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hallam

hallam

hallam Sentence Examples

  • The cruciform church of St Andrew has Norman and later portions; it is the burial-place of Henry Hallam the historian, and members of his family, including his sons Arthur and Henry.

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  • 120-128; Hallam's Literature of Europe, iii.

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  • Hallam maintains that the only overt act of treason proved against Russell was his concurrence in the project of a rising at Taunton, which he denied, and which, Ramsay being the only witness, was not sufficient to warrant a conviction.

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  • Hallam (1811-1833).

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  • But by this time Tennyson was writing lyrics of still higher promise, and, as Arthur Hallam early perceived, with an extraordinary earnestness in the worship of beauty.

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  • In the summer of 1830 Tennyson and Hallam volunteered in the army of the Spanish insurgent Torrijos, and marched about a little in the Pyrenees, without meeting with an enemy.

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  • Arthur Hallam was now betrothed to Emily Tennyson (afterwards Mrs Jesse, 1811-1889), and stayed frequently at Somersby.

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  • In August 1833 Arthur Hallam started with his father, the great historian, for Tirol.

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  • They went no farther than Vienna, where Mr Hallam, returning to the hotel on the 15th of September 1833, found his son lying dead on a sofa: a blood-vessel had broken in his brain.

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  • The earliest effect of Hallam's death upon his friend's art was the composition, in the summer of 1834, of The Two Voices; and to the same period belong the beginnings of the Idylls of the King and of In Memoriam, over both of which he meditated long.

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  • Now a worse thing befell him, for in February 1850, having collected into one "long ledger-like book" all the elegies on Arthur Hallam which he had been composing at intervals since 1833, he left this only MS. in the cupboard of some lodgings in Mornington Place, Hampstead Road.

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  • Of 1852 the principal events were the birth of his eldest son Hallam, the second Lord Tennyson, in August, and in November the publication of the Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington.

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  • His Life, written with admirable piety and taste by his son, Hallam, second Lord Tennyson, was published in two volumes in 1897.

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  • G.) Alfred, Lord Tennyson: a Memoir (1897), by Hallam, second Baron Tennyson, is the authoritative source for the poet's biography.

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  • His most intimate friend was Arthur Hallam, by universal acknowledgment the most remarkable Etonian of his day; but he was not generally popular or even widely known.

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  • HENRY HALLAM (1777-1859), English historian, was the only son of John Hallam, canon of Windsor and dean of Bristol, and was born on the 9th of July 1 777.

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  • Hallam's earliest literary work was undertaken in connexion with the great organ of the Whig party, the Edinburgh Review, where his review of Scott's Dryden attracted much notice.

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  • These are the three works on which the fame of Hallam rests.

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  • These facts and dates represent nearly all the events of Hallam's career.

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  • His eldest son, Arthur Henry Hallam, - the "A.H.H."

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  • Seventeen years later, his second son, Henry Fitzmaurice Hallam, was cut off like his brother at the very threshold of what might have been a great career.

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  • The premature death and high talents of these young men, and the association of one of them with the most popular poem of the age, have made Hallam's family afflictions better known than any other incidents of his life.

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  • In 1834 Hallam published The Remains in Prose and Verse of Arthur Henry Hallam, with a Sketch of his Life.

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  • Hallam was a fellow of the Royal Society, and a trustee of the British Museum, and enjoyed many other appropriate distinctions.

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  • The Middle Ages is described by Hallam himself as a series of historical dissertations, a comprehensive survey of the chief circumstances that can interest a philosophical inquirer during the period from the 5th to the 15th century.

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  • The book may be regarded as a general view of early modern history, preparatory to the more detailed treatment of special lines of inquiry carried out in his subsequent works, although Hallam's original intention was to continue the work on the scale on which it had been begun.

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  • Hallam stopped here for a characteristic reason, which it is impossible not to respect and to regret.

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  • As a matter of fact they ran back much farther, as Hallam soon found.

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  • The work, he says, is the "production of a decided partisan," who "rakes in the ashes of long-forgotten and a thousand times buried slanders, 1 Lord Brougham, overlooking the constitutional chapter in the Middle Ages, censured Hallam for making an arbitrary beginning at this point, and proposed to write a more complete history himself.

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  • Absolute justice is the standard which Hallam set himself and maintained.

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  • But while abstaining from irrelevant historical discussions, Hallam dealt with statesmen and policies with the calm and fearless impartiality of a judge.

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  • If Hallam can ever be said to have deviated from perfect fairness, it was in the tacit assumption that the 19th-century theory of the constitution was the right theory in previous centuries, and that those who departed from it on one side or the other were in the wrong.

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  • Hallam, like Macaulay, ultimately referred all political questions to the standard of Whig constitutionalism.

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  • In the first chapter of the Literature, which is to a great extent supplementary to the last chapter of the Middle Ages, Hallam sketches the state of literature in Europe down to the end of the 14th century: the extinction of ancient learning which followed the fall of the Roman empire and the rise of Christianity; the preservation of the Latin language in the services of the church; and the slow revival of letters, which began to show itself soon after the 7th century - "the nadir of the human mind" - had been passed.

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  • The individuality of great authors is thus dissipated except when it has been preserved by an occasional sacrifice of the arrangement - and this defect, if it is to be esteemed a defect, is increased by the very sparing references to personal history and character with which Hallam was obliged to content himself.

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  • The history of institutions like universities and academies, and that of great popular movements like the Reformation, are of course 1 Technical subjects like painting or English law have been excluded by Hallam, and history and theology only partially treated.

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  • noticed in their immediate connexion with literary results; but Hallam had little taste for the spacious generalization which such subjects suggest.

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  • Not the least striking testimony to Hallam's powers is his mastery over so many diverse forms of intellectual activity.

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  • The labour devoted to an investigation is with Hallam no excuse for dwelling on the result, unless that is in itself important.

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  • Hallam is generally described as a "philosophical historian."

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  • Hallam is a philosopher to this extent that both in political and in literary history he fixed his attention on results rather than on persons.

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  • But, on the other hand, there is no trace in Hallam of anything like a philosophy of history or society.

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  • At the same time Hallam by no means assumes the tone of the mere scholar.

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  • Hallam's prejudices, so far as he had any, belong to the same character.

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  • Hallam's style is singularly uniform throughout all his writings.

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  • Robert Hallam >>

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  • The former cathedral church was mainly built 1069-1089, but was later gothicized; near the west end of the nave a plate in the floor marks the spot where Huss stood when condemned to death, while in the midst of the choir is the brass which covered the grave of Robert Hallam, bishop of Salisbury, who died here in 1417, during the council.

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  • Hallam, Const.

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  • The Arabic geographer, Edrisi, who lived about r roo, is said by Boucher to give an account, though in a confused manner, of the polarity of the magnet (Hallam, Mid.

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  • 293 seq.; and to Hallam's Middle Ages,.

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  • Hallam, Lit.

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  • " But," as Hallam says, " he who fought on horseback and had been invested with peculiar arms in a solemn manner wanted nothing more to render him a knight; " and so he concludes, in view of the verbal identity of " chevalier " and " caballarius," that " we may refer chivalry in a general sense to the age of Charlemagne."

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  • 5 Hallam, Middle Ages, iii.

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  • (now Peterborough), was accepted from Selden to Hallam as an historical fact, and knighthood was supposed, not only to have been known among the Anglo-Saxons, but to have had a distinctively religious character which was contemned by the Norman invaders.

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  • See also Hallam, Middle Ages, iii.

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  • " Torriani," "Visconti," "Sforza" and "Trivulzi"; Muratori, Annali d'Italia; Hallam, History of the Middle Ages; and Mediolanum (4 vols., 1881); L.

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  • In 1846 he was sent as minister to London, where he lived in constant companionship with Macaulay and Hallam.

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  • hallam stigmatized Feltham as one of our worst writers.

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  • In the words of Hallam, "the slow and gradual manner in which parochial churches became independent appears to be of itself a sufficient answer to those who ascribe a great antiquity to the universal payment of tithes."

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  • Graec. xlvii.-lxiv.); but this edition is greatly indebted to the one issued more than a century earlier (1612) by Sir Henry Savile, provost of Eton College, from a press established at Eton by himself, which Hallam (Lit.

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  • He succeeded his friend Henry Hallam as a trustee of the British Museum in 1859, and took part in the reorganization of the departments of antiquities and natural science.

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  • There is a legend, current among historians from the days of Robertson and Hallam, that as the year 1000 approached mankind prepared for the Last Judgment; that the earth "clothed itself with the white mantle of churches," and like a penitent watched in terror and in prayer for the fatal dawn.

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  • On the formation of Mr. Lloyd George's Government in 1916, Mr. Fisher accepted the invitation to become Minister of Education, and was elected to Parliament for the Hallam division of Sheffield.

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  • 869; Calendar of State Papers (1603-1606), Hallam's Constitutional Hist.

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  • It is often stated that the writ is founded on the article of the Great Charter already quoted; but there are extant instances 1 See Hallam, Const.

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  • 5 2 Hallam, Const.

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  • "The great rank of those who were likely to offend against this part of the statute was," says Hallam, "the cause of this unusual severity."

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  • See Tulloch, Rational Theology in England in the 17th Century; Hallam, Literature of Europe (chap. on Philosophy from 1650 to 1700; Hunt, Religious Thought in England; von Stein, Sieben Bucher zur Geschichte des Platonismus (1862), and works on individual philosophers appended to biographies.

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  • The best-known English criticism, that of Hallam in his Literature of Europe, is inadequate.

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  • to 60, and enormous fines imposed on the trespassers, - Lord Salisbury being assessed in £20,000, Lord Westmoreland in £19,000, Sir Christopher Hatton in £12,000 (Hallam's Constitutional History of England, c. viii.).

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  • Hallam deliberately aimed at impartiality, but he could not escape his Whig atmosphere.

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  • francum plegium), an early English institution, consisting (as defined by Stubbs) of an association for mutual security whose members, according to Hallam, "were perpetual bail for each other."

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  • There he met the younger Lewis Hallam (1738-1808), a pioneer American theatrical manager and actor, who induced him to remove to the United States, and in 1783 he settled in Philadelphia, where he at once took the oath of allegiance to the United States, was admitted to practise law in 1785, and rapidly attained a prominent position at the bar.

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  • He was interested in the theatrical projects of Hallam, for whom he wrote several dramatic compositions, and from 1787 to 1789 he edited The Columbian Magazine.

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  • Hallam, Monckton Milnes, W.

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  • These epithets, as Hallam says, were not necessarily synonymous, but merely indicated that the preference given to seniority was to be controlled by a due regard to desert (Constit.

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  • He became the first bishop of the newly created diocese of Hallam in 1980.

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  • Gordon and Sylvia Hallam many new fanciers fail to give themselves a real chance of success.

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  • Anyway went hoarse cheering for UEA, Grace was out shouting the Hallam Poly drum.

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  • revenge for the single point defeat at the hands of Sheffield Hallam.

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  • The poem was written in memory of his friend Arthur Hallam and consists of 132 separate poems - all written in iambic tetrameter.

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  • Hallam, Constitutional History, vol.

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  • The cruciform church of St Andrew has Norman and later portions; it is the burial-place of Henry Hallam the historian, and members of his family, including his sons Arthur and Henry.

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  • 120-128; Hallam's Literature of Europe, iii.

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  • Hallam maintains that the only overt act of treason proved against Russell was his concurrence in the project of a rising at Taunton, which he denied, and which, Ramsay being the only witness, was not sufficient to warrant a conviction.

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  • Hallam (1811-1833).

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  • But by this time Tennyson was writing lyrics of still higher promise, and, as Arthur Hallam early perceived, with an extraordinary earnestness in the worship of beauty.

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  • In the summer of 1830 Tennyson and Hallam volunteered in the army of the Spanish insurgent Torrijos, and marched about a little in the Pyrenees, without meeting with an enemy.

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  • Arthur Hallam was now betrothed to Emily Tennyson (afterwards Mrs Jesse, 1811-1889), and stayed frequently at Somersby.

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  • In August 1833 Arthur Hallam started with his father, the great historian, for Tirol.

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  • They went no farther than Vienna, where Mr Hallam, returning to the hotel on the 15th of September 1833, found his son lying dead on a sofa: a blood-vessel had broken in his brain.

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  • The earliest effect of Hallam's death upon his friend's art was the composition, in the summer of 1834, of The Two Voices; and to the same period belong the beginnings of the Idylls of the King and of In Memoriam, over both of which he meditated long.

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  • The state of utter indigence to which Tennyson was reduced greatly exercised his friends, and in September 1845, at the suggestion of Henry Hallam, Sir Robert Peel was induced to bestow on the poet a pension of f200 a year.

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  • Now a worse thing befell him, for in February 1850, having collected into one "long ledger-like book" all the elegies on Arthur Hallam which he had been composing at intervals since 1833, he left this only MS. in the cupboard of some lodgings in Mornington Place, Hampstead Road.

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  • Of 1852 the principal events were the birth of his eldest son Hallam, the second Lord Tennyson, in August, and in November the publication of the Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington.

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  • His Life, written with admirable piety and taste by his son, Hallam, second Lord Tennyson, was published in two volumes in 1897.

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  • G.) Alfred, Lord Tennyson: a Memoir (1897), by Hallam, second Baron Tennyson, is the authoritative source for the poet's biography.

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  • His most intimate friend was Arthur Hallam, by universal acknowledgment the most remarkable Etonian of his day; but he was not generally popular or even widely known.

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  • HENRY HALLAM (1777-1859), English historian, was the only son of John Hallam, canon of Windsor and dean of Bristol, and was born on the 9th of July 1 777.

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  • Hallam's earliest literary work was undertaken in connexion with the great organ of the Whig party, the Edinburgh Review, where his review of Scott's Dryden attracted much notice.

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  • These are the three works on which the fame of Hallam rests.

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  • These facts and dates represent nearly all the events of Hallam's career.

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  • His eldest son, Arthur Henry Hallam, - the "A.H.H."

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  • Seventeen years later, his second son, Henry Fitzmaurice Hallam, was cut off like his brother at the very threshold of what might have been a great career.

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  • The premature death and high talents of these young men, and the association of one of them with the most popular poem of the age, have made Hallam's family afflictions better known than any other incidents of his life.

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  • In 1834 Hallam published The Remains in Prose and Verse of Arthur Henry Hallam, with a Sketch of his Life.

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  • Hallam was a fellow of the Royal Society, and a trustee of the British Museum, and enjoyed many other appropriate distinctions.

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  • The Middle Ages is described by Hallam himself as a series of historical dissertations, a comprehensive survey of the chief circumstances that can interest a philosophical inquirer during the period from the 5th to the 15th century.

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  • The book may be regarded as a general view of early modern history, preparatory to the more detailed treatment of special lines of inquiry carried out in his subsequent works, although Hallam's original intention was to continue the work on the scale on which it had been begun.

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  • Hallam stopped here for a characteristic reason, which it is impossible not to respect and to regret.

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  • As a matter of fact they ran back much farther, as Hallam soon found.

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  • The work, he says, is the "production of a decided partisan," who "rakes in the ashes of long-forgotten and a thousand times buried slanders, 1 Lord Brougham, overlooking the constitutional chapter in the Middle Ages, censured Hallam for making an arbitrary beginning at this point, and proposed to write a more complete history himself.

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  • Absolute justice is the standard which Hallam set himself and maintained.

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    0
  • But while abstaining from irrelevant historical discussions, Hallam dealt with statesmen and policies with the calm and fearless impartiality of a judge.

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    0
  • If Hallam can ever be said to have deviated from perfect fairness, it was in the tacit assumption that the 19th-century theory of the constitution was the right theory in previous centuries, and that those who departed from it on one side or the other were in the wrong.

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  • Hallam, like Macaulay, ultimately referred all political questions to the standard of Whig constitutionalism.

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  • In the first chapter of the Literature, which is to a great extent supplementary to the last chapter of the Middle Ages, Hallam sketches the state of literature in Europe down to the end of the 14th century: the extinction of ancient learning which followed the fall of the Roman empire and the rise of Christianity; the preservation of the Latin language in the services of the church; and the slow revival of letters, which began to show itself soon after the 7th century - "the nadir of the human mind" - had been passed.

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  • The individuality of great authors is thus dissipated except when it has been preserved by an occasional sacrifice of the arrangement - and this defect, if it is to be esteemed a defect, is increased by the very sparing references to personal history and character with which Hallam was obliged to content himself.

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  • The history of institutions like universities and academies, and that of great popular movements like the Reformation, are of course 1 Technical subjects like painting or English law have been excluded by Hallam, and history and theology only partially treated.

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  • noticed in their immediate connexion with literary results; but Hallam had little taste for the spacious generalization which such subjects suggest.

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  • Not the least striking testimony to Hallam's powers is his mastery over so many diverse forms of intellectual activity.

    0
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  • The labour devoted to an investigation is with Hallam no excuse for dwelling on the result, unless that is in itself important.

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  • Hallam is generally described as a "philosophical historian."

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    0
  • Hallam is a philosopher to this extent that both in political and in literary history he fixed his attention on results rather than on persons.

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  • But, on the other hand, there is no trace in Hallam of anything like a philosophy of history or society.

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    0
  • At the same time Hallam by no means assumes the tone of the mere scholar.

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  • Hallam's prejudices, so far as he had any, belong to the same character.

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  • Hallam's style is singularly uniform throughout all his writings.

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  • Robert Hallam >>

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  • The former cathedral church was mainly built 1069-1089, but was later gothicized; near the west end of the nave a plate in the floor marks the spot where Huss stood when condemned to death, while in the midst of the choir is the brass which covered the grave of Robert Hallam, bishop of Salisbury, who died here in 1417, during the council.

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  • Hallam, Const.

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  • The Arabic geographer, Edrisi, who lived about r roo, is said by Boucher to give an account, though in a confused manner, of the polarity of the magnet (Hallam, Mid.

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  • 293 seq.; and to Hallam's Middle Ages,.

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  • Hallam, who has collected all the passages from Grotius's letters in which the prejudices and narrow tenets of the Reformed clergy are condemned, thought he had a "bias towards popery" (Lit.

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  • Hallam, Lit.

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  • " But," as Hallam says, " he who fought on horseback and had been invested with peculiar arms in a solemn manner wanted nothing more to render him a knight; " and so he concludes, in view of the verbal identity of " chevalier " and " caballarius," that " we may refer chivalry in a general sense to the age of Charlemagne."

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  • 5 Hallam, Middle Ages, iii.

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  • (now Peterborough), was accepted from Selden to Hallam as an historical fact, and knighthood was supposed, not only to have been known among the Anglo-Saxons, but to have had a distinctively religious character which was contemned by the Norman invaders.

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  • See also Hallam, Middle Ages, iii.

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  • " Torriani," "Visconti," "Sforza" and "Trivulzi"; Muratori, Annali d'Italia; Hallam, History of the Middle Ages; and Mediolanum (4 vols., 1881); L.

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  • In 1846 he was sent as minister to London, where he lived in constant companionship with Macaulay and Hallam.

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  • hallam stigmatized Feltham as one of our worst writers.

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  • In the words of Hallam, "the slow and gradual manner in which parochial churches became independent appears to be of itself a sufficient answer to those who ascribe a great antiquity to the universal payment of tithes."

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  • (See Selden.) Hallam, Middle Ages, ii.

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  • Graec. xlvii.-lxiv.); but this edition is greatly indebted to the one issued more than a century earlier (1612) by Sir Henry Savile, provost of Eton College, from a press established at Eton by himself, which Hallam (Lit.

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  • He succeeded his friend Henry Hallam as a trustee of the British Museum in 1859, and took part in the reorganization of the departments of antiquities and natural science.

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  • 34 (see Hallam, Literature of Europe, ii.

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  • There is a legend, current among historians from the days of Robertson and Hallam, that as the year 1000 approached mankind prepared for the Last Judgment; that the earth "clothed itself with the white mantle of churches," and like a penitent watched in terror and in prayer for the fatal dawn.

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  • On the formation of Mr. Lloyd George's Government in 1916, Mr. Fisher accepted the invitation to become Minister of Education, and was elected to Parliament for the Hallam division of Sheffield.

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  • 869; Calendar of State Papers (1603-1606), Hallam's Constitutional Hist.

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  • (See also Hallam, Middle Ages, c. i.

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  • It is often stated that the writ is founded on the article of the Great Charter already quoted; but there are extant instances 1 See Hallam, Const.

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  • 5 2 Hallam, Const.

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  • "The great rank of those who were likely to offend against this part of the statute was," says Hallam, "the cause of this unusual severity."

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  • Under the Roman-Dutch law as applied to South Africa free persons appear to have a right to release under a writ de libero homine exhibendo, which closely resembles the writ of habeas corpus, and the procedure described as "manifestation" used in the kingdom of Aragon (Hallam, Middle Ages, vol.

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  • See Tulloch, Rational Theology in England in the 17th Century; Hallam, Literature of Europe (chap. on Philosophy from 1650 to 1700; Hunt, Religious Thought in England; von Stein, Sieben Bucher zur Geschichte des Platonismus (1862), and works on individual philosophers appended to biographies.

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  • The best-known English criticism, that of Hallam in his Literature of Europe, is inadequate.

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  • Hallam, Constitutional History of England, vol.

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  • to 60, and enormous fines imposed on the trespassers, - Lord Salisbury being assessed in £20,000, Lord Westmoreland in £19,000, Sir Christopher Hatton in £12,000 (Hallam's Constitutional History of England, c. viii.).

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  • Hallam deliberately aimed at impartiality, but he could not escape his Whig atmosphere.

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  • francum plegium), an early English institution, consisting (as defined by Stubbs) of an association for mutual security whose members, according to Hallam, "were perpetual bail for each other."

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    0
  • There he met the younger Lewis Hallam (1738-1808), a pioneer American theatrical manager and actor, who induced him to remove to the United States, and in 1783 he settled in Philadelphia, where he at once took the oath of allegiance to the United States, was admitted to practise law in 1785, and rapidly attained a prominent position at the bar.

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  • He was interested in the theatrical projects of Hallam, for whom he wrote several dramatic compositions, and from 1787 to 1789 he edited The Columbian Magazine.

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  • Hallam, Monckton Milnes, W.

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  • These epithets, as Hallam says, were not necessarily synonymous, but merely indicated that the preference given to seniority was to be controlled by a due regard to desert (Constit.

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  • In Netball the 1st team will be seeking revenge for the single point defeat at the hands of Sheffield Hallam.

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  • In addition, there have been research studies conducted by the Edinburgh Royal Infirmary and Sheffield Hallam University.

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