Halifax sentence example

halifax
  • Halifax was a borough by prescription, its privileges growing up with the increased prosperity brought by the cloth trade, but it was not incorporated until 1848.
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  • On the 15th of November the Exclusion Bill, having passed the Commons, was brought up to the Lords, and an historic debate took place, in which Halifax and Shaftesbury were the leaders on opposite sides.
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  • In 1865 he was re-elected for Halifax, and in 1866 became undersecretary of state for India.
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  • From 1761 to 1763 Governor John Wentworth of New Hampshire issued 108 grants, and settlements were established in Brattleboro, Putney, Westminster, Halifax, Marlborough, Wilmington, New Fane, Rockingham, Townshend, Vernon (Hinsdale) and Dummerston (all in Windham county, except Vernon, which is in Cheshire county).
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  • He was educated at Glasgow university, where he had a brilliant academic career; and having entered the ministry of the Presbyterian Church, he returned to Canada and obtained a pastoral charge in Halifax, Nova Scotia, which he held from 1863 to 1877.
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  • Grant married in 1872 Jessie, daughter of William Lawson of Halifax.
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  • Halifax and the Commons in declaring the prince and princess joint sovereigns.
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  • In June and July new motions were made in parliament for his removal; but notwithstanding his great unpopularity, on the retirement of Halifax in 1690 he again acquired the chief power in the state, which he retained till 1695 by bribery in parliament and by the support of the king and queen.
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  • In 1691, desiring to compromise Halifax, he discredited himself by the patronage of an informer named Fuller, soon proved an impostor.
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  • Early in 1683, however, through the influence of the king's mistress, the duchess of Portsmouth, Sunderland regained his place as secretary for the northern department, the chief feature of his term of office being his rivalry with his brotherin-law, George Savile, marquess of Halifax.
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  • Until 1905 the only grounds for an absolute divorce were 1 Under the Constitution of 1776 senators were elected by counties, one for each county, and representatives also by counties, two for each county - in addition, the towns of Edenton, Newbern, Wilmington, Salisbury, Hillsboro and Halifax each elected one representative; and a property qualification - a freehold of 50 acres held for six months before an election - was imposed on electors of senators.
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  • In the " back country " extortionate fees, excessive taxes, and the oppressive manner of collecting them brought about a popular uprising, known as the Regulation, which centred in Orange and Anson counties, but was strong also in Brown, Edgecombe, Johnson, Granville and Halifax counties.
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  • Their labours ended, however, in another provincial government by a Council of Safety, and the drafting of North Carolina's first state constitution was left to a constitutional convention which assembled at Halifax on the 12th of November.
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  • Halifax ranks with Leeds, Bradford and Huddersfield as a seat of the woollen and worsted manufacture.
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  • At the time of the Conquest Halifax formed part of the extensive manor of Wakefield, which belonged to the king, but in the 13th century was in the hands of John, earl Warrenne (c. 1245-1305).
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  • Among the curious customs of Halifax was the Gibbet Law, which was probably established by a prescriptive right to protect the wool trade, and gave the inhabitants the power of executing any one taken within their liberty, who, when tried by a jury of sixteen of the frith-burgesses, was found guilty of the theft of any goods of the value of more than 13d.
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  • The first execution recorded under this law took place in 1541, and the right was exercised in Halifax longer than in any other town, the last execution taking place in 1650.
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  • In 1635 the king granted the inhabitants of Halifax licence to found a workhouse in a large house given to them for that purpose by Nathaniel Waterhouse, and incorporated them under the name of the master and governors.
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  • In 1607 David Waterhouse, lord of the manor of Halifax, obtained a grant of two markets there every week on Friday and Saturday and two fairs every year, each lasting three days, one beginning on the 24th of June, the other on the 11th of November.
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  • During the Civil War Halifax was garrisoned by parliament, and a field near it is still called the Bloody Field on account of an engagement which took place there between the forces of parliament and the Royalists.
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  • The ruins first became known to Europe through the visit of Dr William Halifax of Aleppo in 1691; his Relation of a voyage to Tadmor has been printed from his autograph in the Pal.
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  • Halifax not only took measurements, but copied 18 Greek and 4 Palmyrene texts.
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  • In 1877 he was one of the counsel for the United States before the commission which in accordance with the treaty of Washington met at Halifax, N.S., to arbitrate the fisheries question between the United States and Great Britain.
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  • Deprived at an early age of his mother, the care of the boy devolved upon his grandmother, the marchioness of Halifax, a lady of culture and connexion, whose house was frequented by the most distinguished Whigs of the epoch.
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  • This led to an important despatch by Viscount Halifax, president of the board of control, to the marquess of Dalhousie, the governor-general, authorizing an educational advance in primary and secondary schools, the provision of technical and scientific teaching, and the establishment of schools for girls.
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  • Lord Halifax (1800-1885) used to say, with reference to the increase in the amount of reading requisite for the highest honours: " My double-first must have been a better thing than Peel's; Gladstone's must have been better than mine."
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  • He died at Halifax, N.S., on the 29th of April 1864.
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  • In 1877 he was the Canadian nominee on the Anglo-American fisheries commission at Halifax, and rendered brilliant service.
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  • Before next spring he had supped with " the great Mr Murray, counsellor," and was engaged to do so with Mr Pope through Murray's introduction, while he was dining with Halifax, Sandwich and Chesterfield.
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  • In 1877 he was counsel for Great Britain before the Anglo-American fisheries arbitration at Halifax; in 1897 he was a joint delegate to Washington with Sir Wilfrid Laurier on the Bering Sea seal question; and in1898-1899a member of the Anglo-American joint high commission at Quebec.
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  • On the 3rd of July Washington took command of the American army at Cambridge and proceeded with what is known as the "siege of Boston," which was marked by no special incident, and closed with the evacuation of the town by the British on the 17th of March 1776, Howe sailing away to Halifax, Nova Scotia.
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  • Howe, heavily reinforced from home, sailed on the 10th from Halifax to New York and on the 5th of July encamped on Staten Island.
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  • The British navy was able to cover the retreat of the army from Boston to Halifax in April 1776, and to convey it to New York in'June.
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  • The chief seaports from east to west are Halifax, N.S., Sydney, N.S., St John, N.B., Quebec and Montreal on the Atlantic; and Vancouver, Esquimalt and Victoria, B.C.; on the Pacific. Halifax is the ocean terminus of the Intercolonial railway; St John, Halifax and Vancouver of the Canadian Pacific railway.
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  • Though Halifax and St John are open in winter, much of the winter trade eastwards is done through American harbours, especially Portland, Maine, owing to the shorter railway journey.
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  • Esquimalt, Halifax, Kingston (Ont.) and Quebec have wellequipped graving-docks.
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  • Those of most importance 1 are: - Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S.
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  • The Fishery Commission, on the other hand, which sat in Halifax, awarded Canada $5,500,000 as the excess value of its fisheries for twelve years, and after much hesitation this sum was paid by the United States into the Canadian treasury.
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  • In bringing about a system of penny postage throughout the empire; in forwarding the construction of the Pacific cable to secure close and safe imperial telegraphic connexion; in creating rapid and efficient lines of steamship communication with the motherland and all the colonies; in granting tariff preference to British goods and in striving for preferential treatment of inter-imperial trade; in assuming responsibility for imperial defence at the two important stations of Halifax and Esquimalt, - Canada, under the guidance of Sir Wilfrid Laurier and his party, took a leading part and showed a truly national spirit.
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  • The eastern section of 1875 m., extending from Winnipeg to Moncton, where connexion is secured with the winter ports of Halifax and St John, was, under the act of incorporation, to be built by the government, and then leased for fifty years, under certain conditions, to the Grand Trunk Pacific Company.
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  • The chief features of his administration were the fiscal preference of 333% in favour of goods imported into Canada from Great Britain, the despatch of Canadian contingents to South Africa during the Boer war, the contract with the Grand Trunk railway for the construction of a second transcontinental road from ocean to ocean, the assumption by Canada of the imperial fortresses at Halifax and Esquimault, the appointment of a federal railway commission with power to regulate freight charges, express rates and telephone rates, and the relations between competing companies, the reduction of the postal rate to Great Britain from 5 cents to 2 cents and of the domestic rate from 3 cents to 2 cents, a substantial contribution to the Pacific cable, a practical and courageous policy of settlement and development in the Western territories, the division of the North-West territories into the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan and the enactment of the legislation necessary to give them provincial status, and finally (1910), a tariff arrangement with the United States, which, if not all that Canada might claim in the way of reciprocity, showed how entirely the course of events had changed the balance of commercial interests in North America.
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  • On the 30th of March 1791 nine preachers sent out the famous Halifax circular making suggestions as to the choice of president and other matters that must come before the conference.
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  • He sailed on the 21st of June, and after chasing the British frigate "Belvidera" (36), which escaped into Halifax by throwing boats, &c., overboard, stood across the North Atlantic in search of a West Indian convoy, which he failed to sight, returning by the 31st of August to Boston.
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  • From this date he devoted increasing attention to political affairs, and in 1835 was prosecuted for libelling the magistrates of Halifax.
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  • In 1836 he was elected member for Halifax in the provincial assembly, and during the next twelve years devoted himself to attaining responsible government for Nova Scotia.
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  • In 1904 a statue in his honour was erected in Halifax.
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  • Joseph Howe, by George Monro Grant (reprinted Halifax, 1904), is a brilliant sketch.
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  • The present system dates from 1854, being based upon a comprehensive despatch sent out by Sir C. Wood (afterwards Lord Halifax) in that year.
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  • After ten years of wandering, he was fixed for eight or nine years at a school at Halifax in Yorkshire.
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  • In 1896 he was elected to the Canadian parliament for the city of Halifax, but later lost his seat there and was elected for Carlton.
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  • At the general election of 1908 he was returned again for Halifax.
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  • Next year she supported the election of the Whig speaker, John Smith, but long resisted the influence and claims of the Junto, as the Whig leaders, Somers, Halifax, Orford, Wharton and Sunderland, were named.
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  • In 1830 Benjamin Outram, of Greetland, near Halifax, appears to have again attempted the spinning of this fibre, and for the second time alpaca was condemned.
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  • Seal Island and Penguin Island are in the bay; Ichaboe, Mercury, and Hollam's Bird islands are to the north; Halifax, Long, Possession, Albatross, Pomona, Plumpudding, and Roastbeef islands are to the south.
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  • The club originally consisted of thirty-nine, afterwards of forty-eight members, and included among others the duke of Marlborough, Lords Halifax and Somers, Sir Robert Walpole, Vanbrugh, Congreve, Steele and Addison.
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  • In his resistance to the great movement for the exclusion of James from the succession, Charles was aided by moderate men such as Halifax, who desired only a restriction of James's powers, and still more by the violence of the extreme exclusionists themselves, who headed by Shaftesbury brought about their own downfall and that of their cause by their support of the legitimacy and claims of Charles's natural son, the duke of Monmouth.
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  • All attempts at compromise failed, and on the assembling of the parliament in October 1680 the Exclusion Bill passed the Commons, being, however, thrown out in the Lords through the influence of Halifax.
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  • Of the two papers in defence of the Roman Catholic religion in Charles's own hand, published by James, Halifax says " though neither his temper nor education made him very fit to be an author, yet in this case.
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  • Halifax, however, concludes by desiring to moderate the roughness of his picture by emphasizing the excellence of his intellect and memory and his mechanical talent, by deprecating a too censorious judgment and by dwelling upon the disadvantages of his bringing up, the difficulties and temptations of his position, and on the fact that his vices were those common to human frailty.
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  • He at first opposed the adoption of the Ftderal constitution of 1787, as a member of the faction led by Willie Jones (1731-1801) of Halifax, North Carolina, but later withdrew his opposition.
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  • The first society for worship was formed in Baltimore in 1792 (reorganized 1798), though a short-lived one had preceded it at Halifax, N.S., in 1791.
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  • Such are Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield, Huddersfield and Halifax on the great and densely peopled West Riding coal-field, which lies on the eastern slope of the Pennines.
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  • Thus, an average below 4.4 is quoted for Rochdale, Halifax, Huddersfield, Yarmouth, Bradford and Stockport, while the average for London was 7.93, and for Gateshead, Newcastle-uponTyne and South Shields, in the northern industrial district of the Tyne, and for Devonport, the average exceeded 8.
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  • His grand-nephew, Hosea Ballou (1796-1861), born in Halifax, Vermont, on the 18th of October 1796, preached _to Universalists in Stafford, Connecticut (1815-1821); and in Massachusetts, in Roxbury (1821-1838) and in Medford (1838-1853); and in 1853 was elected first president of Tufts College at Medford, serving in that office until shortly before his death, which took place at Somerville, Massachusetts, on the 27th of May 1861.
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  • The Discourse on the Dissensions in Athens and Rome (September 1701), written to repel the tactics of the Tory commons in their attack on the Partition Treaties "without humour and without satire," and intended as a dissuasive from the pending impeachment of Somers, Orford, Halifax and Portland, received the honour, extraordinary for the maiden publication of a young politician, of being generally attributed to Somers himself or to Burnet, the latter of whom found a public disavowal necessary.
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  • Charles Montague, who was afterwards earl of Halifax, was a fellow of Trinity College, and was a very intimate friend of Newton; and it was on his influence that Newton relied in the main for promotion to some post of honour and emolument.
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  • This letter must have convinced Newton of the sincerity of Montague's good intentions towards him; we find them living as friends on the most intimate terms until Halifax's death in 1715.
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  • Political writing is at its best from Halifax to Cobbett, and its three greatest names are perhaps Swift, Junius and Burke, though Steele, Defoe, Bolingbroke and Dr Johnson are not far behind, while Cannings contributions to the A4nti-Jacobin and Gillrays caricatures require mention.
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  • In 1882 he entered the local legislature as Liberal member for Halifax, and from 1884 to 1896 was premier and provincial secretary of the province, but in the latter year became finance minister in the Dominion administration of Sir Wilfrid Laurier, and was elected to the House of Commons for Shelburne and Queen's county.
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  • In July 1859 failing health led him to seek rest in a trip to Europe, but he died on the 13th of that month at Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he had been put ashore when it was seen that he probably could not outlive the voyage across the Atlantic. Choate, besides being one of the ablest of American lawyers, was one of the most scholarly of American public men, and his numerous orations and addresses were remarkable for their pure style, their grace and elegance of form, and their wealth of classical allusion.
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  • The Halifax crash landed in a field and was now well ablaze, acting as a beacon to every German in the area.
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  • The brave airman was a 29 year old Halifax navigator with ' B ' Flight with 298 Squadron whose motto was Silent We Strike!
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  • In 1846 Ratcliffe became a beadle at Halifax and later mace-bearer to the first mayor of the town.
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  • She asks the chap from the Halifax for advice.
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  • Martin Ellis, Halifax chief economist, said: " The fall suggests the heat is coming out of the market.
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  • The crew of this Halifax were the only people to return from operation freshman.
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  • Not even nationwide or the Halifax know what is going to happen when.
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  • There was only to be a of Halifax nova.
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  • He noted: " The Halifax house price index, released this morning, was surprisingly strong showing a.. .
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  • During the trial, the somewhat ramshackle nature of the Halifax's security procedures came to light.
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  • Where do you think Halifax Town will finish this season?
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  • They then siphoned cash from the comedian's genuine Halifax accounts into the bogus one.
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  • In 1873 the Atlantic ran into a partially submerged rock off Halifax, Nova Scotia.
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  • The Halifax College site to the south of the Heslington West campus has a leasehold tenure.
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  • The question of the succession was now again prominent, and Shaftesbury, in opposition to Halifax, committed the error, which really brought about his fall, of putting forward Monmouth as his nominee, thus alienating a large number of his supporters; he encouraged, too, the belief that this was agreeable to the king.
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  • Ashurst, to Mazzini, with whom he formed a close friendship. In 1859 he was returned to parliament as Radical member for Halifax, which town he continued to represent for over thirtysix years.
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  • His corruption, his mean submission to a tyrant wife, his greed, his pale face and lean person, which had succeeded to the handsome features and comeliness of earlier days,' were the subject of ridicule, f:om the witty sneers of Halifax to the coarse jests of the anonymous writers of innumerable lampoons.
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  • He did not conceal his vexation and disappointment, which were increased by the appointment of Halifax to the office of lord privy seal.
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  • This he followed up by an encyclical on the unity of the Church (Sails cognitum, 29th June 1896); and the question of the validity of Anglican ordinations from the Roman Catholic point of view having been raised in Rome by Viscount Halifax, with whom the abbe Louis Duchesne and one or two other French priests were in sympathy, a commission was appointed to consider the subject, and on the 15th of September 1896 a condemnation of the Anglican form as theologically insufficient was issued, and was directed to be taken as final.
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  • The fortified harbours of Halifax (N.S.) and Esquimalt (B.C.) were till 1905 maintained and garrisoned by the imperial government, but have since been taken over by Canada.
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  • In 1749 the British founded Halifax, began to colonize Nova Scotia, and, with war imminent, deemed it prudent to disperse the Acadians, chiefly along the Atlantic seaboard (see Nova Scotia: History).
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  • Court intrigue favouring him, he succeeded, by the betrayal of his comrades and by two submissive letters, in reconciling himself with the help of Halifax both to the king and to James, though he had the humiliation of seeing his confessions and declarations of penitence published at length in the Gazette.
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  • When the Indiana visited Halifax, we were invited to go on board, and she sent her own launch for us.
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  • After we left Halifax, we visited Dr. Bell at Cape Breton.
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  • During the trial, the somewhat ramshackle nature of the Halifax 's security procedures came to light.
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  • Finishing just 16 secs behind to take second place was Lauren O'Neill from Halifax S.C in 44mins 29secs.
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  • They then siphoned cash from the comedian 's genuine Halifax accounts into the bogus one.
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  • By 1852 a worsted mill, ran by the Townend Brothers, had been established on the western side of Halifax Road.
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  • Born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Ellen Page is a self-proclaimed tomboy who began acting at a young age.
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  • Halifax Mortgages is a division of the Bank of Scotland.
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  • Halifax Mortgages offers special programs designed for first time homebuyers.
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  • Halifax Mortgages offers both fixed rate and variable rate mortgages.
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  • Halifax also offers mortgages that are continually variable.
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  • Halifax Mortgages allows both existing Halifax customers and people with loans from other lenders to apply for refinancing.
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  • Fixed rate refinance mortgages through Halifax are only fixed rate for a certain period of time and then become variable rates.
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  • The interest rate is a low variable rate for a certain pre-set amount of time and then the interest rate adjusts to the standard Halifax variable rate.
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  • Investment properties that are purchased with the intention of renting out are called Buy to Let mortgages through Halifax.
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  • Applying for a mortgage with Halifax is relatively simple.
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  • The Halifax website offers an impressive amount of resources for existing mortgage holders.
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  • Halifax also has local branches in some locations as well as customer service representatives available over the telephone for customers who need access to information but do not want to use the Internet.
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  • There are many providers in the UK that offer such insurance including Zurich, Aviva, Halifax, L&G, Direct Line, and Norwich Union.
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  • Halifax often offers special deals on their insurance - for example, they may offer programs that provide you with £50 back each year that you do not make an insurance claim when you purchase home and contents insurance.
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