This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

haemorrhage

haemorrhage Sentence Examples

  • Kidney haemorrhage and albuminuria is a constant symptom.

    19
    8
  • There may be haemorrhage from these vessels into the tissues.

    9
    5
  • The chief varieties of haemorrhage are arterial, venous and capillary.

    6
    5
  • HAEMORRHAGE (Gr.

    6
    6
  • HAEMORRHAGE (Gr.

    6
    6
  • 398) " haemorrhage is not an ordinary accompaniment " of Indian plague, though when seen it is in the form of haemoptysis.

    5
    5
  • - Sodium chloride is occasionally used in warm water as an emetic, and injections of it into the rectum as a treatment for thread worms. A o 9% solution forms what is termed normal saline solution, which is frequently injected into the tissues in cases of collapse, haemorrhage and diarrhoea.

    4
    4
  • It is a powerful local haemostatic, but it only checks haemorrhage when brought directly in contact with the bleeding point.

    4
    4
  • - Sodium chloride is occasionally used in warm water as an emetic, and injections of it into the rectum as a treatment for thread worms. A o 9% solution forms what is termed normal saline solution, which is frequently injected into the tissues in cases of collapse, haemorrhage and diarrhoea.

    4
    4
  • They thus act locally as haemostatics or styptics, and will often arrest severe haemorrhage from parts which are accessible, such as the nose.

    4
    5
  • His stay in Leipzig came, however, to an abrupt conclusion; the distractions of student life proved too much for his strength; a sudden haemorrhage supervened, and he lay long ill, first in Leipzig, and, after it was possible to remove him, at home in Frankfort.

    3
    3
  • As the blood gushed out he lapped it up; and instead of suffering the fatal weakness which might have been expected from the haemorrhage, he seems to have done well.

    3
    3
  • In January 1859 he suffered a violent haemorrhage of the lungs, and sought relief by retreating first to the West Indies and afterwards to Europe.

    3
    4
  • In January 1859 he suffered a violent haemorrhage of the lungs, and sought relief by retreating first to the West Indies and afterwards to Europe.

    3
    4
  • The acute poisoning presents a series of symptoms which are only with difficulty to be distinguished from those produced by alcohol, by cerebral haemorrhage and by several other morbid conditions.

    2
    1
  • It is useful in haemorrhage from a gastric ulcer or in haemorrhage from the intestine.

    2
    3
  • In arresting haemorrhage temporarily the chief thing is to press directly on the bleeding part.

    2
    3
  • In small blood-vessels pressure will be sufficient to arrest haemorrhage permanently.

    2
    3
  • In severe haemorrhage, as from the division of a large artery, the patient may collapse and death ensue from syncope.

    2
    3
  • - EXpOSed as it is in the upper part of the abdomen, and being somewhat friable, the human liver is often torn or ruptured by blows or kicks, and, the large blood-vessels being thus laid open, fatal haemorrhage 2.

    2
    3
  • In larger doses colchicum or colchicine acts as a most violent gastrointestinal irritant, causing terrible pain, colic,vomiting, diarrhoea, haemorrhage from the bowel, thirst and ultimately death from collapse.

    1
    2
  • Natural arrest of haemorrhage arises from (I) the coagulation of the blood itself, (2) the diminution of the heart's action as in fainting, (3) changes taking place in the cut vessel causing its retraction and contraction.

    1
    2
  • In the surgical treatment of haemorrhage minor means of arresting bleeding are: cold, which is most valuable in general oozing and local extravasations; very hot water, 130° to 160° F., a powerful haemostatic; position, such as elevation of the limb, valuable in bleeding from the extremities; styptics or astringents, applied locally, as perchloride of iron, tannic acid and others, the most valuable being suprarenal extract.

    1
    2
  • In ccllapse following severe haemorrhage and in sudden and accidental arrest of the heart or respiration during chloroform narcosis an intramuscular injection of 1 gr.

    1
    2
  • In large doses oil of turpentine causes purging and may induce much haemorrhage from the bowel; it should be combined with some trustworthy aperient, such as castor oil, when given as an anthelmintic. It is readily absorbed unchanged and has a marked contractile action upon the blood vessels.

    1
    2
  • It must not be used to check haemorrhage from the kidneys (haematuria) owing to its irritant action on those organs, but in haemoptysis (haemorrhage from the lungs) it is often an invaluable remedy.

    1
    2
  • In larger doses colchicum or colchicine acts as a most violent gastrointestinal irritant, causing terrible pain, colic,vomiting, diarrhoea, haemorrhage from the bowel, thirst and ultimately death from collapse.

    1
    2
  • It must not be used to check haemorrhage from the kidneys (haematuria) owing to its irritant action on those organs, but in haemoptysis (haemorrhage from the lungs) it is often an invaluable remedy.

    1
    2
  • Haemorrhage has been classified as - (I) primary, occurring at the time of the injury; (2) reactionary, or within twenty-four hours of the accident, during the stage of reaction; (3) secondary, occurring at a later period and caused by faulty application of a ligature or septic condition of the wound.

    1
    3
  • If the demand be for the red cells owing to loss from haemorrhage or any of the anaemias, the fatty marrow is rapidly replaced by cellular elements; this is mainly an active proliferation of the nucleated red cells, and gives rise to the erythroblastic type of marrow.

    1
    5
  • If the demand be for the red cells owing to loss from haemorrhage or any of the anaemias, the fatty marrow is rapidly replaced by cellular elements; this is mainly an active proliferation of the nucleated red cells, and gives rise to the erythroblastic type of marrow.

    1
    5
  • In virtue of this property they are also mild haemostatics, tending to coagulate the albumens of the blood and thereby to arrest haemorrhage.

    0
    0
  • It is used in the treatment of haemoptysis in the form of a fine spray, or taken internally it will check gastric haemorrhage.

    0
    0
  • They were formerly used in the treatment of post partum haemorrhage.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes, though rarely, the ulcers perforate the intestines, causing rapidly fatal inflammation of the peritoneum, or they may erode a blood vessel and produce violent haemorrhage.

    0
    0
  • It is useful in haemorrhage from a gastric ulcer or in haemorrhage from the intestine.

    0
    0
  • There may be haemorrhage from these vessels into the tissues.

    0
    0
  • In virtue of this property they are also mild haemostatics, tending to coagulate the albumens of the blood and thereby to arrest haemorrhage.

    0
    0
  • The chief varieties of haemorrhage are arterial, venous and capillary.

    0
    0
  • Natural arrest of haemorrhage arises from (I) the coagulation of the blood itself, (2) the diminution of the heart's action as in fainting, (3) changes taking place in the cut vessel causing its retraction and contraction.

    0
    0
  • In the surgical treatment of haemorrhage minor means of arresting bleeding are: cold, which is most valuable in general oozing and local extravasations; very hot water, 130° to 160° F., a powerful haemostatic; position, such as elevation of the limb, valuable in bleeding from the extremities; styptics or astringents, applied locally, as perchloride of iron, tannic acid and others, the most valuable being suprarenal extract.

    0
    0
  • In arresting haemorrhage temporarily the chief thing is to press directly on the bleeding part.

    0
    0
  • In small blood-vessels pressure will be sufficient to arrest haemorrhage permanently.

    0
    0
  • Haemorrhage has been classified as - (I) primary, occurring at the time of the injury; (2) reactionary, or within twenty-four hours of the accident, during the stage of reaction; (3) secondary, occurring at a later period and caused by faulty application of a ligature or septic condition of the wound.

    0
    0
  • In severe haemorrhage, as from the division of a large artery, the patient may collapse and death ensue from syncope.

    0
    0
  • The surgical procedure for the treatment of an open wound is - (r) arrest of haemorrhage; (2) cleansing of the wound and removal of any foreign bodies; (3) careful apposition of its edges and surfaces - the edges being best brought in contact by sutures of aseptic silk or catgut, the surfaces by carefully applied pressure; (4) free drainage, if necessary, to prevent accumulation either of blood or serous effusion; (5) avoidance of sepsis; (6) perfect rest of the part.

    0
    0
  • Kidney haemorrhage and albuminuria is a constant symptom.

    0
    0
  • - EXpOSed as it is in the upper part of the abdomen, and being somewhat friable, the human liver is often torn or ruptured by blows or kicks, and, the large blood-vessels being thus laid open, fatal haemorrhage 2.

    0
    0
  • In ccllapse following severe haemorrhage and in sudden and accidental arrest of the heart or respiration during chloroform narcosis an intramuscular injection of 1 gr.

    0
    0
  • His stay in Leipzig came, however, to an abrupt conclusion; the distractions of student life proved too much for his strength; a sudden haemorrhage supervened, and he lay long ill, first in Leipzig, and, after it was possible to remove him, at home in Frankfort.

    0
    0
  • 398) " haemorrhage is not an ordinary accompaniment " of Indian plague, though when seen it is in the form of haemoptysis.

    0
    0
  • It is a powerful local haemostatic, but it only checks haemorrhage when brought directly in contact with the bleeding point.

    0
    0
  • It is used in the treatment of haemoptysis in the form of a fine spray, or taken internally it will check gastric haemorrhage.

    0
    0
  • The acute poisoning presents a series of symptoms which are only with difficulty to be distinguished from those produced by alcohol, by cerebral haemorrhage and by several other morbid conditions.

    0
    0
  • They thus act locally as haemostatics or styptics, and will often arrest severe haemorrhage from parts which are accessible, such as the nose.

    0
    0
  • They were formerly used in the treatment of post partum haemorrhage.

    0
    0
  • As the blood gushed out he lapped it up; and instead of suffering the fatal weakness which might have been expected from the haemorrhage, he seems to have done well.

    0
    0
  • In large doses oil of turpentine causes purging and may induce much haemorrhage from the bowel; it should be combined with some trustworthy aperient, such as castor oil, when given as an anthelmintic. It is readily absorbed unchanged and has a marked contractile action upon the blood vessels.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes, though rarely, the ulcers perforate the intestines, causing rapidly fatal inflammation of the peritoneum, or they may erode a blood vessel and produce violent haemorrhage.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →