Half-hardy sentence example

half-hardy
  • It is grown in conservatories for half-hardy plants.
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  • For tropical plants the heat of a propagating house-75° to 80°, with a bottom heat of 80° to 90° - is desirable, and in many cases absolutely necessary; for others, such as half-hardy annuals, a mild hot bed, or a temperate pit ranging from 60° to 70°, is convenient; while of course all outdoor crops have to submit to the natural temperature of the season.
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  • Annuals may be divided into three classes: the hardy, which are sown at once in the ground they are to occupy; the half-hardy, which succeed best when aided at first by a slight hot bed, and then transplanted into the open air; and the tender, which are kept in pots, and treated as greenhouse or stove plants, to which departments they properly belong.
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  • Some of the more popular annuals, hardy and half-hardy, have been very much varied as regards habit and the colour of the flowers, and purchases may be made in the seed shops of such things as China asters, stocks, Chinese and Indian pinks, larkspurs, phloxes and others, amongst which some of the most beautiful of the summer flowers may be found.
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  • The half-hardy series are best sown in pots or pans under glass in mild,heat, in order to accelerate germination.
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  • We add a select list of some of the more distinct annuals desirable for general cultivation as decorative plants for the open air Acroclinium roseum: half-hardy, I ft., rose-pink or white; everlasting.
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  • Carnations, Marguerite: half-hardy, 9 to 12 in., colours various.
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  • Chrysanthemum carinatum: a charming half-hardy annual, 2 to 3 ft.
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  • Cosmos bipinnatus: half-hardy, 3 ft., rose, purple, white; requires sunny spots.
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  • Helichrysum bracteatum: half-hardy, 2 ft.; the incurved crimson, rose and other forms very handsome.
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  • Matthiola annua (Ten-week Stock and its variety, the intermediate stock): half-hardy, I to 2 ft., white, rose and red.
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  • Mimulus cupreus: half-hardy, 6 in., coppery red, varying considerably.
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  • Mimulus luteus tigrinus: half-hardy, t ft., yellow spotted with red; var.
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  • Petunia violacea hybrida: half-hardy, I z ft., various colours; sow in heat.
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  • Phlox Drummondii: half-hardy, I ft., various colours.
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  • Portulaca splendens: half-hardy, 6 in., crimson, rose, yellow, white, &c., single and double; splendid prostrate plants for sunny rockwork.
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  • Pyrethrum Parthenium aureum: half-hardy, I ft.; grown for its golden foliage, and much used for bedding.
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  • Salpiglossis sinuata: half-hardy, 2 to 3 ft., yellow, purple, crimson, &c.; much varied and beautifully veined.
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  • Sanvitalia procumbens flore-pleno: half-hardy, 6 in., golden yellow; procumbent.
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  • Senecio elegans: half-hardy, '1 ft., white, rose or purple; the various double forms are showy.
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  • Sphenogyne speciosa: half-hardy, i ft., orange-yellow, with black ring around the disk.
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  • Tropaeolum aduncum (Canary creeper): half-hardy, ro ft., yellow, fringed; an elegant climber.
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  • Dianthus chinensis (Indian Pink): half-hardy, I ft., various; flower earlier if treated as biennials; must be protected from frost.
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  • Noble half-hardy bulbs, for planting near the front wall of a hothouse or greenhouse; the soil must be deep, rich and well drained.
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  • Pot off tender annuals, and cuttings of half-hardy greenhouse plants put in during February to get them well established for use in the flower garden.
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  • Sow half-hardy annuals, as Nemophila, Collinsia, Schizanthus, Rhodanthe, &c., to flower during winter.
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  • Pot hyacinths, tulips and other bulbs for forcing; and propagate half-hardy plants by cuttings.
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  • Take up, dry and store dahlias and all tender tubers at the end of the month; pot lobelias and similar half-hardy plants from the open borders.
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  • Pelargoniums, pinks, monthly roses and all the half-hardy kinds of flowering plants should be planted early, but coleus, heliotrope and the more tender plants should be delayed until the end of the month.
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  • This is a half-hardy bulbous plant, producing in the spring a number of strap-shaped, dull green leaves, 1-12 ft.
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  • With the exception of the pastel colored varieties, all half hardy fuchsias flourish better outdoors through the summer.
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  • Aspect: full sun hardiness: Fully hardy to half hardy.
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  • In summer our displays of half hardy plants are quite overpowering.
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  • Penstemons originated on the North American prairies, so they come in half hardy and fully hardy varieties.
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  • For tropical plants the heat of a propagating house-75° to 80°, with a bottom heat of 80° to 90° - is desirable, and in many cases absolutely necessary; for others, such as half-hardy annuals, a mild hot bed, or a temperate pit ranging from 60° to 70°, is convenient; while of course all outdoor crops have to submit to the natural temperature of the season.
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  • There is no shortage of plants to choose from among hardy and half-hardy annuals or hardy and tender perennials.
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  • A. roseum is a pretty half-hardy annual from Western Australia, growing over 1 foot high with rosy-pink flowers, used as "ever-lasting" flowers.
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  • Arctotis - Showy half-hardy composites from the Cape, numbering between forty and fifty species, for the most part little known.
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  • Division. A. nitida is a Mexican half-hardy evergreen with shining green leaves and white flowers.
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  • It is among the prettiest of the half-hardy bedding plants, but is not so good on cold soils.
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  • An effective half-hardy plant for the summer; M. major having finely-cut, large, glaucous leaves contrasting effectively with the garden vegetation, and being of the easiest cultivation, it has become a favourite in sub-tropical gardening.
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  • They are naturally perennial, but in the open air must be treated as half-hardy annuals.
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  • S. elegans is easily grown as a half-hardy annual in rich light soil.
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  • Though mostly treated as a half-hardy annual, the roots are perennial in the warm soils of southern gardens, spreading by stolons into handsome tufts.
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  • It is a half-hardy annual, and requires rather careful treatment, as it is impatient of excessive moisture, especially in the early stages of its growth.
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  • Charming little Californian half-hardy annuals, generally known as Clintonia.
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  • E. bartonioides is a half-hardy annual of the Loasa family, from Mexico.
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  • Charming half-hardy annuals from Australia, valuable as border flowers and for winter bouquets.
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  • The half-hardy kinds are S. retusus (deep rose and orange flowers with crimson tips), Grahami (lilac and orange), and Hookeri (pale rose and yellow).
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  • If treated as half-hardy annuals, the seed should be sown in heat in spring, but if treated as biennials, the seed should be sown in August, the plants preserved in the greenhouse till May, and then planted out in rich, sandy loam.
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  • Purple Jacobaea (Senecio Elegans) - This beautiful half-hardy annual has long been a favourite in gardens.
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  • It succeeds well as a half-hardy annual, sown outdoors in April.
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  • H. Sandfordi is a pretty, bright yellow, half-hardy annual "everlasting," of dwarf, branched habit of growth.
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  • They are half-hardy annuals, and should be sown in early spring on warm borders or in frames, and afterwards planted out in good soil.
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  • Iresine - Dwarf half-hardy plants, remarkable for their foliage, and much misused in the flower garden.
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  • Isotoma - I. axillaris is a showy half-hardy plant, resembling some of the dwarfer Lobelias, its growth dense and compact, the flowers 1/2 inch across, star-shaped, and of a pale blue, continuing a long time, even till cut off by frosts.
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  • Should be treated as a half-hardy annual.
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  • Like many dwarf half-hardy plants, they have various uses in the flower garden, and may be trained as standards.
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  • L. Douglasi is a pretty half-hardy annual, about 1 foot high, and having large yellow flowers.
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  • Treated as half-hardy annuals, and grown in a light fertile soil, they are interesting for open borders; the climbing species, such as lateritia, require branches to twine among.
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  • The dwarf section of annual Lobelia is one of the most important, being much used among half-hardy plants.
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  • The plants may be treated as half-hardy annuals, raised from seed in a warm frame, potted on, and planted out in May.
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  • It is a half-hardy plant-hardy, perhaps, in favoured districts.
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  • N. physaloides is a pretty Peruvian half-hardy annual, about 2 feet high, of stout growth, bearing in summer numerous showy blue and white bell-like flowers, and thriving in an open position in light soil.
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  • Colensoi are also very pretty at Castlewellan and other gardens in districts with a climate allowing of the cultivation of the half-hardy evergreens.
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  • Polymnia grandis (Montagnaea Heracleifolia) - A half-hardy shrub with large, much divided, and elegantly-lobed leaves, about 3 feet long, presenting luxuriant masses of foliage.
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  • It may be treated either as a half-hardy annual, and sown in February or March under glass or in a hot-bed, but it requires a warmer climate than ours to do well.
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  • S. sinuata thrives in light, rich, sandy loam, and should be treated as a half-hardy annual.
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  • S. Walkeri is a curious cruciferous half-hardy annual from Chili, about 1 foot high, with slender stems, and numerous white almond-scented elegantly fringed blossoms.
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  • S. speciosa is a beautiful half-hardy Mexican annual Composite of slender, much-branched growth, about I foot high.
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  • In England it is of proved hardiness, though neglected since the advent of Californian and other half-hardy conifers.
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  • These are all worthy of culture, requiring the treatment of half-hardy annuals, and ordinary garden soil.
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  • Venidium - V. calendulaceum is a beautiful half-hardy plant of dwarf spreading growth, with in summer showy yellow Marigold-like blossoms, 2 inches across and good for cutting.
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  • V. encelioides is a half-hardy annual, 1 to 2 feet high, with broad clusters of golden-yellow blossoms.
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