This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

haemoglobin

haemoglobin Sentence Examples

  • The blood is coloured red by haemoglobin in blood corpuscles.

    29
    12
  • Haematogenous pigments are derived from the haemoglobin of the red blood corpuscles.

    2
    2
  • It is very poisonous, uniting with the haemoglobin of the blood to form carbonyl-haemoglobin.

    2
    2
  • Haemoglobin is composed of a basic albumin and an acid substance haematin; it combines readily with oxygen, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide to form loose compounds.

    1
    1
  • An important nucleo-proteid is haemoglobulin or haemoglobin, the colouring matter of the red blood corpuscles of vertebrates; a related substance, haemocyanin, in which the iron of haemoglobin is replaced by copper, occurs in the blood of cephalopods and crayfish.

    1
    2
  • Haematinics are drugs which increase the amount of haemoglobin in the blood.

    1
    2
  • The haemoglobin would, by its pre-eminent properties of fixing oxygen, serve to furnish the nerve system, which more than any other requires a constant supply, with the necessary oxygen.

    1
    3
  • (2) Haemoglobin and allied substances.

    1
    3
  • Blood coloured red with haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • shape, and in Cerebratulus urticans they are deep red, possibly from the presence of haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • It contains a colourless fluid, with flat, oval, nucleated corpuscles, as a rule colourless, but in some cases tinged with yellow or red haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • The ' haemoglobin may be transformed into haematoidin, a pigment that does not contain iron, or into a pigment which does contain iron, haemosiderin.

    0
    0
  • Haemosiderin in the normal process of haemolysis is stored up in the cells of certain organs until required by the organism for the formation of fresh haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • In the Gastropoda the muscular tissue of the buccal mass is coloured red by haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • It has been discovered in seaweed; in the blood of certain Cephalopoda and Ascidia as haemocyanin, a substance resembling the ferruginous haemoglobin, and of a species of Limulus; in straw, hay, eggs, cheese, meat, and other food-stuffs; in the liver and kidneys, and, in traces, in the blood of man and other animals (as an entirely adventitious constituent, however); it has also been shown by A.

    0
    0
  • Haemoglobin is extracted from the blood of an ox and may be administered in bolus form.

    0
    0
  • Haematogen, introduced by Hommel, claims to contain the albuminous constituents of the blood serum and all the blood salts as well as pure haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • Iron being a constituent part of the blood itself, there is a direct indication for the physician to prescribe it when the amount of haemoglobin in the blood is lowered or the red corpuscles are diminished.

    0
    0
  • The first is based on the fact that the iron in the haemoglobin of the blood must be derived from the food, therefore iron medicinally administered is absorbed.

    0
    0
  • In certain forms of anaemia it increases the number of the red corpuscles and also their haemoglobin content.

    0
    0
  • When taken by the mouth, however, no such actions are seen, owing to the fact that very minute quantities are absorbed and that these become stored in the liver, where they are converted into organic compounds and ultimately go to form haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • At the same time the non-striped muscles slightly lose their tonicity, and when very large doses are given the haemoglobin of the blood becomes converted into the chocolate-coloured methaemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • It enters into combination with haemoglobin, forming a bright scarlet compound and interfering with respiration.

    0
    0
  • lxiii.; On the Distribution of Assimilated Iron Cornpotrnds other than Haemoglobin and Haematins, in Animal and Vegetable Cells, Quart.

    0
    0
  • They occupy and destroy the red corpuscles, converting the haemoglobin into melanin; they multiply in the blood by sporulation, and produce accessions of fever by the liberation of a toxin at the time of sporulation (Ross).

    0
    0
  • The pathological changes in malaria are due to the deposition of melanin and the detritus of red corpuscles and haemoglobin, and to the congregation of parasites in certain sites (Ross).

    0
    0
  • The plasma is coloured red by haemoglobin: it is sometimes (in Sabella and a few other Polychaeta) green, which tint is due to another respiratory pigment.

    0
    0
  • me, ms, o, pp, pr, haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • Blood coloured red with haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • In one genus (Planorbis) the plasma of the blood is coloured red by haemoglobin, this being the only instance of the presence of this body in the blood of Glossophorous Mollusca, though it occurs in corpuscles in the blood of the bivalves Arca and Solen (Lankester).

    0
    0
  • shape, and in Cerebratulus urticans they are deep red, possibly from the presence of haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • For the Heteronemertines arguments have been adduced to prove that here they have the physiological significance of a special respiratory apparatus for the central nervous tissue, which in all these forms is strongly charged with haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • The haemoglobin would, by its pre-eminent properties of fixing oxygen, serve to furnish the nerve system, which more than any other requires a constant supply, with the necessary oxygen.

    0
    0
  • It is colourless and contains definite corpuscles, which are round or elliptical, and in many Metanemertines are coloured red by haemoglobin, being colourless in other species.

    0
    0
  • It contains a colourless fluid, with flat, oval, nucleated corpuscles, as a rule colourless, but in some cases tinged with yellow or red haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • (2) Haemoglobin and allied substances.

    0
    0
  • Kossel) they give rise to important cell constituents - haemoglobin, nucleo-proteids, &c. " Thymus histone " occurs in the thymus gland; globin occurs in combination as haemoglobin; other histones have been extracted from the red blood corpuscles of the goose and the testes of fishes and other animals.

    0
    0
  • An important nucleo-proteid is haemoglobulin or haemoglobin, the colouring matter of the red blood corpuscles of vertebrates; a related substance, haemocyanin, in which the iron of haemoglobin is replaced by copper, occurs in the blood of cephalopods and crayfish.

    0
    0
  • Haemoglobin is composed of a basic albumin and an acid substance haematin; it combines readily with oxygen, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide to form loose compounds (see Nutrition).

    0
    0
  • By a dilute acid haemoglobin is decomposed into globin, and " haematin," a ferri-pyrrol derivative of the probable formula C34H34N4FeOs; under certain conditions the iron-free " haematoporphyrin " is obtained.

    0
    0
  • Haematogenous pigments are derived from the haemoglobin of the red blood corpuscles.

    0
    0
  • These corpuscles may break down in the blood vessels, and their colouring material (haemoglobin) is set free in the serum.

    0
    0
  • The ' haemoglobin may be transformed into haematoidin, a pigment that does not contain iron, or into a pigment which does contain iron, haemosiderin.

    0
    0
  • Haemosiderin in the normal process of haemolysis is stored up in the cells of certain organs until required by the organism for the formation of fresh haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • The oxygen contained in that fluid, and destined for consumption by the tissues, is retained by the influence of alcohol in its combination with the haemoglobin or colouring matter of the red blood corpuscles.

    0
    0
  • It is very poisonous, uniting with the haemoglobin of the blood to form carbonyl-haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • In Ceratisolen legumen, various species of Arca and a few other species the blood is crimson, owing to the presence of corpuscles impregnated with haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • In a few forms the blood contains haemoglobin, either in solution or in haematids (red blood-corpuscles).

    0
    0
  • In the Gastropoda the muscular tissue of the buccal mass is coloured red by haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • The blood is coloured red by haemoglobin in blood corpuscles.

    0
    0
  • It has been discovered in seaweed; in the blood of certain Cephalopoda and Ascidia as haemocyanin, a substance resembling the ferruginous haemoglobin, and of a species of Limulus; in straw, hay, eggs, cheese, meat, and other food-stuffs; in the liver and kidneys, and, in traces, in the blood of man and other animals (as an entirely adventitious constituent, however); it has also been shown by A.

    0
    0
  • Whilst it is not a haematinic, in that it does not increase the number of the red blood corpuscles, it very markedly influences the stability of the compounds of the haemoglobin with oxygen.

    0
    0
  • Haemoglobin is extracted from the blood of an ox and may be administered in bolus form.

    0
    0
  • Haematogen, introduced by Hommel, claims to contain the albuminous constituents of the blood serum and all the blood salts as well as pure haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • Iron being a constituent part of the blood itself, there is a direct indication for the physician to prescribe it when the amount of haemoglobin in the blood is lowered or the red corpuscles are diminished.

    0
    0
  • The first is based on the fact that the iron in the haemoglobin of the blood must be derived from the food, therefore iron medicinally administered is absorbed.

    0
    0
  • In certain forms of anaemia it increases the number of the red corpuscles and also their haemoglobin content.

    0
    0
  • When taken by the mouth, however, no such actions are seen, owing to the fact that very minute quantities are absorbed and that these become stored in the liver, where they are converted into organic compounds and ultimately go to form haemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • At the same time the non-striped muscles slightly lose their tonicity, and when very large doses are given the haemoglobin of the blood becomes converted into the chocolate-coloured methaemoglobin.

    0
    0
  • It enters into combination with haemoglobin, forming a bright scarlet compound and interfering with respiration.

    0
    0
  • Haematinics are drugs which increase the amount of haemoglobin in the blood.

    0
    0
  • me, ms, o, pp, pr, haemoglobin.

    0
    1
  • For the Heteronemertines arguments have been adduced to prove that here they have the physiological significance of a special respiratory apparatus for the central nervous tissue, which in all these forms is strongly charged with haemoglobin.

    0
    1
  • By a dilute acid haemoglobin is decomposed into globin, and " haematin," a ferri-pyrrol derivative of the probable formula C34H34N4FeOs; under certain conditions the iron-free " haematoporphyrin " is obtained.

    0
    1
  • lxiii.; On the Distribution of Assimilated Iron Cornpotrnds other than Haemoglobin and Haematins, in Animal and Vegetable Cells, Quart.

    0
    2
  • The plasma is coloured red by haemoglobin: it is sometimes (in Sabella and a few other Polychaeta) green, which tint is due to another respiratory pigment.

    0
    3
Browse other sentences examples →