This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

halogen

halogen

halogen Sentence Examples

  • This change only occurs when the halogen atom is in the orthoor paraposition to the - N2 - group.

    10
    3
  • It is decomposed by the halogen elements and also by sulphuretted hydrogen.

    7
    2
  • It is to be noted that only traces of the aromatic amines are produced by heating the halogen substituted benzenes with ammonia, unless the amino group be situated in the side chain, as in the case of benzylamine.

    5
    4
  • Molybdenum combines with the halogen elements in varying proportions, forming with chlorine a di-, tri-, tetraand penta-chloride, and similar compounds with bromine and iodine.

    4
    1
  • Similarly, the formation of organic halogen products may be effected by electrolytic chlorine, as, for example, in the production of chloral by the gradual introduction of alcohol into an anode cell in which the electrolyte is a strong solution of potassium chloride.

    4
    1
  • Similarly, the formation of organic halogen products may be effected by electrolytic chlorine, as, for example, in the production of chloral by the gradual introduction of alcohol into an anode cell in which the electrolyte is a strong solution of potassium chloride.

    4
    1
  • We may quote one of the principal conclusions at which they arrived: " An inspection of our maps will show that the radical of a body is represented by certain well-marked bands, some differing in position according as it is bonded with hydrogen, or a halogen, or with carbon, oxygen or nitrogen.

    4
    2
  • The amino derivatives are stable bases which readily yield substitution derivatives when acted upon by the halogen elements.

    4
    3
  • The amino derivatives are stable bases which readily yield substitution derivatives when acted upon by the halogen elements.

    4
    3
  • In formulating these facts Liebig at first retained the dualistic conception of the structure of acids; but he shortly afterwards perceived that this view lacked generality since the halogen acids, which contained no oxygen but yet formed salts exactly similar in properties to those containing oxygen, could not be so regarded.

    3
    1
  • Several halogen compounds of sulphur are known, the most stable of which is sulphur fluoride, SF 6, which was first prepared by H.

    1
    0
  • The same absorbent' quantitatively takes up any halogen and sulphur which may be present.

    1
    0
  • Chablay, Comptes rendus, 1906, 1 43, p. 123) 2CH 2 :CH CH 2 OH+2NH 3 Na = CH,:CH CH3+CH2:CH CH20Na +NaOH+2NH31 from the lower members of the series by heating them with alkyl halides in the presence of lead oxide or lime: C5H,9-I-2CH31 =2H1+ C 7 H, 4 i and by the action of the zinc alkyls upon the halogen substituted olefines.

    1
    0
  • Halogen acids convert it into monohalogen fatty acids, and the halogens themselves convert it into dihalogen fatty acids.

    1
    0
  • Several halogen compounds of sulphur are known, the most stable of which is sulphur fluoride, SF 6, which was first prepared by H.

    1
    0
  • The same absorbent' quantitatively takes up any halogen and sulphur which may be present.

    1
    0
  • Considering derivatives primarily concerned with transformations of the hydroxyl group, we may regard our typical acid as a fusion of a radical R CO - (named acetyl, propionyl, butyl, &c., generally according to the name of the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms) and a hydroxyl group. By replacing the hydroxyl group by a halogen, acid-haloids result; by the elimination of the elements of water between two molecules, acid-anhydrides, which may be oxidized to acid-peroxides; by replacing the hydroxyl group by the group. SH, thio-acids; by replacing it by the amino group, acid-amides (q.v.); by replacing it by the group - NH NH2, acid-hydrazides.

    1
    1
  • Halogen Compounds.

    1
    1
  • Balard completed for many years Berzelius's group of " halogen " elements; the remaining member, fluorine, notwithstanding many attempts, remained unisolated until 1886, when Henri Moissan obtained it by the electrolysis of potassium fluoride dissolved in hydrofluoric acid.

    0
    0
  • We may, in fact, consider that the descriptive study of the various halogen compounds dates from about this time.

    0
    0
  • Of the halogen compounds of phosphorus, the trichloride was discovered by Gay Lussac and Thenard, while the pentachloride was obtained by Davy.

    0
    0
  • The oxychloride, bromides, and other compounds were subsequently discovered; here we need only notice Moissan's preparation of the trifluoride and Thorpe's discovery of the pentafluoride, a compound of especial note, for it volatilizes unchanged, giving a vapour of normal density and so demonstrating the stability of a pentavalent phosphorus compound (the pentachloride and pentabromide dissociate into a molecule of the halogen element and phosphorus trichoride).

    0
    0
  • Instances had already been recorded of cases where a halogen element replaced hydrogen with the production of a closely allied substance: Gay Lussac had prepared cyanogen chloride from hydrocyanic acid; Faraday, hexachlorethane from ethylene dichloride, &c. Here the electronegative halogens exercised a function similar to electro-positive hydrogen.

    0
    0
  • From the fact that reduction products containing either one or two double linkages behave exactly as unsaturated aliphatic compounds, being readily reduced or oxidized, and combining with the halogen elements and haloid acids, it seems probable that in benzenoid compounds the fourth valencies are symmetrically distributed in such a manner as to induce a peculiar stability in the molecule.

    0
    0
  • By actual observations it has been shown that ether, alcohol, many esters of the normal alcohols and fatty acids, benzene, and its halogen substitution products, have critical constants agreeing with this originally empirical law, due to Sydney Young and Thomas; acetic acid behaves abnormally, pointing to associated molecules at the critical point.

    0
    0
  • The same difference attends the introduction of the methyl group into many classes of compounds, for example, the paraffins, olefines, acetylenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and esters, while a slightly lower value (157.1) is found in the case of the halogen compounds, nitriles, amines, acids, ethers, sulphides and nitro compounds.

    0
    0
  • It is remarkable that the position of the halogen in the molecule has no effect on the heat of formation; for example, chlorpropylene and allylchloride, and also ethylene dichloride and ethylidene dichloride, have equal heats of formation.

    0
    0
  • An important nucleus-synthetic reaction is the saponification of nitriles, which may be obtained by the interaction of potassium cyanide with a halogen substitution derivative or a sulphonic acid.

    0
    0
  • The advantage of the new definition lies in the fact that the estimation of the chlorine (or rather of the total halogen expressed as chlorine) is sufficient to determine the salinity by a very simple operation.

    0
    0
  • 8050 Cl where S is the salinity and Cl the amount of total halogen in a sample.

    0
    0
  • 3, p. 319.) Ammonia finds a wide application in organic chemistry as a synthetic reagent; it reacts with alkyl iodides to form amines, with esters to form acid amides, with halogen fatty acids to form amino-acids; while it also combines with isocyanic esters to form alkyl ureas and with the mustard oils to form alkyl thioureas.

    0
    0
  • FLUORINE (symbol F, atomic weight iv), a chemical element of the halogen group. It is never found in the uncombined condition, but in combination with calcium as fluor-spar CaF2 it is widely distributed; it is also found in cryolite Na3A1F6, in fluor-apatite, CaF 2.3Ca 3 P 2 O 8, and in minute traces in seawater, in some mineral springs, and as a constituent of the enamel of the teeth.

    0
    0
  • Friend, The Theory of Valency (1909), p. iii.) The aqueous solution behaves on concentration similarly to the other halogen acids; E.

    0
    0
  • Eltekow, Ber., 1878, 11, p. 414); by the action of metals on the halogen compounds Cn.H 20 Br 2 i by boiling the aqueous solution of nitrites of the primary amines (V.

    0
    0
  • Zeit., 1906, 30, p. 37) has shown that on passing the monohalogen derivatives of the paraffins through a glass tube containing reduced nickel, copper or cobalt at 250° C., olefines are produced, together with the halogen acids, and recombination is prevented by passing the gases through a solution of potash.

    0
    0
  • As unsaturated compounds they can combine with two monovalent atoms. Hydrogen is absorbed readily at ordinary temperature in the presence of platinum black, and paraffins are formed; the halogens (chlorine and bromine) combine directly with them, giving dihalogen substituted compounds; the halogen halides to form monohalogen derivatives (hydriodic acid reacts most readily, hydrochloric acid, least); and it is to be noted that the haloid acids attach themselves in such a manner that the halogen atom unites itself to the carbon atom which is in combination with the fewest hydrogen atoms (W.

    0
    0
  • IODINE (symbol I, atomic weight 126.92), a chemical element, belonging to the halogen group. Its name is derived from Gr.

    0
    0
  • Grignard (Comptes rendus, 1900 et seq.) observed that magnesium and alkyl or aryl halides combined together in presence of anhydrous ether at ordinary R temperatures (with the appearance of brisk boiling) to form compounds of the type RMgX(R = an alkyl or aryl group and X = halogen).

    0
    0
  • g As (the root of salt, halogen, &c.).

    0
    0
  • On the halogen compounds see V.

    0
    0
  • Chlor-, brom-, iodoand fluor-benzoic acids are known and can be obtained by oxidizing the corresponding halogen toluenes, or from the amido acids, or by substitution.

    0
    0
  • Nickel occludes hydrogen readily, is attacked by the halogen elements, and oxidizes easily when heated in air.

    0
    0
  • The word halogen is derived from the Greek as (sea-salt) and yevvav (to produce), and consequently means the sea-salt producer.

    0
    0
  • The halogen of lower atomic weight can displace one of higher atomic weight from its hydrogen compound, or from the salt derived from such hydrogen compound, while, on the other hand, the halogen of higher atomic weight can displace that of lower atomic weight, from the halogen oxy-acids and their salts; thus iodine will liberate chlorine from potassium chlorate and also from perchloric acid.

    0
    0
  • CHLORINE (symbol Cl, atomic weight 35.46 (0=16), a gaseous chemical element of the halogen group, taking its name from the colour, greenish-yellow (Gr.

    0
    0
  • They are obtained by condensing a halogen derivatives of ketones with acid-amides (M.

    0
    0
  • The ketenes are usually obtained by the action of zinc on ethereal or ethyl acetate solutions of halogen substituted acid chlorides or bromides.

    0
    0
  • Compounds of antimony with all the halogen elements are known, one atom of the metal combining with three or five atoms of the halogen, except in the case of bromine, where only the tribromide is known.

    0
    0
  • It receives application in synthetic organic chemistry by virtue of its power to remove the halogen atoms from alkyl haloids, and so effect the combination of the two alkyl residues.

    0
    0
  • BROMINE (symbol Br, atomic weight 79-96), a chemical element of the halogen group, which takes its name from its pungent unpleasant smell (0pW,uos, a stench).

    0
    0
  • The tertiary phosphines are characterized by their readiness to pass into derivatives containing pentavalent phosphorus, and consequently they form addition compounds with sulphur, carbon bisulphide, chlorine, bromine, the halogen acids and the alkyl halides with great readiness.

    0
    0
  • Zelinsky, Ber., 1901, 34, p. 3 2 49); and by eliminating the halogen acid from monoor di-halogen polymethylene compounds by heating them with quinoline.

    0
    0
  • The formation of addition compounds with the halogens, halogen hydrides, and with nitrosyl chloride, is characteristic of many, whilst others unite readily with nitrogen peroxide.

    0
    0
  • 4.1 Chemical Reactivity 4.2 Solubility 4.3 Compounds 4.4 Ferrous Oxide 4.5 Magnetite 4.6 Ferric Acid 4.7 Halogen Compounds 4.8 Ferric Chloride 4.9 Ferrous Bromide 4.10 Sulfur(Sulphur)Compounds 4.11 Nitrides and Nitrates 4.12 Phosphides, Phosphates 4.13 Arsenides and Arsenites 4.14 Carbides, Carbonates 4.15 Medical Uses

    0
    0
  • The haloid esters of the paraffin alcohols formed by heating the alcohols with the halogen acids are the monohaloid derivatives of the paraffins, and are more conveniently prepared by the action of the phosphorous haloid on the alcohol.

    0
    0
  • They do not possess basic properties; the halogen in the chlorine compounds is readily replaced by oxygen, and the oxides produced behave like basic oxides.

    0
    0
  • In its properties it shows some analogy to the halogen acids, since it forms difficultly soluble lead, silver and mercurous salts.

    0
    0
  • arc lamps of such energy include lasers, arc discharge lamps, and tungsten halogen bulbs.

    0
    0
  • aryl halide has a halogen atom attached directly to a benzene ring.

    0
    0
  • I have been running with halogen bulbs in my tail lights for about 12 years now.

    0
    0
  • Bulbs: The bulbs: The bulbs are 20 watt halogen bulbs.

    0
    0
  • The Cooking Pot has a solid base and is suitable for heating on all hobs, including ceramic and halogen cookers.

    0
    0
  • dichroic halogen lamps.

    0
    0
  • Internally the house benefits from brass halogen down lights throughout, and these are matched by brass dimmer switches and all electrical sockets.

    0
    0
  • discharge lamps, and tungsten halogen bulbs.

    0
    0
  • This in turn involves bond dissociation, gain of an electron by the halogen, and hydration of the halide ion.

    0
    0
  • The site was lit by four halogen floodlights at the corners, an echo of the original guard towers of the PoW camp.

    0
    0
  • An aryl halide has a halogen atom attached directly to a benzene ring.

    0
    0
  • halogen down lighters, heated towel rail, fitted mirror.

    0
    0
  • The ceiling is coved with recessed halogen down lights and there is a window above the sink overlooking the rear patio and garden.

    0
    0
  • use low voltage halogen spotlights in recessed ceiling fittings for a clean, modern look.

    0
    0
  • Options are also available for fire retardant formulas including low smoke zero halogen.

    0
    0
  • A more reactive halogen can displace a less reactive halogen from an aqueous solution of its salt.

    0
    0
  • All you would need to do is swap the symbol Cl in the two equations for whichever other halogen you were interested in.

    0
    0
  • halogen downlighters.

    0
    0
  • halogen hob, fan assisted oven.

    0
    0
  • halogen bulbs in my tail lights for about 12 years now.

    0
    0
  • halogen lamp used in the dental clinic, emitting mainly in the blue part of the spectrum.

    0
    0
  • halogen spotlights in the ceiling above.

    0
    0
  • halogen floodlights at the corners, an echo of the original guard towers of the PoW camp.

    0
    0
  • A tungsten halogen source may be better with auto white balance.

    0
    0
  • I am going to attempt this, for the first time ever, with a 500 watt quartz halogen bulb!

    0
    0
  • Bulbs: The bulbs are 20 watt halogen bulbs.

    0
    0
  • Think instead of inset halogen lights for a truly minimalist look.

    0
    0
  • Don't confuse low energy bulbs with low voltage halogen light bulbs.

    0
    0
  • Inset four ring halogen hob with extractor hood over.

    0
    0
  • xenon headlamps, whose light output is twice that of halogen bulbs, are also available.

    0
    0
  • The average low beam range of a regular halogen headlamp is approximately 40 meters.

    0
    0
  • The 612 Scaglietti's twin xenon projector headlights also offer a beam that is far superior to traditional halogen lights.

    0
    0
  • The test car was also fitted with optional adaptive halogen headlights, which see round corners for a worthwhile £ 250.

    0
    0
  • The most modern form of hob today is the induction or halogen hob.

    0
    0
  • The range includes: StopClock Professional: the standard version suitable for almost all enlargers which use tungsten or halogen illumination.

    0
    0
  • It works with both normal incandescent lamps and electronic and magnetic low voltage halogen lamps.

    0
    0
  • inset halogen lights for a truly minimalist look.

    0
    0
  • The IEA reserves particular ire for that favorite of the western middle-class lounge, the halogen uplighter.

    0
    0
  • Sources of such energy include lasers, arc discharge lamps, and tungsten halogen bulbs.

    0
    0
  • The light source was a halogen lamp used in the dental clinic, emitting mainly in the blue part of the spectrum.

    0
    0
  • Lined in ash & sapele with panel lights and halogen lighting throughout.

    0
    0
  • direct ophthalmoscope with XL 3.5 V xenon lamp or HL 2.5 V halogen lamp.

    0
    0
  • The lone pairs on the halogen atom interact with the delocalized Pi system, which strengthens the C-X covalent bond.

    0
    0
  • Artificial light is provided by three swiveling halogen ceiling mounted fittings and concealed pelmet fluorescent lighting beneath wall unit.

    0
    0
  • pullout resistance and low smoke and fume, zero halogen seal onto the cables outer sheath.

    0
    0
  • quartz halogen bulb!

    0
    0
  • recessed halogen spotlights in the ceiling above.

    0
    0
  • recessed halogen down lights and there is a window above the sink overlooking the rear patio and garden.

    0
    0
  • rheostat controlled 6v 20 watt quartz halogen system with full bulb adjustment.

    0
    0
  • Stone floors imported from a distant land reflect the twinkle of numerous recessed halogen spotlights in the ceiling above.

    0
    0
  • tertiary halogenoalkanes You would need to keep the halogen atom constant.

    0
    0
  • tungsten halogen source may be better with auto white balance.

    0
    0
  • Continue to use quartz tungsten halogen curing lights as plasma arc curing lights appear to confer no clinical advantage at the present time.

    0
    0
  • voltage halogen light bulbs.

    0
    0
  • watt halogen bulbs.

    0
    0
  • xenon headlamps, whose light output is twice that of halogen bulbs, are also available.

    0
    0
  • xenon projector headlights also offer a beam that is far superior to traditional halogen lights.

    0
    0
  • xenon lamp or HL 2.5 V halogen lamp.

    0
    0
  • Choice of XL 3.5 v xenon lamp or HL 2.5 V halogen lamp.

    0
    0
  • Molybdenum combines with the halogen elements in varying proportions, forming with chlorine a di-, tri-, tetraand penta-chloride, and similar compounds with bromine and iodine.

    0
    0
  • Balard completed for many years Berzelius's group of " halogen " elements; the remaining member, fluorine, notwithstanding many attempts, remained unisolated until 1886, when Henri Moissan obtained it by the electrolysis of potassium fluoride dissolved in hydrofluoric acid.

    0
    0
  • We may, in fact, consider that the descriptive study of the various halogen compounds dates from about this time.

    0
    0
  • Of the halogen compounds of phosphorus, the trichloride was discovered by Gay Lussac and Thenard, while the pentachloride was obtained by Davy.

    0
    0
  • The oxychloride, bromides, and other compounds were subsequently discovered; here we need only notice Moissan's preparation of the trifluoride and Thorpe's discovery of the pentafluoride, a compound of especial note, for it volatilizes unchanged, giving a vapour of normal density and so demonstrating the stability of a pentavalent phosphorus compound (the pentachloride and pentabromide dissociate into a molecule of the halogen element and phosphorus trichoride).

    0
    0
  • Instances had already been recorded of cases where a halogen element replaced hydrogen with the production of a closely allied substance: Gay Lussac had prepared cyanogen chloride from hydrocyanic acid; Faraday, hexachlorethane from ethylene dichloride, &c. Here the electronegative halogens exercised a function similar to electro-positive hydrogen.

    0
    0
  • Dumas gave especial attention to such substitutions, named metalepsy (µeraXntks, exchange); and framed the following empirical laws to explain the reactions: - (1) a body containing hydrogen when substituted by a halogen loses one atom of hydrogen for every atom of halogen introduced; (2) the same holds if oxygen be present, except that when the oxygen is present as water the latter first loses its hydrogen without replacement, and then substitution according to (1) ensues.

    0
    0
  • Thus from ethyl alcohol there can be prepared compounds, termed esters, or ethereal salts, exactly comparable in structure with corresponding salts of, say, potassium; by the action of the phosphorus haloids, the hydroxyl group is replaced by a halogen atom with the formation of derivatives of the type R Cl(Br,I); nitric acid forms nitrates, R O NO 2; nitrous acid, nitrites, R O NO; sulphuric acid gives normal sulphates R 2 SO 4, or acid sulphates, R SO 4 H.

    0
    0
  • Considering derivatives primarily concerned with transformations of the hydroxyl group, we may regard our typical acid as a fusion of a radical R CO - (named acetyl, propionyl, butyl, &c., generally according to the name of the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms) and a hydroxyl group. By replacing the hydroxyl group by a halogen, acid-haloids result; by the elimination of the elements of water between two molecules, acid-anhydrides, which may be oxidized to acid-peroxides; by replacing the hydroxyl group by the group. SH, thio-acids; by replacing it by the amino group, acid-amides (q.v.); by replacing it by the group - NH NH2, acid-hydrazides.

    0
    0
  • From the fact that reduction products containing either one or two double linkages behave exactly as unsaturated aliphatic compounds, being readily reduced or oxidized, and combining with the halogen elements and haloid acids, it seems probable that in benzenoid compounds the fourth valencies are symmetrically distributed in such a manner as to induce a peculiar stability in the molecule.

    0
    0
  • By actual observations it has been shown that ether, alcohol, many esters of the normal alcohols and fatty acids, benzene, and its halogen substitution products, have critical constants agreeing with this originally empirical law, due to Sydney Young and Thomas; acetic acid behaves abnormally, pointing to associated molecules at the critical point.

    0
    0
  • The abnormal specific heats of the halogen elements may be due to a loosening of the atoms, a preliminary to the dissociation into monatomic molecules which occurs at high temperatures.

    0
    0
  • The same difference attends the introduction of the methyl group into many classes of compounds, for example, the paraffins, olefines, acetylenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and esters, while a slightly lower value (157.1) is found in the case of the halogen compounds, nitriles, amines, acids, ethers, sulphides and nitro compounds.

    0
    0
  • It is remarkable that the position of the halogen in the molecule has no effect on the heat of formation; for example, chlorpropylene and allylchloride, and also ethylene dichloride and ethylidene dichloride, have equal heats of formation.

    0
    0
  • It is to be noted that only traces of the aromatic amines are produced by heating the halogen substituted benzenes with ammonia, unless the amino group be situated in the side chain, as in the case of benzylamine.

    0
    0
  • In formulating these facts Liebig at first retained the dualistic conception of the structure of acids; but he shortly afterwards perceived that this view lacked generality since the halogen acids, which contained no oxygen but yet formed salts exactly similar in properties to those containing oxygen, could not be so regarded.

    0
    0
  • An important nucleus-synthetic reaction is the saponification of nitriles, which may be obtained by the interaction of potassium cyanide with a halogen substitution derivative or a sulphonic acid.

    0
    0
  • The advantage of the new definition lies in the fact that the estimation of the chlorine (or rather of the total halogen expressed as chlorine) is sufficient to determine the salinity by a very simple operation.

    0
    0
  • 8050 Cl where S is the salinity and Cl the amount of total halogen in a sample.

    0
    0
  • 3, p. 319.) Ammonia finds a wide application in organic chemistry as a synthetic reagent; it reacts with alkyl iodides to form amines, with esters to form acid amides, with halogen fatty acids to form amino-acids; while it also combines with isocyanic esters to form alkyl ureas and with the mustard oils to form alkyl thioureas.

    0
    0
  • FLUORINE (symbol F, atomic weight iv), a chemical element of the halogen group. It is never found in the uncombined condition, but in combination with calcium as fluor-spar CaF2 it is widely distributed; it is also found in cryolite Na3A1F6, in fluor-apatite, CaF 2.3Ca 3 P 2 O 8, and in minute traces in seawater, in some mineral springs, and as a constituent of the enamel of the teeth.

    0
    0
  • Friend, The Theory of Valency (1909), p. iii.) The aqueous solution behaves on concentration similarly to the other halogen acids; E.

    0
    0
  • They may also be prepared by eliminating the halogen hydride from the alkyl halides by heating with alcoholic potash, or with litharge at 220° C. (A.

    0
    0
  • Eltekow, Ber., 1878, 11, p. 414); by the action of metals on the halogen compounds Cn.H 20 Br 2 i by boiling the aqueous solution of nitrites of the primary amines (V.

    0
    0
  • Chablay, Comptes rendus, 1906, 1 43, p. 123) 2CH 2 :CH CH 2 OH+2NH 3 Na = CH,:CH CH3+CH2:CH CH20Na +NaOH+2NH31 from the lower members of the series by heating them with alkyl halides in the presence of lead oxide or lime: C5H,9-I-2CH31 =2H1+ C 7 H, 4 i and by the action of the zinc alkyls upon the halogen substituted olefines.

    0
    0
  • Zeit., 1906, 30, p. 37) has shown that on passing the monohalogen derivatives of the paraffins through a glass tube containing reduced nickel, copper or cobalt at 250° C., olefines are produced, together with the halogen acids, and recombination is prevented by passing the gases through a solution of potash.

    0
    0
  • As unsaturated compounds they can combine with two monovalent atoms. Hydrogen is absorbed readily at ordinary temperature in the presence of platinum black, and paraffins are formed; the halogens (chlorine and bromine) combine directly with them, giving dihalogen substituted compounds; the halogen halides to form monohalogen derivatives (hydriodic acid reacts most readily, hydrochloric acid, least); and it is to be noted that the haloid acids attach themselves in such a manner that the halogen atom unites itself to the carbon atom which is in combination with the fewest hydrogen atoms (W.

    0
    0
  • Halogen Compounds.

    0
    0
  • IODINE (symbol I, atomic weight 126.92), a chemical element, belonging to the halogen group. Its name is derived from Gr.

    0
    0
  • They are crystalline solids, usually of a yellow colour, which do not unite with acids; they are readily converted into amino-azo compounds (see above) and are decomposed by the concentrated halogen acids, yielding haloid benzenes, nitrogen and an amine.

    0
    0
  • We may quote one of the principal conclusions at which they arrived: " An inspection of our maps will show that the radical of a body is represented by certain well-marked bands, some differing in position according as it is bonded with hydrogen, or a halogen, or with carbon, oxygen or nitrogen.

    0
    0
  • Grignard (Comptes rendus, 1900 et seq.) observed that magnesium and alkyl or aryl halides combined together in presence of anhydrous ether at ordinary R temperatures (with the appearance of brisk boiling) to form compounds of the type RMgX(R = an alkyl or aryl group and X = halogen).

    0
    0
  • g As (the root of salt, halogen, &c.).

    0
    0
  • This change only occurs when the halogen atom is in the orthoor paraposition to the - N2 - group.

    0
    0
  • Halogen acids convert it into monohalogen fatty acids, and the halogens themselves convert it into dihalogen fatty acids.

    0
    0
  • On the halogen compounds see V.

    0
    0
  • Chlor-, brom-, iodoand fluor-benzoic acids are known and can be obtained by oxidizing the corresponding halogen toluenes, or from the amido acids, or by substitution.

    0
    0
  • Nickel occludes hydrogen readily, is attacked by the halogen elements, and oxidizes easily when heated in air.

    0
    0
  • The word halogen is derived from the Greek as (sea-salt) and yevvav (to produce), and consequently means the sea-salt producer.

    0
    0
  • The halogen of lower atomic weight can displace one of higher atomic weight from its hydrogen compound, or from the salt derived from such hydrogen compound, while, on the other hand, the halogen of higher atomic weight can displace that of lower atomic weight, from the halogen oxy-acids and their salts; thus iodine will liberate chlorine from potassium chlorate and also from perchloric acid.

    0
    0
  • CHLORINE (symbol Cl, atomic weight 35.46 (0=16), a gaseous chemical element of the halogen group, taking its name from the colour, greenish-yellow (Gr.

    0
    0
  • They are obtained by condensing a halogen derivatives of ketones with acid-amides (M.

    0
    0
  • The ketenes are usually obtained by the action of zinc on ethereal or ethyl acetate solutions of halogen substituted acid chlorides or bromides.

    0
    0
  • It is decomposed by the halogen elements and also by sulphuretted hydrogen.

    0
    0
  • Compounds of antimony with all the halogen elements are known, one atom of the metal combining with three or five atoms of the halogen, except in the case of bromine, where only the tribromide is known.

    0
    0
  • It receives application in synthetic organic chemistry by virtue of its power to remove the halogen atoms from alkyl haloids, and so effect the combination of the two alkyl residues.

    0
    0
  • BROMINE (symbol Br, atomic weight 79-96), a chemical element of the halogen group, which takes its name from its pungent unpleasant smell (0pW,uos, a stench).

    0
    0
  • PH3.2BF31 2PH 3 =S1C1 4 (Besson, Comptes rendus, 1890, Ito, 80, pp. 240, 516; 1891, 113, p. 78), with the halogen acids to form phosphonium salts, PH 4 X (X=C1,Br,I), and with sodammonium and potassammonium to form PH 2 Na, PH 2 K (Joannis, Comptes rendus, 189x, 9, 557).

    0
    0
  • The tertiary phosphines are characterized by their readiness to pass into derivatives containing pentavalent phosphorus, and consequently they form addition compounds with sulphur, carbon bisulphide, chlorine, bromine, the halogen acids and the alkyl halides with great readiness.

    0
    0
  • Halogen Compounds.-Phosphorus trifluoride, PF 3, discovered by Davy, may be obtained mixed with the pentafluoride; by direct combination of its elements; from the tribromide and arsenic trifluoride (Maclvor); from the tribromide and zinc fluoride, and from dried copper phosphide and lead fluoride (H.

    0
    0
  • Hydrocarbons may be obtained from the dihalogen paraffins by the action of sodium or zinc dust, provided that the halogen atoms are not attached to the same or to adjacent carbon atoms (A.

    0
    0
  • Zelinsky, Ber., 1901, 34, p. 3 2 49); and by eliminating the halogen acid from monoor di-halogen polymethylene compounds by heating them with quinoline.

    0
    0
  • Alcohols are obtained from the corresponding halogen compounds by the action of moist silver oxide, or by warming them with silver acetate and acetic acid; by the reduction of ketones with metallic sodium; by passing the vapours of monohydric phenols and hydrogen over finely divided nickel (P. Sabatier and J.

    0
    0
  • The formation of addition compounds with the halogens, halogen hydrides, and with nitrosyl chloride, is characteristic of many, whilst others unite readily with nitrogen peroxide.

    0
    0
  • 4.1 Chemical Reactivity 4.2 Solubility 4.3 Compounds 4.4 Ferrous Oxide 4.5 Magnetite 4.6 Ferric Acid 4.7 Halogen Compounds 4.8 Ferric Chloride 4.9 Ferrous Bromide 4.10 Sulfur(Sulphur)Compounds 4.11 Nitrides and Nitrates 4.12 Phosphides, Phosphates 4.13 Arsenides and Arsenites 4.14 Carbides, Carbonates 4.15 Medical Uses

    0
    0
  • The haloid esters of the paraffin alcohols formed by heating the alcohols with the halogen acids are the monohaloid derivatives of the paraffins, and are more conveniently prepared by the action of the phosphorous haloid on the alcohol.

    0
    0
  • They do not possess basic properties; the halogen in the chlorine compounds is readily replaced by oxygen, and the oxides produced behave like basic oxides.

    0
    0
  • In its properties it shows some analogy to the halogen acids, since it forms difficultly soluble lead, silver and mercurous salts.

    0
    0
  • Provides a high pullout resistance and low smoke and fume, zero halogen seal onto the cables outer sheath.

    0
    0
  • The microscope has an epi-illumination system, with rheostat controlled 6v 20 watt quartz halogen system with full bulb adjustment.

    0
    0
  • Comparing the reaction rates of primary, secondary and tertiary halogenoalkanes You would need to keep the halogen atom constant.

    0
    0
  • Continue to use quartz tungsten halogen curing lights as plasma arc curing lights appear to confer no clinical advantage at the present time.

    0
    0
  • Choice of XL 3.5 V xenon lamp or HL 2.5 V halogen lamp.

    0
    0
  • The type of floor lamps that would work best for task lighting are arc floor lamps, adjustable floor lamps, halogen floor lamps and multiple light floor lamps.

    0
    0
  • Taking photos in rooms with halogen bulbs (twisted type bulbs) gets rid of the yellow glow.

    0
    0
  • Halogen gas and a regular light bulb filament combine in a quartz envelope to create a high-wattage, yet still cost-effective light source.

    0
    0
  • Most use high-intensity halogen bulbs, so even though the individual lights are quiet small, the beam is penetrating.

    0
    0
  • Low Voltage, Energy-Efficient Heads - New are low-voltage halogen lamps and heads that can be changed for your existing heads.

    0
    0
  • Enhance the features of your modern home with bright halogen light infused through a Swarovski crystal.

    0
    0
  • Transformers are easy to replace, but this will add to your maintenance cost over the years, as will the cost of using halogen bulbs, common in most track heads.

    0
    0
  • Halogen accent lights-Place these accent lights under your kitchen cabinets and transform your kitchen from a drab, boring area to an eye-catching room bathed in warmth.

    0
    0
  • If you're not used to halogen, this type of light tends to be whiter and brighter than some of the indoor light bulbs you may be using now.

    0
    0
  • If you need bright, clean light with flexible placement within your home, consider using halogen track lighting.

    0
    0
  • Halogen bulbs burn brighter and longer than traditional bulbs and with track placement, can give you that light right where you need it.

    0
    0
  • As old fashioned light bulbs begin to fall into disfavor, other types of light bulbs are beginning to come into popular use, including halogen light bulbs.

    0
    0
  • Halogen light bulbs produce a bright, white light that doesn't diminish over time the way traditional light bulbs do.

    0
    0
  • Additionally, halogen lights are up to 20 percent more energy efficient, while lasting nearly twice as long.

    0
    0
  • Add in the flexible placement of a halogen track lighting system, and you have a great light source for home offices, crafting rooms, living rooms and kitchen work areas.

    0
    0
  • There are several reasons why track lights, including track lights which use halogen bulbs, can be beneficial to homeowners.

    0
    0
  • Track lighting that uses halogen bulbs does have many pluses for homeowners.

    0
    0
  • Halogen lighting can produce a strong glare, particularly when pointed directly at a reflective surface.

    0
    0
  • Halogen bulbs burn very hot; so take care to choose lighting systems that shield the bulb to help prevent fires.

    0
    0
  • While a halogen bulb will last twice as long as a standard bulb, and reduce your energy costs by as much as 20 percent, they cost nearly four times as much as a standard bulb.

    0
    0
  • Make sure you do the math, and consider the other benefits of using halogen lights in your home before you purchase to make sure you are truly getting your money's worth.

    0
    0
  • There is no doubt that halogen track lighting is the work horse of home lighting options.

    0
    0
  • One potential drawback to using low voltage fixtures is that most of them employ halogen bulbs.

    0
    0
  • Halogen lighting is energy efficient, but may take some getting used to.

    0
    0
  • Halogen lights provide bright, white illumination that can cause eyestrain.

    0
    0
  • Another consideration is the added heat halogen lighting contributes to a room.

    0
    0
  • Light blue lenses on safety goggles are the right choice for jobs where the work space is being lit by fluorescent or halogen lighting.

    0
    0
  • Select GE models utilize Advantium Speed-Cook technology, which uses a halogen bulb.

    0
    0
  • The vacuum also has a halogen light system, which makes it easier to see when you're vacuuming under beds and chairs.

    0
    0
  • Other parts are halogen bulbs that help to cook food more quickly.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →