Hamburg sentence example

hamburg
  • He was one of the plenipotentiaries who concluded peace with Lubeck at the congress of Hamburg, and subsequently took an active part in the great work of national reconstruction necessitated by the Reformation, acting as mediator between the Danish and the German parties who were contesting for 2 Hence another of the names - " hurricane-bird " - by which this species is occasionally known.
    2
    0
  • In 1890 Liverpool was placed in direct telegraphic communication with Hamburg and Havre, and London with Rome.
    1
    0
  • After his release he engaged in commerce at Hamburg with his brother Charles and the duc d'Aiguillon, and did not return to France until the Consulate.
    1
    0
  • In 1528 he arranged the church affairs of Brunswick and Hamburg; in 1530 those of Lubeck and Pomerania.
    1
    0
  • The town only dates from 1873, having been formed by uniting the villages of Ritzebiittel and Cuxhaven, which had belonged to Hamburg since 1394.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The town-hall, built in 1881, contains several stainedglass windows, two of which were the gift of citizens of Amsterdam and Hamburg, in gratitude for services rendered by the islanders to fishermen and seamen of those ports.
    1
    0
  • His miracles were reported and eagerly believed everywhere; " from Poland, Hamburg and Amsterdam treasures poured into his court; in the Levant young men and maidens prophesied before him; the Persian Jews refused to till the fields.
    1
    0
  • In 1529 on his way to Hamburg he was wrecked on the Dutch coast, and lost his newly completed translation of Deuteronomy.
    1
    0
  • Even the free cities were divided, Hamburg and Lubeck for, Bremen and Frankfort against.
    1
    0
  • Having finished his university course, he returned to Hamburg, and passed his examination for the Christian ministry.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Medicated soaps, first investigated scientifically by Unna of Hamburg in 1886, contain certain substances which exercise a specific influence on the skin.
    1
    0
  • It has little trade, but is the principal tourist centre on this part of the coast, and the steamers from Hull and Newcastle, the Norwegian ports, Hamburg, Antwerp, &c., call here.
    1
    0
  • It is pleasantly situated at the foot of a lofty range of hills, which here dip down to the river, at the junction of the main lines of railway from Bremen and Hanover to Hamburg, which are carried to the latter city over two grand bridges crossing the southern and the northern arms of the Elbe.
    1
    0
  • In 1813 and 1814 it suffered considerably from the French, who then held Hamburg, and who built a bridge between the two towns, which remained standing till 1816.
    1
    0
  • Reinforcements had been coming up without ceasing and at the beginning of August he calculated that he would have 30o,000 men available about Bautzen and 10o,000 along the Elbe from Hamburg via Magdeburg to Torgau.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Napoleon continued to build line-of-battle ships in numbers from Venice to Hamburg, but only in order to force the British government to maintain costly and wearing blockades.
    1
    0
  • Were it not for political and municipal boundaries Hamburg might be considered as forming with Altona and Ottensen (which lie within Prussian territory) one town.
    1
    0
  • The oldest portion of the city is that which lies Boundary of Hamburg ' shown Thus:- ....._--- - - to the east.of the Alster; but, though it still retains the name of Altstadt, nearly all trace of its antiquity has disappeared, as it was rebuilt after the great fire of 1842.
    1
    0
  • The largest of the public squares in Hamburg is the Hopfenmarkt, which contains the church of St Nicholas (Nikolaikirche) and is the principal market for vegetables and fruit.
    1
    0
  • Of the thirty-five churches existing in Hamburg (the old cathedral had to be taken down in 1805), the St Petrikirche, Nikolaikirche, St Katharinenkirche, St Jakobikirche and St Michaeliskirche are those that give their names to the five old city parishes.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The St Petrikirche, originally consecrated in the 12th century and rebuilt in the 14th, was the oldest church in Hamburg; it was burnt in 1842 and rebuilt in its old form in 1844-1849.
    1
    0
  • Hamburg has comparatively few secular buildings of great architectural interest, but first among them is the new Rathaus, a huge German Renaissance building, constructed of sandstone in 1886-1897, richly adorned with sculptures and with a spire 33 o ft.
    1
    0
  • Near the west extremity, abutting upon the Elbe, the moat was filled in in 1894-1897, and some good streets were built along the site, while the Kersten Miles-Briicke, adorned with statues of four Hamburg heroes, was thrown across the Helgolander Allee.
    1
    0
  • Close to the latter stand the new supreme court, the old age and accident state insurance offices, the chief custom house, and the concert hall, founded by Karl Laeisz, a former Hamburg wharfinger.
    1
    0
  • The through railway traffic of Hamburg is practically confined to that proceeding northwards - to Kiel and Jutland - and for the accommodation of such trains the central (terminus) station at Altona is the chief gathering point.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The Hamburg stations, connected with the other by the Verbindungs-Bahn (or metropolitan railway) crossing the Lombards-Brucke, are those of the Venloer (or Hanoverian, as it is often called) Bahnhof on the south-east, in close proximity to the harbour, into which converge the lines from Cologne and Bremen, Hanover and Frankfort-on-Main, and from Berlin, via Nelzen; the Klostertor-Bahnhof (on the metropolitan line) which temporarily superseded the old Berlin station, and the Lubeck station a little to the north-east, during the erection of the new central station, which occupies a site between the Klostertor-Bahnhof and the Lombards-Brucke.
    1
    0
  • The Imperial army, strictly speaking, was one third composed of Dutch, Belgians, men from the borders of the Rhine, Piedmontese, Swiss, Genevese, Tuscans, Romans, inhabitants of the Thirty-second Military Division, of Bremen, of Hamburg, and so on: it included scarcely a hundred and forty thousand who spoke French.
    1
    0
  • 'How could you have written it yourself?' said he, and he took up the Hamburg Gazette that was lying on the table.
    1
    0
  • Neuwerk and Scharhorn, situated off the mouth of the Elbe, are islands belonging to the state of Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Harwich is one of the principal English ports for continental passenger traffic, steamers regularly serving the Hook of Holland, Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Antwerp, Esbjerg, Copenhagen and Hamburg.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • This improvement was projected to include the damming of the Charles river, and the creation of a great freshwater basin, with drive-ways of reclaimed land along the shores, and other adornments, somewhat after the model of the Alster basins at Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • While still very young, he removed with his mother to Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • The Prussian government proposes establishing here a free port, on the lines of the Freihafen in Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • An excellent service of electric trams interconnect the towns of Hamburg, Altona and the adjacent suburbs, and steamboats provide communication on the Elbe with the riparian towns and villages; and so with Blankenese and Harburg, with Stade, Gliickstadt and Cuxhaven.
    0
    0
  • - Probably there is no place which during the last thirty years of the 19th century grew faster commercially than Hamburg.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Of the total importations of all kinds of coal to Hamburg, that of British coal, particularly from Northumberland and Durham, occupies the first place, and despite some falling off in late years, owing to the competition made by Westphalian coal, amounts to more than half the total import.
    0
    0
  • The increase of the trade of Hamburg is most strikingly shown by that of x11.28 a the shipping belonging to the port.
    0
    0
  • The development of manufacturing industries at Hamburg and its immediate vicinity since 1880, though not so rapid as that of its trade and shipping, has been very remarkable, and more especially has this been the case since the year 1888, when Hamburg joined the German customs union, and the barriers which prevented goods manufactured at Hamburg from entering into other parts of Germany were removed.
    0
    0
  • The import trade of various cereals by sea to Hamburg is very large, and a considerable portion of this corn is converted into flour at Hamburg itself.
    0
    0
  • Shipbuilding has made very important progress, and there are at present in Hamburg eleven large shipbuilding yards, employing nearly io,000 hands.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • There are also two yards for the building of pleasure yachts and rowing-boats (in both which branches of sport Hamburg takes a leading place in Germany).
    0
    0
  • - It was the accession of Hamburg to the customs union in 1888 which gave such a vigorous impulse to her more recent commercial development.
    0
    0
  • In 1897 Hamburg was provided with a huge floating dock, 558 ft.
    0
    0
  • During the last 25 years of the 19th century the channel of the Elbe was greatly improved and deepened, and during the last two years of the 19th century some £360,000 was spent by Hamburg alone in regulating and correcting this lower course of the river.
    0
    0
  • Hamburg is one of the principal continental ports for the embarkation of emigrants.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The health of the city of Hamburg and the adjoining district may be described as generally good, no epidemic diseases having recently appeared to any serious degree.
    0
    0
  • The results of the census of 1905 showed the population of the city (not including the rural districts belonging to the state of Hamburg) to be 802,793.
    0
    0
  • Hamburg is well supplied with places of amusement, especially of the more popular kind.
    0
    0
  • Under Schroder and Lessing the Hamburg stage rose into importance.
    0
    0
  • The historian Lappenberg and Friedrich von Hagedorn were born in Hamburg; and not only Lessing, but Heine and Klopstock lived there for some time.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Hamburg probably had its origin in a fortress erected in 808 by Charlemagne, on an elevation between the Elbe and Alster, as a defence against the Sla y s, and called Hammaburg because of the surrounding forest (Hamme).
    0
    0
  • In 811 Charlemagne founded a church here, perhaps on the site of a Saxon place of sacrifice, and this became a great centre for the evangelization of the north of Europe, missionaries from Hamburg introducing Christianity into Jutland and the Danish islands and even into Sweden and Norway.
    0
    0
  • In 834 Hamburg became an archbishopric, St Ansgar, a monk of Corbie and known as the apostle of the North, being the first metropolitan.
    0
    0
  • In 845 church, monastery and town were burnt down by the Norsemen, and two years later the see of Hamburg was united with that of Bremen and its seat transferred to the latter city.
    0
    0
  • In i i i o Hamburg, with Holstein, passed into the hands of Adolph I., count of Schauenburg, and it is with the building of the Neustadt (the present parish .of St Nicholas) by his grandson, Adolph III.
    0
    0
  • The defensive alliance of the city with Lubeck in 1241, extended for other purpose by the treaty of 1255, practically laid the foundations of the Hanseatic League, of which Hamburg continued to be one of the principal members.
    0
    0
  • In 1461 Hamburg did homage to Christian I.
    0
    0
  • In 1529 the Reformation was definitively established in Hamburg by the Great Recess of the 19th of February, which at the same time vested the government of the city in the Rath, together with the three colleges of the Oberalten, the Forty-eight (increased to 60 in 1685) and the Hundred and Forty-four (increased to 180).
    0
    0
  • In 1536 Hamburg joined the league of Schmalkalden, for which error it had to pay a heavy fine in 1547 when the league had been defeated.
    0
    0
  • In 1549, too, the English merchant adventurers removed their staple from Antwerp to Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Hamburg had established, so early as the 16th century, a regular postal service with certain cities in the interior of Germany, e.g.
    0
    0
  • In 1603 Hamburg received a code of laws regulating exchange, and in 1619 the bank was established.
    0
    0
  • In 1685, at the invitation of the popular leaders, the Danes appeared before Hamburg demanding the traditional homage; they were repulsed, but the internal troubles continued, culminating in 1708 in the victory of the democratic factions.
    0
    0
  • Denmark, however, only finally renounced her claims by the treaty of Gottorp in 1768, and in 1770 Hamburg was admitted for the first time to a representation in the diet of the empire.
    0
    0
  • The trade of Hamburg received its first great impulse in 1783, when the United States, by the treaty of Paris, became an independent power.
    0
    0
  • In 1866 Hamburg joined the North German Confederation, and in 1871, while remaining outside the Zollverein, became a constituent state of the German empire.
    0
    0
  • In 1883-1888 the works for the Free Harbour were completed, and on the 18th of October 1888 Hamburg joined the Customs Union (Zollverein).
    0
    0
  • Benrath, Lokalfiihrer durch Hamburg and Umgebungen (1904); and the consular reports by Sir William Ward, H.B.M.'s consul-general at Hamburg, to whom the author is indebted for great assistance in compiling this article.
    0
    0
  • Venetian white, Hamburg white and Dutch white are mixtures of one part of white lead with one, two and three parts of barium sulphate respectively.
    0
    0
  • In 1586 sugar is mentioned as an import, and in 1646 deal boards were brought here from Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • In 1798 he published L'Inde en rapport avec l'Europe (Hamburg, 2 vols.), which contained much invective against the English, and numerous misrepresentations.
    0
    0
  • It is the point of departure and arrival of the steam ferry to Nyborg on Fiinen, lying on the Hamburg, Schleswig, Fredericia and Copenhagen route.
    0
    0
  • He was asked in 1709 to conduct a rich young gentleman to Dresden, and on his return journey he lectured at Leipzig, Halle and Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • After spending a month in Paris, he walked on to Amsterdam, took sail to Hamburg, and so went back to Denmark in 1716.
    0
    0
  • Durban (Port Natal) is in regular communication with Europe via Cape Town and via Suez by several lines of steamers, the chief being the boats of the Union-Castle line, which sail from Southampton and follow the west coast route, those of the German East Africa line, which sail from Hamburg and go via the east coast route and those of the Austrian Lloyd from Trieste, also by the east coast route.
    0
    0
  • The Geestlande comprise the suburban districts encircling the city on the north and west; the Marschlande includes various islands in the Elbe and the fertile tract of land lying between the northern and southern arms of the Elbe, and with its pastures and market gardens supplying Hamburg with large quantities of country produce.
    0
    0
  • Two rivers, the Alster and the Bille, flow through the city of Hamburg into the Elbe, the mouth of which, at Cuxhaven, is 75 m.
    0
    0
  • As a state of the empire, Hamburg is represented in the federal council (Bundesrat) by one plenipotentiary, and in the imperial diet (Reichstag) by three deputies.
    0
    0
  • According to this Hamburg is a republic, the government (Staatsgewalt) residing in two chambers, the Senate and the House of Burgesses.
    0
    0
  • The law administered is that of the civil and penal codes of the German empire, and the court of appeal for all three Hanse towns is the common Oberlandesgericht, which has its seat in Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • - The church in Hamburg is completely separated from the state and manages its affairs independently.
    0
    0
  • The ecclesiastical arrangements of Hamburg have undergone great modifications since the general constitution of 1860.
    0
    0
  • From the Reformation to the French occupation in the beginning of the 19th century, Hamburg was a purely Lutheran state; according to the "Recess" of 1529, re-enacted in 1603, nonLutherans were subject to legal punishment and expulsion from the country.
    0
    0
  • By the new constitution of the Lutheran Church, published at first in 1870 for the city only, but in 1876 extended to the rest of the Hamburg territory, the parishes or communes are divided into three church-districts, and the general affairs of the whole community are entrusted to a synod of 53 members and to an ecclesiastical council of 9 members which acts as an executive.
    0
    0
  • Civil marriages have been permissible in Hamburg since 1866, and since the introduction of the imperial law in January 1876 the number of such marriages has greatly increased.
    0
    0
  • The jurisdiction of the Free Port was on the 1st of January 1882 restricted to the city and port by the extension of the Zollverein to the lower Elbe, and in 1888 the whole of the state of Hamburg, with the exception of the so-called "Free Harbour" (which comprises the port proper and some large warehouses, set apart for goods in bond), was taken into the Zollverein.
    0
    0
  • The population of the country districts (exclusive of the city of Hamburg) was 72,085 in 1905.
    0
    0
  • For manufactures and trade statistics see Hamburg (city).
    0
    0
  • The military organization of Hamburg was arranged by convention with Prussia.
    0
    0
  • At Pirna the Elbe leaves behind it the stress and turmoil of the Saxon Switzerland, rolls through Dresden, with its noble river terraces, and finally, beyond Meissen, enters on its long journey across the North German plain, touching Torgau, Wittenberg, Magdeburg, Wittenberge, Hamburg, Harburg and Altona on the way, and gathering into itself the waters of the Mulde and Saale from the left, and those of the Schwarze Elster, Havel and Elde from the right.
    0
    0
  • Eight miles above Hamburg the stream divides into the Norder (or Hamburg) Elbe and the Slider (or Harburg) Elbe, which are linked together by several cross-channels, and embrace in their arms the large island of Wilhelmsburg and some smaller ones.
    0
    0
  • One consequence of this is that the bed of the river just below Hamburg is obstructed by a bar, and still lower down is choked with sandbanks, so that navigation is confined to a relatively narrow channel down the middle of the stream.
    0
    0
  • But unremitting efforts have been made to maintain a sufficient fairway up to Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • It total length is 725 m., of which 190 are in Bohemia, 77 in the kingdom of Saxony, and 350 in Prussia, the remaining 108 being in Hamburg and other states of Germany.
    0
    0
  • 8 in., whilst from the Bohemian frontier down to Magdeburg the minimum depth is 3 ft., and from Magdeburg to Hamburg, 3 ft.
    0
    0
  • In 1896 and 1897 Prussia and Hamburg signed covenants whereby two channels are to be kept open to a depth of 9.
    0
    0
  • In this respect the greatest efforts have naturally been made by Hamburg; but Magdeburg, Dresden, Meissen, Riesa, Tetschen, Aussig and other places have all done their relative shares, Magdeburg, for instance, providing a commercial harbour and a winter harbour.
    0
    0
  • A towing chain, laid in the bed of the river, extends from Hamburg to Aussig, and by this means, as by paddle-tug haulage, large barges are brought from the port of Hamburg into the heart of Bohemia.
    0
    0
  • The Elbe is crossed by numerous bridges, as at KOniggratz, Pardubitz, Kolin, Leitmeritz, Tetschen, Schandau, Pirna, Dresden, Meissen, Torgau, Wittenberg, Rosslau, Barby, Magdeburg, Rathenow, Wittenberge, Ddmitz, Lauenburg, and Hamburg and Harburg.
    0
    0
  • At both Hamburg and Harburg, again, there are handsome railway bridges, the one (1868-1873 and 1894) crossing the northern Elbe, and the other (1900) the southern Elbe; and the former arm is also crossed by a fine triple-arched bridge (1888) for vehicular traffic.
    0
    0
  • In the days of the old German empire no fewer than thirty-five different tolls were levied between Melnik and Hamburg, to say nothing of the special dues and privileged exactions of various riparian owners and political authorities.
    0
    0
  • In its lower course, whatever is worthy of record clusters round the historical vicissitudes of Hamburg - its early prominence as a missionary centre (Ansgar) and as a bulwark against Slav and marauding Northman, its commercial prosperity as a leading member of the Hanseatic League, and its sufferings during the Napoleonic wars, especially at the hands of the ruthless Davotit.
    0
    0
  • In the same month Fitzgerald and his friend Arthur O'Connor proceeded to Hamburg, where they opened negotiations with the Directory through Reinhard, French minister to the Hanseatic towns.
    0
    0
  • The proceedings of the conspirators at Hamburg were made known to the government in London by an informer, Samuel Turner.
    0
    0
  • The result of the Hamburg negotiations was Hoche's abortive expedition to Bantry Bay in December 1796.
    0
    0
  • London, Hamburg, Bremen and the chief Baltic ports as far as Riga and St Petersburg participate in the traffic on the Rhine.
    0
    0
  • The state has two Amtsgerichte (courts of first instance) at Bremen and Bremerhaven respectively, and a superior court, Landgericht, at Bremen, whence appeals lie to the Oberlandesgericht for the Hanseatic towns in Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • It produces vegetables and fruit for the Hamburg markets, and carries on tanning, glass manufacture, brewing and brick-making.
    0
    0
  • It received civic rights in 1275, belonged to Lubeck and Hamburg conjointly from 1420 to 1868, and in the latter year was purchased by Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • In 1241 we find Lubeck and Hamburg agreeing to safeguard the important road connecting the Baltic and the North Sea.
    0
    0
  • The first known meeting of the "maritime towns," later known as the Wendish group and including Lubeck, Hamburg, Luneburg, Wismar, Rostock and Stralsund, took place in 1256.
    0
    0
  • In 1266 and 1267 the merchants of Hamburg and Lubeck received from Henry III.
    0
    0
  • Lubeck and Hamburg, however, dominated the German trade in the ports of the east coast, notably in Lynn and Boston, while they were strong in the organized trading settlements at York, Hull, Ipswich, Norwich, Yarmouth and Bristol.
    0
    0
  • In 1252 the first treaty privileges for German trade in Flanders show two men of Lubeck and Hamburg heading the "Merchants of the Roman Empire," and in the later organization of the counter at Bruges four or five of the six aldermen were chosen from towns east of the Elbe, with Lubeck steadily predominant.
    0
    0
  • Under Elizabeth, however, the English Merchant Adventurers could finally rejoice at the withdrawal of privileges from the Hanseatics and their concession to England, in return for the retention of the Steelyard, of a factory in Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • At the Hanseatic assembly of 1469, Dantzig, Hamburg and Breslau opposed the maintenance of a compulsory staple at Bruges in the face of the new conditions produced by a widening commerce and more advantageous markets.
    0
    0
  • Lappenberg's Urkundliche Geschichte des Hansischen Stahlhofes zu London (Hamburg, 1851).
    0
    0
  • There is regular steamer communication with London, Christiania, Hamburg, Rotterdam and Amsterdam.
    0
    0
  • It was adopted by many important British and continental shipping companies, among others by the Peninsular & Oriental, the Inman, the North German Lloyd and the Hamburg American companies.
    0
    0
  • Fabricius from a Hamburg MS. and published in his Bibliotheca Graeca, vi.
    0
    0
  • Further state aid enabled him to visit Germany and France in 1825, and having visited the astronomer Heinrich Schumacher (1780-1850) at Hamburg, he spent six months in Berlin, where he became intimate with August Leopold Crelle, who was then about to publish his mathematical journal.
    0
    0
  • Always a place of great trading importance, long the place of election for the German kings, and until 1866, together with Hamburg, Bremen and Lubeck, one of the four free cities of Germany, it still retains its position as one of the leading commercial centres of the German empire.
    0
    0
  • Here cross and unite the lines from Berlin to Basel, from Cologne to Wiirzburg and Vienna, from Hamburg and Cassel, and from Dresden and Leipzig to France and Switzerland.
    0
    0
  • The Ephemerides litterariae (1686) came out at Hamburg in Latin and French.
    0
    0
  • Hamburg had its Niedersdchsische neue Zeitungen, styled from 1731 Niedersdchsische Nachrichten, which came to an end in 1736, and Mecklenburg owned in 1710 its Neuer Vorrath, besides others brought out at Rostock.
    0
    0
  • Wilckens, Leben des gelehrten Lucae Holstenii (Hamburg, 1723); Johann Moller, Cimbria literata, iii.
    0
    0
  • In 1402, after the defeat of the pirates off Heligoland by the fleet of Hamburg, Emden was besieged, but it was not reduced by Hamburg, with the aid of Edzard Cirksena of Greetsyl, until 1431.
    0
    0
  • The town was held jointly by its captors till 1453, when Hamburg sold Self=dif= ferentia= tion.
    0
    0
  • The dues were fostered by the growing trade of Hamburg, and in 1861, when they were redeemed (for 427,600) by the nations trading in the Elbe, the exchequer of Hanover was in the yearly receipt of about L45,000 from this source.
    0
    0
  • Hamburg and Great Britain each paid more than a third of the redemption money.
    0
    0
  • It is reached by steamer from Geestemiinde, Emden, Bremen or Hamburg, and at low tide by road from the mainland.
    0
    0
  • He studied at Hameln, Luneburg, Hamburg, Lubeck and Danzig, and after graduating Ph.D.
    0
    0
  • Kunkel shares with Boyle the honour of having discovered the secret of the process by which Brand of Hamburg had prepared phosphorus in 1669, and he found how to make artificial ruby (red glass) by the incorporation of purple of Cassius.
    0
    0
  • By 1904 more than 6800 of these meteorological logs with 7,000,000 observations had been accumulated by the Meteorological Office in London; 20,000 with io,600,000 observations by the German Marine Observatory at Hamburg; 4700 with 3,300,000 observations by the Central Institute of the Netherlands at de Bilt near Utrecht.
    0
    0
  • Hecker took the opportunity of a voyage from Hamburg to La Plata, and in 1904 and 1905 of voyages in the Indian and Pacific Oceans to determine the local attraction over the ocean by comparing the atmospheric pressure measured by means of a mercurial barometer and a boiling-point thermometer, and obtained results similar to Scott Hansen's.
    0
    0
  • Important current and temperature charts of the ocean and occasional memoirs are published for the Admiralty by the Meteorological Office in London, by the U.S. Hydrographic Office in Washington, the Deutsche Seewarte in Hamburg, and also at intervals by the French, Russian, Dutch and Scandinavian admiralties.
    0
    0
  • He was apparently much in East Friesland till 1541; in North Holland, with Amsterdam as centre, from 1541 to 1543; again till '545 in East Friesland (where he held a disputation at Emden with John a Lasco in January 1 544); till 1547 in South Holland; next, about Lubeck; at Wismar in1553-1554(he held two disputations with Martin Micronius at Norden in February 1 554); lastly at Wustenfelde, a village near Oldesloo, between Hamburg and Lubeck, where he died on the 13th of January 1 559.
    0
    0
  • Full details as to Jansen's career will be found in Reuchlin's Geschichte von Port Royal (Hamburg, 1839), vol.
    0
    0
  • The German East Africa Line of Hamburg runs a fleet of first-class steamers to East Africa, which touch at Tanga, Dar-es-Salaam and Zanzibar.
    0
    0
  • It is connected by railway with Berlin, Hamburg, Bremen, Hameln, Cologne, Altenbeken and Cassel, and the facilities of intercourse have, under the fostering care of the Prussian government, enormously developed its trade and manufactures.
    0
    0
  • This led to his establishing branches of his business at Hamburg and at Rotterdam.
    0
    0
  • His Hamburg interests continued from that date onwards to multiply in something like geometrical progression.
    0
    0
  • But everything of which he could cheat his appetite was spent on Arabic books, and when he had read all that was then printed he thirsted for manuscripts, and in March 1738 started on foot for Hamburg, joyous though totally unprovided, on his way to Leiden and the treasures of the Warnerianum.
    0
    0
  • At Hamburg he got some money and letters of recommendation from the Hebraist Wolf, and took ship to Amsterdam.
    0
    0
  • He served in the British navy from 1807 until 1817, and was director of the school of navigation at Hamburg from 1819 till 1820.
    0
    0
  • He returned to Europe in 1830 and took charge of the observatory at Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • His SOH, George Friedrich Wilhelm (1832-1900), born on the 31st of December 1832, at Hamburg, was astronomer at the observatory at Durham, England, from 1853 to 1856.
    0
    0
  • He then became assistant at the Hamburg observatory, and in 1862 was appointed director of the same institution.
    0
    0
  • From 1884 he was the Hamburg delegate for the International Earth Measurement.
    0
    0
  • Grand and Little Bassam are in regular communication by steamer with Bordeaux, Marseilles, Liverpool, Antwerp and Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Bishoprics were founded at Bremen, Minster, Verden, Minden, Paderborn, Osnabruck, Hildesheim and Hamburg, and one`founded at Seligenstadt was removed to Halberstadt.
    0
    0
  • Some of these bishoprics were under the authority of the archiepiscopal see of Cologne, others under that of Mainz, and this arrangement was unaltered when in 834 Hamburg was raised to an archbishopric. In 847 the bishopric of Bremen was united with Hamburg, but the authority of this archbishopric extended mainly over the districts north and east of the Elbe.
    0
    0
  • Varenius studied at the gymnasium of Hamburg (1640-42), and at Konigsberg (1643-45) and Leiden (1645-49) universities, where he devoted himself to mathematics and medicine, taking his medical degree at Leiden in 1649.
    0
    0
  • It was followed by other volumes dealing with the successors of Alexander, published under the title of Geschichte des Hellenisg nus (Hamburg, 1836-1843).
    0
    0
  • During the next two years he continued to support the cause of the duchies, and in 1850, with Carl Samwer, he published a history of the dealings of Denmark with Schleswig-Holstein, Die Herzogthiimer Schleswig-Holstein land das Kiinigreich Ddnemark seit dem Jahre 1806 (Hamburg, 1850).
    0
    0
  • Sidney went first to Copenhagen, and then, being doubtful of his reception by the English court, settled at Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • He shortly afterwards left Hamburg, and passed through Germany by way of Venice to Rome.
    0
    0
  • In Hoboken are the piers of the North German Lloyd, the Hamburg American, the Netherlands American, the Scandinavian and the Phoenix steamship lines.
    0
    0
  • As a wholly inland nation, Czechoslovakia has to rely in the matter of transport upon its railways and its waterways, notably the Elbe, which connects the republic with Hamburg and the North Sea, and the Danube, which unites it with the east of Europe and the Balkans.
    0
    0
  • Under the peace treaties Czechoslovakia acquired her own docks and warehouses in the harbour of Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • The best independent German history of Poland is, on the whole, Roepell (Richard) and Caro's (Jakab) Geschichte Polens (Hamburg and Gotha, 1840-1888).
    0
    0
  • Wolfgang Michael's Englands Stellung zur ersten Teilung Polens (Hamburg, 1890) is of especial interest to Englishmen.
    0
    0
  • The Gardens of the Zoological Society of Hamburg, founded in 1863, always contain a large and fine collection and display many ingenious devices for the housing of the animals.
    0
    0
  • More recently C. Hagenbeck has constructed a remarkable zoological park at Stellingen, near Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • The port is the largest on the south coast, and all the coast steamers, and those serving Christiania from London, Hull, Grangemouth, Hamburg, &c., touch here.
    0
    0
  • Morenas, Parallele du ministere du Cardinal Richelieu et du Cardinal de Fleury (Avignon, 1743); Nachrichten von dem Leben and der Verwaltung des Cardinals Fleury (Hamburg, 1744).
    0
    0
  • In 1637, when the doubts of Scaliger and Heinsius as to the purity of the Greek of the New Testament prompted the rector of Hamburg to introduce the study of classical authors, any reflection on the style of the Greek Testament was bitterly resented.
    0
    0
  • Several by-channels of the river, passing through the town, are known as fleets, recalling the similar flethe of Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • During his student career he made a special study of Hebrew and Greek; and in order to learn Hebrew more thoroughly, he for some time put himself under the instructions of Rabbi Ezra Edzardi at Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • On leaving Luneburg he spent some time in Hamburg, where he became a teacher in a private school, and made the acquaintance of Nikolaus Lange (1659-1720).
    0
    0
  • The war continued intermittently till 1201, when Duke Valdemar, Canute's younger brother, conquered the whole of Holstein, and Duke Adolf was subsequently captured at Hamburg and sent in chains to Denmark.
    0
    0
  • His architectural education was carried out successively in Hamburg, where later, upon his return from Greece, he built the Donner Museum, in Berlin, in Dresden, in Paris under Gau and in Munich under Gartner; afterwards he visited Italy and Greece.
    0
    0
  • In 1529 the manuscript translation of Deuteronomy is mentioned as having perished with his other books and papers in a shipwreck which he suffered on the coast of Holland, on his way to Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • The republic is in regular steam communication on the Atlantic side with New Orleans, New York and Hamburg, by vessels which visit the ports of Barrios (Santo Tomas) and Livingston.
    0
    0
  • On the southern side the ports of San Jose, Champerico and Ocos are visited by the Pacific mail steamers, by the vessels of a Hamburg company and by those of the South American (Chilean) and the Pacific Steam Navigation Companies.
    0
    0
  • See Honore Mirabeau, Les Lettres de cachet et des prisons d'etat (Hamburg, 1782), written in the dungeon at Vincennes into which his father had thrown him by a lettre de cachet, one of the ablest and most eloquent of his works, which had an immense circulation and was translated into English with a dedication to the duke of Norfolk in 1788; Frantz Funck-Brentano, Les Lettres de cachet d Paris (Paris, 1904); and Andre Chassaigne, Les Lettres de cachet sous l'ancien regime (Paris, 1903).
    0
    0
  • The Robinson family was descended from an eminent Hamburg merchant, William Robinson (1522-1616), who represented York in parliament in Elizabeth's reign.
    0
    0
  • In early times both the archbishop of Hamburg and the archbishop of York disputed with the Norwegians ecclesiastical jurisdiction over the Orkneys and the right of consecrating bishops; but ultimately the Norwegian bishops, the first of whom was William the Old, consecrated in 1102, continued the canonical succession.
    0
    0
  • German is the official language, though among themselves the natives speak a dialect of Frisian, barely intelligible to the other islands of the group. There is regular communication with Bremen and Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Finally it became a fief of the dukes of Schleswig-Holstein, though often hypothecated for loans advanced to these princes by the free city of Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • The city extends along the river bank for a distance of more than 3 m., and is connected by a bridge with Hamburg, and with North Augusta, South Carolina, two residential suburbs.
    0
    0
  • He was killed by the fall of a wall during a fire at Hamburg on the 14th of January 1830.
    0
    0
  • For a number of years the firm furnished meridian circles to the observatories at Hamburg, Konigsberg, Pulkova, &c.; later on its activity declined, while Pistor and Martins of Berlin rose to eminence.
    0
    0
  • Although the carrying trade of Hanover is to a great extent absorbed by Hamburg and Bremen, the shipping of the province counted, in 1903, 750 sailing vessels and 86 steamers of, together, 55,498 registered tons.
    0
    0
  • Hanover is intersected by important trunk lines of railway; notably the lines from Berlin to Cologne, from Hamburg to Frankfort-onMain, from Hamburg to Bremen and Cologne, and from Berlin to Amsterdam.
    0
    0
  • Newport News is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio railway, of which it is a terminus; by river boats to Richmond and Petersburg, Va.; by coastwise steamship lines to Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Providence; by foreign steamship lines to London, Glasgow, Liverpool, Dublin, Belfast, Rotterdam, Hamburg and other ports; and by electric lines to Old Point Comfort, Norfolk and Portsmouth.
    0
    0
  • After holding various diplomatic posts, among them that of Prussian minister to Hamburg, he was sent to Bucharest in 1900 and remained there for 10 years, when he was recalled to occupy the post of Foreign Secretary under the somewhat inexperienced Chancellor, Herr von Bethmann Hollweg.
    0
    0
  • See Sir C. Fellows's Journal of an Excursion in Asia Minor in 1838, and Wiebel's Die Insel Kephalonia and die Meermiihlen von Argostoli (Hamburg, 1873).
    0
    0
  • In 1681 he gave up office, and retired to Hamburg, where he died on the 11th of May 1686.
    0
    0
  • Some Manchester export business is done through London, Glasgow, and continental towns, of which Hamburg is the principal.
    0
    0
  • The conquest of Hamburg by the Danes, and the death of John of England, were further blows to his cause.
    0
    0
  • He skilfully took advantage of the alarm of the German Protestants after the battle of White Hill in 1620, to secure the coadjutorship to the see of Bremen for his son Frederick (September 1621), a step followed in November by a similar arrangement as to Werden; while Hamburg by the compact of Steinburg (July 1621) was induced to acknowledge the Danish overlordship of Holstein.
    0
    0
  • In 1767 Lessing settled in Hamburg, where he had been invited to take part in the establishment of a national theatre.
    0
    0
  • In despair, Lessing determined towards the end of his residence in Hamburg to quit Germany, believing that in Italy he might find congenial labour that would suffice for his wants.
    0
    0
  • Another result of Lessing's labours in Hamburg was the Antiquarische Briefe (1768), a series of masterly letters in answer to Christian Adolf Klotz (1738-1771), a professor of the university of Halle, who, after flattering Lessing, had attacked him, and sought to establish a kind of intellectual despotism by means of critical journals which he directly or indirectly controlled.
    0
    0
  • For a time he was not unhappy, but the debts which he had contracted in Hamburg weighed heavily on him, and he missed the society of his friends; his health, too, which had hitherto been excellent, gradually gave way.
    0
    0
  • In 1775 he travelled for nine months in Italy with Prince Leopold of Brunswick, and in the following year he married Eva KOnig, the widow of a Hamburg merchant, with whom he had been on terms of intimate friendship. But their happiness lasted only for a brief period; in 1778 she died in childbed.
    0
    0
  • Reimarus (1694-1768), professor of oriental languages in Hamburg, who commanded general respect as a scholar and thinker, wrote a book entitled Apologie oder Schutzschrift fiir die verniinftigen Verehrer Gottes.
    0
    0
  • His most formidable assailant was Johann Melchior Goeze (1717-1786), the chief pastor of Hamburg, a sincere and earnest theologian, but utterly unscrupulous in his choice of weapons against an opponent.
    0
    0
  • An examination of its lists of exports and imports will show that Holland receives from its colonies its spiceries, coffee, sugar, tobacco, indigo, cinnamon; from England and Belgium its manufactured goods and coals; petroleum, raw cotton and cereals from the United States; grain from the Baltic provinces, Archangel, and the ports of the Black Sea; timber from Norway and the basin of the Rhine, yarn from England, wine from France, hops from Bavaria and Alsace; ironore from Spain; while in its turn it sends its colonial wares to Germany, its agricultural produce to the London market, its fish to Belgium and Germany, and its cheese to France, Belgium and Hamburg, as well as England.
    0
    0
  • Aalesund is a port of call for steamers between Bergen, Hull, Newcastle and Hamburg, and Trondhjem.
    0
    0
  • Like_ Hamburg, it does predominantly a transit trade; it is especially important as the importer of raw products from America.
    0
    0
  • In two articles, tobacco and rice, Bremen is the greatest market in the world; in cotton and indigo it takes the first place on the continent, and it is a serious rival of Hamburg and Antwerp in the import of wool and petroleum.
    0
    0
  • Bremen also shares with Hamburg the position of being one of the two chief emigration ports of Germany.
    0
    0
  • In 848 the destruction of Hamburg by the Normans led to the transference of the archiepiscopal see of Hamburg to Bremen, which became the seat of the archbishops of HamburgBremen.
    0
    0
  • Regular steamers serve the port from Hull and Newcastle (about 40 hours), from Hamburg, and from all the Norwegian coast towns.
    0
    0
  • In 1795 he was at Hamburg with Dumouriez, who still hoped to make him king.
    0
    0
  • It was through his initiative, too, that the convention of KlosterSeven was signed (loth of September 1757), and on the 4th of May 1758 he concluded a still more promising treaty with France, whereby, in consideration of Denmark's holding an army-corps of 24,000 men in Holstein till the end of the war, to secure Hamburg, Lubeck and the Gottorp part of Holstein from invasion, France, and ultimately Austria also, engaged to bring about an exchange between the king of Denmark and the cesarevitch, as regards Holstein.
    0
    0
  • Political Divisions.The empire is composed of the following twenty-six states and divisions: the kingdoms of Prussia, Bavaria, Saxony and Wtirttemberg; the grand-duchies of Baden, Hesse, Mecklenburg-Schwerin,, Mecklenburg-Strelitz, Oldenburg and Saxe-Weimar; the duchies of Anhalt, Brunswick, Saxe-Altenburg, Saxe-Coburg-Gotha and Saxe-Meiningen; the principalities of Lippe-Detmold, Reuss-Greiz, Reuss-Schleiz, Schaumburg-Lippe, Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt, SchwarzburgSondershausen and Waldeck-Pyrmont; the, free towns of Bremen, Hamburg and Lubeck, and the imperial territory of Alsace-Lorraine.
    0
    0
  • With the exception of those on the east coast of Schleswig-Holstein, all the important trading ports of Germany are river ports, such as Emden,Bremen, Hamburg, LUbeck, Stettin, Danzig, Konigsberg, Memel.
    0
    0
  • Hamburg may be reached by vessels of 17 ft.
    0
    0
  • Chestnuts and walnuts Hamburg appear on the terraces of the Imperial Territory Alsace-Lorraine .
    0
    0
  • The increase of population during 1895 1900 was greatest in Hamburg, Bremen, LUbeck, Saxony, Prussia and Baden, and least in Mecklenburg-Strelitz and Wakieck.
    0
    0
  • Apart from the free cities, Hamburg, Bremen and Lbeck, the kingdom of Saxony is the most, and MecklenburgStrelitz the least, closely peopled state of the empire.
    0
    0
  • But, to this number must be added 284,787 foreigners who in that year were shipped from German ports (notably Hamburg and Bremen) to distant parts.
    0
    0
  • Of late years the production has somewhat diminished, owing to the extensive tobacco manufacturing indu~tries of Brernen and Hamburg, which import almost exclusively foreign leaves.
    0
    0
  • Glass and porcelain are largely produced in Bavaria; lace in Sxony; tobacco in Bremen and Hamburg; chemicals in the Prussian province of Saxony; watches in Saxony (Glashutte) and Nuremberg; toys in Bavaria; gold and silver filagree in Berlin and Aschaffenburg; and beer in Bavaria and Prussia.
    0
    0
  • The jute manufacture, the principal centres of which are Berlin, Bonn, Brunswick and Hamburg, has of late attained considerable dimensions.
    0
    0
  • Wall papers are produced chiefly in Rhenish Prussia, Berlin and Hamburg; the finer sorts of letter-paper in Berlin, Leipzig and Nuremberg; and printing-paper (especially for books) in Leipzig, Berlin and Frankfort-on-Main.
    0
    0
  • The last important addition was in October 1888, when Hamburg and Bremen were ~ncorporated.
    0
    0
  • Included within it, besides the grand-duchy of Luxemburg, are the Austrian communes of Jungholz and Mittelberg; while, outside, lie the little free-port territories of Hamburg, Cuxhaven, Bremerhaven and Geestemnde, Heligoland, and small portions of the districts of Constance and Waldshut, lying on the Baden Swiss frontier.
    0
    0
  • Navigaiion.The seamen of Frisia are among the best in the world, and the shipping of Bremen and Hamburg had won a respected name tong before a German mercantile marine, properly co called, was heard of.
    0
    0
  • Many Hamburg vessels sailed under charter of English and other houses in foreign, especially Chinese, waters.
    0
    0
  • Since 1868 all German ships have carried a common flagblack, white, red; but formerly Oldenburg, Hanover, Bremen, Hamburg, LUbeck, Mecklenburg and Prussia had each its own flag, and Schleswig-Holstein vessels sailed under the Danish flag.
    0
    0
  • The chief ports are Hamburg, Stettin, Bremen, Kiel, Lbeck, Flensburg, Bremerhaven, Danzig (Neufahrwasser), Geestemunde and Emden; and the number and tonnage of vessels of foreign nationality entering and clearing the ports of the empire, as compared with national shipping, were in 1906:
    0
    0
  • The ports of Hamburg and Bremen, which are the chief outlets for emigration to the United States of America, carry on a vast commercial trade with all the chief countries of the world, and are the main gates of maritime intercourse between the United Kingdom and Germany.
    0
    0
  • The difficulties arising to Prussia from this source were experienced in a still greater degree by the seaports of Bremen and Hamburg, which were severely hampered by the particularism displayed by Hanover.
    0
    0
  • The passenger ports of Germany affording oversea communications to distant lands are mainly those of Bremen (Bremerhaven) and Hamburg (Cuxhaven) both of which are situate on the North Sea.
    0
    0
  • On this point it must be borne in mind that the population of the larger towns, on account of the greater mobility of the population since the introduction of railways and the abolition of restrictions upon free settlement, has become more mixedBerlin, Leipzig, Hamburg, &c., showing proportionally more Roman Catholics, and Cologne, Frankfort-onMain, Munich more Protestants than formerly.
    0
    0
  • They are increasingly numerous in Hamburg, Berlin, Frankfurt-on-Main, Breslau, Knigsberg, Posen, Cologne, Nurerhberg and Frth.
    0
    0
  • The most celebrated public libraries are those of Berlin (i,ooo,ooo volumes and 30,000 MSS.); Munich (1,000,000 volumes, 40,000 MSS.); Heidelberg (563,000 volumes, 8ooo MSS.); Göttingen (503,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Strassburg (760,000 volumes); Dresden (500,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Hamburg (municipal library, 600,000 volumes, 5000 MSS.); Stuttgart (400,000 volumes, 3500 MSS.); Leipzig (universitylibrary, 500,000 volurries, 5000 MSS.); Wurzburg (350,000 volumes); TUbingen (340,000 volumes); Rostock (318,000 volumes); Breslau (university library, 300,000 volumes, 7000 MSS.); Freiburg-im-Breisgau (250,000 volumes); Bonn (265,000 volumes); and Konigsberg (230,000 volumes, I ioo MSS.).
    0
    0
  • Some large cities, notably Berlin, Cologne, Hamburg, Dresden, Leipzig and Munich, have, however, newspapers with a daily circulation of over 100,000 copies, and in the case of some papers in Berlin a million copies is reached.
    0
    0
  • The coinage takes place in the six mints belonging to the various states thus Berlin (Prussia), Munich (Bavaria), Dresden (in the Muldenerhtte near Freibcrg, Saxony), Stuttgart (WUrttemberg), Karlsruhe (Baden) and Hamburg (for the state of Hamburg).
    0
    0
  • Their name is supposed to be preserved in Bardengau, south of Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Great importance was also acquired by the Hanseatic League, which had originated during the interregnum in a treaty of alliance between Lubeck and Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • The preliminary negotiations for peace were begun at Hamburg and Cologne before the death of the emperor Ferdinand Il.
    0
    0
  • By a treaty signed at Hamburg in December 1641 it was agreed that peace conferences should meet The peace at Munster and at Osnabruck in March 1642, the ha1i5
    0
    0
  • For the rest the sovereigns of Wflrttemberg and Saxony retained the title of king bestowed upon them by Napoleon, and this title was also given to the elector of Hanover; the dukes of Weimar, Mecklenburg and Oldenburg became grand dukes; and LUbeck, Bremen, Hamburg and Frankfort were declared free cities.
    0
    0
  • Hamburg was to remain outside until 1883; but practically the whole of what now is Germany was thus included in a union in which Prussia had a predominating influence, and to which, when too late, Austria in vain sought admission.i Even in the earlier stages of its development the Zoilverein had a marked effect on the condition of the country.
    0
    0
  • On this occasion Bismarck accepted the decision, but when important interests were at stake he showed himself as ready to crush opposition as in the older days, as in the case of Hamburg and Bremen.
    0
    0
  • Then there were other systems in Hamburg and in Bremen.
    0
    0
  • The ~.aw, which had obviously failed, was renewed in 1881; the state if siege was applied to Hamburg, Leipzig and Stettin, but all to no purpose; and though the law was twice more renewed, ~n 1886 arid in 1888, the feeling began to gro~w that the Socialists were more dangerous under it than they had been before.
    0
    0
  • The first step was the inclusion of Hamburg and Bremen in the Zollverein; this was necessary if German maritime enterprise was to become a national and not merely a local concern, for the two Hansa cities practically controlled the whole foreign trade and owned three-quarters of the shipping; but so long as they were excluded for the Customs Union their interests were more -cosmopolitan than national.
    0
    0
  • Both cities, but especially Hamburg, were very reluctant to give up their privileges and the commercial independence which they had enjoyed almost since their foundation.
    0
    0
  • Bismarck, with characteristic e1~ergy, proposed to take steps, by altering the position of the imperial customs stations, which would practically destroy the commerce of Hamburg, and some of his proposals which seemed contrary to the constitution aroused a very sharp resistance in the Bundesrat.
    0
    0
  • It was, however, not necessary to go to extremities, for in 1881 the senate of Hamburg accepted an agreement which, after a keen struggle, was ratified by the citizens.
    0
    0
  • By this Hamburg was to enter the Zoilverein; a part of the harbour was to remain a free port, and the empire contributed two million pounds towards rearranging and enlarging the harbour.
    0
    0
  • They have had no reason to regret the change, for no part of the country profited so much by the great prosperity of the following years, notwithstanding the temporary check caused by the serious outbreak of cholera at Hamburg in 1892.
    0
    0
  • The failure of the great Hamburg house of Godefroy in 1879 threatened to ruin the growing German industries in the South Seas, which it had helped to build up. Bismarck therefore consented to apply to the Reichstag for a state guarantee to a company which would take over its great plantations in Samoa.
    0
    0
  • There is a daily steamboat service with Emden, Leer and Hamburg during the summer months.
    0
    0
  • The book shows signs of his indebtedness to Joachim Jung of Hamburg, who had died in 1657, leaving his writings unpublished; but a MS. copy of some of them was sent to Ray by Samuel Hartlib in 1660.
    0
    0
  • Two years after this event the first German factory was established in the estuary by Messrs Woermann of Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Klamroth's translation of the fifty oldest suras, Die fiinfzig altesten Suren (Hamburg, 1890) attempts successfully to reproduce the rhymed form of the originals.
    0
    0
  • Other steamers ply between the ports named (and others in the protectorate) and London and Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Ansgar preached in Denmark from 826 to 861, but it was not till after the subsidence of the Viking raids that Adaldag, archbishop of Hamburg, could open a new and successful mission, which resulted in the erection of the bishoprics of Schleswig, Ribe and Aarhus (c. 948), though the real conversion of Denmark must be dated from the baptism of King Harold Bluetooth (960).
    0
    0
  • There is more than one meaning of Hamburg discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
    0
    0
  • The Louvre also possesses some good examples, and many others are dispersed in various public collections, as in the Musee Bonnat at Bayonne, at Munich, Hamburg, Bremen, Frankfort, Dresden, Basel, Milan, Florence and Oxford, as well as in private hands all over Europe.
    0
    0
  • From 1888 to 1892 he was general American representative of the Hamburg American Steamship Company.
    0
    0
  • After presiding for five years over the French Protestant church at Hamburg, he was, in 1823, called to become pastor of a congregation in Brussels and preacher to the court.
    0
    0
  • His house was the centre of the highest culture of Hamburg, and a monument of his influence in that city still remains in the Haus der patriotischen Gesellschaft, where the learned and artistic societies partly founded by him still meet.
    0
    0
  • The original MS. is in the Hamburg town library; a copy was made for the university library of Göttingen, 1814, and other copies are known to exist.
    0
    0
  • Motherof-pearl was exported before the World War to the value of £20,000; after the war high freights and absence of demand from Hamburg, the principal market, killed the trade for the time being.
    0
    0
  • It carries on a number of small manufactures and has some shipping trade, chiefly with Hamburg, but the rise of Harburg has deposed it from its former position as the chief port of Hanover.
    0
    0
  • Lubeck has a court of first instance (Amtsgericht) and a high court of justice (Landgericht); from the latter appeals lie to the Hanseatic court of appeal (Oberlandesgericht) at Hamburg, and from this again to the supreme court of the empire (Reichsgericht) in Leipzig.
    0
    0
  • Its position as the first German emporium of the west end of the Baltic has been to some extent impaired by Hamburg and Bremen since the construction of the North Sea and Baltic Canal, and by the rapid growth and enterprise of Stettin.
    0
    0
  • As early as 1241 Lubeck, Hamburg and Soest had combined to secure their highways against robber knights.
    0
    0
  • The Hanseatic League, however, having never been officially dissolved, Lubeck still enjoyed its traditional connexion with Bremen and Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Lubeck joined the North German Confederation in 1866, profiting by the retirement from Holstein and Lauenburg of the Danes, whose interference had prevented as long as possible a direct railway between Lubeck and Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • About 1840 a great advance was made by the Repsolds of Hamburg in the equatorial mounting of the Oxford heliometer.
    0
    0
  • The object-glass is by Messrs Clark of Cambridge, Mass., the mounting by the Repsolds of Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • After leaving his second post he was received into the house of a merchant at Riga named Johann Christoph Behrens, who contracted a great friendship for him and selected him as his companion for a tour through Danzig, Berlin, Hamburg, Amsterdam and London.
    0
    0
  • Frankfurt has a good prison on the Pentonville (London) plan; so has Hamburg; and new buildings have been erected at Wohlan, Siegburg, Breslau and Munster.
    0
    0
  • But he emigrated in 1792, and established himself at Brussels, whence he removed successively to London, Hamburg and Berlin.
    0
    0
  • At the peace in 1815, however, only four were spared, namely, Frankfort, Bremen, Hamburg and Lubeck, these being practically the only ones still in a sufficiently flourishing and economically independent position to warrant such preferential treatment.
    0
    0
  • With others like Bremen, Hamburg and Magdeburg, it was long in the balance which class they belonged to.
    0
    0
  • (Hanover and Berlin, 1826-1892); C. Griinhagen, Adalbert Erzbischof von Hamburg and die Idee eines Nordischen Patriarchats (Leipzig, 1854).
    0
    0
  • Hamburg suffered in 1664.
    0
    0
  • In Prussia and Lithuania 283,000 persons perished; Dantzig, Hamburg and other northern cities suffered severely.
    0
    0
  • Lying higher than Hamburg, Altona enjoys a purer and healthier atmosphere.
    0
    0
  • Its site is that formerly occupied by the terminus of the Schleswig-Holstein railways, but a handsome central station lying somewhat farther to the N., connected with Hamburg by an elevated railway, now accommodates all the traffic and provides through communication with the main Prussian railway systems. There are also fine municipal and judicial buildings, a theatre (under the same management as the Stadttheater in Hamburg), a gymnasium, technical schools, a school of navigation and a hospital.
    0
    0
  • Altona carries on an extensive maritime trade with Great Britain, France and America, but it has by no means succeeded in depriving Hamburg of its commercial superiority - indeed, so dependent is it upon its rival that most of its business is transacted on the Hamburg exchange, while the magnificent warehouses on the Altona river bank are to a large extent occupied by the goods of Hamburg merchants.
    0
    0
  • The exports and imports resemble those of Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Its rise to its present position is mainly due to the fostering care of the Danish kings who conferred certain customs privileges and exemptions upon it with a view to making it a formidable rival to Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • In 1864 Altona was occupied in the name of the German Confederation, passed to Prussia after the war of 1866, and 1888 together with Hamburg joined the Zollverein, while retaining certain free trade rights over the Freihafengebiet which it shares with Hamburg and Wandsbek.
    0
    0
  • Sieveking, president of the Hanseatic High Court of Appeal at Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • The port, which has regular communication with all the Norwegian coast towns - Hull, Newcastle, Hamburg, &c. - carries on an extensive trade in timber, oil, fish, copper, &c. The industries include shipbuilding, sawmilling, wood-pulp and fish-curing works and machine shops.
    0
    0
  • Oncken (1800-1884) formed the first church in Hamburg in 1834, and thereafter Baptist churches were formed in other countries as follows:- Denmark (1839), Holland and Sweden (1848), Switzerland (1849), Norway (1860), Austria and Rumania (1869), Hungary (1871), and Bulgaria (1884).
    0
    0
  • His father, Heinrich Floris Schopenhauer, the youngest of a family to which the mother had brought the germs of mental malady, was a man of strong will and originality, and so proud of the independence of his native town that when Danzig in 1793 surrendered to the Prussians he and his whole establishment withdrew to Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • During the twelve years which followed the removal of the family to Hamburg (1793-1805) the Schopenhauers made frequent excursions.
    0
    0
  • Gregoire, a merchant of Havre, and friend of the Hamburg house, with whose son Anthime he formed a fast friendship. Returning to Hamburg, for the next four years he had but indifferent training.
    0
    0
  • At Hamburg in the beginning of 1805 he was placed in a merchant's office.
    0
    0
  • After his death the young widow (still under forty), leaving Arthur at Hamburg, proceeded with her daughter Adele in the middle of 1806 to Weimar, where she arrived only a fortnight before the tribulation which followed the victory of Napoleon at Jena.
    0
    0
  • A considerable trade is carried on in agricultural products and wood, chiefly with Hamburg and Altona.
    0
    0
  • For many years he had desired to see the continent, and in September 1798, in company with Wordsworth and his sister, he left England for Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Steamers run at regular intervals between Freetown and Liverpool, Hamburg, Havre and Marseilles.
    0
    0
  • In 1820 he was sent by the Hamburg senate as resident minister to the Prussian court.
    0
    0
  • In 1823 he became keeper of the Hamburg archives; an office in which he had the fullest opportunities for the laborious and critical research work upon which his reputation as an historian rests.
    0
    0
  • In 1850 he represented Hamburg in the German parliament at Frankfort, and his death took place at Hamburg on the 28th of November 1865.
    0
    0
  • Lappenberg's most important work is his Geschichte von England, which deals with the history of England from the earliest times to 1154, and was published in two volumes at Hamburg in 1834-1837.
    0
    0
  • Emigrating in 1791, he fought two campaigns in the army of Conde, and eventually found his way to Hamburg, where he met Antoine de Rivarol, of whose brilliant conversation he has left an account.
    0
    0
  • Large liners from Liverpool, Southampton, London, Hamburg, Havre and Antwerp call regularly for passengers or cargo at Leixoes or Lisbon, or both ports, on their way to and from South America (especially Brazil).
    0
    0
  • It is very nearly the shortest route, great circle sailing, from Panama to Yokohama and Hongkong; the Panama Canal will shorten the sea route from Liverpool and Hamburg by about 5500 m.
    0
    0
  • Hamburg commerce, too, owed much to the enterprise of Portuguese Maranos.
    0
    0
  • Lying apart from the system are the Lehrter Bahnhof for Hamburg and Bremen, the Stettiner for Baltic ports, and the Gorlitzer, Anhalter and Potsdamer termini for traffic to the south, of which the last two are fine specimens of railway architecture.
    0
    0
  • Berlin is also the great centre and the chief market for speculation in corn and other cereals which reach it by water from Poland, Austria and South Russia, while in commerce in spirits it rivals Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • The sea-borne commerce of Stettin is of scarcely less importance than her industry and a larger number of vessels enter and clear here than at any other German port, except Hamburg and Bremerhaven.
    0
    0
  • In the Elbe the twaite shad spawns below Hamburg, the allis shad above Dresden.
    0
    0
  • Rape is grown in the marsh lands and flax on the east coast, while large quantities of apples and other fruit are raised near Altona for the Hamburg and English markets.
    0
    0
  • In 1809 he published at Hamburg his Theoria motus corporum coelestium, a work which gave a powerful impulse to the true methods of astronomical observation; and his astronomical workings, observations, calculations of orbits of planets and comets, &c., are very numerous and valuable.
    0
    0
  • See C. Hager, Die Marshall-Inseln (Leipzig, 1886); Steinbach and Grosser, Wiirterbuch der Marshall-Sprache (Hamburg, 1902).
    0
    0
  • The chief ports for continental passenger traffic are as follows: Harwich to Amsterdam, Antwerp, Hamburg, Hook of Holland, Rotterdam (Great Eastern railway); to Copenhagen and Esbjerg (Royal Danish mail route).
    0
    0
  • This category includes German places in the Prussian provinces of Hanover and Schleswig-Holstein, in the Duchy of Brunswick, in the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, and in the Free Cities of Hamburg, Bremen, and Lübeck.
    0
    0
  • There is a regular mail service between Antwerp and the ports of the lower Congo, which are also served by steamers from Liverpool, Hamburg, Rotterdam and Lisbon.
    0
    0
  • In 1793, while his recollections of the Revolution were still fresh, he wrote a novel, L'Emigre (Hamburg, 4 vols., 1797), which shows perspicacity and good judgment in its treatment of events.
    0
    0
  • From Russia he went to Hamburg, and thence to Vienna, where he found a friend in the prince de Ligne.
    0
    0
  • Senac collected his own CEuvres philosophiques et litteraires (2 vols.) at Hamburg in 1795.
    0
    0
  • The element appears to have been first obtained in 1669 by Brand of Hamburg; Krafft bought his secret and in 1677 exhibited specimens in England, where it created an immense sensation.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (the Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Annapolis Short Line, the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic; the Northern Central; the Western Maryland and the Maryland & Pennsylvania railways; and by steamship lines running directly to all the more important ports on the Atlantic coast of the United States, to ports in the West Indies and Brazil, to London, Liverpool, Southampton, Bristol, Leith, Glasgow, Dublin, Belfast, Havre, Antwerp, Rotterdam, Bremen, Hamburg and other European ports.
    0
    0
  • His memoirs were published at Hamburg in 1794.
    0
    0
  • Napper Tandy, who was drunk during most of the expedition, took possession of the village of Rutland, where he hoisted an Irish flag and issued a bombastic proclamation; but learning the complete failure of Humbert's expedition, and that Connaught instead of being in open rebellion was perfectly quiet, the futility of the enterprise was apparent to the French if not to Tandy himself; and the latter having been carried on board the "Anacreon" in a state of intoxication, the vessel sailed round the north of Scotland to avoid the English fleet, and reached Bergen in safety, whence Tandy made his way to Hamburg with three or four companions.
    0
    0
  • This leniency may have been partly due to doubts as to the legality of the demand for his surrender by the Hamburg authorities; but the government was probably more influenced by Cornwallis's opinion that Tandy was "a fellow of so very contemptible a character that no person in this country (Ireland) seems to care the smallest degree about him."
    0
    0
  • No corroboration has, however, been found for Foxe's statement that in 1529 he was at Hamburg assisting Tyndale in his translation of the Pentateuch.
    0
    0
  • Leipzig is one of the most enterprising and prosperous of German towns, and in point of trade and industries ranks among German cities immediately after Berlin and Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • The diet of Regensburg, under the mediation of Maximilian of Bavaria, decided in favor of peace with France, and on the25th of December 1641 the preliminary settlement at Hamburg fixed the opening of negotiations to take place at Munster and Osnabruck.
    0
    0
  • To conceal his plan he aroused French colonial aspirations against England, and also the memory of the spoliations of 1763, exasperating English jealousy of France, whose borders now exteiided to the Rhine, and laying hands on Hanover, Hamburg and Cuxhaven.
    0
    0
  • After his retirement he resided at Friedrichsruh, near Hamburg, a house on his Lauenburg estates.
    0
    0
  • Hamburg afterwards was its principal depot, and it became known as the "Hamburg Company."
    0
    0
  • In the north of Europe, Hamburg, Rotterdam, Antwerp and Copenhagen are the largest centres of the oil and fat trade.
    0
    0
  • Since 1896 an indispensable guide is the periodical review Kantstudien (Hamburg and Berlin, thrice yearly), edited by Hans Vaihinger and Bruno Bauch, which contains admirable original articles and notices of all important books on Kant and Kantianism.
    0
    0
  • The experiment is located at the proton electron accelerator HERA at DESY in Hamburg, Germany.
    0
    0
  • In 831 he was consecrated archbishop of Hamburg with oversight of the people of Scandinavia.
    0
    0
  • This was the call sign of a Hamburg radio station which broadcast nightly news bulletins in English to the British people.
    0
    0
  • With us in Gotha, this help is coming from the military censor, in Hamburg, from the ban on meetings.
    0
    0
  • The application of the phenomenology has been extended to experiments at the electron-proton collider HERA in Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • He became the British consul in Hamburg, a post which he then resigned to become a full-time writer.
    0
    0
  • Bill now lives in Hamburg, Germany and I have a wonderful daughter-in-law.
    0
    0
  • Lee Westwood has enjoyed a timely return to form on the opening day of the Deutsche Bank Players ' Championship in Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • The British bomb Hamburg causing a firestorm that kills 42,000 German civilians.
    0
    0
  • Three of the hijackers, including suspected ringleader Mohammed Atta, lived in the northern German port city of Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Several local races of African elephant have been described, mainly distinguished from one another by the form and size of the ears, shape of the head, &c. The most interesting of these is the pigmy Congo race, africanus pumilio, named on the evidence of an immature specimen in the possession of C. Hagenbeck, the well-known animal-dealer of Hamburg, in 1905.
    0
    0
  • It lies on the right bank of the Elbe, is bounded by the territories of Hamburg, Lubeck, Mecklenburg-Strelitz and the province of Hanover, and comprises an area of 453 sq.
    0
    0
  • In 1201 he assumed the offensive, conquered Holstein, together with Hamburg, and compelled Count Henry of Schwerin to acknowledge the over-lordship of the Danish crown.
    0
    0
  • Napoleon showed his indifference to the opinion of the tsar by ordering the seizure of the British envoy at Hamburg, Sir George Rumbold (24th of October); but set him free on the remonstrance of the king of Prussia, with whom he then desired to remain on friendly terms. Nevertheless, the general trend of his policy was such as powerfully to help on the formation of the Third Coalition against France - a compact which Pitt (who returned to power in May 1804) had found it very difficult to arrange.
    0
    0
  • Tunstall disappointed him, so he got employment as a preacher at St Dunstan's-inthe-West, and worked at his translation, living as chaplain in the house of Humphrey Monmouth, an alderman, and forming a firm friendship with John Frith; but finding publication impossible in England, he sailed for Hamburg in May 1524.
    0
    0
  • His father, a wealthy manufacturer, having been all but ruined by the French siege, he had, when only sixteen, to apprentice himself to an apothecary in Hamburg, and when twenty-two began to earn his living as an apothecary's assistant at Itzehoe.
    0
    0
  • The " fleets " with their quaint medieval warehouses, which come sheer down to the water, and are navigated by barges, have gained for Hamburg the name of " Northern Venice."
    0
    0
  • In fine contrast to them is the bright appearance of the Binnen Alster, which is enclosed on three sides by handsome rows of buildings, the Alsterdamm in the east, the Alter Jungfernstieg in the south, and the Neuer Jungfernstieg in the west, while it is separated from the Aussen Alster by part of the rampart gardens traversed by the railway uniting Hamburg with Altona and crossing the lakes by a beautiful bridge - the LombardsBriicke.
    0
    0
  • The new synagogue was built by Rosengarten between 1857 and 1859, and to the same architect is due the sepulchral chapel built for the Hamburg merchant prince Johann Heinrich, Freiherr von Schroder (1784-1883), in the churchyard of the Petrikirche.
    0
    0
  • At an assembly of 1629, Lubeck, Bremen and Hamburg were entrusted with the task of safeguarding the general welfare, and after an effort to revive the League in the last general assembly of 1669, these three towns were left alone to preserve the name and small inheritance of the Hansa which in Germany's disunion had upheld the honour of her commerce.
    0
    0
  • Landing at Hamburg in the January following, he spent some time there in the company of his friends Madame de Geniis and Reinhard; and when party rancour continued to abate at Paris, he returned thither in September.
    0
    0
  • 2 In May 152 4 he consequently betook himself to Hamburg, his resolution to carry out his great work never for a moment flagging, and it was probably during his stay in this free city and in Wittenberg, where he may have been stimulated by Luther, that his translation of the New Testament was actually made.
    0
    0
  • The most celebrated public libraries are those of Berlin (i,ooo,ooo volumes and 30,000 MSS.); Munich (1,000,000 volumes, 40,000 MSS.); Heidelberg (563,000 volumes, 8ooo MSS.); Göttingen (503,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Strassburg (760,000 volumes); Dresden (500,000 volumes, 6000 MSS.); Hamburg (municipal library, 600,000 volumes, 5000 MSS.); Stuttgart (400,000 volumes, 3500 MSS.); Leipzig (universitylibrary, 500,000 volurries, 5000 MSS.); Wurzburg (350,000 volumes); TUbingen (340,000 volumes); Rostock (318,000 volumes); Breslau (university library, 300,000 volumes, 7000 MSS.); Freiburg-im-Breisgau (250,000 volumes); Bonn (265,000 volumes); and Konigsberg (230,000 volumes, I ioo MSS.).
    0
    0
  • The original MS. is in the Hamburg town library; a copy was made for the university library of Göttingen, 1814, and other copies are known to exist.
    0
    0
  • This category includes German places in the Prussian provinces of Hanover and Schleswig-Holstein, in the Duchy of Brunswick, in the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, and in the Free Cities of Hamburg, Bremen, and Lübeck.
    0
    0
  • Quick on the uptake, he transferred the tube quest to Hamburg (adapting the rules slightly in the process).
    0
    0
  • The Hamburg Dungeon: This is a great way to learn about the city 's history without traipsing round the normal museums.
    0
    0
  • June German Post Office 's local videophone service in Hamburg is being used for about 20 calls a day.
    0
    0
  • Her father is a German medical services executive from Hamburg and her Norwegian mother once owned an art gallery.
    0
    0
  • In 1960, Best was asked to join the band for a tour of Hamburg.
    0
    0
  • Stavanger is the first port of call for northward-bound passenger steamers from Hull and Newcastle, and has regular services from all the Norwegian coast towns, from Hamburg, &c. A railway runs south along the wild and desolate coast of Jaederen, one of the few low and unprotected shores in Norway, the scene of many wrecks.
    1
    1
  • St Michael's church at Hamburg, built as late as 1762 and unaltered in 1880, had a 17th-century pitch, a' 407.9.
    1
    1
  • 1783 St Jacobi, Hamburg, "Tertia minore" stop..1688-1693Hofcapelle, Dresden.
    1
    1
  • The railroad from Hamburg to Berlin traverses the country.
    1
    1