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hairs

hairs Sentence Examples

  • epiphytic plants and desert plants) have absorptive hairs or scales on the leaf epidermis through which rain and dew can be absorbed.

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  • The maxillae are not piercing organs, and their function is to protect the mandibles and labrum and separate the hairs or feathers of the host.

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  • As the powers of the telescope were gradually developed, it was found that the finest hairs or filaments of silk, or the thinnest silver wires that could be drawn, were much too thick for the refined purposes of the astronomer, as p p they entirely obliterated the image of a star in the more powerful telescopes.

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  • The hairs on the back of his neck rose as she stopped in front of one and pushed the door open.

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  • I hope it will not occur to her to count the hairs of her head.

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  • Tail longer than the body and head, scantily clothed with short hairs, prehensile.

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  • Dark hairs were already showing on his upper lip, and his whole face expressed impetuosity and enthusiasm.

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  • He brushed stray hairs from her face and replaced his hand on her stomach.

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  • But hairs have a variety of other functions.

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  • A bee, we will assume, attracted by the colour and perfume of the flower, alights on that part of it which is the first to attract its attention - the lip. There, guided by the hairs or ridges before-mentioned, it is led to the orifice of the spur with its store of honeyed juice.

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  • Fred began to pick cat hairs from his blue suit.

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  • The root hairs grow out from the cells of the piliferous layer immediately behind the elongating tegion.

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  • The water of the soil, which in well-drained soil is met with in the form of delicate films surrounding the particles of solid matter, is absorbed into the plant by the delicate hairs borne by the young roots, the entry being effected by a process of modified osmosis.

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  • His chest was wide and sprinkled with dark hairs that trailed his ridged belly and disappeared into the dark pants.

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  • To run her hands over the washboard abs or twirl her fingertips through the tight hairs dusting his chest …Or better yet, to feel his large hands and muscular body against hers ...

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  • I think it's great being active even after you've got a few grey hairs.

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  • Looking back, she couldn't help but think they were being followed.  The sense was unlike any other: the hairs on the back of her neck stood up, and someone's warm breath brushed the back of one ear.  She saw nothing other than the trees in the dark and started forward again.

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  • From the same stock may be derived the Abyssinian breed, in which the ears are relatively large and occasionally tipped with long hairs (thus recalling the tufted ears of the jungle-cat).

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  • Tail long, clothed with long hairs.

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  • Tail rather short, clothed with short depressed hairs.

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  • Tail long, its apical half-clothed on the dorsal surface with long hairs.

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  • Tail not quite so long as the body, and covered with short hairs.

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  • The oval leaves are dark-green above, and whitish with stellate hairs beneath, the margin entire and slightly recurved.

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  • p, Pistillate, s, staminate flowers; h, sterile flowers forming a circlet of stiff hairs closing the mouth of the chamber formed by the lower part of the spathe.

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  • Other hairs consist of a chain of cells; others, again, are branched in various ways; while yet others have the form of a flat plate of cells placed parallel to the leaf surface and inserted on a stalk.

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  • The cells of hairs may have living contents or they may simply contain air.

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  • A very common function of hairs is to diminish transpiration, by creating a still atmosphere between them, as in the case of the sunk stomata already mentioned.

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  • In one type they may take the form of specially-modified single epidermal cells or multicellular hairs without any direct connection with the vascular system.

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  • Multitudes of such hairs on the branches of the roots cause the entry of great quantities of water, which by a subsequent similar osmotic action accumulates in the cortex of the roots.

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  • One of these hairs can be seen to be penetrated at a particular spot, and the entering body is then found to grow along the length of the hair till it reaches the cortex of the root.

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  • Six sensitive hairs spring from the upper surface of the lobes, three from each; when one of these is touched the two lobes rapidly close, bringing their upper surfaces into contact and imprisoning anything which for the moment is between them.

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  • Among the simplest examples of the former are the hairs which follow the irritation of the cells by mites.

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  • These hairs often occur in tufts, and are so colored and arranged that they were long taken for Fungi and placed in the genus Erineum.

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  • The cells of the staminal hairs of Tradescantia air ginica contain a large sap-cavity across which run, in.

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  • These occur on the tips of tendrils and on the tentacles of Drosera; (2) sensitive papillae found on the irritable filaments of certain stamens; and (3) sensitive hairs or bristles on the leaves of Dionaea muscipula and Mimosa pudicaall of which are so constructed that any pressure exerted on them at once reacts on the protoplasm.

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  • Cuculus canorus and trogons, is often lined with the broken-off hairs of these caterpillars, which, penetrating the cuticle, assume a regular spiral arrangement, due to the rotatory motion of the muscles of the gizzard.

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  • Clinging to her hairs they are carried to the nest, where they bore into the body of a bee or wasp larva, and after a moult become soft-skinned legless maggots.

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  • long, and have pale-yellow anthers, bearing tufts of hairs at the apex; the female attain a length in the fruiting stage of 2 to 4 in., with bracts i to 12 in.

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  • The wings, which are not capable of being folded, are usually transparent, but occasionally pigmented and adorned with coloured spots, blotches or bands; the wing-membrane, though sometimes clothed with minute hairs, seldom bears scales; the wing-veins, which are of great importance in the classification of Diptera, are usually few in number and chiefly longitudinal, there being a marked paucity of cross-veins.

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  • In addition there is in this particular genus, as indeed in many others, a long tubular spur or horn projecting downwards from the back of the lip, whose office it is to secrete and store a honeyed juice; the forepart of the lip forms an expanded plate, usually larger and more brightly coloured than the other parts of the flower, and with hairs or ridges and spots of various kinds according to the species.

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  • The seeds are minute and innumerable; they contain a small rudimentary embryo surrounded by a thin loose membraneous coat, and are scattered by means of hygroscopic hairs on the inside of the valves which by their movements jerk out the seeds.

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  • t, Tactile hairs springing from surface of body.

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  • In Tibet a lama (priest) is called in to cut off some hairs from the head of a dying person, in order that his soul may escape through the top of his head, which is deemed an essential condition of a good transmigration (Horace de la Penna, in Bogle and Manning's Travels in Tibet, ed.

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  • usually present on the thighs, shins and feet so delicate as to be termed " hairs," others After Miall and Denny, The Cockroach, Lovell Reeve & Co.

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  • These later stages, comprising the greater part of the larval history, are adapted for an inquiline or a parasitic life, where shelter is assured and food abundant, while the short-lived, active condition enables the newly-hatched insect to make its way to the spot favourable for its future development, clinging, for example, in the case of an oil-beetle's larva, to the hairs of a bee as she flies towards her nest.

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  • GUEREZA, the native name of a long-tailed, black and white Abyssinian monkey, Colobus guereza (or C. abyssinicus), characterized by the white hairs forming a long pendent mantle.

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  • qutun), the most important of the vegetable fibres of the world, consisting of unicellular hairs which occur attached to the seeds of various species of plants of the genus Gossypium, belonging to the Mallow order (Malvaceae).

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  • Microscopic examination of a specimen of mature cotton shows that the hairs are flattened and twisted, resembling somewhat in general appearance an empty and twisted fire hose.

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  • The chief of these silk cottons is kapok, consisting of the hairs borne on the interior of the pods (but not attached to the seeds) of Eriodendron anfractuosum, the silk cotton tree, a member of the Bombacaceae, an order very closely allied to the Malvaceae.

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  • Of the two Italian botanists who in comparatively recent years have monographed the group, Parlatore (Le Specie dei cotoni, 1866) recognizes seven species, whilst Todaro (Relazione sulla culta dei cotoni, 18 7718 78) describes over fifty species: many of these, however, are of but little economic importance, and, in spite of the difficulties mentioned above, it i s possible for practical purposes to divide the commercially important plants into five species, placing these in two groups according to the character of the hairs borne on the seeds.

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  • There remains one other important group, the so-called " kidney " cottons in which there are only long hairs, and the seed easily comes away clean as with " Sea Island," but, instead of each seed being separate, the whole group in each of the three compartments of the capsule is firmly united together in a more or less kidney-shaped mass.

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  • Seeds covered with long hairs only, flowers yellow, turning to red.

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  • Seeds covered with long and short hairs.

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  • It yields the most valuable of all cottons, the hairs being long, fine and silky, and ranging in length from to 22 in.

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  • It is usually regarded as the standard Egyptian cotton; the lint is yellowish brown, the seeds black and almost smooth, usually with a little tuft of short green hairs at the ends.

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  • A, Part of seed-coat with hairs B,, insertion and lower part; B2 middle part; and Bar upper part of a hair (X300).

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  • Small tufts of tactile hairs or papillae are sometimes observed in small number at the tip of the head; sometimes longer hairs, apparently rather stiff, are seen on the surface, very sparingly distributed between the cilia, and hitherto only in a very limited number of small specimens.

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  • The English setter should have a silky coat with the hair waved but not curly; the legs and toes should be hairy, and the tail should have a bushy fringe of hairs hanging down from the dorsal border.

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  • It results from this that the horn has the appearance of a mass of agglutinated hairs, which, in the newly growing part at the base, readily fray out on destruction of the softer intermediate substance; but the fibres differ from true hairs in growing from a free papilla of the derm, and not within a follicular involution of the same.

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  • The nectarine is a variation from the peach, mainly characterized by the circumstance that, while the skin of the ripe fruit is downy in the peach, it is shining and destitute of hairs in the nectarine.

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  • Some are black, very thin and curved like threads or hairs (trichites); often a group of these is seated on a small crystal of augite or magnetite and spreads outwards on all sides.

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  • It is known as the silk rubber tree, probably on account of the silky hairs which are attached to the seeds.

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  • Large metallic surfaces (especially external surfaces) are sometimes plated by means of a "doctor," which, in its simplest form, is a brush constantly wetted with the electrolyte, with a wire anode buried amid the hairs or bristles; this brush is painted slowly over the surface of the metal to be coated, which must be connected to the negative terminal of the electrical generator.

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  • Scattered hairs cover the body.

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  • In it the hairs are confined to the dorsal middle line and the creeping setae are hooked, of a finer structure than in Chaetosoma, and situated so far forward that the vagina opens amongst them.

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  • This lies in the anterior part of a groove fringed with hairs on the inferior petal.

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  • XIl the free surfaces of the adjacent lamellae being --- covered with a very delicate chitinous cuticle ?,' Xlll which is drawn out into delicate hairs and .

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  • The eggs, laid on the hairs, and known as "nits," hatch in about eight days, and the lice are full grown in about a month.

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  • The irritation is caused by the rostrum of the insect being inserted into the skin, from which the blood is rapidly pumped up. A third human louse, known as the crab-louse (Phthirius pubis) is found amongst the hairs on other parts of the body, particularly those of the pubic region, but probably never on the head.

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  • The tail is cylindrical, with some bushy elongation of the hairs near the end, but not forming a distinct tuft.

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  • The whole of the green parts of the plant are covered with long soft hairs which exude a viscid juice, giving the surface a moist glutinous feeling.

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  • The hairs are multicellular, and of two kinds, one branching and ending in a fine point, while the other, unbranched, terminates in a clump of small cells.

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  • (2) The presence of variously formed scales on the body and its appendages: the head is clothed with scales, the thorax with hairs or scales, and the abdomen with either hairs or scales, or both; the legs and veins of the wings are always covered with scales, and the palpi are often (as in some Anophelinae) conspicuously scaly.

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  • It is regarded as a modified zooecium, the polypide of which has become vestigial, although it is commonly represented by a sense-organ, bearing tactile hairs, situated on what may be termed the palate.

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  • The fur is short, dense and rather soft to the touch, and composed of an extremely fine and close under-fur, and of longer hairs which project beyond this, each of which is very slender at the base, and expanded, flattened and glossy towards the free end.

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  • The tail is short, broad and depressed, and covered with coarse hairs, which in old animals generally become worn off from the under (From Gould's Mammals of Australia.) Platypus.

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  • flowers forming a ring of hairs 4.

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  • The mouth of this chamber is protected by a ring of hairs pointing downwards, which allow the entrance but prevent the escape of small flies; after fertilization of the pistils the hairs wither.

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  • The general ` brown' has a greyish cast, as far as the under fur is concerned, and is overlaid with rich lustrous blackish-brown in places where the long bristly hairs prevail.

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  • The tail occasionally shows interspersed white hairs, or a white tip."

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  • When ripe the two carpels separate in the form of two valves and liberate a large number of seeds, each provided at the base with a tuft of silky hairs, and containing a straight embryo without any investing albumen.

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  • The tuft of hairs at the base facilitates rapid dispersion of the seed, early germination of which is rendered desirable owing to its tenuity.

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  • They are dwarf, ribbed, globose or cylindrical plants; and the flowers, which are produced from the side instead of the apex of the stem, are large, and in some cases very beautiful, being remarkable for the length of the tube, which is more or less covered with bristly hairs.

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  • The bees which make up this group agree with the Sphecoidea in the short pronotum, but may be distinguished from all other Hymenoptera by the widened first tarsal segment and the plumose hairs on head and body.

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  • They are covered with short hairs which form a velvet-like pile, so dense that water cannot penetrate.

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  • The Notonectidae breathe mostly through the thoracic spiracles; the air is conveyed to these from the tail-end, which is brought to the surface, along a kind of tunnel formed by overlapping hairs.

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  • The gall is cup-shaped, and its outer surface is crumpled and covered with small warts and hairs.

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  • In Hippotragus the stout and thickly ringed horns rise vertically from a ridge above the eyes at an obtuse angle to the plane of the lower part of the face, and then sweep backwards in a bold curve; while there are tufts of long white hairs near the eyes.

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  • The South African springbuck (Antidorcas euchore) is nearly related to the gazelles, from which it is distinguished by the presence on the middle line of the loins of an evertible pouch, lined with long white hairs capable of erection.

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  • In the duikers themselves the single pair of horns is set in the midst of a tuft of long hairs, and the face-gland opens in a long naked line on the side of the face above the muzzle.

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  • palustris, is a perennial plant growing to a height of 6 to 18 in., with rootstock creeping, stem clothed with lax spreading hairs, leaves light green, and somewhat shining, buds pink, becoming blue as they expand, and corolla rotate, broad, with retuse lobes and bright blue with a yellow centre.

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  • As is the case with other water-bugs, this insect is predaceous and feeds upon aquatic grubs or worms. The body is richly supplied with long hairs, which serve to entangle bubbles of air for purposes of respiration.

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  • captured are absorbed into the plant by star-shaped hairs which line the interior of the bladder.

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  • The polar or white bear (Ursus maritimus), common to the Arctic regions of both hemispheres, is distinguished from the other species by having the soles of the feet covered with close-set hairs, - in adaptation to the wants of the creature, the bear being thereby enabled to walk securely on slippery ice.

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  • A second species, or race, Theropithecus obscures, distinguished by its darker hairs and the presence of a bare flesh-coloured ring round each eye, inhabits the eastern confines of Abyssinia.

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  • Bassett, 3 is the petiole, and its terminal tuft of woolly hairs the enormously developed pubescence of the young oak-leaf.

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  • Of the Ceylonese galls, " some are as symmetrical as a composite flower when in bud, others smooth and spherical like a berry; some protected by long spines, others clothed with yellow wool formed of long cellular hairs, others with regularly tufted hairs."

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  • The dipterous gall-formers include the gall-midges, or gallgnats (Cecidomyidae), minute slender-bodied insects, with bodies usually covered with long hairs, and the wings folded over the back.

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  • Mite-galls, or acarocecidia, are abnormal growths of the leaves of plants, produced by microscopic Acaridea of the genus Phytoptus (gall-mites), and consist of little tufts of hairs, or of thickened portions of the leaves, usually most hypertrophied on the upper surface, so that the lower is drawn up into the interior, producing a bursiform cavity.

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  • At a subsequent confederation, held at Lublin in June, Zebrzydowski was reinforced by another great nobleman, Stanislaus Stadnicki, called the Devil, who "had more crimes on his conscience than hairs on his head," and was in the habit of cropping the ears and noses of small squires and chaining his serfs to the walls of his underground dungeons for months at a time.

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  • They are all stout, heavily-built animals, with blunt rounded heads, fleshy mobile snouts, and coats of thick cylindrical or flattened spines, which form the whole covering of their body, and are not intermingled with ordinary hairs.

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  • The spines are mixed with long soft hairs.

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  • They include three genera, of which the first is represented by the Canadian porcupine (Erethizon dorsatus), a stout, heavily-built animal, with long hairs almost or quite hiding its spines, four frontand five hind-toes, and a short, stumpy tail.

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  • They are of a lighter build than the ground-porcupines, with short, close, many-coloured spines, often mixed with hairs, and prehensile tails.

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  • Flowers with nectar concealed by pouches, hairs, &c. Regular flowers predominate, e.g.

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  • On either side is attached a dorsolateral and ventro-lateral appendage, each with a fan-like plumose termination consisting of compound hairs or setae, found elsewhere only among arthropods (q.v.); each of these is moved by muscles running upwards towards the neck and arising immediately under the trochal disk, the inferior ventro-lateral pair also presenting muscles which form a girdle in the hind region of the body.

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  • It bears a group of long setose hairs the bases of which are connected with the nerve fibre.

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  • cristatus, distinguished by the more pronounced development of the crest of long hairs on the nape of the neck, and closely related to the next species.

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  • The skin is clothed with a thick coat of coarse black hair of a bristly nature, but there are a few whitish hairs on the face and in the groin.

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  • Along the middle of the hinder half of the back is a line of long erectile white hairs, forming the "fan," continued down over the rump; in repose this is concealed by the surrounding hair, but is conspicuously displayed when the animal takes the great leaps from which it derives its popular name.

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  • The liquid which exudes from the glandular hairs clothing the leaves and stems of the plant, more especially during the cold season when the seeds ripen, contains a notable proportion of oxalic acid.

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  • avellanarius, the common dormouse, distinguished by the cylindrical bushy tail, and thickened glandular walls of the cardiac extremity of the oesophagus; thirdly, Eliomys, containing several species, with tufted and doubly vaned tails, simple stomachs and smaller molar teeth, having concave crowns and faintly marked enamel-folds; and lastly, the African Graphiurus, represented by several species, with short cylindrical tails ending in a pencil of hairs, and very small molars almost without trace of enamel-folds.

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  • They hay e large heads, projecting incisors, no ears, almost functionless eyes and moderately long tails; the skin, with the exception of a few hairs on the body and frinr-es on the feet, being naked.

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  • soles of the feet are densely clothed with hairs FIG.

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  • The plants are mostly herbs, rarely becoming shrubby, with generally simple glandular hairs on the stem and leaves.

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  • 1); in Erodium and Pelargonium each coccus remains closed, and the long twisted upper portion separates from the central column, forming an awn, the distribution of which is favoured by the presence of bristles or hairs.

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  • Externally the most striking feature of the bird is its head, armed with a powerful beak that it well knows how to use, and its face clothed with hairs and elongated feathers that sufficiently resemble the physiognomy of an owl to justify the generic name bestowed upon it.

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  • In the case of the Norway hare, it has been stated that a general moult, including all the hairs and under fur, takes place and new white hairs are substituted.

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  • On the other hand, it has been stated that during the whole of the transformation in the fur no hairs fall from the animal, and it is attributed to an actual change in the colour of the hair (Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, vol.

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  • In this animal the long hairs (which form the pile) become white at their extremities, and in some of them this whiteness extends through their whole length.

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  • At the same time, new hairs begin to develop and to grow rapidly, and soon outstrip the hairs of the autumn pile.

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  • From their first ap p earance these new hairs are white and stiff, and they are confined to the sides and back of the body.

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  • It is not clear from Welch's account what is the cause of the whiteness of the tips of the hairs of the autumn coat, but his figures suggest that it is due to the development of gas in the interspaces between the keratin bridges and trabeculae of the hairs.

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  • The colour of this substance is that of the pigment in the skin or hairs of the animal used.

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  • Given the presence of all the necessary determinants for the development of pigment in a mammal's coat, some or all of the hairs may bear this pigment according to the pattern determinants, or absence of pattern determinants, which the cells of the hair papillae carry.

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  • And this brings us to the question as to whether in a piebald animal the pigmented hairs are in any way different from the pigmentless or white hairs.

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  • Haacke has described a single albino rat, in which he states that the hairs of the shoulder and mid-dorsal regions were of a different texture from those of the rest of the body.

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  • The hairs which occupy the region which in the pigmented individual is black, are longer, thinner and more widely separated than those in the regions which are white.

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  • As a result of this, the pink skin is quite visible where these hairs occur, but elsewhere it is invisible.

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  • Moreover, some of the albinoes possess these particular "pattern" hairs all over the body and obviously such individuals are carrying the self pattern.

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  • And with certain cutaneous diseases accompanied by constitutional disturbances which afflict cattle, the affection in the skin appears on the patches bearing white hairs, the other parts remaining apparently healthy.

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  • In the Hemipterous group of the Rhynchota ant-mimicry is illustrated by the larva of a British species of Reduviidae (Nabis lativentris) in which the forepart of the abdomen is furnished on each side with a patch of white hairs leaving a central narrow dark portion in imitation of the waist of the ant; and also by an East African species (Myrmoplasta mira) which in its general form exhibits a close resemblance to an ant (Polyrrhacis gagates) which occurs in the same neighbourhood.

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  • This forcibly suggests that the drone-fly mimics a honey-bee not only in appearance but also in the feel of its hairs or the nature of its buzz.

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  • In the majority of ant-imitating spiders the forepart of the cephalothorax is constricted on each side to resemble the neck of the insect, and in many cases the similarity is increased by the presence of a stripe of white hairs which has the optical effect of cutting out an extra piece of integument, exactly as occurs in analogous cases in insects.

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  • Narrowing of the posterior portions of the spider's cephalothorax and sometimes of the anterior end of the abdomen reproduces the slender waist of the ant, and frequently transverse bands of hairs represent the segmentation of this region in the insect.

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  • The surface of the thallus often exhibits outgrowths in the form of warts, hairs, &c. The medullary layer, which usually forms the main part of the thallus, is distinguished from the cortical layer by its looser consistence and the presence in it of numerous, large, air-containing spaces.

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  • Verbascum Blattaria: hardy, 3 to 4 ft., yellowish, with purple hairs on the filaments; in tall spikes.

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  • The receptacle ends above in appendages, each consisting of one or a few cells, some of which are the male organs, others the female organs, and others again may be barren hairs.

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  • seals, otters, beavers, nutrias and musquash, the beauty of which is not seen until after the stiff water or top hairs are pulled out or otherwise removed.

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  • Some Russian sables are of a very dense bluish brown almost a black, which is the origin undoubtedly of the term "sables," while some, from one district in particular, have a quantity of silver hairs, evenly interspersed in the fur, a peculiarity which has nothing to do with age.

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  • The best sea otters have very dark coats which are highly esteemed, a few with silver hairs in parts; where these are equally and evenly spread the skins are very valuable.

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  • American sorts have coarse thick underwool of a pale fawn or stone colour with a growth of longer black and white hairs, 3 or 4 in.

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  • Where the best coloured skins are not used for carriage rugs they are extensively dyed, and badger and other white hairs are inserted to resemble silver fox.

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  • Many Mongolian goats with the long hairs pulled out are sold as mouflon.

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  • Unlike other aquatic animals the skin undergoes no process of unhairing, the fur being of a rich dense silky wool with the softest and shortest of water hairs.

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  • The colours vary from pale grey brown to a rich black, and many have even or uneven sprinkling of white or silvery-white hairs.

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  • deep, pale brown, with long top hairs of a dark and silvery-grey mixture of a grizzly type, the best having a bluish tone and the cheapest a yellowish or reddish-brown.

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  • The most valuable are the darkest from Yakutsk in Siberia, particularly those that have silvery hairs evenly distributed over the skin.

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  • The Amur skins are paler, but often of a pretty bluish stony tone with many frequently interspersed silvery hairs.

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  • In the case of seal and beaver skins the process is a much more difficult one, as the water or hard top hairs have to be removed by hand after the pelt has been carefully rendered moist and warm.

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  • Subsequently the hard top hairs are taken out as in the case of otters and beavers and the whole thoroughly cleaned in the revolving drums. The close underwool, which is of a slightly wavy nature and mostly of a pale drab colour, is then dyed by repeated applications of a rich dark brown colour, one coat after another, each being allowed to thoroughly dry before the next is put on, till the effect is almost a lustrous black on the top. The whole is again put through the cleaning process and evenly reduced in thickness by revolving emery wheels, and eventually finished off in the palest buff colour.

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  • In Paris, too, they obtain beautiful results in the "topping" or colouring Russian sables and the Germans are particularly successful in dyeing Persian lambs black and foxes in all blue, grey, black and smoke colours and in the insertion of white hairs in imitation of the real silver fox.

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  • Small quantities of good beaver are dyed in Russia occasionally, and white hairs put in so well that an effect similar to sea otter is obtained.

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  • The process of inserting white hairs is called in the trade "pointing," and is either done by stitching them in with a needle or by adhesive caoutchouc.

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  • The opportunities for cheating in the fur trade are very considerable, and most serious frauds have been perpetrated in the selling of sables that have been coloured or "topped"; that is, just the tips of the hairs stained dark to represent more expensive skins.

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  • Nutria also is prepared to represent sealskin, and in its natural colour, after the long hairs are plucked out, it is sold as otter or beaver.

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  • Sold as White hairs inserted in foxes and sables Sold as real or natural furs.

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  • Otter, with its water hairs removed, the strongest of furs for external use, is, in this table, taken as the standard at too and other furs marked accordingly: The Precious Furs.

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  • Otter with the water hairs removed, the strongest fur suited for linings, is here taken as the standard.

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  • Otter with the water hairs, the strongest fur suited for motoring garments, is taken as the standard.

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  • The diagonal telescope nn is provided with cross hairs, and is used fcr the final centring of the instrument over an object.

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  • In the best telescopes, whether for theodolite or level, the diaphragm on which the image is formed is made of glass, and the cross hairs are engraved thereon.

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  • There is also a tuft of elongated hairs at the end of the tail, one upon each elbow, and in most lions a copious fringe along the middle line of the under surface of the body, wanting, however, in some examples.

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  • This mosque is specially sacred as possessing what are said to be three hairs of the Prophet's beard, buried with the saint, who was one of the companions of Mahomet.

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  • 2, ei) that stomata, st, are produced, and it is there also that hairs, p, usually occur.

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  • Hairs.

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  • The under side of the young leaf is densely covered with fine one-celled thick-walled hairs, about i mm.

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  • These hairs entirely disappear with increasing age.

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  • When placed on the stigma, under favourable circumstances, the pollen-grain puts forth a pollen-tube which grows down the tissue of the style to the ovary, and makes its way along the placenta, guided by projections or hairs, to the mouth of an ovule.

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  • The pelage consists of a dense, soft, matted under fur, mixed with long, stiff, lustrous hairs on all parts of the body and tail.

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  • The gloss is greatest on the upper parts; on the tail the bristly hairs predominate.

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  • Biologie der Algen, by permission of Gustav Fischer.) Dermatophyton grows on the carapace of the tortoise and Trichophilus nucleus, each cell is found to contain many small nuclei, and is in the hairs of the sloth.

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  • The branches end in fine hairs in Chaetointervals.

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  • In Desmarestia and Arthrocladia, for example, it is found that the thallus ends in a tuft of such hairs, each of them growing by means of an intercalated growing point.

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  • In these cases, however, the portions of the hairs behind the growing region become agglutinated together into a solid cylindrical pseudo-parenchymatous axis.

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  • Besides the differentiation into holdfast and shoot, and into branches of limited and branches of unlimited growth, there appear superficial structures of the nature of hairs.

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  • The summits of the hind pair are surmounted by bristly hairs.

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  • The sheaths are akin to hair in structure, thus suggesting affinity with the hairs surmounting the giraffe's horns.

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  • Shakespeare introduces Siward and his son, whom he calls young Siward, into the tragedy of Macbeth, and represents the old man as saying when he heard that his son's wounds were in front, "Had I as many sons as I have hairs, I would not wish them to a fairer death."

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  • The simplest of such repeated elements are the cells of the tissues, more complex are cell-aggregates, from hairs, scales, teeth and the like, up to limbs or metameres in animals, or the .00 '00 leaves and their homologues in plants.

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  • The very sparrows are God's care - much more shall they be; the hairs of their head are all counted.

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  • Along this surface stretches a groove which is surrounded by thickened cuticle and practically formed into a tube by numerous fine hairs.

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  • W, wax-yielding surface, covering true gland; s, septem, or carina; wh, webbed hairs.

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  • The Indian wolf has a dingy reddish-white fur, some of the hairs being tipped with black.

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  • The colour is a slaty black; the hide is immensely thick, with scanty hairs.

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  • In preparing this for the market it is usually spread out on the leaves of the pepper plant in order to free it from the hairs that have become detached from the pouch.

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  • A prodigiously long tail, beetling eyebrows with long black hairs, black ears, face, feet and hands, and a general greyish-brown colour of the fur are the distinctive characteristics of the langur.

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  • In the variety C. purpurea, the leaves, as also the pellicle of the kernel and the husk of the nut, are purple, and in C. heterophylla they are thickly clothed with hairs.

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  • " Truth, " as Malebranche quaintly says, " always has a few hairs on her chin "; and the conclusions of sound learning must needs be slow, fragmentary and tentative.

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  • his head and hairs white like wool, as white as snow; and his eyes as a flame of fire " (Rev. i.

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  • In cultivation the potato varies very greatly not only as to the season of its growth but also as to productiveness, the vigour and luxuriance of its foliage, the presence or relative absence of hairs, the form of the leaves, the size and colour of the flowers, &c. The tubers vary greatly in size, form and colour; gardeners divide them into rounded forms and long forms or "kidneys," and there are of course varieties intermediate in form.

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  • One is shown more highly magnified (400 diameters) at F; the contained protoplasm breaks up into a definite number of parts as at G, forming eight minute mobile bodies called "zoospores," each zoospore being furnished with two extremely attentuated vibrating hairs termed "cilia," as shown at H.

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  • The beak is hard, strong and deeply notched, the nostrils are prominent, and the gape is furnished with twelve long hairs on each side.

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  • Thus, when acting as swimming organs, the appendages, or their rami, are more or less flattened, or oar-like, and often have the margins fringed with long plumose hairs.

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  • In the great majority of Crustacea the antennules are purely sensory in function and carry numerous " olfactory " hairs.

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  • In a few Entomostraca (some Phyllopoda and Ostracoda) the chitinous lining of the fore-gut develops spines and hairs which help to triturate and strain the food, and among the Ostracods there is occasionally (Bairdia) a more elaborate armature of toothed plates moved by muscles.

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  • The walls of the pyloric chamber bear a series of pads and ridges beset with hairs and so disposed as to form a straining apparatus.

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  • As in Arthropoda, the hairs or setae on the surface of the body are important organs of sense and are variously modified for special sensory functions.

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  • Of the approximate size of an English mastiff, this powerful baboon is blackish grey in colour with a tinge of green due to the yellow rings on most of the hairs.

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  • The hairs on the body are long, especially on the ridge of the neck and back, where they form a distinct mane, which is continued along the tail.

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  • 2), a rootless plant, which hangs in long grey lichen-like festoons from the branches of trees, a native of Mexico and the southern United States; the water required for food is absorbed from the moisture in the air by peculiar hairs which cover the (From The Botanical Magazine, by permission of Lovell, Reeve & Co.) FIG.

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  • Peculiar hairs are developed on the inner surface of the sheath by which the water and dissolved substances are absorbed, thus helping to feed the plant.

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  • All this time the growing antler is invested with a skin clothed with exceedingly fine short hairs, and is most liberally supplied with blood-vessels; this sensitive skin being called the velvet.

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  • The most distinctive feature of the deer of this group is, however, the patch of long erectile white hairs on the buttocks, which, although inconspicuous when the animals are quiescent, is expanded into a large chrysanthemum-like bunch when they start to run or are otherwise excited.

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  • It is rarely quite absent, but may be represented by a tuft of hairs (very conspicuous in Pariana).

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  • or truncate, sometimes fringed with hairs, and are in contact with the ovary.

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  • Note the zigzag axis (rhachilla) bearing long silky hairs.

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  • In germination the coleorhiza lengthens, ruptures the pericarp, and fixes the grain to the ground by developing numerous hairs.

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  • In the sugar-cane (Saccharum) and several allied genera the separating joints of the axis bear long hairs below the spikelets; in others, as in Arundo (a reed-grass), the flowering glumes are enveloped in long hairs.

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  • in Stipa, species of Avena, Heteropogon and others the base of the glume forms a sharp point which will easily penetrate the ground; above the point are short stiff upwardly pointing hairs which oppose its withdrawal.

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  • A feature of interest in connexion with the phylogeny of cycads is the presence of long hairs clothing the scale-leaves, and forming a cap on the summit of the stem-apex or attached to the bases of petioles; on some fossil cycadean plants these outgrowths have the form of scales, and are identical in structure with the ramenta (paleae) of the majority of ferns.

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  • The sporangia (pollen-sacs), which occur on the under-side of the stamens, are often arranged in more or less definite groups or sori, interspersed with hairs (paraphyses); dehiscence takes place along a line marked out by the occurrence of smaller and thinner-walled cells bounded by larger and thickerwalled elements, which form a fairly prominent cap-like " annulus " near the apex of the sporangium, not unlike the annulus characteristic of the Schizaeaceae among ferns.

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  • The leaves at once invite a comparison with ferns; the numerous long hairs which form a delicate woolly covering on young leaves recall the hairs of certain ferns, but agree more closely with the long filamentous hairs of recent cycads.

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  • The spike of an inflorescence bears whorls of flowers at each node in the axils of concrescent bracts accompanied by numerous sterile hairs (paraphyses); in a male inflorescence numerous flowers occur at each node, while in a female inflorescence the number of flowers at each node is much smaller.

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  • long and covered with long fleshy hairs.

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  • From both birds and reptiles the class is distinguished, so far at any rate as existing forms are concerned, by the following features: the absence of a nucleus in the red corpuscles of the blood, which are nearly always circular in outline; the free suspension of the lungs in a thoracic cavity, separated from the abdominal cavity by a muscular partition, or diaphragm, which is the chief agent in inflating the lungs in respiration; the aorta, or main artery, forming but a single arch after leaving the heart, which curves over the left terminal division of the windpipe, or bronchus; the presence of more or fewer hairs on the skin and the absence of feathers; the greater development of the bridge, or commissure, connecting the two halves of the brain, which usually forms a complete corpus callosum, or displays an unusually large size of its anterior portion; the presence of a fully developed larynx at the upper end of the trachea or windpipe, accompanied by the absence of a syrinx, or expansion, near the lower end of the same; the circumstance that each half of the lower jaw (except perhaps at a very early stage of development) consists of a single piece articulating posteriorly with the squamosal element of the skull without the intervention of a separate quadrate bone; the absence of prefrontal bones in the skull; the presence of a pair of lateral knobs, or condyles (in place of a single median one), on the occipital aspect of the skull for articulation with the first vertebra; and, lastly, the very obvious character of the female being provided with milk-glands, by the secretion of which the young (produced, except in the very lowest group, alive and not by means of externally hatched eggs) are nourished for some time after birth.

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  • Such hairs, either upon different parts of the skin of the same species, or in different species, assume very diverse forms and are of various sizes and degrees of rigidity - as seen in the fur of the mole, the bristles of the pig, and the spines of the hedgehog and porcupine, which are all modifications of the same structures.

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  • Though generally nearly smooth, or but slightly scaly, the surface of some hairs is imbricated; that is to say, shows projecting scale-like processes, as in some bats, while in the twotoed sloth (Choloepus) they are longitudinally grooved or fluted.

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  • Though usually more or less cylindrical or circular in section, hairs are often elliptical or flattened, as in the curly-haired races of men, the terminal portion of the hair of moles and shrews, and conspicuously in the spines of the spiny squirrels of the genus Xerus and those of the mouse-like Platacanthomys.

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  • de Meijere that the insertion of the individual hairs in the skin displays a definite arrangement, constant for each species, but varying in different groups.

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  • In jerboas, for example, a bunch of twelve or thirteen hairs springs from the same point, while in the polar bear a single stout hair and several slender ones arise together, and in the marmosets three equal-sized hairs form regular groups.

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  • In a large proportion of mammals there exist hairs of two distinct types: the one long, stiff, and alone appearing on the surface, and the other shorter, finer and softer, constituting the under-fur, which may be compared to the down of birds.

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  • In this connexion reference may be made to patches or lines of long and generally white hairs situated on the back of certain ruminants, which are capable of erection during periods of excitement, and serve, apparently, as " flags " to guide the members of a herd in flight.

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  • Such are the white chrysanthemum-like patches on the rump of the Japanese deer and of the American prong-buck (Antilocapra), and the line of hairs situated in a groove on the loins of the African spring-buck.

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  • Special tufts of stout stiff hairs, sometimes termed vibrissae, and connected with nerves, and in certain cases with glands, occur in various regions.

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  • Some kinds of hairs, as those of the mane and tail of the horse, persist throughout life, but more generally, as in the case of the body-hair of the same animal, they are shed and renewed periodically, generally annually.

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  • There has been much discussion as to whether this winter whitening is due to a change in the colour of the individual hairs or to a change of coat.

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  • Trouessart, it appears that much the same kind of action takes place in the hairs of mammals that turn white in winter.

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  • When ripe, the grain is of an elongated oval form, with a few hairs at the summit.

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  • In both Psilotum and Tmesipteris the functions of the root-system, which is completely absent, are performed by leafless rhizomes bearing absorbent hairs and inhabited by an endophytic fungus.

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  • Its surface is clothed with filamentous or scaly hairs (paleae), which protect the growing point; and adventitious roots spring from it.

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  • The ovary adheres firmly to the seed in the interior, so that on examining a longitudinal section of the grain by the microscope the outer layer is seen to consist of epidermal cells, of which the uppermost are prolonged into short hairs to cover the apex of the grain.

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  • The radical leaves of this biennial plant spread out flat on all sides from the crown of the root; they are ovate-oblong, acute, stalked, and more or less incisely-toothed, of a greyish-green colour, and covered with viscid hairs; these leaves perish at the approach of winter.

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  • in height, and as it grows becoming branched, and furnished with alternate sessile leaves, which are stem-clasping, oblong, unequally-lobed, clothed with glandular clammy hairs, and of a dull grey-green, the whole plant having a powerful nauseous odour.

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  • Ye have more curses than ye have hairs of your head, and I advise you for Christ's sake not to preach at Navan."

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  • 1T, Lateral sensory hairs.

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  • - The horse (Equus caballus) is distinguished from the others by the long hairs of the tail being more abundant and growing quite or nearly from the base as well as the end and sides, and also by possessing a small bare callosity on the inner side of the hind leg, just below the "hock" or heel joint, in addition to the one on the inner side of the fore-arm above the carpus or " knee," common to all the genus.

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  • In its relatively long ears and general build it approaches the African wild asses, from which it chiefly differs by the striping (which is markedly different from that of the quagga-group) and the reversal of the direction of the hairs along the spine.

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  • (After W o s s i d l o.) a, Female flowers; b, male flowers; c, hairs representing sterile flowers.

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  • In Scrophularia the fifth stamen appears as a scale-like body; in other Scrophulariaceae, as in Pentstemon, it assumes the form of a filament, with hairs at its apex in place of an anther.

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  • In Valeriana the superior calyx is at first an obsolete rim, but as the fruit ripens it is shown to consist of hairs rolled inwards, which expand so as to waft the fruit.

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  • Petals are generally glabrous or smooth; but, in some instances, hairs are produced on their surface.

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  • Petaline hairs, though sparse and scattered, present occasionally the same arrangement as those which occur on the leaves; thus, in Bombaceae they are stellate.

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  • Coloured hairs are seen on the petals of Menyanthes, and on the segments of the perianth of Iris.

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  • Older flower with the stamens (S) anther is developed o n the c orolla dried up.er(X2) dth e hairs before the filament, and when the latter is not produced, the anther is sessile, as in the mistletoe.

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  • Hairs, scales, teeth or processes of different kinds are some times developed on the filament.

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  • In spiderwort (Tradescantia virginica) the hairs are beautifully coloured, moniliform or necklace-like, and afford good objects for studying rotation of the protoplasm.

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  • a, b, Barren glumes; c, fertile glumes, each enclosing one flower with its pale, d; the zigzag axis (rhachilla) bears long silky hairs.

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  • In Scrophularia the fifth stamen appears in the form of a scale; and in many Pentstemons it is reduced to a filament with hairs or a shrivelled membrane at the apex.

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  • It presents great varieties of form, such as a ring, scales, glands, hairs, petaloid appendages, &c., and in the progress of growth it often contains saccharine matter, thus becoming truly nectariferous.

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  • It sometimes bears hairs, which aid in the application of the pollen to the stigma, and are called collecting hairs, as in Campanula, and also in Aster and other Compositae.

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  • These hairs, during the upward growth of the style, come into contact with the already ripened pollen, and carry it up along with them, ready to be applied by insects to the mature stigma of other flowers.

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  • In Vicia and Lobelia the hairs frequently form a tuft below the stigma.

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  • a, Vascular bundle; c, hairs; b, d, annulus, magnified.

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  • forensis, the plant was covered with characteristic jointed hairs, which have served to identify the various organs on which they occur.

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  • Cycads, but the ramenta, instead of having the form of long unicellular hairs like those on the petioles and bud-scales of existing species are exactly like the paleae or ramental scales characteristic of the majority of ferns.

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  • The fur is of fine quality, consisting of a short soft whitish grey under-fur, brown at the tips, interspersed with longer, stiffer and thicker hairs, shining, greyish at the base, bright rich brown at the points, especially on the upper-parts and outer surface of the legs; the throat, cheeks, under-parts and inner surface of the legs brownish grey throughout.

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  • The fur is remarkable for the preponderance of the beautifully soft woolly under-fur, the longer stiffer hairs being scanty.

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  • The general colour is deep liver-brown, silvered or frosted with the hoary tips of the longer stiff hairs.

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  • They had six legs with little pads for feet instead of toes and claws, a delicate snout not quite the length of an anteater's lined with fine hairs and tiny teeth used to vacuum up mold, dust, and dirt that was its main food source, and an odd habit of climbing walls with hidden suckers in its padded feet.

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  • To run her hands over the washboard abs or twirl her fingertips through the tight hairs dusting his chest …Or better yet, to feel his large hands and muscular body against hers ...

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  • Alpine bistort and goldenrod, dwarfed by the conditions, and mountain everlasting, sensibly covered in dense white hairs.

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  • I have only just noticed that the filaments, holding the anthers, are covered in fine brown hairs.

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  • The rest is mostly various other swimming appendages, prominent for all of their fine filtering hairs.

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  • Some will sit all alone some will line in pairs, some will be completely bald whilst others might have hairs.

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  • bindweed flower - complete with pollen attached to its hairs!

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  • We also saw Alpine bistort and goldenrod, dwarfed by the conditions, and mountain everlasting, sensibly covered in dense white hairs.

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  • Each segment has four tiny bristles (tough hairs) underneath its body.

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  • cilium hairs, called cilia, move the mucus to the back of the throat where it is swallowed.

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  • Drive away old cobwebs with gray hairs turning white on my scalp.

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  • Many tarantulas have a dense covering of stinging hairs on the abdomen to protect them from enemies.

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  • crackle in the air, causing the hairs on the back of my neck to rise.

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  • doeth right is an honor to his gray hairs.

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  • exfoliate to prevent ingrowing hairs.

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  • Leaves rather fleshy, dark green above and greyish-white below due to dense coating of short hairs.

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  • When dry, remove all fluff, dust and hairs with a soft rag or brush.

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  • With small forceps, take the fragment of epidermis (with hairs) and pull it smoothly perpendicular to the stem.

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  • These products tend to include air fresheners and turbo heads with a beating action in order to remove the pet hairs.

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  • The pearl-bordered fritillary 's body is densely covered in hairs, which vary in color from brown to beige.

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  • glistening silver hairs which more than compensate for its rather disappointing flowers.

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  • gray hairs with sorrow to the grave?

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  • Long, coarse guard hairs conceal and protect the soft velvety under fur.

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  • In addition, wild carrot leaves have small hairs on them, while the leaves of poison hemlock are smooth.

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  • Clothes moth larvae are among the few insects able to digest the keratin of hairs and feathers.

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  • lint roller on the dirty clothes to get off the resistant hairs that can't be shaken off.

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  • The fur is made up of guard hairs supporting a dense mat of secondary fibers.

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  • For example, regular grooming keeps dogs and cats from dropping hairs everywhere and also prevents their fur from getting matted.

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  • Once a week run a grooming mitt over their coats to remove dead hairs, finishing off with a soft cloth to promote shine.

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  • nerve impulses generated by the hairs indicate to the brain the direction of apparent head movement.

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  • All her body hairs are shaved, and she is not allowed to wear any ornaments.

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  • The disk seeds have a pappus of hairs for wind dispersal.

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  • perianth segment is covered with tiny, short, curved hairs.

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  • Thoracic limbs lack pincers, branched and fringed with hairs, and mainly used for swimming.

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  • They have very long flexible baleen plates that catch the tiny plankton in the hairs.

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  • Brushes had very pliable hairs, usually made from deer, goat, wolf or hare.

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  • They vary in appearance between different localities, but common features include stems covered with short stiff hairs and curved prickles.

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  • prickle beautiful high harmonies, that sentiment, combine to send the hairs prickling on the back of my neck.

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  • A large, fat man in a suit and light raincoat was giving himself gray hairs with the Telegraph crossword.

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  • This tiny plant, less than 1 cm long, has root-like hairs called rhizoids to anchor it to soil, bark or rock.

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  • Exposing the roots for only a few minutes can damage the fine root hairs, and reduce the plant's chance of survival.

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  • scaly patches with broken hairs on the patch.

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  • scanty gray hairs still hung about his yellow scalp.

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  • Don't use pointed scissors for removing nose hairs.

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  • Special olfactory or tactile hairs called setae cover the body surface.

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  • shave the hairs off my big toe.

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  • Blacks with Silver in their ancestry may have a sprinkling of silver hairs through their coat with maturity.

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  • stadia hairs are used to bracket either side of a tree trunk.

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  • You will always have some stray, very stubborn hairs in the first few times you wax.

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  • tarantula species can kick defensive hairs off the top of the abdomen.

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  • The bladder has a trapdoor, which opens inwards with two or three trigger hairs on the outside.

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  • Now I use tweezers, like women plucking eyebrows, for removing unwanted nasal hairs.

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  • The Norwegian Forest cat is known for its dense, rich fur with a wooly undercoat covered by long, coarse guard hairs.

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  • The coat consists of a short, very thick undercoat covered with long guard hairs.

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  • The close-up photograph shows the long coarse guard hairs which overlie the soft dense wooly underfur.

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  • These hairs give the leaf undersides a silvery-white color.

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  • woollyNorwegian Forest cat is known for its dense, rich fur with a wooly undercoat covered by long, coarse guard hairs.

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  • Dr Hooke made the important improvement on Gascoigne's micrometer of substituting parallel hairs for the parallel edges of its original construction (Hooke's Posthumous Works, p. 497).

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  • This forms the attractive area, and the inner surface of the lid also bears numerous glands, as well as downwardpointing hairs, each with a delicately striated surface (fig.

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  • In the middle ectoderm cell are seen a nucleus and three nematocysts, with trigger hairs projecting beyond the cuticle.

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  • The catkins of the poplars differ from those of the nearly allied willows in the presence of a rudimentary perianth, of obliquely cup-shaped form, within the toothed bracteal scales; the male flowers contain from eight to thirty stamens; the fertile bear a onecelled (nearly divided) ovary, surmounted by the deeply cleft stigmas; the two-valved capsule contains several seeds, each furnished with a long tuft of silky or cotton-like hairs.

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  • Many of the numerous hairs (fig.

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  • For example, the egg may be raised above the surface on which it is laid by an elongate stalk; the eggs may be protected by a secretion, which in some cases forms a hard protective capsule or " purse "; or they may be covered with shed hairs of the mother, while among waterinsects a gelatinous envelope, often of rope-like form, is common.

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  • The members of the subgenus Guereza present a transition from a wholly black animal (C. satanas) to one (C. caudatus) in which the sides of the face are white, and the whole flanks, as well as the tail, clothed with a long fringe of pure white hairs.

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  • The spider owes its name Argyroneta or the silver swimmer to its silvery appearance as it swims about under water enveloped in air, and its power to retain an envelope of air on its sternum and abdomen depends upon the circumstance that these areas are beset with hairs which prevent the water reaching the integument; but the air retained by these hairs can be released when the spider wishes to fill its subaqueous home with that element.

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  • A seed of " Sea Island cotton " is covered with long hairs only, which are readily pulled off, leaving the comparatively small black seed quite clean or with only a slight fuzz at the end, whereas a seed of " Upland " or ordinary American cotton bears both long and short hairs; the former are fairly easily detached (less easily, however, than in Sea Island cotton), whilst the latter adhere very firmly, so that when the long hairs are pulled off the seed remains completely covered with a short fuzz.

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  • The hair much resembles that of a beaver, but is shorter; it consists of a thick soft underfur, interspersed with longer stiff, glistening hairs, which overlie and conceal the former, on the upper surface and sides of the body.

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  • From the North American grey foxes, constituting the genus or subgenus Urocyon, the true foxes are distinguished by the absence of a crest of erectile long hairs along the middle line of the upper surface of the tail, and also of a projection (subangular process) to the postero-inferior angle of the lower jaw.

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  • The American grey fox, or Virginian fox, is now generally ranged as a distinct genus (or a subgenus of Canis) under the name of Urocyon cinereo-argentatus, on account of being distinguished, as already mentioned, by the presence of a ridge of long erectile hairs along the upper surface of the tail and of a projection to the postero-inferior angle of the lower jaw.

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  • B, stellate hairs from interior of bladder of U.

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  • Foxes, too, and badger are dyed a brownish black, and white hairs inserted to imitate silver fox, but the white hairs are too coarse and the colour too dense to mislead any one who knows the real article.

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  • Those include mites, termites (or white ants), thread blight, grey blight, caterpillars (naked or in bags) and caterpillars armed with stinging hairs to protect them, and borers, red and black, some of which eat the core out of the wood, while others content themselves with eating only the bark.

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  • apis), a large and natural family of the zoological order Hymenoptera, characterized by the plumose form of many of their hairs, by the large size of a the basal segment of the foot, which is always elongate and in the hindmost limb sometimes as broad as the shin, and by the development of a "tongue" for sucking liquid food; this organ has been variously interpreted as the true insectan tongue (hypopharynx) or as a ligula formed by fused portions of the second maxillae (probably the latter).

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  • Bees are specialized in correspondence with the flowers from which they draw the bulk of their food supply, the flexible c tongue being used for sucking nectar, the plumed hairs and the modified legs (fig.

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  • The food, too, is always placed in the cell after a fixed routine - first honey disgorged from the mouth, then pollen brushed off the hairs beneath the body (fig.

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  • c, Feathered hairs with pollen d, Fore-leg of Apis showing grains, magnified.

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  • Generally the perianth is represented by hairs, bristles or similar developments, often indefinite in number; in the two largest genera, Cyperus, (fig.

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  • Tufts or borders of hairs are frequently present (Calamagrostis, Phragmites, Andropogon), and are often so long as to surround and conceal the flowers (fig.

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  • io), Pennisetum, &c., the one or more circles of simple or feathery hairs represent abortive branches of the inflorescence; in Cenchrus (fig.

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  • In Compositae, Dipsacaceae and Valerianaceae the calyx is attached to the pistil, and its limb is developed in the form of hairs called pappus (fig.

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  • Sometimes the micropyle lies close to the base of the style, and then the pollentube enters it at once, but frequently it has to pass some distance into the ovary, being guided in its direction by various contrivances, as hairs, grooves, &c. In gymnosperms the pollen-grain resting on the apex of the nucellus sends out its pollen-tubes, which at once penetrate the nucellus (fig.

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  • I do not wish to split hairs, to make fine distinctions, or set myself up as better than my neighbors.

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  • The hairs tied in the knot hurt Pierre and there were lines of pain on his face and a shamefaced smile.

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  • If a song can make the hairs on the back of neck stand up after repeated listening, there 's something magical there.

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  • Exposing the roots for only a few minutes can damage the fine root hairs, and reduce the plant 's chance of survival.

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  • The symptoms are bald, scaly patches with broken hairs on the patch.

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  • A few scanty gray hairs still hung about his yellow scalp.

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  • Do n't use pointed scissors for removing nose hairs.

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  • I will shave the hairs off my big toe.

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  • During operation, these (numbered) stadia hairs are used to bracket either side of a tree trunk.

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  • Several tarantula species can kick defensive hairs off the top of the abdomen.

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  • The breeze played with the hairs on his neck, seeming to tease each individual hair.

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  • The coat is very light in color but there is still dark ticking and the base of the hairs is yellowish in color.

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  • The warm wax is applied over the area you want hairs removed from.

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  • The Devon Rex, the Cornish Rex and the LaPerm Rex have fewer coat hairs, providing less area for the Fel D 1 proteins to become trapped.

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  • There are two undercoats; one is a downy fur that helps keep the cat warm during cold winters, and the second undercoat is longer hairs that serve to retain heat.

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  • Finally, the third or topcoat consists of long guard hairs that easily shed snow and rain.

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  • Although not prevalent in the United States, lungworms may be the cause if a cat has ongoing respiratory problems.These worms can grow up to 10 millimeters long, and they look like hairs.

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  • It requires a little brushing now and then to remove loose hairs and guard against hairballs, but there is not a significant time investment when it comes to caring for one of these kittens.

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  • Apply the foundation in downward strokes, not circles, to avoid lifting and accentuating any small hairs on the face (everyone has them!) when you're using a liquid or cream formula.

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  • That's because the right brow hairs grow down and the brow tends to look round.

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  • From smoothing foundation, to plucking stray eyebrow hairs, a lighted cosmetic mirror with a high level of magnification is a must for every woman's beauty toolbox.

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  • From cosmetic application to tweezing stray eyebrow hairs and more, a lighted makeup mirror is one of a woman's most essential beauty tools, and the vintage style and functional appeal of the Clairol makeup mirror is appealing to many.

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  • The technician can shape a new brow completely, or simply fill in a few hairs to give the area a complete look.

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  • The brow can be filled completely to create a "new" brow, or single hairs can be added to create an illusion of fullness.

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  • It's short, stout and wide, with cropped hairs that pick up and distribute just the right amount of color.

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  • The other end features longer, slightly rounded hairs that are extremely soft.

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  • Reach for a softly colored brown or a clear mascara to add the finishing touch, and remember to clear up any stray hairs that may mar the brows.

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  • From stray grays to stray brow hairs, tweezers certainly pay for themselves over time.

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  • So, if you are in the process of going through chemo right now, wait to use this product until some of the lash hairs begin to come back in.

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  • Bushy eyebrows with stray hairs can also age the face.

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  • The eye shadow and contour brushes pack the color on beautifully and evenly, while the blush, powder and fan brushes never leave stray hairs behind (a personal pet peeve that I can't stand).

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  • Additionally, they discovered that attaching a fur covering to the bottom of these makeshift skis, and arranging the hairs so that they pointed backwards would keep the snow from sticking to the bottom.

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  • The hairs also allowed these snow transport devices to glide along the snow.

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  • Real fur will have a complex base of what looks like wool, faux's base will show hairs all the same length and color.

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  • At this point, improved cilia (small hairs responsible for pushing mucus out of the lungs) function means that the lungs are cleaner.

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  • Brushing removes dead hairs and dandruff, and will make the dog's coat shine.

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  • Rather than lots of floating hairs, you'll find the occasional tuft on the floor.

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  • If you find a mat, use the first couple of teeth on the comb to begin gently teasing hairs free from the outermost edge of the mat.

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  • This helps you see how the cut is falling into place and catches loose hairs.

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  • The Japanese Wine-berry (R. phaenicolasius) is a strong-growing Bramble, the stems of which are covered with reddish hairs, and the leaves silvery white on the under side.

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  • About 9 inches high, with sparingly branched, succulent stems and glaucous leaves, covered with stiff hairs and short terminal racemes of flowers about half an inch in diameter, resembling in form that of Borage.

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  • Calopogon - C. pulchellus is a beautiful hardy Orchid suitable for boggy ground, the flowers pink, 1 inch in diameter, in clusters of two to six upon a stem, beautifully bearded with white, yellow, and purple hairs.

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  • Each of the numerous flowers has at its base a tuft of long silky hairs, which contribute greatly to the feathery lightness of the whole.

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  • It may be known when not in leaf by the dense rusty hairs covering the young twigs.

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  • Viburnum Carlesii - A charming Japanese shrub of rather loose habit, with roundish leaves, silvery on the underside and greyish-green above from their coating of fine hairs.

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  • It is a biennial, hardy, and with oval uncut leaves of pale green, about 1 foot long when fully grown, and more or less covered with soft, silky hairs.

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  • The leaves are entire, tapering at both ends, and covered with long coarse hairs of a shining yellow color.

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  • Meconopsis Quintuplinervia - A perennial kind from Manchuria, of dwarf growth as a rosette of long-stemmed uncut leaves, covered with reddish hairs and traversed by five prominent veins.

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  • Phlomis Tuberosa - In good soils, 3 to 5 feet, with handsome dark-green leaves and dense whorls of rosy-purple flowers in summer, partly fringed with white hairs.

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  • L. hispida is pretty, growing about 18 inches high, with deeply-cut foliage and short stinging hairs, the flowers 1 inch across, of a bright lemon-yellow, the centre prettily marked with green and white.

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  • Its leaves are densely covered with hairs when young, less so as they get older; the flowers are borne loosely in small trusses, rosy white on opening, whiter with age.

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  • It is less than 1 foot in height, with ovate leaves from a quarter of an inch to half an inch long, thickly clustered on the twigs, the margins set with slender hairs.

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  • The curious fruits are spindle-shaped and covered with pale brown hairs.

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  • The leaves and flower-stalks are densely clothed with minute hairs.

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  • The leaves (and stems) are densely covered with long soft hairs, and often take a fine color in autumn, which is increased by the persistent crimson seed-clusters.

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  • All have leaves covered with dense glandular hairs.

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  • The North American Thread-leaved Sundew (D. filiformis) is a beautiful bog plant, with very long slender leaves covered with glandular hairs, the flowers purple-rose color, half an inch wide, and opening only in the sunshine.

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  • The leaves are fully 4 feet long on vigorous specimens, and clothed with soft, silky hairs.

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  • Vitis Romaneti - Has large leaves, differing from all the Vines in cultivation (except Spinovitis Davidi) in having the branches and petioles covered with bristles or stout hairs.

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  • The flower-stalks bear long hairs and a few faint brown streaks.

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  • The stems of W. macrophylla, from Mexico, are covered with short stinging hairs, bearing brownish viscid drops, which adhere to the hand like oil.

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  • The flowers are not so large as those of the other species, but are more charming in color, their beauty enhanced by the white tuft of silky hairs in the throat of the corolla.

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  • Blonde or light brown hairs offer a more casual look.

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  • The other 10 percent of your hair remains in a dormant or resting stage, and these are the hairs that are usually shed.

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  • Today, graphics are about as realistic as it gets with incredible lighting effects and individual droplets of sweat dripping off the tips of individual hairs.

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  • The small hairs on this writer's arms prickled with alarm when he first shot a corpse by accident in this game.

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  • In the case of cigarette smokers, the nicotine present in the smoke paralyzes the hairs (cilia) that regularly flush mucus from the respiratory system.

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  • About 10 percent to 15 percent of hairs are involved in this phase, which lasts for approximately three months.

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  • Each person has about 100,000 hairs on their scalp.

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  • Although it is normal to lose between 25 and 100 hairs per day, any disruption of the hair growth cycle may cause abnormal hair loss.

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  • Children with this condition usually have patchy hair loss with some broken hairs visible just above the surface of the scalp.

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  • When broken off at the surface, the hairs resemble small black dots on the scalp.

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  • These patches are smooth and without inflammation, scaling, or broken hairs and may appear overnight or over the course of a few days.

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  • The hair loss associated with trichotillomania is patchy and is characterized by broken hairs of varying length.

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  • In telogen effluvium, there is a physiologic basis to the hair loss; something happens to interrupt the hair's normal growth cycle and to drive many or all of the hairs into the telogen phase.

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  • It is important to consult a dermatologist or pediatrician if a child sheds hair in large amounts (more than 100 hairs per day for longer than four weeks) after combing, brushing, or shampooing or if the hair becomes significantly thinner.

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  • The first line of defense includes tiny hairs in the nostrils that filter out large particles.

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  • Inside are thousands of tiny hairs called cilia.

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  • This skin has tiny little hairs projecting from it called cilia.

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  • The ear canal is normally skin-colored and is covered with tiny hairs.

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  • They are visible at the base or on the shaft of individual hairs.

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  • Signs of heat damage are singed nasal hairs, burns around and inside the nose and mouth, and internal swelling of the throat.

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  • When the hair root remains intact and the hair shaft is broken, this sensation is not felt and the patient may repetitively pull hairs until successful.

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  • The hairs may be ingested by some patients.

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  • The typical trichotillomania patient will spend one to three hours daily pulling hairs.

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  • The necessary implements, such as tweezers, are collected, the location where this is to be performed is determined, the preferred texture or color to be pulled may be planned as well as disposal of the hairs.

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  • Rarely, the individual with trichotillomania may attempt to pull the hairs of others.

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  • The hairs of a pet or doll or the fibers of an inanimate object, such as sweater, may be pulled as well.

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  • The individual with OCD is aware of his or her actions, while the individual with trichotillomania is not always conscious that he or she is pulling hairs.

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  • Some patients pull out hairs without regard for symmetry, while others will attempt to follow a pattern or pull out hairs in an effort to maintain symmetry of appearance.

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  • The diagnosis of trichotillomania is made by history and interview, along with histological examination of the hairs in the area of hair loss as well as skin tissue in the area.

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  • This tension is relieved upon pulling hairs.

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  • In the areas of hair loss in trichotillomania there will be a mixture of short and longer hairs in the area of hair loss.

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  • Although not done often, transplantation of hairs to these areas is possible.

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