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halévy

halévy Sentence Examples

  • Gifford Palgrave and Sir Lewis Pelly amongst Englishmen, and Karsten Niebuhr, John Lewis Burckhardt, Visconte, Joseph Halevy and others, amongst foreign travellers.

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  • Halevy (1909) and M.

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  • At the governmental institutions, Professors Oppert and Halevy helped further to train him.

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  • In his second and third systems (1895 and 1898),' and in his second alternative scheme of 1901 (see below), he abandoned this proposal and adopted a suggestion of Halevy that Dynasty III.

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  • Halevy and J.

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  • Halevy in Revue semitique, vol.

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  • Halevy in Nejran.

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  • Halevy, was able to carry out any Jauf and complete exploration there.

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  • p p g Halevy went north-eastward to El Madid, a town of 5000 inhabitants and the capital of the small district of Nihm; thence crossing a plateau, where he saw the ruins of numerous crenellated towers, he reached the village of Mijzar at the foot of J.

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  • Yam, on the borders of Jauf, a vast sandy plain, extending eastwards to El Jail and El Hazm, where Halevy made his most important discoveries of Sabaean inscriptions: here he explored Main, the ancient capital of the Minaeans, Kamna on the banks of the W.

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  • Kharid, the ancient Caminacum, and Kharibat el Beda, the Nesca of Pliny, where the Sabaean army was defeated by the Romans under Aelius Gallus in 24 B.C. From El Jail Halevy travelled northward, passing the oasis of Khab, and skirting the great desert, reached the fertile district of Nejran, where he found a colony of Jews, with whom he spent several weeks in the oasis of Makhlaf.

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  • officers of the Egyptian army in that district, and with that of Halevy, who makes all the drainage from Nejran northward run to the same great wadi.

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  • The water-parting between central and southern Arabia seems to be somewhere to the south of Nej ran, which, according to Halevy, drains northward to the W.

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  • Even in remote Nejran, Halevy, himself a Jew, found a considerable colony of his co-religionists.

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  • Stern, Wanderings among the Falashas in Abyssinia (London, 1862); Joseph Halevy, Travels in Abyssinia (trans.

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  • Many of these names are found on the inscriptions or in the Arabic geographers - Sheba (Saba'), Hazarmaveth (Hadramut), Abimael (Abime`athtar), Jobab (Yuhaibib, according to Halevy), Jerah (Warah of the geographers), Joktan (Arab Qahtan; wagata=gahata).

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  • Then Joseph Halevy made his remarkable journey through the Jauf, visiting districts and ruins which no European foot had trod since the expedition of Gallus, and returned with almost Boo inscriptions.

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  • Reinaud thought of the Seleucid era, which is not impossible; but Halevy observes that the fortress of Mawiyyat (now Hisn Ghorab) bears the date 640, and is said to have been erected " when the Abyssinians overran the country and destroyed the king of Himyar and his princes."

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  • 525), Halevy fixes 115 B.C. as the epoch of the Sabaean era.

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  • The only objections to Halevy's hypothesis are (I) that we know nothing of an epoch-making event in 115 B.C., and (2) that it is a little remarkable that the latest dated inscription, of the year 669 (A.D.

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  • (1864-1865); Halevy, Journ.

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  • Halevy's suggestion that we are to look towards the Hauran,.

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  • This non-Semitic system, which is found, in many instances, on alternate lines with a regular Semitic translation, in other cases in opposite columns to a Semitic rendering, and again without any Semitic equivalent at all, has been held by one school, founded and still vigorously defended by the distinguished French Assyriologist, Joseph Halevy, to be nothing more than a priestly system of cryptography based, of course, on the then current Semitic speech.

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  • On the other hand, grammatical and constructional examples may be cited from other more modern agglutinative idioms, in order to establish the truly linguistic character of the Sumerian peculiarities and to disprove the Halevyan contentions that Sumerian is really not a language at a11.4 It is not surprising that Halevy's view as to the cryptographic nature of Sumerian should have arisen.

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  • Facts of this character taken by themselves would perhaps be sufficient to convince most philologists that in Sumerian we have an arbitrarily compounded cryptography just as Halevy believes, but these facts cannot be taken by themselves, as the evidences of the purely linguistic basis of Sumerian are stronger than these apparent proofs of its artificial character.

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  • 503-505; Halevy, Journal asiatique (1874), 3rd series, vol.

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  • Compare also the material cited in the footnotes above, and note the correspondence between Briinnow and Halevy in the Revue semitique (1906).

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  • xiii.; Assyrian: Halevy, Melanges (1883); Jager, in Beitr.

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  • In 1869 Joseph Halevy brought back 1 See Berger's Histoire de l'ecriture dans l'antiquite, p. 252 ff.; Lidzbarski, Nordsemitische Epigraphik, p. 186 ff., from whom this summary is taken.

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  • The rock inscriptions in the wild district of Safah near Damascus which have been collected by Halevy are also written in an Arabic dialect, but, owing chiefly to their careless execution, they are to a large extent unintelligible.

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  • That the Book of Enoch was written in Semitic is now accepted on all hands, but scholars are divided as to whether the Semitic language in question was Hebrew or Aramaic. Only one valuable contribution on this question has been made, and that by Halevy in the Journal Asiatique, AvrilMai 186 7, pp. 35 2 -395.

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  • In support of the latter statement no evidence has yet been offered by these or any other scholars, nor yet has there been any attempt to meet the positive arguments of Halevy for a Hebrew original of xxxvii.-civ., whose Hebrew reconstructions of the text have been and must be adopted in many cases by every editor and translator of the book.

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  • Main, identified by Halevy as the seat of the former, is on a hilltop surrounded by walls still well preserved.

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  • It was the irrepressible upward tendency that caused the French government in 1859, acting with the advice of Halevy, Meyerbeer, Auber, Ambroise Thomas and Rossini, to establish by law the Diapason Normal.

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  • Many French Jews acquired fame, among them the ministers Cremieux (1796-1879), Fould, Gondchaux and Raynal; the archaeologists and philologians Oppert, Halevy, Munk, the Derenbourgs, Darmesteters and Reinachs; the musicians Halevy, Waldteufel and Meyerbeer; the authors and dramatists Catulle Mendes and A.

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  • Gifford Palgrave and Sir Lewis Pelly amongst Englishmen, and Karsten Niebuhr, John Lewis Burckhardt, Visconte, Joseph Halevy and others, amongst foreign travellers.

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  • Halevy (1909) and M.

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  • At the governmental institutions, Professors Oppert and Halevy helped further to train him.

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    0
  • In his second and third systems (1895 and 1898),' and in his second alternative scheme of 1901 (see below), he abandoned this proposal and adopted a suggestion of Halevy that Dynasty III.

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  • Halevy and J.

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  • Halevy in Revue semitique, vol.

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  • Halevy in Nejran.

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  • Halevy, was able to carry out any Jauf and complete exploration there.

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  • p p g Halevy went north-eastward to El Madid, a town of 5000 inhabitants and the capital of the small district of Nihm; thence crossing a plateau, where he saw the ruins of numerous crenellated towers, he reached the village of Mijzar at the foot of J.

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    0
  • Yam, on the borders of Jauf, a vast sandy plain, extending eastwards to El Jail and El Hazm, where Halevy made his most important discoveries of Sabaean inscriptions: here he explored Main, the ancient capital of the Minaeans, Kamna on the banks of the W.

    0
    0
  • Kharid, the ancient Caminacum, and Kharibat el Beda, the Nesca of Pliny, where the Sabaean army was defeated by the Romans under Aelius Gallus in 24 B.C. From El Jail Halevy travelled northward, passing the oasis of Khab, and skirting the great desert, reached the fertile district of Nejran, where he found a colony of Jews, with whom he spent several weeks in the oasis of Makhlaf.

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    0
  • officers of the Egyptian army in that district, and with that of Halevy, who makes all the drainage from Nejran northward run to the same great wadi.

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  • The water-parting between central and southern Arabia seems to be somewhere to the south of Nej ran, which, according to Halevy, drains northward to the W.

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  • Halevy in Nejran, Von Wrede in Hadramut, and Wellsted in Oman reached its edge, though none of them actually entered it, and the guides accompanying them all concurred in describing it as uninhabitable and uncrossed by any track.

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  • Even in remote Nejran, Halevy, himself a Jew, found a considerable colony of his co-religionists.

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  • The ruins of the city of Ma'rib, the old Sabaean capital, have been visited by Arnaud, Halevy and Glaser, but call for further description, as Arnaud confined himself to a description of the dike (see below), while Halevy and Glaser were interested chiefly in the inscriptions.

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  • Stern, Wanderings among the Falashas in Abyssinia (London, 1862); Joseph Halevy, Travels in Abyssinia (trans.

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  • Many of these names are found on the inscriptions or in the Arabic geographers - Sheba (Saba'), Hazarmaveth (Hadramut), Abimael (Abime`athtar), Jobab (Yuhaibib, according to Halevy), Jerah (Warah of the geographers), Joktan (Arab Qahtan; wagata=gahata).

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  • Then Joseph Halevy made his remarkable journey through the Jauf, visiting districts and ruins which no European foot had trod since the expedition of Gallus, and returned with almost Boo inscriptions.

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  • Reinaud thought of the Seleucid era, which is not impossible; but Halevy observes that the fortress of Mawiyyat (now Hisn Ghorab) bears the date 640, and is said to have been erected " when the Abyssinians overran the country and destroyed the king of Himyar and his princes."

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  • 525), Halevy fixes 115 B.C. as the epoch of the Sabaean era.

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  • The only objections to Halevy's hypothesis are (I) that we know nothing of an epoch-making event in 115 B.C., and (2) that it is a little remarkable that the latest dated inscription, of the year 669 (A.D.

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  • (1864-1865); Halevy, Journ.

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  • Halevy, Ecole pratique des hautes etudes (1905), pp. 52 4, and the Chinese parallel in the Mittheilungen of the Berlin Seminar for Oriental Languages (1904), vii.

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  • Halevy's suggestion that we are to look towards the Hauran,.

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  • This non-Semitic system, which is found, in many instances, on alternate lines with a regular Semitic translation, in other cases in opposite columns to a Semitic rendering, and again without any Semitic equivalent at all, has been held by one school, founded and still vigorously defended by the distinguished French Assyriologist, Joseph Halevy, to be nothing more than a priestly system of cryptography based, of course, on the then current Semitic speech.

    0
    0
  • On the other hand, grammatical and constructional examples may be cited from other more modern agglutinative idioms, in order to establish the truly linguistic character of the Sumerian peculiarities and to disprove the Halevyan contentions that Sumerian is really not a language at a11.4 It is not surprising that Halevy's view as to the cryptographic nature of Sumerian should have arisen.

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  • In these instances, however, we can explain the difficulty away by applying that great fundamental principle followed by the Semitic priests and scribes who played with and on the Sumerian idiom, and in the course of many centuries turned what was originally an agglutinative language into what has almost justified Halevy and his followers in calling Sumerian a cryptography.

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  • Facts of this character taken by themselves would perhaps be sufficient to convince most philologists that in Sumerian we have an arbitrarily compounded cryptography just as Halevy believes, but these facts cannot be taken by themselves, as the evidences of the purely linguistic basis of Sumerian are stronger than these apparent proofs of its artificial character.

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  • 503-505; Halevy, Journal asiatique (1874), 3rd series, vol.

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  • Compare also the material cited in the footnotes above, and note the correspondence between Briinnow and Halevy in the Revue semitique (1906).

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  • xiii.; Assyrian: Halevy, Melanges (1883); Jager, in Beitr.

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  • In 1869 Joseph Halevy brought back 1 See Berger's Histoire de l'ecriture dans l'antiquite, p. 252 ff.; Lidzbarski, Nordsemitische Epigraphik, p. 186 ff., from whom this summary is taken.

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  • The rock inscriptions in the wild district of Safah near Damascus which have been collected by Halevy are also written in an Arabic dialect, but, owing chiefly to their careless execution, they are to a large extent unintelligible.

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  • That the Book of Enoch was written in Semitic is now accepted on all hands, but scholars are divided as to whether the Semitic language in question was Hebrew or Aramaic. Only one valuable contribution on this question has been made, and that by Halevy in the Journal Asiatique, AvrilMai 186 7, pp. 35 2 -395.

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  • In support of the latter statement no evidence has yet been offered by these or any other scholars, nor yet has there been any attempt to meet the positive arguments of Halevy for a Hebrew original of xxxvii.-civ., whose Hebrew reconstructions of the text have been and must be adopted in many cases by every editor and translator of the book.

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  • Main, identified by Halevy as the seat of the former, is on a hilltop surrounded by walls still well preserved.

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