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hamadan

hamadan

hamadan Sentence Examples

  • His bouts of pleasure gradually weakened his constitution; a severe colic, which seized him on the march of the army against Hamadan, was checked by remedies so violent that Avicenna could scarcely stand.

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  • On a similar occasion the disease returned; with difficulty he reached Hamadan, where, finding the disease gaining ground, he refused to keep up the regimen imposed, and resigned himself to his fate.

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  • He died in June 1037, in his fif tyeighth year, and was buried in Hamadan.

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  • J.) Malayir, a small province of Persia, situated between Hamadan and Burujird.

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  • from Hamadan and 32 m.

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  • After this victory the three princes Toghrul Beg, Chakir Beg and Ibrahim Niyal separated in different directions and conquered the Mahommedan provinces east of the Tigris; the last named, after conquering Hamadan and the province of Jebel (Irak i Ajami), penetrated as early as 1048, with fresh Ghuzz troops, into Armenia and reached Manzikert, Erzerutn and Trebizond.

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  • This excited the jealousy of Toghrul Beg, who summoned him to give up Hamadan and the fortresses of Jebel; but Ibrahim refused, and the progress of the Seljukian arms was for some time checked by internal discord - an everrecurring event in their history.

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  • Thus there originated a separate dynasty of Irak with its capital at Hamadan (Ecbatana); but Sinjar during his long reign often interfered in the affairs of the new dynasty, and every occupant of the throne had to acknowledge his supremacy.

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  • He reached Sawa in the vicinity of Hamadan, where he died quite exhausted, at the age of eighty-five years.

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  • Rei and Hamadan were taken without serious difficulty.

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  • Jabala to Hamadan with 20,000 men.

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  • Tahir defeated him, forced Hamadan to surrender, and occupied all the strong places in Jabal (Media).

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  • At its foot passes the great road which leads from Babylonia (Bagdad) to the highlands of Media (Ecbatana, Hamadan).

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  • Farther south, the Takht-i-Bilkis, in the Afshar district, rises to 11,200 ft., the Elvend (ancient Orontes), near Hamadan, to 11,600.

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  • rising north of Teheran, the Kend and Kerej rivers, rising nrthwest of Teheran, the Shureh-rud (also called Abhar-rud), rising near Sultanieh on the road between Kazvin and Tabriz, and the Kara-su, which rises near Hamadan and is joined by the Zarinrud (also known as Do-ab), the Reza Chai (also called Mazdakanrud), the Jehrud River and the Kum-rud.

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  • Isfahan (100,000); Meshed (8o,ooo); Kerman, Resht, Shiraz (6o,ooo); Barfurush, Kazvin, Yezd (5o,ooo); Hamadan, Kermnshah (40,000); Kashan, Khoi, Urmia (35,000); Birjend, Burujird, Bushire, Dizful, Kum, Senendij (Sinna), Zenjan (25,00o to 30,000); Amol, Ardebil, Ardistan, Astarabad, Abekuh, Barn, Bander, Abbasi, Bander Lingah, Damghan, Dilman, Istahbanat, Jahnim, Khunsar, Kumishah, Kuchan, Marand, Maragha, Nishapur, Sari, Sabzevar, Samnan, Shahrud, Shushter (1o,ooo to 20,000).

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  • About three-fifths of this number belong to the diocese of Azerbaijan, with a bishop at Tabriz, and reside in the cities of Tabriz, KhoI, Selmas, Urmia and Maragha, and in about thirty villages close to the north-western frontier; the other two-fifths, under the diocese of Isfahan, with a bishop in Julfa, reside in Teheran, Hamadan, Julfa, Shiraz, Bushire, Resht, Enzeli and other towns, and in some villages in the districts of Chahar Mahal, Feridan, Barbarud, Kamareh, Kazaz, Kharakan, &c. Many Persian Armenians are engaged in trade and commerce, and some of their merchants dispose of much capital, but the bulk live on the proceeds of agriculture and are poor.

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  • The religious missions ministering to their spiritual welfare are: (1) The board of foreign missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, which has six establishments in Persia: Urmia since 1835, Teheran since 1872, Tabriz since 1873, Hamadan since 1880, Resht since r902 and Kazvin since 1903.

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  • The establishments of Tabriz and Urmia form the Western Persia Mission, those of Teheran, Hamadan, Resht and Kazvin the Eastern Persia Mission.

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  • (4) The London Society for promoting Christianity among the Jews, which was established at Teheran in 1876, and at Isfahan and Hamadan in 1889.

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  • It has in Teheran a church and a school, at Isfahan a school and at Hamadan a small school.

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  • The Jews in Persia number about 36,000, and are found in nearly all cities of the country, but communities with synagogues and priests exist only in the larger cities like Teheran, Isfahan, Yezd, Shiraz, Hamadan, &c.

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  • In 1037 Seljuk princes were recognized in Merv and Nishapur, and in the ensuing eighteen years the Seljuks conquered Balkh, Jorjan, Tabaristan, Klwarizm, Hamadan, Rai, Isfahan, and finally Bagdad (1055).

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  • In the meanwhile the Saduzai tribe revolted at Herat, and declared itself independent in 1717; the Kurds overran the country rous~d Hamadan; the Uzbegs desolated Khorasan; and the Arabs of Muscat seized the island of Bahrein and threatened Bander Abbasi.

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  • The Turks seized on Tiflis, Tabriz and Hamadan, while Peter the Great, whose aid had been sought by the friendless Tahmasp, fitted out a fleet on the Caspian.2 The Russians occupied Shirvan, and the province of Gilan south-west of the Caspian;3 and Peter made a treaty with Tahmasp II.

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  • There is,1 however, also shown, as a result of the Afghan intrusion and the impotency of the later Safawid kings, a long broad strip of country to the west, including Tabriz and Hamadan, marked conquests of the Turks, and the whole west shore of the Caspian from Astrakan to Mazandaran marked conquests of the czar of Muscovy; Makran, written Mecran, is designated a warlike independent nation.

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  • A partition treaty had been signed between these two powers in 1723, by which the czar was to take Astarabad, Mazandaran, Gilan, part of Shirvan and Daghistan, while the acquisitions of the Porte were to be traced out by a line drawn from the junction of the Aras and Kur rivers, and passing along by Ardebil, Tabriz and Hamadan, and thence to Kerm~nshah.

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  • In the sequel a kind of desultory warfare appears to have been prosecuted on the Persian side of Kurdistan, and the shah himself came down with an army to Hamadan.

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  • Kemalu d-Din was a native of Hamadan and a Persian subject, and as the assassin repeatedly stated that he was the sheikhs emissary ~and had acted by his orders, the Persian government demanded the extradition of Kemal from the Porte; but during the protracted negotiations which followed he died.

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  • HAMADAN, a province and town of Persia.

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  • Hamadan, the capital of the province, is situated 188 m.

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  • The leather of Hamadan is much esteemed throughout.

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  • Hamadan has post and telegraph offices and two, churches, one Armenian, the other Protestant (of the American Presbyterian Mission).

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  • It is now generally admitted that Hamadan is the Hagmatana (of the inscriptions), Agbatana or Ecbatana (of the Greek writers), the "treasure city" of the Achaemenian kings which was taken and plundered by Alexander the Great, but very few ancient remains have been discovered.

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  • Hamadan), the capital of Astyages (Istuvegu), which was taken by Cyrus in the sixth year of Nabonidos (549 B.C.).

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  • Rawlinson attempted to prove that there was a second and older Ecbatana in Media Atropatene, on the site of the modern Takht-i Suleiman, midway between Hamadan and Tabriz (J.R.G.S.

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  • See HAMADAN and PERSIA: Ancient History, § V.

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  • The mountain Ru-u-[a], mentioned thrice by Tiglath-pileser IV., is placed by Billerbeck near Hamadan (Sandschak Suleimania, 82, 86, and map, 1898).

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  • NEHAVEND, a small but very fertile and productive province of Persia, situated south-west of Hamadan, west of Malayir, and north-west of Burujird.

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  • But the constant feuds which raged between the regent and her second son, Shams Addaula, compelled the scholar to quit the place, and of ter a brief sojourn at Kazwin, he passed southwards to Hamadan, where that prince had established himself.

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  • Meanwhile, he had written to Abu Ya`far, the prefect of Isfahan, offering his services; but the new amir of Hamadan getting to hear of this correspondence, and discovering the place of Avicenna's concealment, incarcerated him in a fortress.

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  • War meanwhile continued between the rulers of Isfahan and Hamadan; in 1024 the former captured Hamadan and its towns, and expelled the Turkish mercenaries.

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  • When the storm had passed Avicenna returned with the amir to Hamadan, and carried on his literary labours; but at length, accompanied by his brother, a favourite pupil, and two slaves, made his escape out of the city in the dress of a Sufite ascetic. After a perilous journey they reached Isfahan, and received an honourable welcome from the prince.

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  • His bouts of pleasure gradually weakened his constitution; a severe colic, which seized him on the march of the army against Hamadan, was checked by remedies so violent that Avicenna could scarcely stand.

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  • On a similar occasion the disease returned; with difficulty he reached Hamadan, where, finding the disease gaining ground, he refused to keep up the regimen imposed, and resigned himself to his fate.

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  • He died in June 1037, in his fif tyeighth year, and was buried in Hamadan.

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  • J.) Malayir, a small province of Persia, situated between Hamadan and Burujird.

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  • from Hamadan and 32 m.

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  • After this victory the three princes Toghrul Beg, Chakir Beg and Ibrahim Niyal separated in different directions and conquered the Mahommedan provinces east of the Tigris; the last named, after conquering Hamadan and the province of Jebel (Irak i Ajami), penetrated as early as 1048, with fresh Ghuzz troops, into Armenia and reached Manzikert, Erzerutn and Trebizond.

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  • This excited the jealousy of Toghrul Beg, who summoned him to give up Hamadan and the fortresses of Jebel; but Ibrahim refused, and the progress of the Seljukian arms was for some time checked by internal discord - an everrecurring event in their history.

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  • Malik Shah, the son and successor of Alp Arslan, had to encounter his uncle Kavurd, founder of the Seljukian empire of Kerman (see below), who claimed to succeed Alp Arslan in accordance with the Turkish laws, and led his troops towards Hamadan.

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  • Thus there originated a separate dynasty of Irak with its capital at Hamadan (Ecbatana); but Sinjar during his long reign often interfered in the affairs of the new dynasty, and every occupant of the throne had to acknowledge his supremacy.

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  • He reached Sawa in the vicinity of Hamadan, where he died quite exhausted, at the age of eighty-five years.

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  • Rei and Hamadan were taken without serious difficulty.

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  • Jabala to Hamadan with 20,000 men.

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  • Tahir defeated him, forced Hamadan to surrender, and occupied all the strong places in Jabal (Media).

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  • At its foot passes the great road which leads from Babylonia (Bagdad) to the highlands of Media (Ecbatana, Hamadan).

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  • Farther south, the Takht-i-Bilkis, in the Afshar district, rises to 11,200 ft., the Elvend (ancient Orontes), near Hamadan, to 11,600.

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  • rising north of Teheran, the Kend and Kerej rivers, rising nrthwest of Teheran, the Shureh-rud (also called Abhar-rud), rising near Sultanieh on the road between Kazvin and Tabriz, and the Kara-su, which rises near Hamadan and is joined by the Zarinrud (also known as Do-ab), the Reza Chai (also called Mazdakanrud), the Jehrud River and the Kum-rud.

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  • Isfahan (100,000); Meshed (8o,ooo); Kerman, Resht, Shiraz (6o,ooo); Barfurush, Kazvin, Yezd (5o,ooo); Hamadan, Kermnshah (40,000); Kashan, Khoi, Urmia (35,000); Birjend, Burujird, Bushire, Dizful, Kum, Senendij (Sinna), Zenjan (25,00o to 30,000); Amol, Ardebil, Ardistan, Astarabad, Abekuh, Barn, Bander, Abbasi, Bander Lingah, Damghan, Dilman, Istahbanat, Jahnim, Khunsar, Kumishah, Kuchan, Marand, Maragha, Nishapur, Sari, Sabzevar, Samnan, Shahrud, Shushter (1o,ooo to 20,000).

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  • About three-fifths of this number belong to the diocese of Azerbaijan, with a bishop at Tabriz, and reside in the cities of Tabriz, KhoI, Selmas, Urmia and Maragha, and in about thirty villages close to the north-western frontier; the other two-fifths, under the diocese of Isfahan, with a bishop in Julfa, reside in Teheran, Hamadan, Julfa, Shiraz, Bushire, Resht, Enzeli and other towns, and in some villages in the districts of Chahar Mahal, Feridan, Barbarud, Kamareh, Kazaz, Kharakan, &c. Many Persian Armenians are engaged in trade and commerce, and some of their merchants dispose of much capital, but the bulk live on the proceeds of agriculture and are poor.

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  • The religious missions ministering to their spiritual welfare are: (1) The board of foreign missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, which has six establishments in Persia: Urmia since 1835, Teheran since 1872, Tabriz since 1873, Hamadan since 1880, Resht since r902 and Kazvin since 1903.

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  • The establishments of Tabriz and Urmia form the Western Persia Mission, those of Teheran, Hamadan, Resht and Kazvin the Eastern Persia Mission.

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  • (4) The London Society for promoting Christianity among the Jews, which was established at Teheran in 1876, and at Isfahan and Hamadan in 1889.

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  • It has in Teheran a church and a school, at Isfahan a school and at Hamadan a small school.

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  • The Jews in Persia number about 36,000, and are found in nearly all cities of the country, but communities with synagogues and priests exist only in the larger cities like Teheran, Isfahan, Yezd, Shiraz, Hamadan, &c.

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    0
  • In 1037 Seljuk princes were recognized in Merv and Nishapur, and in the ensuing eighteen years the Seljuks conquered Balkh, Jorjan, Tabaristan, Klwarizm, Hamadan, Rai, Isfahan, and finally Bagdad (1055).

    0
    0
  • In the meanwhile the Saduzai tribe revolted at Herat, and declared itself independent in 1717; the Kurds overran the country rous~d Hamadan; the Uzbegs desolated Khorasan; and the Arabs of Muscat seized the island of Bahrein and threatened Bander Abbasi.

    0
    0
  • The Turks seized on Tiflis, Tabriz and Hamadan, while Peter the Great, whose aid had been sought by the friendless Tahmasp, fitted out a fleet on the Caspian.2 The Russians occupied Shirvan, and the province of Gilan south-west of the Caspian;3 and Peter made a treaty with Tahmasp II.

    0
    0
  • There is,1 however, also shown, as a result of the Afghan intrusion and the impotency of the later Safawid kings, a long broad strip of country to the west, including Tabriz and Hamadan, marked conquests of the Turks, and the whole west shore of the Caspian from Astrakan to Mazandaran marked conquests of the czar of Muscovy; Makran, written Mecran, is designated a warlike independent nation.

    0
    0
  • A partition treaty had been signed between these two powers in 1723, by which the czar was to take Astarabad, Mazandaran, Gilan, part of Shirvan and Daghistan, while the acquisitions of the Porte were to be traced out by a line drawn from the junction of the Aras and Kur rivers, and passing along by Ardebil, Tabriz and Hamadan, and thence to Kerm~nshah.

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  • In the sequel a kind of desultory warfare appears to have been prosecuted on the Persian side of Kurdistan, and the shah himself came down with an army to Hamadan.

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  • Kemalu d-Din was a native of Hamadan and a Persian subject, and as the assassin repeatedly stated that he was the sheikhs emissary ~and had acted by his orders, the Persian government demanded the extradition of Kemal from the Porte; but during the protracted negotiations which followed he died.

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  • HAMADAN, a province and town of Persia.

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  • Hamadan, the capital of the province, is situated 188 m.

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  • The leather of Hamadan is much esteemed throughout.

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  • Hamadan has post and telegraph offices and two, churches, one Armenian, the other Protestant (of the American Presbyterian Mission).

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  • Hamadan also has the grave of the celebrated physician and philosopher Abu Ali ibn Sina, better known as Avicenna (d.

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  • It is now generally admitted that Hamadan is the Hagmatana (of the inscriptions), Agbatana or Ecbatana (of the Greek writers), the "treasure city" of the Achaemenian kings which was taken and plundered by Alexander the Great, but very few ancient remains have been discovered.

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  • Hamadan), the capital of Astyages (Istuvegu), which was taken by Cyrus in the sixth year of Nabonidos (549 B.C.).

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  • Rawlinson attempted to prove that there was a second and older Ecbatana in Media Atropatene, on the site of the modern Takht-i Suleiman, midway between Hamadan and Tabriz (J.R.G.S.

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  • See HAMADAN and PERSIA: Ancient History, § V.

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  • The mountain Ru-u-[a], mentioned thrice by Tiglath-pileser IV., is placed by Billerbeck near Hamadan (Sandschak Suleimania, 82, 86, and map, 1898).

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  • NEHAVEND, a small but very fertile and productive province of Persia, situated south-west of Hamadan, west of Malayir, and north-west of Burujird.

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  • Collectors may consider buying antique Hamadan rugs due to their exquisite beautiful design, colors and historical value.

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  • Hamadan (also called Hamedan) is thought to be one of the oldest cities in Iran, and today is a major city west of Tehran.

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  • Two distinct designs have been produced from each village, giving about 3,000 different types of Hamadan rugs.

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  • Another feature of the Hamadan rug is that they all have a geometric medallion pattern, with the diamond and hexagon being the most common shapes.

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  • Hamadan rugs produced within the last 150 years can be purchased from antique galleries, personal collectors and even online auctions.

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  • Antique Hamadan rugs are difficult to come by since European countries purchased the majority, which are now being displayed in museums.

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  • Natural fiber material: Authentic Hamadan rugs are made with wool, especially if you are looking for a semi-antique or earlier produced rug.

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  • If you are buying antique Hamadan rugs, synthetic materials are definitely not worth your time.

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  • The Hamadan you purchase should have a certificate of authenticity to verify where it originated, the materials used, and the approximate age of the rug.

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  • Looking for a good place to buy antique Hamadan rugs?

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  • Their big inventory is imported from around the world, and includes a large choice of Hamadan rugs of antique and new types.

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  • If you are a collector and are considering buying antique Hamadan rugs, you will need to research the items carefully.

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  • True "antique" Hamadan rugs can be a challenge to find and purchase, but you can find great "semi-antique" pieces that were produced in the last 150 years.

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  • With a little persistence, price shopping, and knowledge on your side, the perfect Persian Hamadan rug will be a nice addition to your collection or furnishings.

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