  • We were rolling in euphoria when an old friend from my Amherst, Massachusetts childhood telephoned with an invitation to visit her family cabin in New Hampshire.
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  • The goal of our offered summer sojourn was described as a seasonal cabin on a small lake in near Wolfboro, New Hampshire.
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  • We never travelled much except to come up here to New Hampshire a few times.
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  • Neither of us mentioned the subject since we left New Hampshire.
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  • Connecticut and Rhode Island were ruled out and we began to concentrate on New Hampshire.
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  • Betsy's loving boss presented the most difficulty but she used the excuse her new husband was transferred to New Hampshire.
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  • Frost, not uncommon in New Hampshire as late as June, was considered by Howie a villain to reckon with.
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  • After all, you're miles away in Keene, New Hampshire.
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  • Come on back to New Hampshire and get on with your life and forget about history.
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  • Cheshire County, New Hampshire.
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  • I arranged to ship Quinn's equipment back to New Hampshire tomorrow so that's out of the way.
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  • I didn't at first recognize the New Hampshire number but remembered I'd given mine to Detective Jackson.
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  • My wife and I had promised each other to remain constantly in phone contact after the close calls in New Hampshire.
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  • There is what looks like an excellent contemporary portrait in one of the windows of All Souls College, which is figured in the Victoria County History for Hampshire, ii.
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  • In 1827 he received the rectory of West Tytherley, Hampshire, and two years later he was elected headmaster of Harrow.
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  • His parents died before he was ten years of age, and he inherited extensive estates in Hampshire, Wiltshire, Dorsetshire and Somersetshire, much reduced, however, by litigation in Chancery.
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  • Along the shore of Lake Champlain are a few species of maritime plants that remain from the time when portions of western Vermont were covered by the sea, and on the upper slopes of some of the higher mountains are a few Alpine species; these, however, are much less numerous on the Green Mountains of Vermont than on the White Mountains of New Hampshire.
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  • The first legislature of the state met at Windsor in March 1778, and voted to admit sixteen towns east of the Connecticut river which were dissatisfied with the rule of New Hampshire.
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  • It was regarded as the principal establishment of the kind in the country till the foundation of Netley in Hampshire.
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  • Milne-Edwards, and in the equivalent beds of Hampshire.
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  • He was a judge of the New Hampshire Court of Common Pleas in 17761 777, a member (and speaker) of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1776 until 1782, a member of the state Constitutional Convention of 1778 and of the state Senate in 1784-1785, and in1783-1784was again a member of Congress.
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  • during the first Congress and the second session of the second Congress; a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in1801-1805and its speaker in 1803-1805; and governor of the state in1805-1809and in 1810-1812.
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  • In 1680 the town became a part of the newly created province of New Hampshire.
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  • DANIEL WEBSTER (1782-1852), American statesman, was born in Salisbury (now Franklin), New Hampshire, on the 18th of January 1782.
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  • He was a descendant of Thomas Webster, of Scottish ancestry, who settled in New Hampshire about 1636.
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  • He was a member of Rogers' Rangers in the Seven Years' War, served in the War of Independence, was for several years a member of the New Hampshire legislature, was a delegate to the New Hampshire convention which ratified the Federal constitution, and was a justice of the court of common pleas for his county.
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  • The case came before the Supreme Court of New Hampshire in May 1817.
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  • Webster was twice married - first in 1898 to Grace, daughter of Rev. Elijah Fletcher, a New Hampshire clergyman.
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  • It was in 1875 that the Smithfield Club first provided the competitive classes for lambs, and in 1883 the champion plate offered for the best pen of sheep of any age in the show was for the first time won by lambs, a pen of Hampshire Downs.
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  • The Hampshire Down Sheep Breeders' Association may be taken as a type of the latter, its principal object being to encourage the breeding of Hampshire Down sheep at home and abroad, and to maintain the purity of the breed.
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  • Prizes are offered by the society at various agricultural shows where Hampshire Down sheep are exhibited.
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  • PORTSMOUTH, a city, port of entry and one of the countyseats of Rockingham county, New Hampshire, U.S.A., on the Piscataqua river, about 3 m.
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  • In 1679, however, New Hampshire was constituted a separate province, and Portsmouth was the capital until 1775.
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  • Both were afterwards removed to the memorial chapel at Farnborough in Hampshire.
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  • Hampshire >>
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  • His wife was the widow of Colonel Benjamin Rolfe, and the daughter of Timothy Walker, "a highly respectable minister, and one of the first settlers at Rumford," now called Concord, in New Hampshire.
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  • Soon after it he became acquainted with Governor Wentworth of New Hampshire, who conferred on him the majority of a local regiment of militia.
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  • The township of Rutland was granted by New Hampshire in 1761 to John Murray of Rutland, Massachusetts, and about the same time it was granted (as Fairfield) by New York.
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  • SOUTH HADLEY, a township of Hampshire county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on the Connecticut river, about 12 m.
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  • In the two winters of 1814-1816 he ministered to the English congregation at Geneva, and from 1816 to 1821 was curate of Highclere, Hampshire.
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  • From 1903 to 1905 he was a member of the Legislature of New Hampshire, and in 1912 he was an unsuccessful candidate for governor on the Progressive ticket.
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  • AMHERST, a village of Amherst township, Hampshire county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., in the central part of the state, about 7 m.
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  • the Hampshire and Berkshire Hills, on the N.
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  • After preaching four years in New York and New Hampshire, he became, in April 1773, pastor of the Second church at Franklin (until 1778 a part of Wrentham, Massachusetts), of which he remained in charge until May 1827, when failing health compelled his relinquishment of active ministerial cares.
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  • DOVER, a city and the county seat of Strafford county, New Hampshire, U.S.A., on the Cochecho river, at the head of navigation, io m.
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  • See Jeremy Belknap, History of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1784-1792); and Rev. Dr A.
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  • Upon the dissolution he retired into privacy at his country seat of Stratton in Hampshire.
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  • In 1649 he married Dorothy, daughter of Richard Mayor, or Major, of Hursley in Hampshire.
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  • He represented Hampshire in the parliament of 1654, and Cambridge University in that of 1656, and in November 16J5 was appointed one of the council of trade.
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  • He returned to England about 1680 and lived at Cheshunt, in the house of Sergeant Pengelly, where he died on the 12th of July 1712, being buried in Hursley church in Hampshire.
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  • Laconia, New Hampshire >>
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  • In 1820 he was re-elected, receiving all the electoral votes but one, which William Plumer (1759-1850) of New Hampshire cast for John Quincy Adams, in order, it is said, that no one might share with Washington the honour of a unanimous election.
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  • It is served by the Boston & Maine railroad and by electric railways to Andover, Boston, Lowell, Haverhill and Salem, Massachusetts, and to Nashua and Salem, New Hampshire.
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  • Foiled by the valour of the citizens, they sailed away and harried the coast from Essex to Hampshire. !Ethelred now resorted to the old experiment and bought them off for £16,000 and a promise of supplies.
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  • LEVI WOODBURY (1789-1851), American political leader, was born at Francestown, New Hampshire, on the 22nd of December 1789.
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  • He was secretary of the navy in 1831-1834, secretary of the treasury in 1834-1841, and associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1846 until his death, at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on the 4th of September 1851.
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  • In June 1754, in pursuance of a recommendation of the Lords of Trade, a convention of representatives of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania and Maryland met here for the purpose of confirming and establishing a closer league of friendship with the Iroquois and of arranging for a permanent union of the colonies.
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  • They gradually made their way into Hampshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, Staffordshire, Northumberland, Scotland and Ireland.
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  • The chief collections are those issued at Grately in Hampshire, at Exeter, at Thunresfeld, and the Judicia civitatis Lundonie.
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  • Ordained in 1662, he successively held the livings of Little Easton in Essex, Brighstone (sometimes called Brixton) in the Isle of Wight, and East Woodhay in Hampshire; in 1672 he resigned the last of these, and returned to Winchester, being by this time a prebendary of the cathedral, and chaplain to the bishop, as well as a fellow of Winchester College.
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  • Upon the removal in 1824 of the conference's academy at New Market, New Hampshire, to Wilbraham, Massachusetts, Fisk became one of its agents and trustees, and in 1826 its principal.
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  • FAREHAM, a market town in the Fareham parliamentary division of Hampshire, England, 76 m.
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  • Hutchinson went to England in 1740 as the representative of Massachusetts in a boundary dispute with New Hampshire.
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  • EASTHAMPTON, a township of Hampshire county, Mass., U.S.A., in the Connecticut Valley.
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  • New Hampshire had the highest average, 1785 lb per acre, and Mississippi the lowest, 440 Ib.
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  • JOHN STARK (17?8-1822), American soldier, was born at Nutfield, now Londonderry, New Hampshire, on the 28th of August 1728.
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  • Later in the year, however, he was placed in command (by New Hampshire), with the rank of brigadier-general of militia, of a force of militiamen, with whom, on the 16th of August, near Bennington, Vermont, he defeated two detachments of Burgoyne's army under Colonel Friedrich Baum and Colonel Breyman.
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  • He died at Manchester, New Hampshire, on the 8th of May 1822.
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  • Nelson Dale, The Chief Commercial Granites of Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island (Ibid., 1908), being Bulletin 354 of the U.S. Geological Survey.
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  • One of his most intimate friends was William Stukeley (1687-1765) with whom he studied anatomy, chemistry, &c. In1708-1709Hales was presented to the perpetual curacy of Teddington in Middlesex, where he remained all his life, notwithstanding that he was subsequently appointed rector of Porlock in Somerset, and later of Faringdon in Hampshire.
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  • FITZ-JOHN PORTER (1822-1901), American soldier, was born at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on the 31st of August 1822.
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  • laevis, the "smooth snake" of Europe, in England, in Hampshire and Dorsetshire, eats chiefly lizards; owing to its coloration, which varies much, it is often mistaken for the viper.
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  • NEW FOREST, one of the few woodland regions left in England covering about 93,000 acres in the south-west of Hampshire, between the Solent, Southampton Water and the river Avon.
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  • The trees were formerly felled for building the ships of the navy and for feeding the iron furnaces of Sussex and Hampshire.
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  • JOHN GREAVES (1602-1652), English mathematician and antiquary, was the eldest son of John Greaves, rector of Colemore, near Alresford in Hampshire.
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  • Opposite Holyoke, in Hampshire county, is South Hadley Falls.
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  • HENRY PARRY LIDDON (1829-1890), English divine, was the son of a naval captain and was born at North Stoneham, Hampshire, on the 10th of August 1829.
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  • Dana in 1824 at Franconia in New Hampshire.
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  • LEVI PARSONS MORTON (1824-), American banker and politician, was born at Shoreham, Vermont, on the 16th of May 1824.1 He was in business at Hanover, New Hampshire, in1843-1849and in Boston in 1849-1854.
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  • New Hampshire >>
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  • SOUTHAMPTON, a municipal, county, and parliamentary borough of Hampshire, England, a seaport, and county in itself, 79 m.
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  • The Royal South Hampshire Infirmary is the principal of numerous benevolent and charitable institutions.
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  • To the north of the old town are the East and West Parks and the Hampshire county cricket ground, and to the south the small Queen's Park.
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  • See Victoria County History: Hampshire, iii.
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  • Woodward, History of Hampshire (London, 1861-9); Rev. Silvester Davies, History of Southampton (London, 1883).
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  • by Vermont and New Hampshire, on the E.
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  • Monadnock (in New Hampshire, nearN.E.Massachusetts), the Blue Hills near Boston, Greylock, in the north-west, and Wachusett in the centre, are the most commanding remnant-summits (known generically as " Monadnocks ") of the original mountain system.
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  • The Berkshire country - Berkshire, Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin counties - is among the most beautiful regions of the United States.
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  • " Abandoned farms " (aggregating, in 1890, 3.4% of the total farm area, and 6.85% in Hampshire county) are common, especially in the west and south-east.
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  • The Massachusetts railroad commission, though preceded in point of time by that of New Hampshire of 1844, was the real beginning of modern state commissions.
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  • A convention of delegates representing the malcontents of numerous towns in Worcester county met at Worcester on the 15th of August 1786 to consider grievances, and a week later a similar convention assembled at Hatfield, Hampshire county.
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  • Warner, Picturesque Berkshire (also Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, Northampton, 1890-1893); U.
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  • But others were won over by the news that it had been ratified by New Hampshire and Virginia or by the telling arguments of Hamilton, and on the 26th of July the motion to ratify was carried by a vote of 30 to 27.
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  • In 1767 he became minister of a Congregational church at Dover, New Hampshire, remaining there until 1787, when he removed to Federal Street church, Boston.
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  • Belknap's chief works are: History of New Hampshire (1784-1792); An Historical Account of those persons who have been distinguished in America, generally known as American Biography (1792-1794); The Foresters (1792), &c.
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  • While incumbent of Curdridge Chapel near Bishops Waltham in Hampshire, he published (1835) The Story of Justin Martyr and Other Poems, which was favourably received, and was followed in 1838 by Sabbation, Honor Neale, and other Poems, and in 1842 by Poems from Eastern Sources.
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  • - From Winchester, in Hampshire, to Canterbury, in Kent, runs a road or way which can still be traced, now on the present made roads, now as a lane, bridle path, or cart track, now only by a line of ancient yews, hollies or oaks which once bordered it.
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  • HORACE GREELEY (1811-1872), American statesman and man of letters, was born at Amherst, New Hampshire, on the 3rd of February 1811.
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  • The peace negotiations were opened at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on the 9th of August, and by the end of the month the belligerents had agreed as to the main points at issue, that Russia should cede the half of Saghalien, annexed in 1875, surrender her lease of the Kwangtung peninsula and Port Arthur, evacuate Manchuria and recognize Japan's sphere of influence in Korea.
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  • HAVANT, a market-town in the Fareham parliamentary division of Hampshire, England, 67 m.
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  • JOHN SULLIVAN (1740-1795), American soldier and political leader, was born in Somersworth, New Hampshire, on the 18th of February 1740.
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  • He was a member of the New Hampshire Provincial Assembly in 1774, and in1774-1775was a delegate to the Continental Congress.
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  • In 1772 he had been commissioned a major of New Hampshire militia, and on the 15th of December 1774 he and John Langdon led an expedition which captured Fort William and Mary at New Castle.
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  • From 1782 to 1785 he was attorney-general of New Hampshire.
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  • He presided over the New Hampshire convention which ratified the Federal constitution in June 1788.
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  • From 1789 until his death at Durham, on the 23rd of January 1795, he was United States District Judge for New Hampshire.
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  • In 1686 he became governor, with Boston as his capital, of the "Dominion of New England," into which Massachusetts (including Maine), Plymouth, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Hampshire were consolidated, and in 1688 his jurisdiction was extended over New York and the Jerseys.
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  • In September 1872 Gladstone again offered him the great seal, which Lord Hatherley had resigned; in the same year he took up his residence in his newly erected house at Blackmoor, in the parish of Selborne, in the county of Hampshire, from which he took his new title as a peer.
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  • He died on the 4th of May 1895 at his seat in Hampshire, full of years and of honours.
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  • The legislatures of Connecticut and Rhode Island, and town meetings in Cheshire and Grafton counties (New Hampshire) and in Windham county (Vermont) accepted the invitation, and the convention, composed of 12 delegates from Massachusetts, 7 from Connecticut, 4 from Rhode Island, 2 from New Hampshire and 1 from Vermont, all Federalists, met on the 15th of December 1814, chose George Cabot of Massachusetts president and Theodore Dwight of Connecticut secretary, and remained in secret session until the 5th of January 1815, when it adjourned sine die.
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  • Two Indian attacks are particularly noteworthy - one in 1698, in which Hannah Dustin, her newborn babe, and her nurse were carried away to the vicinity of Penacook, now Concord, New Hampshire.
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  • ROMSEY, a market town and municipal borough in the New Forest parliamentary division of Hampshire, England, 7 m.
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  • In medieval times Romsey had a considerable share of the woollen trade of Hampshire, but by the end of the 17th century this manufacture began to decline, and the introduction of machinery and the adoption of steam led to its subsequent transference to the northern coal centres.
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  • He all but completed the cathedral which his predecessor, William of St Carilef, had begun; fortified Durham; built Norham Castle; founded the priory of Mottisfout and endowed the college of Christchurch, Hampshire.
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  • Copies of the resolutions were sent to the governors of the various states, to be laid before the different state legislatures, and replies were received from Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and Virginia, but all except that from Virginia were unfavourable.
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  • 15) states that the people of the more northern kingdoms (East Anglia, Mercia, Northumbria, &c.) belonged to the Angli, while those of Essex, Sussex and Wessex were sprung from the Saxons, and those of Kent and southern Hampshire from the Jutes.
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  • NEW HAMPSHIRE, a North Atlantic state of the United States, one of the New England group, and one of the Original Thirteen, lying between latitudes 42° 40' and 45° 18' 23" N., and between longitudes 70° 37' and 72° 37' W.
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  • bank of the Connecticut is New Hampshire's W.
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  • The delightful scenery of mountains, lakes, streams and woodlands gives to the greater part of New Hampshire, which is in the New England physiographic province, the appearance of a vast and beautiful park; and the state is a favourite summer resort.
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  • from the shore are the bleak and nearly barren Isles of Shoals, nine in number, a part of which belong to New Hampshire and a part to Maine.
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  • Except on the summits of the higher mountains New Hampshire was originally an unbroken forest of which the principal trees were the white pine, hemlock, sugar maple, yellow birch, beech, red oak, and white oak in the S., red spruce, balsam, and white birch on the upper mountain slopes, and red spruce, white pine, sugar maple, white spruce and white cedar in the other parts of the N.
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  • half of New Hampshire are many song birds belonging to the Alleghany faunal area; in the N.
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  • Fertile soil in New Hampshire is confined largely to the bottom-lands of the Merrimac and Connecticut rivers, where on deposits of glacial drift, which are generally quite deep in the southern half of the state, there is considerable alluvium.
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  • Farms in the more sterile parts of New Hampshire were abandoned when the depleted soil and the old methods of agriculture made it impossible for owners or tenants to compete with western farmers.
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  • Minerals.-The most important of the mineral products of New Hampshire, which has long been known as " the Granite State," is granite, which is quarried in the southern part of the state in the area of " Lake Winnepesaukee gneiss," near Concord, Merrimack county, near Milford, Hillsboro county, and E.
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  • New Hampshire granites were used for building as early as 1623.
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  • In that year New Hampshire ranked fourth among the states in output of granite, with 6.3% of the total value of granite quarried in the entire country; in 1908 the value of granite ($867,028) was exceeded by that of each of seven other states but was more than one-half of the total value of all mineral products of the state.
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  • Mica, first mined at grafton|Grafton, Grafton county, in 1803, found also in the northern part of Merrimack county and in the north-western corner of Cheshire county in such quantities that for sixty years:New Hampshire was the largest producer of mica in the United States, is no longer an important product: in 1907 its value ($7227) was less than that of the mica produced in South Dakota, Alabama, North Carolina or Colorado.
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  • A quartz schist, suitable for making whetstones and oilstones, was discovered in 1823 by Isaac Pike at Pike Station, Grafton county, and the Pike Manufacturing Company now owns and operates quarries outside this state also; in 1907 New Hampshire was the principal producer of scythe-stones in the United States, and the total value of whetstones made in 1907 (including the value of precious stones') was $59,870.
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  • Manufactures.-The heavy precipitation on the elevated central and northern parts, and the hundreds of lakes and ponds which serve as reservoirs, give to the lower southern part of the state on the Merrimac and other rivers such an abundant and constant water-power that southern New Hampshire has become an important manufacturing district, and manufacturing has become the leading industry of the state.
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  • Textiles, and boots and shoes represented ' Gems are not sought for systematically in New Hampshire.
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  • Factorymade boots and shoes increased in value from $11,986,003 in 1890 to $23,405,558 in 1900, or 95.3%, the industry ranking first in 1900; but in 1905 there was a decrease to $22,425,700, the industry then ranking second; in 1900 the value of boots and shoes was 21.8% and in 1905 it was 18.1% of the total value of all factory products, and in no other state was the degree of specialization in this industry so great as in New Hampshire.
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  • As compared with other states of the Union, New Hampshire in 1905 ranked fifth in the manufacture of factory-made boots and shoes, and in woollen goods, sixth in cotton goods, and seventh in paper and wood pulp, in hosiery and knit goods, and in the dyeing and finishing of textiles.
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  • Of the 323,481 native-born, 80,435, or 24.8%, were natives of other states than New Hampshire; 56,210 of these were natives of other New England states, however, and 7502 were natives of New York.
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  • 1860), who was then governor of New Hampshire.
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  • New Hampshire was the first of the original thirteen states to establish a government wholly independent of Great Britain.
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  • New Hampshire is the only state in the Union in which amendments to the constitution may be proposed only by a constitutional convention, and once in seven years at the general election a popular vote is taken on the necessity of a revision of the constitution.
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  • The constitution of New Hampshire places scarcely any restrictions on the powers of the legislature.
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  • Under the laws of New Hampshire the property rights of husband and wife are nearly equal.
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  • The homestead law of New Hampshire exempts from seizure for debt five hundred dollars' worth of any person's homestead except for the enforcement of a mortgage upon it, for the collection of debts incurred in making repairs or improvements, or for the collection of taxes.
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  • New Hampshire formed a part of Massachusetts when, in 1647, the General Court of that province passed the famous act requiring every town in which there were fifty householders to maintain a school for teaching reading and writing, and every town in which there were one hundred householders to maintain a grammar school with an instructor capable of preparing young men for college.
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  • The plan of 1821 to use the Literary Fund for founding and maintaining a state college for instruction in the higher branches of science and literature was abandoned in 1828 and the only state institutions of learning are the Plymouth Normal School (1870) at Plymouth, the Keene Normal School (1909) at Keene, and the New Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, organized as a department of Dartmouth College in 1866, but removed to Durham, Strafford county, as a separate institution in 1891.
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  • The state charitable and correctional institutions consist of the New Hampshire School for Feeble-minded Children, at Laconia; the New Hampshire Soldiers' Home, at Tilton; the New Hampshire Industrial School, at Manchester; the New Hampshire Hospital for the Insane, and the State Prison, at Concord; and the New Hampshire Sanatorium for consumptives (1909) near Warren Summit, about 75 m.
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  • Samuel de Champlain discovered the Isles of Shoals and sailed along the New Hampshire coast in 1605, and much more information concerning this part of the New World was gathered in 1614 by Captain John Smith, who in his Description of New England refers to the convenient harbour at the mouth of the Piscataqua and praises the country back from the rocky shore.
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  • latitude, and which made the following grants bearing upon the history of New Hampshire by their inducement to settlement, by determining the boundaries or by causing strife through their conflicts with one another: to John Mason, who has been called " the founder of New Hampshire," on the 9th of March 1622, a grant of the region between the Salem and Merrimac rivers, under the name of Mariana; to John Mason and Sir Ferdinando Gorges jointly, on the loth of August 1622, a grant of the region between the Merrimac and Kennebec rivers for 60 m.
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  • of the Merrimac river, or to the northward of any and every part thereof," and extending west to the South Sea or Pacific Ocean, under the name of Massachusetts; to John Mason alone, on the 7th of November 1629, a grant of that portion of the " Province of Maine " which lay between the Merrimac and the Piscataqua, under the name of New Hampshire; to the Laconia Company, consisting of Gorges, Mason and associates, on the 17th of November 1629, a grant of an extensive territory (which was called Laconia) around the Lake of the Iroquois (Lake Champlain) together with one thousand acres at some place to be selected along the sea coast; to Edward Hilton, on the 12th of March 1630, the grant of a tract on and about the lower part of Dover Neck; to the Laconia Company, in November 1631, a grant of a tract on both sides of the Piscataqua river near its mouth, known as the Pescataway grant; and finally to John Mason, on the 22nd of April 1635, a short time before the Council surrendered its charter, a grant of the region between the Salem river on the south and the Piscataqua and Salmon Falls rivers on the north-east and extending 60 m.
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  • inland, under the name of New Hampshire.
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  • Mason died in December of this year, and New Hampshire, unlike the other colonies from which the United States originated, New Jersey and Delaware excepted, never received a royal charter.
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  • The charter of that colony was drafted under the impression that the Merrimac flowed east for its entire course, but now an investigation was in progress which was to show that its source in Lake Winnepesaukee was several miles north of any of the four settlements in New Hampshire.
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  • Thereupon Mason, in January 1679, petitioned the king to appoint a governor who should have jurisdiction over all the lands which he claimed, and on the 18th of September of this year New Hampshire was constituted a separate province with a government vested in a president and council appointed by the king and an assembly chosen by the people.
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  • 1689 New Hampshire formed a part of the Dominion of New England, which, after the first few months, was under Sir Edmund Andros as governor-general.
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  • There being no provincial authority in New Hampshire at the close of this period, a convention of the leading citizens of its four towns attempted to establish -one.
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  • Upon the failure of this attempt, a temporary nominal union with Massachusetts was formed, but in 1692 Samuel Allen, the assign of Mason, caused a royal government to be established with his son-in-law, John Usher, as lieutenant-governor, and during the remainder of the colonial era New Hampshire was separate from Massachusetts except that from 1699 to 1741 the two had the same governor.
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  • Massachusetts proposed to confine New Hampshire to less than one-fourth its present area; that is, on the west to a line drawn 3 m.
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  • New Hampshire claimed for its southern boundary a line drawn west from a point 3 m.
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  • New Hampshire, being on the more friendly terms with the home government, finally petitioned the king to decide the matter, and in 1737 a royal order referred it to a commission to be composed of councillors from New York, Nova Scotia and Rhode Island.
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  • This gave New Hampshire much more territory on the south than it had claimed.
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  • New Hampshire asked for the territory west to within 20 m.
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  • Within a few years the governor of New Hampshire granted in the disputed territory 138 townships which were rapidly settled by those whom it was the duty of the province to protect.
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  • But there was a reluctance to incur the expense of a contest with so powerful a neighbour as New York, and in 1764 that province procured from the king in council a royal order declaring the western boundary of New Hampshire to be the western bank of the Connecticut river.
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  • From 1676 to 1759 New Hampshire suffered greatly from the Indians, and the fear of them, together with the boundary disputes and Mason's claims, retarded settlement.
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  • By June 1775 the once popular governor, Sir John Wentworth, was a refugee; on the 5th of January 1776 the fifth Provincial Congress established a provisional government; on the 5th of the following June the first Assembly elected under that government declared for independence; and on the 16th of August 1777 the important victory at Bennington was won by New Hampshire and Vermont troops under the command of General John Stark, who had a commission from New Hampshire.
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  • Six states had ratified the Federal constitution when the New Hampshire convention met at Exeter on the 13th of February 1788, to accept or reject that instrument, and so great was the opposition to it among the delegates from the central part of the state that after a discussion of ten days the leaders in favour of ratification dared not risk a decisive vote, but procured an adjournment in order that certain delegates who had been instructed to vote against it might consult their constituents.
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  • National elections in New Hampshire were carried by the Federalists until 1816, except in 1804 when President Thomas Jefferson won by a small majority; but within this period of Federalist supremacy in national politics the Democrat-Republicans elected the governor from 1805 to 1812 inclusive except in 1809.
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  • In 1816 the Democrats won both state and national elections; and out of the transition from Federalist to Democratic control, which was effected under the leadership of William Plumer (1759-1850), a prominent politician in New Hampshire for half a century, a United States senator from 1802 to 1807 and governor of the state in1812-1813and 1816-1819, arose the famous Dartmouth College Case.
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  • Accordingly, his denunciation of President Andrew Jackson's bank policy added strength to the Jacksonian Democracy, and, later, his Whig connexions were the greatest source of the Whig party's weakness in New Hampshire.
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  • Hitchcock, Geology of New Hampshire (Concord, 1874-1878); New Hampshire Annual Reports (1871), especially those of the Forestry Commission, Fish and Game Commission, Board of Agriculture and Board of Charities and Correction; J.
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  • Colby, Manual of the Constitution of the State of New Hampshire (Concord, 1902), containing an historical sketch of the constitutions of the state; F.
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  • Ward, " The New Hampshire Constitution," in The New England Magazine, N.S., vol.
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  • 29 (September 1903); Laws of New Hampshire, including Public and Private Acts and Resolves and the Royal Commissions and Instructions, with Historical and Descriptive Notes, edited by A.
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  • Batchellor (Manchester, 1904); Captain John Mason, the Founder of New Hampshire, including his tract on Newfoundland, the American charters in which he was a grantee, with letters and other historical documents, together with a memoir by C. W.
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  • Deane; New Hampshire Provincial Papers; documents and records relating to the province from the earliest period of its settlement (Concord, 1867-1873); J.
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  • Belknap, The History of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1784); Life of William Plumer (Boston, 1857), by his son William Plumer, Jr.; G.
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  • Barstow, The History of New Hampshire from its discovery, in 1614, to the passage of the toleration act, in 1819 (New York, 1853); E.
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  • Charlton, New Hampshire as it is (Claremont, 1857); J.
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  • McClintock, History of New Hampshire (Boston, 1889); F.
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  • Fry, New Hampshire as a Royal Province (New York, 1908).
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  • After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880); but before taking this office was advanced to the new see of Liverpool, where he remained until his resignation, which took place three months before his death at Lowestoft on the 10th of June 1900.
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  • FRANKLIN PIERCE (1804-1869), fourteenth president of the United States, was born at Hillsborough, New Hampshire, on the 23rd of November 1804.
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  • His father, Benjamin Pierce (1757-1839), served in the American army throughout the War of Independence, was a Democratic member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 1789 to 1803, and was governor of the state in 1827-1829.
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  • In 1842, before the expiration of his term, he resigned his seat, and at Concord, New Hampshire, began his career at the bar in earnest, though still retaining an interest in politics.
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  • He accepted, however, an appointment as Federal District Attorney for New Hampshire, as the duties of this office, which he held in 1845-1847, were closely related to those of his profession.
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  • In January 1852 the legislature of New Hampshire proposed him as a candidate for the presidency, and when the Democratic national convention met at Baltimore in the following June the Virginia delegation brought forward his name on the thirty-fifth ballot.
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  • The school was never incorporated, it had no buildings, and the lectures were delivered in the law offices of its instructors, but among its 1000 or more students were many who afterwards became famous, including John C. Calhoun; Levi Woodbury (1789-1851), United States senator from New Hampshire in1825-1831and in 1841-1845, secretary of the navy in 1831-1834 and of the treasury in 1834-1841, and a justice of the United States Supreme Court from 1845; John Y.
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  • HENRY WILSON (1812-1875), vice-president of the United States from 1873 to 1875, was born at Farmington, New Hampshire, on the 16th of February 1812.
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  • 4364 ft., Killington Peak, 4241 ft.) and their (west) piedmont ridges farther north in Vermont; and in the ridges of northern Maine: these are all in synipathy with Appalachian structure: so also are certain open valleys, as the Berkshire (limestone) Valley in western Massachusetts and the correspondin Rutland (limestone and marble) Valley in western Vermont; an more particularly the long Connecticut Valley from northern New Hampshire across Massachusetts to the sea at the southern border of Connecticut, the populous southern third of which is broadly &roded along a belt of red Triassic sandstones with trap ridges.
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  • The type of this class of forms is Mt Monadnock in south-western New Hampshire, a fine example of an isolated residual mass rising from an upland some 1500 ft.
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  • The White Mountains of northern New Hampshire may be treated as a complex group of rnonadnocks, all of subdued forms, except for a few cliffs at the head of cirque-like valleys, with Mt Washington, the highest of, the dome-like or low pyramidal summits, reaching 6293 ft., and thirteen other summits over 5000 ft.
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  • The Arctic or ArcticAlpine zone covers in the United States only the tops of a few mountains which extend above the limit of trees, such as Mt Katahdin in Maine, Mt Washington and neighboring peaks in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and the loftier peaks of the Rocky, Cascade and Sierra Nevada Mountains.
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  • The Canadian zone crosses from Canada into northern and northwestern Maine, northern and central New Hampshire, northern Michigan, and north-eastern Minnesota and North Dakota, covers the Green Mountains, most of the Adirondacks and Catskills, the higher slopes of the mountains in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee, the lower slopes of the northern Rocky and Cascade Mountains, the upper slopes of the southern Rocky and Sierra Nevada Mountains, and a strip along the Pacific coast as far south as Cape Mendocino, interrupted, however, by the Columbia Valley.
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  • New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and New Hampshire in the eastern part of the country, Louisiana in the south, and New Mexico, Arizona, California and Montana in the western part are distinctively Roman Catholic states, with not less than 63% of these in the total church body.
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  • Delaware with 17 senators and 35 representatives, has the smallest; Minnesota, with 63 senators, has the largest Senate; and New Hampshire (a small state) has, with its 390 representatives, the largest House.
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  • True executive councils have now disappeared except in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire.
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  • The Putnam Free School, now part of the public school system, was endowed early in the 19th century by Oliver Putnam of Newburyport and afterwards of Hampstead, New Hampshire.
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  • Manchester, New Hampshire >>
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  • HANOVER, a township of Grafton county, New Hampshire, U.S.A., on the Connecticut river, 75 m.
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  • Bede states that the invaders belonged to three different nations, Kent and southern Hampshire being occupied by Jutes, while Essex, Sussex and Wessex were founded by the Saxons, and the remaining kingdoms by the Angli.
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  • To this category belong the shires of Wessex (Hampshire, Wiltshire, Berkshire, &c.), each of which had an earl (aldormon, princeps, dux) of its own, at all events from the 8th century onwards.
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  • He graduated in 1856 at the Biblical Institute at Concord, New Hampshire (now a part of Boston University), became a minister in the Episcopal Church in 1857, and during the next three years was a rector first at North Adams, and then at Newton Lower Falls, Mass.
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  • ROCHESTER, a city of Strafford county, New Hampshire, U.S.A., on the Cochecho and Salmon Falls rivers, about 30 m.
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  • McDuffee, History of the Town of Rochester, New Hampshire (Rochester, 1892).
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  • The city is a wholesale distributing centre for all northern Vermont and New Hampshire, and is one of the principal lumber markets in the east, most of the lumber being imported from Canada.
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  • A charter for a town to be founded here was granted by the province of New Hampshire in 1763, but no settlement was made until 1774.
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  • FRANCIS BROWN (1849-), American Semitic scholar, was born in Hanover, New Hampshire, on the 26th of December 1849, the son of Samuel Gilman Brown (1813-1885), president of Hamilton College from 1867 to 1881, and the grandson of Francis Brown (1784-1820), whose removal from the presidency of Dartmouth College and later restoration were incidental to the famous "Dartmouth College case."
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  • Rochester, New Hampshire >>
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  • ANDOVER, a market-town and municipal borough in the Andover parliamentary division of Hampshire, England, 67 m.
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  • In 1346 he invaded England in the interests of France, but was defeated and taken prisoner at the battle of Neville's Cross in October of this year, and remained in England for eleven years, living principally in London and at Odiham in Hampshire.
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  • He then settled as minister of the Congregational church at Gosport in Hampshire (1777), and to his pastoral duties added the charge of an institution for preparing men for the ministry.
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  • The party held its national convention at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, on the 11th of August 1852, delegates being present from all the free states, and from Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and Kentucky; and John P. Hale, of New Hampshire, and George W.
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  • BERLIN, a city of Coos county, New Hampshire, U.S.A., on the Androscoggin river, in the N.
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  • Very few of the localities connected with the story of these princes have been identified with certainty, but such identifications as there are point to the southern part of Hampshire.
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  • Suspicion likewise attaches to the name Cerdic, which seems to be Welsh, while we learn from Bede that the Isle of Wight, together with part at least of the Hampshire coast, was colonized by Jutes, who apparently had a kingdom distinct from that of Wessex.
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  • The latter, however, on account of his misgovernment was deserted by most of the leading nobles, and with the exception of Hampshire the whole kingdom came into the hands cf Cynewulf.
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  • In 1838 he entered Magdalene College, Cambridge, and in 1842 he was ordained to the curacy of Eversley in Hampshire, to the rectory of which he was not long afterwards presented, and this, with short intervals, was his home for the remaining thirty-three years of his life.
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  • His reign was marked by two serious attacks on the part of the Danes, who destroyed Winchester in 860, in spite of the resistance of the ealdormen Osric and Æthelwulf with the levies of Hampshire and Berkshire, while in 865 they treacherously ravaged Kent.
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  • On the 18th of May 1807 the duc de Montpensier died at Christchurch in Hampshire, where he had been taken for change of air, of consumption.
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  • CONCORD, the capital of New Hampshire, U.S.A., and the county-seat of Merrimack county, on both sides of the Merrimac river, about 75 m.
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  • In, 1725 Massachusetts granted the land in this vicinity to some of her citizens; but this grant was not recognized by New Hampshire, whose legislature issued (1727) a grant (the Township of Bow) overlapping the Massachusetts grant, which was known as Penacook or Penny Cook.
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  • The New Hampshire grantees undertook to establish here a colony of Londonderry Irish; but the Massachusetts settlers were firmly established by the spring of 1727, Massachusetts definitely assumed jurisdiction in 1731, and in 1734 her general court incorporated the settlement under the name of Rumford.
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  • The conflicting rights of Rumford and Bow gave rise to one of the most celebrated of colonial land cases, and although the New Hampshire authorities enforced their claims of jurisdiction, the privy council in 1755 confirmed the Rumford settlers in their possession.
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  • In 1778 and again in 1781-1782 a state constitutional convention met here; the first New Hampshire legislature met at Concord in 1782; the convention which ratified for New Hampshire the Federal Constitution met here in 1788; and in 1808 the state capital was definitely established here.
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  • The New Hampshire Patriot, founded here in 1808 (and for twenty years edited) by Isaac Hill (1788-1851), who was a member of the United States Senate in 1831-1836, and governor of New Hampshire in 1836-1839, became one of the leading exponents of Jacksonian Democracy in New England.
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  • Lyford, The History of Concord, New Hampshire (City History Commission) (2 vols., Concord, 1903); Concord Town Records, 1732-1820 (Concord, 1894); J.
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  • He remained in this office until his death at Newburg, New Hampshire, on the 1st of July 1905.
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  • Andover was settled about 1643 and was incorporated in 1646, being named from the English town of Andover, Hampshire, whence some of the chief settlers had migrated; the first settlement was made in what is now the township of North Andover (pop. 4614 in 1905), which was separated from Andover in 1855.
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  • Manchester, Exeter and Dover in New Hampshire, at Hartford (5th March), New Haven (6th March), Woonsocket (8th March) and Norwich (9th March).
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  • In1781-1783he was a member of the Continental Congress, which in 1782 made him a judge of the court of appeals for admiralty cases; in 1784 he was one of the commissioners from Massachusetts to settle the boundary line between Massachusetts and New York; in1789-1801he was a judge of the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts; and from 1801 until his death in Roxbury on the 6th of May 1802 he was a justice of the U.S. Circuit Court for the First Circuit (Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Rhode Island).
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  • SALMON PORTLAND CHASE (1808-1873), American statesman and jurist, was born in Cornish township, New Hampshire, on the 13th of January 1808.
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  • in Hampshire.
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  • He was a teacher at Swanzey, New Hampshire, and at the Leicester Academy, Massachusetts, in 1845-1847, and attempted the philological method of teaching English "like Latin and Greek," later described in his Method of Philological Study of the English Language (1865); at Amherst in 1847-1849; at Fredericksburg, Virginia, in 1852-1855; and in 1855 became a tutor at Lafayette College, where he became adjunct professor of belles-lettres and English literature in 1856, and professor of English language and comparative philology - the first chair of the kind established - in 1857.
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  • LACONIA, a city and the county-seat of Belknap county, New Hampshire, U.S.A., on both sides of the Winnepesaukee river, 28 m.
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  • It is pleasantly situated in the lake district of central New Hampshire, and in the summer season Lake Winnisquam on the S.
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  • from its centre, are the grounds of the Winnepesaukee Camp-Meeting Association, and the camping place for the annual reunions of the New Hampshire Veterans of the Civil War, both at The Weirs, the northernmost point in the territory claimed by colonial Massachusetts; about 2 m.
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  • The New Hampshire State Fish Hatchery is in Laconia.
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  • SOMERSWORTH, a city of Strafford county, New Hampshire, U.S.A., on the Salmon Falls river, 5 m.
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  • It commemorates the success gained on the 16th of August 1777 by a force of nearly 2000 "Green Mountain Boys" and New Hampshire and Massachusetts militia under General John Stark over two detachments of General Burgoyne's army, totalling about 1200 men, under Col.
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  • Bennington was settled in 1761 and was named in honour of Governor Benning Wentworth of New Hampshire.
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  • It was one of the "New Hampshire Grant" towns, both New York and New Hampshire claiming jurisdiction over it, and, being the home of Ethan Allen and Seth Warner, it became the centre of activities of the "Green Mountain Boys," of whom they were leaders.
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  • Dover, New Hampshire >>
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  • spent some time in active religious, reformatory and political (Democratic) work in the interior of New York state, and at Walpole, New Hampshire, and Canton, Massachusetts, Brownson removed in 1839 to Chelsea, Mass.
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  • In 1847 he was appointed science-master at Queenwood school, Hampshire, where he first met J.
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  • A clause in the state constitution prohibited any justice of the Supreme Court from holding any other post save that of delegate to Congress on a "special occasion," but in November 1778 the legislature pronounced the secession of what is now the state of Vermont from the jurisdiction of New Hampshire and New York to be such an occasion, and sent Jay to Congress charged with the duty of securing a settlement of the territorial claims of his state.
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  • See Victoria County History - Hampshire; William Westall, History of Carisbrooke Castle (1850).
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  • In the Virginia convention for ratifying the constitution (June 1788), when eight states had ratified and it seemed that Virginia's vote would be needed to make the necessary nine (New Hampshire's favourable vote was cast only shortly before that of Virginia), and it appeared that New York would vote against the constitution if Virginia did not ratify it, Madison was called upon to defend that instrument again, and he appeared at his best against its opponents, Patrick Henry, George Mason, James Monroe, Benjamin Harrison, William Grayson and John Tyler.
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  • PORTSMOUTH, a municipal, county and parliamentary borough, and seaport of Hampshire, England, 74 m.
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  • Portsmouth, New Hampshire >>
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  • Among the principal residence streets are Massachusetts, especially between Dupont and Sheridan circles, New Hampshire, Connecticut and Vermont Avenues and 16th Street, all in the N.W.
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  • The exterior walls are of white New Hampshire granite, and the walls of the See Glenn Brown, The History of the United States Capitol (2 vols., 1900-1903).
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  • JOHN ADAMS DIX (1798-1879), American soldier and political leader, was born at Boscawen, New Hampshire, on the 24th of July 1798.
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  • In 1835 Keble's father died at the age of ninety, and soon after this his son married Miss Clarke, left Fairford, and settled at Hursley vicarage in Hampshire, a living to which he had been presented by his friend and attached pupil, Sir William Heathcote, and which continued to be Keble's home and cure for the remainder of his life.
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  • NEW ENGLAND, a general name for the north-east section of the United States of America, embracing the states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut.
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  • During its existence of fifteen years the New England Council made numerous grants of territory, and from three of these grew three of the present states: Massachusetts, from a grant to the Massachusetts Bay Company in 1628; Maine, from the grant to Sir Ferdinando Gorges and John Mason (the two most influential members of the council) in 1622; and New Hampshire, from the grant to John Mason in 1629.
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  • New Hampshire was a part of Massachusetts from1641-1643to 1679.
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  • Vermont was settled largely by emigrants from New Hampshire, but New York claimed the territory and the dispute was not settled until the new state was erected in 1791.
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  • against the Puritan governments of New England, among them Massachusetts' extension of its jurisdiction over the towns of Maine and New Hampshire, the persecution of the Quakers, and the denial of the right of appeal to the crown, and in 1664 a royal commission, consisting of Richard Nicolls, Samuel Maverick, Robert Carr and George Cartwright, was sent over to settle disputes and secure some measure of imperial control, but Massachusetts, the chief offender; successfully baffled all attempts at interference, and the mission was almost a complete failure.
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  • This done, the home government set to work to organize the royal domain which should be known as New England, or the Dominion of New England, and its plan for this provided for the annulment of the charters of Rhode Island and Connecticut, and the inclusion in the Dominion of these colonies, and New Hampshire, Maine, New York and the Jerseys, thereby restoring to New England all the territory, with the exception of Pennsylvania, that was included in the grant to the New England Council in 1620.
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  • Under William and Mary no attempt was made to preserve the Dominion of New England, but Rhode Island and Connecticut were permitted to resume government under their old charters, Massachusetts received a new one, and New Hampshire again became a separate royal province.
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  • After a visit to Germany he was a tutor at Amherst in 1839-1842, and was minister of the First (Congregational)Church, Exeter, New Hampshire, in 18 451852.
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  • LEWIS CASS (1782-1866), American general and statesman, was born at Exeter, New Hampshire, on the 9th of October 1782.
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  • FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE (1820-1910), younger daughter of William Edward Nightingale of Embley Park, Hampshire, and Lea Hurst, Derbyshire, was born at Florence on the 15th of May 1820, and named after that city, but her childhood was spent in England, chiefly in Derbyshire.
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  • THE SOLENT, a strait of the English Channel, between the mainland (the coast of Hampshire, England), and the northwestern coast of the Isle of Wight, forming the western entrance to Southampton Water, Spithead being the eastern.
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  • After some unspecified secular employment, Wykeham became "under-notary (vice tabellio) to a certain squire, constable of Winchester Castle," probably Robert of Popham, sheriff of Hampshire, appointed constable on the 25th of April 1340, not as commonly asserted Sir John Scures, the lord of Wykeham, who was not a squire but a knight, and had held the office from 1321, though, from Scures being named as second of his benefactors, Wykeham perhaps owed this appointment to his influence.
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  • As Hampshire people they may have helped Wykeham.
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  • On the approach of the royal troops he deserted his followers, and ran for refuge to the sanctuary of Beaulieu in Hampshire.
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  • political economist, born on the 26th of May 1623, was the son of a clothier at Romsey in Hampshire, and received his early education at the grammar school there.
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  • WILLIAM PITT FESSENDEN (1806-1869), American statesman and financier, was born in Boscawen, New Hampshire, on the 16th of October 1806.
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  • WARE, a township of Hampshire county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., traversed by the Ware river, and about 25 m.
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  • In the British Museum are the bronze matrices of seals of ZEthilwald, bishop of Dunwich, about Boo; of lElfric, alderman of Hampshire, about 985; and the finely carved ivory double matrix of Godwin the thane (on the obverse) and of the nun Godcythe (on the reverse), of the beginning of the 11th century.
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  • 3); and the matrix of Southwick Priory in Hampshire, of the same period (Archaeologia, xxiii.
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  • Amesbury is served by two divisions of the Boston & Maine railway, and is connected by electric line with Haverhill and Newburyport, Mass., and with Hampton Beach, New Hampshire, and Salisbury Beach, Mass., two summer resorts.
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  • 2.1 Natural Divisions 2.2 Lake District 2.3 Pennine Region 2.4 Wales 2.5 Cornwall and Devon 2.6 The Jurassic Belt 2.7 The Chalk Country 2.8 The Fenland 2.9 The Weald 2.10 The London Basin 2.11 The Hampshire Basin 2.12 Communications 2.13 Density of Population 2.14 Political Divisions
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  • In the north of Hampshire along its boundary with Surrey and Berkshire, in the southern half of Wiltshire (where rises the upland of Salisbury Plain), in Dorsetshire, and the south of Somersetshire, the hills may be said to run in a series of connected groups.
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  • In these hollows the Tertiary rocks were protected from erosion, and remain to form the London and the Hampshire Basins respectively, while on the anticlinal axis the whole of the Tertiary and the upper Cretaceous strata have been dissected away, and a complex and beautiful configuration has been impressed on the district of the Weald.
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  • This is closely followed on the south-east by the Chalk country, occupying the whole of the rest of England except where the Tertiary Basins of London and Hampshire cover it, where the depression of the Fenland carries it out of sight, and where the lower rocks of the Weald break through it.
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  • The Chalk country extends over part of Dorset, most of Wiltshire, a considerable portion of Hampshire and Oxfordshire, most of Hertfordshire and Cambridgeshire, the west of Norfolk and Suffolk, the east of Lincolnshire, and the East Riding of Yorkshire.
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  • The dissection of the great east and west anticline in the south-east of England has resulted in a remarkable piece of country, occupying the east of Hampshire and practically the whole of Sussex, Surrey and Kent, in which each geological stratum produces its own type of scenery, and exercises its own specific influence on every natural distribution.
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  • It thus occupies parts of Wiltshire, Hampshire, Surrey, Kent, Berkshire, Hertfordshire, the whole of Middlesex, the county of London and Essex, and the eastern edge of Suffolk and Norfolk.
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  • The Hampshire Basin forms a triangle with Dorchester, Salisbury and Worthing near the angles, and the rim of Chalk to the south appears in broken fragments in the Isle of Purbeck, the Isle of Wight, and to the east of Bognor.
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  • of England are the two Tertiary basins of London and Hampshire, separated by the dissected anticline of the Weald.
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  • Again, in the Hampshire Basin and Isle of Wight, Eocene and Oligocene formations rest upon the Chalk.
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  • Basingstoke, Winchester, Southampton, Bournemouth, &c. Extensive connexions in Surrey, Hampshire and the south-west, as far as North Cornwall.
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  • Most of the eastern part of England is " arable," while the western and northern part is " grass," the boundary between the sections being the western limit of Hampshire, Berkshire, Oxfordshire, Warwickshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, and of the East Riding of Yorkshire.
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  • Hampshire.
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  • Riding of Yorkshire are especially productive in all crops these; the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire pro duce a notable quantity of barley and oats; and the oat-crops in the following counties deserve mention - Devonshire, Hampshire, Lancashire, Cumberland, Cornwall, Cheshire and Sussex.
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  • There is also plenty of hillpasture in the south-western counties (from Hampshire and Berkshire westward), especially in Devonshire, Cornwall and Somersetshire, and also in Monmouthshire and along the Welsh marches, on the Cotteswold Hills, &c. In all these localities sheep are extensively reared, especially in Northumberland, but on the other hand in Lincolnshire the numbers of sheep are roughly equal to those in the northern county.
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  • The New Forest in Hampshire, the Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire, and Epping Forest, which is preserved as a public recreation-ground by the City of London, are the most notable instances.
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  • The counties comprising the greatest proportional amount of woodland fall into two distinct groups - Hampshire, Surrey, Sussex and Kent, with Berkshire and Buckinghamshire; Monmouth, Herefordshire and Gloucestershire.
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  • (I) North-western division, Rivers Eden, Derwent, Lune, Ribble; (2)North-eastern, Coquet, Tyne, Wear, Tees, &c.; (3) Western, Dee, Usk, Wye, Severn; (4) South-western, Taw, Torridge, Camel, Tamar, Dart, Exe, Teign, &c.; (5) Southern, Avon and Stour (Christchurch) and the Itchin and other famous trout streams of Hampshire.
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  • For limestone the principal localities are in Durham, Derbyshire and Yorkshire, while for chalk-quarrying Kent is pre-eminent among a group of southeastern counties, including Hampshire, Sussex and Surrey, with Essex.
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  • Hampshire jSouthampton.
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  • BENJAMIN FRANKLIN BUTLER (1818-1893), American lawyer, soldier and politician, was born in Deerfield, New Hampshire, on the 5th of November 1818.
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  • In 1838 he refused the post of assistant bishop of the eastern diocese (Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Rhode Island).
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  • by New Hampshire, the Piscataqua and Salmon Falls rivers being the natural boundary lines at the S.W.
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  • Chestnut and walnut are rare and are found only near 2 This name is applied to a chain of lakes (the Rangeley, or Oquossoc, the Cupsuptic, the Mooselookmeguntic, the Molechunkamunk or Upper Richardson, the Welokenebacook or Lower Richardson, and the Umbagog) in Franklin and Oxford counties, in the western part of the state; the Umbagog extends into New Hampshire and its outlet helps to form the Androscoggin River.
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  • Among them were some of those men of mark who made the backbone of the American character: the sturdy Puritan, Peter Bulkeley, sometime rector of Odell in Bedfordshire, and afterward pastor of the church in the wilderness at Concord, New Hampshire; the zealous evangelist, Father Samuel Moody of Agamenticus in Maine, who pursued graceless sinners even into the alehouse; Joseph Emerson of Malden, "a heroic scholar," who prayed every night that no descendant of his might ever be rich; and William Emerson of Concord, Mass., the patriot preacher, who died while serving in the army of the Revolution.
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  • HOSEA BALLOU (1771-1852), American Universalist clergyman, was born in Richmond, New Hampshire, on the 30th of April 1771.
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  • He preached at Barnard, Vermont, and the surrounding towns in 1801-1807; at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in 1807-1815; at Salem, Massachusetts, in 1815-1817; and as pastor of the Second Universalist Church in Boston from December 1817 until his death there on the 7th of June 1852.
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  • oryzoides occurs in the north temperate zone of both old and new worlds, and is a rare grass in Surrey, Sussex and Hampshire.
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  • BASINGSTOKE, a market-town and municipal borough of Hampshire, England, 48 m.
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  • SOUTHSEA, a seaside resort of Hampshire, England, part of the municipal and parliamentary borough of Portsmouth, with a terminal station (East Southsea) on a branch of the London & South-Western and London, Brighton & South Coast railways.
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  • The making of cloth, particularly Hampshire kerseys, was the staple industry of Godalming in the middle ages, but it began to decay early in the 17th century and by 1850 was practically extinct.
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  • JOHN MASON (1586-1635), founder of New Hampshire, U.S.A., was born in King's Lynn, Norfolk, England.
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  • Towards the close of 1629 Mason and Gorges agreed upon a division of the territory held jointly by them, and on the 7th of November 1629 Mason received from the Council a separate grant of the tract between the Merrimac and the Piscataqua, which he now named New Hampshire.
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  • Forty-four years after his death New Hampshire was made a royal province.
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  • See Captain John Mason, the Founder of New Hampshire (Boston, 1887; published by the Prince Society), which contains a memoir by C. W.
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  • Franklin, New Hampshire >>
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  • NORTHAMPTON, a city and the county-seat of Hampshire county, Massachusetts, U.S.A., situated on the Connecticut river, about 16 m.
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  • The Smith Charities is a peculiar institution, endowed by Oliver Smith (1766-1845) of Hatfield, who left an estate valued at $370,000, to be administered by a board of three trustees, chosen by electors representing the towns of Northampton, Hadley, Hatfield, Amherst and Williamsburg in Hampshire county and Greenfield and Whately in Franklin county - the beneficiaries of the will.
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  • In September 1786, at the time of the Shays Rebellion, the New Hampshire Gazette (still published; daily edition since 1890) was established here in the interest of the state administration.
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  • The shortwool breeds are the Oxford Down, Southdown, Shropshire, Hampshire Down, Suffolk, Ryeland, Dorset and Somerset Horn, Kerry Hill, Radnor and Clun Forest.
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  • The Oxford Down is a modern breed which owes its origin to crossing between Cotswolds and Hampshire Downs and Southdowns.
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  • The Hampshire Down is another breed which owes much of its improved character to an infusion of Southdown blood.
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  • Only a remnant of the former under the name of the Western sheep survives in a pure state, but their cross descendants are seen in the modern Hampshire Down, which originated by blending them with the Southdown.
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  • Whilst heavier than the Shropshire, the Hampshire Down sheep is less symmetrical.
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  • The Dorset Down or West Country Down, " a middle type of Down sheep pre-eminently suited to Dorsetshire," is a local variety of the Hampshire Down breed, separated by the formation of a Dorset Down sheep society in 1904, about eighty years after the type of the breed had been established.
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  • When he died, in 1892, in New Hampshire, among the hills he loved and sang so well, he had been an active writer for over sixty years, leaving more than that number of publications that bore his name as author or editor.
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  • He was pastor of the Second Congregational Church of Newport, Rhode Island, from 1755 to 1777; in 1776-1777 he preached occasionally in Dighton, Massachusetts, whither he had removed his family after the British occupation of Newport; and in April 1777 he became pastor of the North Church of Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
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  • Under two kings named Halfdan and Bacsceg, and six earls, they seized Reading and began to harry Berkshire, Surrey and Hampshire.
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  • The invaders harried Wiltshire and Hampshire at their leisure, and vainly thought that Wessex was at last subdued.
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  • ZACHARIAH CHANDLER (1813-1879), American politician, was born at Bedford, New Hampshire, on the 10th of December 1813.
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  • FRANKLIN, a city of Merrimack county, New Hampshire, U.S.A., at the confluence of the Pemigewasset and Winnepesaukee rivers to form the Merrimac; about 95 m.
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  • Here, in what was then a part of the town of Salisbury, Daniel Webster was born, and on the Webster farm is the New Hampshire orphans' home, established in 1871.
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  • He spent one year as a teacher in Phillip's Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, and then began the study of law in the office of John Quincy Adams. In 1809 Adams was appointed minister to Russia, and Everett accompanied him as his private secretary, remaining attached to the American legation in Russia until 1811.
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  • Dale, The Chief Commercial Granites of Mass., New Hampshire and Rhode Island (Washington, 1908), Bulletin 354 of the U.S. Geol.
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  • Township government, owing to the abolition of the committee on general business and the consequent confusion of handling so many and minute details, and to the addition to the population of a large Irish element and a large New Hampshire element, both workmen in the quarries, reached the minimum of efficiency in 1840-1870; in 1870, however, the town-meetings were reformed, and in 1874 a committee to consider business details was again appointed.
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  • Nelson Dale, The Chief Commercial Granites of Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Rhode Island (Washington, 1908), Bulletin 354 of the U.S. Geological Survey.
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  • Two years later, on the 14th of August 1870, he died at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.
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  • RINGWOOD, a market town in the New Forest parliamentary division of Hampshire, England, 1031 m.
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  • He had little fight in him, however, and after a futile siege of Exeter and an advance to Taunton he stole away and took sanctuary at Beaulieu in Hampshire.
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  • Concord, New Hampshire >>
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  • BOURNEMOUTH, a municipal and county borough and watering-place of Hampshire, England, in the parliamentary borough of Christchurch, 1071 m.
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  • He was one of the Boston grand jurors who refused to serve in 1774 because parliament had made the justices independent of the people for their salaries; was a leader in the Boston Tea Party; was one of the thirty North End mechanics who patrolled the streets to watch the movements of the British troops and Tories; and in December 1774 was sent to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, to urge the seizure of military stores there, and induced the colonists to attack and capture Fort William and Mary - one of the first acts of military force in the war.
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  • A very fine prospect over a great part of Surrey and Sussex, and extending to Hampshire and Kent, is obtained from the neighbouring Reigate Hill.
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  • 2 He was born in Hinsdale, New Hampshire, on the Loth of January 1844; served in the Union army during the Civil War; graduated at Brown University in 1870 and at Newton Theological Institution in 1874; taught homiletics at Newton in 1879-1882, history and economics at Brown in 1882-1888, and political economy and finance at Cornell in 1888-1889; and was president of Brown University in 1889-1898.
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  • GILBERT WHITE (1720-1793), English writer on natural history, was born on the, 8th of July 17 20 in the little Hampshire village of Selborne, which his writings have rendered so familiar to all lovers of either books or nature.
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  • They settled in Kent and the Isle of Wight together with the adjacent parts of Hampshire.
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  • This plateau itself again rests upon a more extended tableland, stretching westwards, and, with the Middlesex Plains, the Hampshire Hills and the Emu Plains, maintaining an altitude of 1200 to 2000 feet.
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  • Leaving these Scottish and Irish deposits of doubtful age, we find in the Hampshire Basin a thick series of fluviatile, lacustrine and marine deposits undoubtedly of Lower and Middle Oligocene date.
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  • outside the state; its average yield per acre (1673 lb) was exceeded in the continental United States only in Vermont (1844 lb) and Massachusetts (1674 lb) in 1899, and in 1907 (1510 lb) by New Hampshire (1650 lb), Vermont (1625 lb) and Massachusetts (1525 lb).
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  • In New Hampshire, our sessions bordered on simple curiosity; we'd described it as a parlor game, but with each new revelation another level of gravity descended over us like a snow-melt fog.
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  • Agreement was final reached on a tentative location for our Shangri La; Keene, New Hampshire.
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  • I gave Daniel Brennan a New Hampshire cell phone number.
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  • One, the Surry Mountain Campground was near our house and a brief drive-through showed only one out of state visitor, a New Hampshire tenter.
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  • In the years before Hampshire's county lunatic asylum existed, the Winchester workhouse provided care for " lunatic and mentally handicapped paupers " .
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  • Hampshire County Council have been introducing highly reflective road bollards to replace the more traditional illuminated versions.
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  • In particular one of the boys has a strong Irish brogue, and another has an equally strong west Hampshire accent.
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  • Visit her home and museum at Chawton and explore the picturesque byways of Hampshire, which inspired her.
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  • Two teachers from Hampshire are preparing to join a research cruise to explore submarine canyons off Portugal.
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  • My favorite crap celeb story: I was at a Hotel in rural Hampshire once for a training weekend through my bland office job.
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  • I William Petty was born May 26, 1623, at Romsey, in Hampshire, where his father was a poor clothier.
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  • Michael became serious about composing while studying A-level music at St Vincent sixth-form college, Gosport, Hampshire.
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  • Sun 1st Aug 2004: By election results shows that only the Liberal Democrats can beat conservatives in North West Hampshire.
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  • That's the message from Project Integra, the partnership of all local authorities in Hampshire and private contactor Onyx Hampshire.
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  • Hampshire will also be running a Hampshire youth cricket festival at the Rose Bowl in Southampton in 2006.
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  • edited version of Hampshire Scouting News.
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  • flagon made at the well-known pottery production of Alice Holt in present-day Hampshire.
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  • We have around 1,200 lock-up garages available for rent across East Hampshire.
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  • guinea pig breeder based in southampton, hampshire!
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  • House of Treats is a small artisan chocolate business, based in Hampshire, where all products are carefully handcrafted on the premises.
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  • Paula Smith UK Area Served Hampshire, Surrey, Berkshire, London Friendly, professional harpist with great vocals.
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  • hedgehog sitings Date: Tue, 17 October 13:42 Author: dahlia Location: Old Portsmouth, Hampshire.
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  • Here's your chance to discover this part of Hampshire and my lovely new hometown.
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  • Features quick cuts omaha worth Howard in new hampshire.
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  • The trial leas were: Hampshire, Liverpool, Lincolnshire, Newham, and West Sussex.
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  • Britain's greatest soldier, Lord Kitchener, died on the cruiser HMS Hampshire, sunk by mines off Orkney's west coast in 1916.
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  • In New Hampshire car number plates bear the legend, Live Free or Die; a state motto is Don't Tread on Me.
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  • Opened in 1992 the hospice is now acknowledged as providing the highest quality specialist palliative and support care in North Hampshire.
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  • London beat Oxford 23-14 and Devon had a second playoff against Hampshire to book their places in the semi's.
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  • Prior to her university post, she worked as a social worker in acute psychiatry in Hampshire.
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  • For planned roadworks in Rushmoor, please visit the Hampshire County Council website link on the right hand side of this page.
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  • The South coast of England has some wonderfully scenic counties and Hampshire just serves to emphasize this point.
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  • shooticious Venison Our wild venison is shot by expert marksmen (and women) in Somerset and Hampshire.
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  • Both wheels were rebuilt with stainless spokes by Brian Parsons of Fleet, Hampshire.
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  • superstore based in Fareham between Portsmouth and Southampton, Hampshire, UK.
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  • Our commercial and industrial gardens include superstores, shopping centers, factories and forecourts Details | Hampshire, UK.
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  • This makes us an expert st john's wood property lettings surrey properties to let for hampshire property sales and letting.
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  • The large tower block (Top left) is the Hampshire Police HQ.
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  • Another series of experiments with the magnet variometers was conducted in New Hampshire between November 1970 and September 1972.
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  • In Hampshire, try fresh watercress, strong and peppery, picked from the cool, clear waters of the river Itchen.
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  • ALAN J EVENS SOUTHSEA, HAMPSHIRE Sir: The current whipping boy of environmental campaigners is the vilified 4x4 car.
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  • Ian Harbor from Andover Hampshire fished early week catching a personal best 8lb zed.
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  • WILLIAM WARHAM (c. 1450-1532), archbishop of Canterbury, belonged to a Hampshire family, and was educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, afterwards practising and teaching law both in London and Oxford.
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  • On the 31st of August 1407 Guy Mone (he is always so spelt and not Mohun, and was probably from one of the Hampshire Meons; there was a John Mone of Havant admitted a Winchester scholar in 1397), bishop of St David's, died, and on the 12th of October 1407 Chicheley was by the pope provided to the bishopric of St David's.
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  • ALTON, a market-town in the Fareham parliamentary division of Hampshire, England, 462 m.
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  • He was president of New Hampshire in1785-1786and in 1788-1789; a member of the Federal Constitutional Convention in 1787, where he voted against granting to Congress the power of issuing paper money; a member of the state convention which ratified the Federal Constitution for New Hampshire; a member of the United States Senate in 178 9 -1801, and its president pro tem.
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  • His elder brother, Woodbury Langdon (1739-1805), was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1779-1780, a member of the executive council of New Hampshire in 1781-1784, judge of the Supreme Court of the state in 1782 and in1786-1790(although he had had no legal training), and a state senator in 1784-1785.
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  • Irksome as were his employments, grievous as was the waste of time, uncongenial as were his companions, solid benefits were to be set off against these things; his health became robust, his knowledge of the world was enlarged, he wore off some of his foreign idiom, got rid of much of his reserve; he adds - and perhaps in his estimate it was the benefit to be most prized of all - " the discipline and evolutions of a modern battalion gave me a clearer notion of the phalanx and the legion, and the captain of the Hampshire grenadiers (the reader may smile) has not been useless to the historian of the Roman empire."
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  • The East or Hampshire Avon rises in Wiltshire south of Marlborough, and watering the Vale of Pewsey collects feeders from the high downs between Marlborough and Devizes.
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  • Schools for farmers' sons and daughters, and others, answering to the ecoles pratiques d'agriculture (see France), are few, the principal being the Dauntsey Agricultural School, Wiltshire, the Hampshire Farm School, Basing, and the Farm School at Newton Rigg, Penrith, Cumberland, maintained by the county councils of Cumberland and Westmorland.
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  • In 1841, while a student at Harvard, he made a rough journey of exploration in the woods of northern New Hampshire, where he had a taste of adventure slightly spiced with hardship. About this time he made up his mind to write a history of the last French war in America, which ended in the conquest of Canada, and some time afterwards he enlarged the plan so as to include the whole course of the American conflict between France and Great Britain; or, to use his own words, "The history of the American forest; for this was the light in which I regarded it.
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  • ALDERSHOT, an urban district in the Basingstoke parliamentary division of Hampshire, England, 34 m.
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  • C. Amory, General John Sullivan, A Vindication of his Character as a Soldier and a Patriot (Morrisania, N.Y., 1867); John Scales, "Master John Sullivan of Somersworth and Berwick and his Family," in the Proceedings of the New Hampshire Historical Society, vol.
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  • NEW HAMPSHIRE, a North Atlantic state of the United States, one of the New England group, and one of the Original Thirteen, lying between latitudes 42° 40' and 45° 18' 23" N., and between longitudes 70° 37' and 72° 37' W.
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  • At the same time there were 124,561 natives of New Hampshire numbered among the inhabitants of other states, principally Massachusetts, Vermont, Maine, New York, Illinois, California, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, Kansas and Nebraska, and to induce these to return for a holiday season to their native state the " Old Home Week" festival, now held throughout New England, was planned in 1899 by Frank West Rollins (b.
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  • Sanborn, New Hampshire, an Epitome of Popular Government (Boston, 1904) in the " American Commonwealths Series "; and W.
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  • His reign was marked by two serious attacks on the part of the Danes, who destroyed Winchester in 860, in spite of the resistance of the ealdormen Osric and Æthelwulf with the levies of Hampshire and Berkshire, while in 865 they treacherously ravaged Kent.
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  • Laura Bridgman was born at Hanover, New Hampshire, December 21, 1829; so she was almost eight years old when Dr. Howe began his experiments with her.
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  • Delicious Venison Our wild venison is shot by expert marksmen (and women) in Somerset and Hampshire.
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  • Motocross Bike sales, spares and servicing from our Off-Road superstore based in Fareham between Portsmouth and Southampton, Hampshire, UK.
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  • This makes us an expert st john 's wood property lettings surrey properties to let for hampshire property sales and letting.
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  • We are lucky in Hampshire to have two Wheelchair Basketball teams.
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  • They include Alaska, Georgia, Colorado, Hawaii, California, Kentucky, Iowa, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Tennessee, Vermont, Utah, New York, Wyoming and Washington.
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  • Other companies, such as Brittany and Coggs of New Hampshire paint their tiles in layers, rubbing off the top layer of glaze from the relief portion of the tiles to allow the base layer to show through.
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  • If you ski in areas that are known for their narrow trails, such as the ski areas of New Hampshire, this can cause some problems.
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  • Amanda "Mandy" Leigh Moore was born April 10, 1984 in Nashua, New Hampshire, to Stacy and Don Moore.
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  • Sarah Kate Silverman was born on December 1, 1970 in Bedford, New Hampshire to Donald and Beth Ann Silverman.
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  • After graduating from The Derryfield School, a private day school in Manchester, Silverman left New Hampshire to attend New York University.
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  • He is a big supporter of the Boys and Girls Clubs and donated one million dollars to the Manchester, New Hampshire branch in 2007.
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  • It was founded in 1769 in Hanover, New Hampshire and today offers undergraduate degrees in liberal studies, professional programs in medicine, business and engineering, and 18 graduate programs in the arts and sciences.
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  • Dartmouth College is located in Hanover, New Hampshire.
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  • The NEASC only accredits schools and colleges within Rhode Island, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont and Connecticut.
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  • Southern New Hampshire University offers an entirely online program which earns students a Bachelor of Arts in Creative Writing and English.
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  • North East Rottweiler Rescue and Referral finds homes for Rotties in Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine.
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  • The dying process takes place in New Hampshire and the manufacturing of the garments is done in Massachusetts.
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  • According to the National Safety Council, children have died from lead poisoning in Alabama and New Hampshire within the last 10 years.
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  • Yet CNN Money lists college towns like Durham, North Carolina and Hanover, New Hampshire as some of the best cities to retire.
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  • Hanover, New Hampshire, home to Dartmouth College, features plenty to do for those planning an active life in retirement.
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  • Omni Medical Search features a list of ENT specialists in New Hampshire.
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  • Portsmouth sleep dentists are difficult to find, but the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine lists three dentists in Nashua, New Hampshire.
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  • Two states (New Mexico and New Hampshire) require joint custody to be awarded, except when the children's best interests or a parent's health or safety are compromised.
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  • For local competitions, check out the companies Star Quest and Star Power Talent; each one offers competitions in all regions of the United States, ranging from New Hampshire, to California, to Florida.
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  • Income tax records 1862-1874 for Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.
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  • Some states allow a visit to a pharmacist in order to get the pill; they include Alaska, California, Hawaii, Maine, New Mexico, New Hampshire, and Washington.
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  • Settled in the White mountains in New Hampshire, Camp Cody is known for providing excellent opportunities in outdoor sports.
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  • One weekend in August, many years ago, a Boy Scout troop from a town in Western Maine went on a weekend camping trip in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.
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  • Off Broadway stores can be found in California, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland and New Hampshire.
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  • White Mountain Shoes was founded in 1978 in Lisbon, New Hampshire.
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  • The company's name and image derive from its factory location in the rural White Mountains of New Hampshire.
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  • British actor Marcus Patric was born Patrick Henry Gosling in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England on August 17, 1979.
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  • In 1856 a draper's apprentice, 21-year-old Thomas Burberry, opened his own store in Basingstoke, Hampshire, England.
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  • The first American alarm clock was invented in 1787 by Levi Hutchins of Concord, New Hampshire.
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  • Taxpayers living in Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont and the District of Columbia, have an April 18th filing deadline, because of a Massachusetts state holiday where the IRS houses a processing facility.
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  • In this fascinating interview, LoveToKnow Cars talks to local New Hampshire car enthusiast Rod Tetu.
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  • Rod Tetu was born and raised in Northern New Hampshire, and as young as eight years old, he started working in his Uncle's repair shop.
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  • RT (Rod Tetu): I was eight years old and I started working at my Uncle's repair shop up in Northern New Hampshire where I grew up.
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  • If I'm really looking for a certain car part, the best place I like to go is Amherst or Nashua, New Hampshire where they have the big flea markets.
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  • Amanda Holden was born in Bishop's Waltham, Hampshire, England on February 16, 1971.
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  • Kyle Kupiszewski - Kyle is from New Hampshire, and has experience as a cook on board nuclear powered submarines as a member of the U.S. Navy.
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  • He was elected to the House of Representatives of the last Royal .Assembly of New Hampshire and then to the second Continental Congress in 1775, and was a member of the first Naval Committee of the latter, but he resigned in 1776, and in June 1776 became Congress's agent of prizes in New Hampshire and in 1778 continental (naval) agent of Congress in this state, where he supervised the building of John Paul Jones's "Ranger" (completed in June 1777), the "America," launched in 1782, and other vessels.
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