Hadrian sentence example

hadrian
  • About 130 the emperor Hadrian decided to rebuild Jerusalem, and make it a Roman colony.
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  • We do not, however, know its date, save that, if not Domitian's work, it was carried out soon after his death, and the whole frontier thus constituted was reorganized, probably by Hadrian, with a continuous wooden palisade reaching from Rhine to Danube.
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  • Antinous, the favourite of Hadrian, was adored in Egypt a century after his death (Origen, Contra Celsum, iii.
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  • Gregorovius, The Emperor Hadrian, trans.
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  • The first building to which the name was given was that built in Rome in 27 B.C. by Agrippa; it was burned later and the existing building was erected in the reign of Hadrian; since A.D.
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  • This was restored by Hadrian for the 15 m.
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  • The noble qualities of the child attracted the attention of Hadrian, who, playing upon the name "Verus," said that it should be changed to "Verissimus" (Bhpiccimoc on medals).
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  • Hadrian adopted, as his successor, Titus Antoninus Pius (uncle of Marcus), on condition that he in turn adopted both Marcus (then seventeen) and Lucius Ceionius Commodus, the son of Aelius Caesar, who had originally been intended by Hadrian as his successor, but had died before him.
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  • From the time of Socrates in unbroken succession up to the reign of Hadrian, the school was represented by men of strong individuality.
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  • Trajan, who had been set against Hadrian by reports of his extravagance, soon took him into favour again, chiefly owing to the goodwill of the empress Plotina, who brought about the marriage of Hadrian with (Vibia) Sabina, Trajan's great-niece.
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  • It seems to have retained some importance up to the time of Hadrian.
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  • From inscriptions it appears that Matidia the younger, sister-in-law of Hadrian,.
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  • Perhaps the oldest remains are some of the piers -and buttresses of the bridge over the Moselle, which may date from about 28 B.C. The well-preserved amphitheatre just outside the modern town to the south-east was probably built in the reign of Trajan or Hadrian.
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  • The full name he then bore was Marcus Aelius Aurelius Antoninus, Aelius coming from Hadrian's family, and Aurelius being the original name of Antoninus Pius.
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  • 7 §§ 6-8, Agrippa Castor, who lived under Hadrian (117-138), already wrote a polemic against him, so that his activity may perhaps be set back to a date earlier than 138.
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  • With the same idea he built the temple of the Pythian Apollo and began, though he did not finish, the temple of Zeus (the magnificent columns now standing belong to the age of Hadrian).
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  • FAVORINUS (2nd century A.D.), Greek sophist and philosopher, flourished during the reign of Hadrian.
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  • With Plutarch, who dedicated to him his treatise IIEpi Tov irpwrov 11vxpov, with Herodes Atticus, to whom he bequeathed his library at Rome, with Demetrius the Cynic, Cornelius Fronto, Aulus Gellius, and with Hadrian himself, he lived on intimate terms; his great rival, whom he violently attacked in his later years, was Polemon of Smyrna.
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  • Communal independence had probably been acquired as early as the end of the 10th century, but the first of the popes to reside in Orvieto and to recognize its communal administration was Hadrian IV.
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  • The massacres they perpetrated were avenged in kind and all the insurrections were quelled when Hadrian succeeded Trajan.
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  • Hadrian had forbidden circumcision as illegal mutilation: he had also replaced Jerusalem by a city of his own, Aelia Capitolina, and the temple of Yahweh by a temple of Jupiter.
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  • Hadrian sent his best generals against the rebels, and at length they were driven from Jerusalem to Bethar (135).
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  • Jerusalem was rebuilt by Hadrian, orders to this effect being given during the emperor's first journey through Syria in 130, the date of his foundations at.
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  • Hadrian's policy in this respect was matched later on by the edict of the caliph Omar (c. 638), who, like his Roman prototype, prevented the Jews from settling in the capital of their ancient country.
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  • The death of Hadrian and the accession of Antoninus Pius (138), however, gave the dispersed people of Palestine a breathing-space.
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  • Whatever question may be possible as to the force or character of Pharisaism in the time of Christ, there can be no doubt that it became both all-pervading and ennobling among the successors of Aqiba (q.v.), himself one of the martyrs to Hadrian's severity.
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  • The whole closes with an appeal to the princes, with a reference to the edict issued by Hadrian in favour of the Christians.
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  • Hadrian treated the city with special favour, and on the occasion of his visit in A.D.
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  • Ceded to the Parthians by Hadrian, it became a Roman colony (Septimia Colonia Nisibis) under Septimius Severus.
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  • Hadrian made three provinces of it, Syria, Syria Phoenice and Syria Palestina.
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  • The name was also borne by the following saints: (1) a Roman tribune who suffered martyrdom under Hadrian; (2) a bishop of Siscia in Pannonia; (3) the patron of the Tegernsee in Bavaria, beheaded in Rome in 269 and invoked by those suffering from gout.
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  • HADRIAN (PUBLIUS AELIUS HADRIANUS), Roman emperor A.D.
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  • He served with distinction in both Dacian campaigns; in the second Trajan presented him with a valuable ring which he himself had received from Nerva, a token of regard which seemed to designate Hadrian as his successor.
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  • In 107 Hadrian was legatus praetorius of lower Pannonia, in 108 consul suffectus, in 112 archon at Athens, legatus in the Parthian campaign (113117), in 117 consul designatus for the following year, in 119 consul for the third and last time only for four months.
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  • When Trajan, owing to a severe illness, decided to return home from the East, he left Hadrian in command of the army and governor of Syria.
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  • On the 9th of August 117, Hadrian, at Antioch, was informed of his adoption by Trajan, and, on the iith, of the death of the latter at Selinus in Cilicia.
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  • Hadrian's first important act was to abandon as untenable the conquests of Trajan beyond the Euphrates (Assyria, Mesopotamia and Armenia), a recurrence to the traditional policy of Augustus.
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  • The provinces were unsettled, the barbarians on the borders restless and menacing, and Hadrian wisely judged that the old limits of Augustus afforded the most defensible frontier.
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  • From Antioch Hadrian set out for Dacia to punish the Roxolani, who, incensed by a reduction of the tribute hitherto paid them, had invaded the Danubian provinces.
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  • An arrangement was patched up, and while Hadrian was still in Dacia he received news of a conspiracy against his life.
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  • Hurrying back to Rome, Hadrian endeavoured to remove the unfavourable impression produced by the whole affair and to gain the goodwill of senate and people.
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  • The record of Hadrian's journeys 1 through all parts of the empire forms the chief authority for the events of his life down to his final settlement in the capital during his last years.
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  • From Egypt Hadrian returned through Syria to Europe (his movements are obscure), but was obliged to hurry back to Palestine (spring, 133) to give his personal attention (this is denied by some historians) to the revolt of the Jews, which had broken out (autumn, 131, or spring, 132) after he had left Syria.
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  • " Hadrian"), which lasted till 135.
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  • Leaving the conduct of affairs in the hands of his most capable general, Julius Severus, in the spring of 134 Hadrian returned to Rome.
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  • Hadrian died at Baiae on the 10th of July 138.
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  • In military matters Hadrian was a strict disciplinarian, but his generosity and readiness to share their hardships endeared him to the soldiers.
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  • Among the magnificent buildings erected by Hadrian mention may be made of the following: In the capital, the temple of Venus and Roma; his splendid mausoleum, which formed the groundwork of the castle of St Angelo; the pantheon of Agrippa; the Basilica Neptuni; at Tibur the great villa 8 m.
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  • Hadrian was fond of the society of learned men - poets, scholars, rhetoricians and philosophers - whom he alternately humoured and ridiculed.
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  • The Athenaeum owed its foundation to Hadrian.
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  • The letter of Hadrian to the consul Servianus (in Vopiscus, Vita Saturnini, 8) is no longer considered genuine.
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  • The character of Hadrian exhibits a mass of contradictions, well summed up by Spartianus (14.11).
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  • Diirr, Die Reisen des Kaisers Hadrian (1881); F.
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  • Gregorovius, The Emperor Hadrian (Eng.
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  • Plew, Quellenuntersuchungen zur Geschichte des Kaisers Hadrian (Strassburg, 1890); O.
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  • Schulz, "Leben des Kaisers Hadrian," Quellenanalysen [of Spartianus' Vita] (1904); E.
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  • Kornemann, Kaiser Hadrian and der letzte grosse Historiker von Rom (1905); W.
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  • Hitzig, Die Stellung Kaiser Hadrians in der romischen Rechtsgeschichte (1892); C. Schultess, Bauten des Kaisers Hadrian (1898); G.
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  • Hadrian's Wall >>
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  • 12 9, the temple was completed and dedicated by Hadrian, who set up a chryselephantine statue of Zeus in the cella.
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  • This was the City of Hadrian (Hadrianapolis) or New Athens (Novae Athenae); a handsome suburb with numerous villas, baths and gardens; some traces remain of its walls, which, like those of Themistocles, were fortified with rectangular towers.
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  • An ornamental entrance near the Olympieum, the existing Arch of Hadrian, marked the boundary between the new and the old cities.
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  • One of the principal monuments of Hadrian's munificence was the sumptuous library, in all probability a vast rectangular enclosure, immediately north of the New Agora, the eastern side of which was explored in 1885-1886.
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  • A portion of its western front, adorned with monolith unfluted Corinthian columns, is still standing - the familiar " Stoa of Hadrian "; another well-preserved portion, with six pilasters, runs parallel to the west side of Aeolus Street.
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  • This cloistered edifice may be identified with the library of Hadrian mentioned by Pausanias; the books were, perhaps, stored in a square building which occupied a portion of the central area.
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  • Strikingly similar in design and construction is a large quadrangular building, the foundations of which were discovered by the British School near the presumed Cynosarges; this may perhaps be the Gymnasium of Hadrian, which Pausanias tells us also possessed ioo columns.
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  • 143 by Tiberius Claudius Herodes Atticus, a wealthy Roman resident, whose benefactions to the city rivalled those of Hadrian.
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  • Hadrian displayed his special fondness for the city by raising new buildings and relieving financial distress.
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  • Hadrian took from masters the power of life and death and abolished the subterranean prisons.
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  • According to Mommsen, Solinus also used a chronicle (possibly by Cornelius Bocchus) and a Chorographia pliniana, an epitome of Pliny's work with additions made about the time of Hadrian.
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  • The emperor Hadrian visited York in A.D.
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  • Utica became a Roman colony under Hadrian, and the civitates liberae, municipia, castella, pagi and turres were peopled with Latins.
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  • The emperor Claudius tentatively entrusted certain posts connected with these to the equites; in the time of Hadrian this became the regular custom.
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  • The body-guard of Augustus, consisting of foreign soldiers (chiefly Germans and Batavians), abolished by Galba, was revived from the time of Trajan or Hadrian under the above title.
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  • The date is placed by some scholars as early as 70-79, by others as late as the early years of the emperor Hadrian, 117.
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  • The emperor Hadrian chose senators as companions on his travels and to help him in public business.
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  • They formed a permanent council, and Hadrian's successors entrusted these comites with the administration of justice and finance, or placed them in military commands.
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  • He came to Rome in the reign of Hadrian, and soon gained such renown as an advocate and orator as to be reckoned inferior only to Cicero.
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  • In the and century a much greater name appears among the methodists, that of Soranus of Ephesus, a physician mentioned with praise even by Tertullian and Augustine, who practised at Rome in the reigns of Trajan and Hadrian.
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  • From these remains we may guess that London was a handsome city in the reign of Hadrian, and probably then in as great a position of importance as it ever attained.
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  • The changeability of colour may remind us of the " calices versicolores " which Hadrian sent to Servianus.
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  • Gamaliel's son, Simon, long after his father's death, and after the persecutions under Hadrian, inherited his office, which thenceforward his descendants handed on from father to son.
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  • PTOLEMAEUS, of Alexandria, surnamed Chennus, Greek grammarian during the reigns of Trajan and Hadrian.
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  • The frontier on the Danube was protected by the establishment of the two colonies Aelia Mursia (Esse) and Aelia Aquincum (Alt-Of en, modern Buda) by Hadrian.
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  • Harnack places " The Shepherd " proper mostly under Hadrian
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  • A further appendix consisted of Anecdotes, Letters and Rescripts of the emperor Hadrian; fables of Aesop; extracts from Hyginus; a history of the Trojan War, abridged from the Iliad; and a legal fragment, Hepi iXethEpci €wv (De manumissionibus).
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  • The so-called exedra of Herodes Atticus (which answers in all respects to a nymphaeum in the Roman style), the nymphaeum in the palace of Domitian and those in the villa of Hadrian at Tibur (five in number) may be specially mentioned.
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  • This was recognized by Claudius, who granted the honorary title Claudiconium, and by Hadrian, who elevated the city to the rank of a Roman colony about A.D.
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  • The place was laid out as a town in 1828, and according to tradition was named in honour of the Roman emperor Hadrian.
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  • 96, and lived during the reigns of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius.
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  • He was greatly esteemed by Hadrian, who appointed him governor (legatos) of Cappadocia (131-137), in which capacity he distinguished himself in a campaign against the Alani.
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  • This fourth period is itself subdivided into three divisions: (I) from the accession of Tiberius to the death of Nero, 68 - the most important part of it being the Neronian age, 54 to 68; (2) the Flavian era, from the death of Nero to the death of Domitian, 96; (3) the reigns of Nerva and Trajan and part of the reign of Hadrian.
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  • Two epitomists of previous histories may be mentioned: Justinus (of uncertain date) who abridged the history of Pompeius Trogus, an Augustan writer; and P. Annius Florus, who wrote in the reign of Hadrian a rhetorical sketch based upon Livy.
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  • The Historia Augusta, which includes the lives of the emperors from Hadrian to Numerianus (117-284), is the work of six writers, four of whom wrote under Diocletian and two under Constantine.
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  • Salvius Julianus was entrusted by Hadrian with the task of reducing into shape the immense mass of law which had grown up in the edicts of successive praetors - thus taking the first step towards a code.
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  • Augustus made it the capital of Achaea; Hadrian enriched it with public works.
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  • This great complex was apparently supplied with water from Hadrian's aqueduct from Lake Stymphalus.
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  • 2); and these were to be found primarily (until the complete destruction of that church during the revolt of Barcochebas and its suppression by Hadrian) in the mother community in Jerusalem (cf.
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  • Pliny rightly praises Trajan as the lawgiver and the founder of discipline, and Vegetius classes Augustus, Trajan and Hadrian together as restorers of the morale of the army.
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  • We may without hesitation follow the opinion of Mommsen, who maintains that the limes was not intended, like Hadrian's Wall between the Tyne and the Solway, and like the great wall of China, to oppose an absolute barrier against incursions from the outside.
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  • Whether Hadrian, the relative of Trajan (cousin's son), was actually adopted by him or not is impossible to determine; certainly Hadrian had not been advanced to any great honours by Trajan.
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  • The work underwent three later redactions at the hands of successive editors in the reigns of Trajan and Hadrian.
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  • 7, 10-20, made in the time of Hadrian (pp. 148-171).
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  • In the reign of Hadrian their territory was invaded by the Alani (Th.
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  • Mantineia regained its autonomous position in the Achaean League in 192, and its original name during a visit of the emperor Hadrian in A.D.
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  • The remains of Hadrian, who died at the neighbouring town of Baiae, were buried at Puteoli, and Antoninus Pius, besides.
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  • Inscriptions record repairs to the breakwater by Antoninus Pius in 139 in fulfilment of a promise made by Hadrian before his death.
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  • Hadrian died in Caesar's villa in A.D.
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  • The Pons Aelius, built by Hadrian A.D.
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  • In the hands of Trajan, Hadrian and the Antonines, Nerva's example bore fruit in the institution of the alimentationes, the most genuinely charitable institution of the pagan world.
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  • Wallsend derives its modern name from its position at the eastern extremity of the Roman Hadrian's Wall; and there was a Roman fort here.
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  • It guarded the great Roman north road from York to Hadrian's wall.
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  • Typical examples of "piety" are Aeneas and Antoninus Pius, who founded games called Eusebeia at Puteoli in honour of Hadrian.
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  • The lives of Roman poets and scholars were among the many subjects that exercised the literary skill of Hadrian's private secretary, Suetonius.
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  • Some are supposed to have fled thither when expelled from Cyrenaica in the reign of the emperor Hadrian, and others on their banishment from Italy in 1342.
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  • Lastly, his Mouseion (a word of doubtful meaning) contained the narrative of the contest between Homer and Hesiod, two fragments of which are found in the 'Agon `Omerou Kai `Esiodou, the work of a grammarian in the time of Hadrian.
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  • But if the evidence available points to the time of Hadrian as the period at which the Hebrew text assumed its present form, it is even more certain that prior to that date the various MSS.
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  • The pagan chronicler, Phlegon, writing in the reign of Hadrian, noted under Olympiad 202.4 (= A.D.
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  • Further, the Megillath Ta'anith (" roll of fasts "), an old source with a collection of miscellaneous legends, &c.; Megillath Antiokhos, on the martyrdom under Hadrian; Seder`Olam Rabbah, on biblical history from Adam to the rebellion of Bar Kokba (Barcocheba); the " Book of Jashar "; the Chronicle of Jerahmeel," &c. Liturgical Midrash is illustrated by the Haggada shel Pesah, part of the ritual recited at the domestic service of the first two Passover evenings.
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  • The largest is that of Hadrian, situated in the low ground about 2 m.
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  • The remains are extensive and well preserved, though the identifications of the existing buildings with those mentioned by Spartianus who records that Hadrian gave to them the names of various well-known edifices at Athens and elsewhere, cannot in most cases be treated as certain.
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  • Adrianople was originally known as Uskadama, Uskadama or Uskodama, but was renamed and enlarged by the Roman emperor Hadrian (117-138).
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  • Dr Hadrian de Saravia, canon of Canterbury.
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  • This view is expressed by Laelius Felix, a lawyer probably of the age of Hadrian, when he writes "Is qui non universum populum, sed partem aliquam adesse jubet, non comitia, sed concilium edicere debet" (Gellius, Nodes Atticae, xv.
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  • The traditional scene of the Nativity, a grotto on the eastern part of the ridge, is alleged to have been desecrated during the reign of Hadrian by a temple of Adonis.
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  • 'Alrlrcavos), of Alexandria, Roman historian, flourished during the reigns of Trajan, Hadrian and Antoninus Pius.
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  • He acquired much influence with the emperor Hadrian, who adopted him as his son and successor on the 25th of February 138, after the death of his first adopted son Aelius Verus, on condition that he himself adopted Marcus Annius Verus, his wife's brother's son, and Lucius, son of Aelius Verus, afterwards the emperors Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Aelius Verus (colleague of Marcus Aurelius).
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  • A few months afterwards, on Hadrian's death, he was enthusiastically welcomed to the throne by the Roman people, who, for once, were not disappointed in their anticipation of a happy reign.
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  • In 122 the second reigning emperor who crossed the ocean, Hadrian, came himself to Britain, brought the Sixth Legion to replace the Ninth, and introduced the frontier policy of his age.
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  • The details of his work are imperfectly known, for though many remains survive, it is hard to separate those of Hadrian's date from others that are later.
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  • But that Hadrian built a wall here is proved alike by literature and by inscriptions.
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  • Whether the land beyond Hadrian's wall became temptingly peaceful or remained in vexing disorder, our authorities do not say.
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  • We know only that about 142 Hadrian's successor, Antoninus Pius, acting through his general Lollius Urbicus, advanced from the Tyne and Solway frontier to the narrower isthmus between Forth and Clyde, 36 m.
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  • An ancient writer states that the rampart was built of regularly laid sods (the same method which had probably been employed by Hadrian), and excavations in 1891-1893 have verified the statement.
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  • This wall was in addition to, and not instead of, the wall of Hadrian.
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  • He came thither in person, invaded Caledonia, commenced the reconstruction of the wall of Hadrian, rebuilding it from end to end in stone, and then in the fourth year of his operations died at York.
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  • Amid much that is uncertain and even legendary about his work in Britain, this is plain, that he fixed on the line of Hadrian's wall as his substantive frontier.
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  • The wall of Hadrian remained for nearly two hundred years more the northern limit of Roman power in the extreme west.
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  • The army which guarded or coerced the province consisted, from the time of Hadrian onwards, of (I) three legions, the Second at Isca Silurum (Caerleon-on-Usk, q.v.), the Ninth at Eburacum (q.v.; now York), the Twentieth at Deva (q.v.; now Chester), a total of some 15,000 heavy infantry; and (2) a large but uncertain number of auxiliaries, troops of the second grade, organized in infantry cohorts or cavalry alae, each 500 or 1000 strong, and posted in castella nearer the frontiers than the legions.
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  • Its ramparts are of stone, and its north rampart coincides with the great wall of Hadrian.
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  • Of the English examples a few have been carefully excavated, notably Gellygaer between Cardiff and Brecon, one of the most perfect specimens to be found anywhere in the Roman empire of a Roman fort dating from the end of the ist century A.D.; Hardknott, on a Cumberland moor overhanging Upper Eskdale; and Housesteads on Hadrian's wall.
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  • A second road, turning north-west from Catterick Bridge, mounted the Pennine Chain by way of forts at Rokeby, Bowes and Brough-underStainmoor, descended into the Eden valley, reached Hadrian's wall near Carlisle (Luguvallium), and passed on to Birrens.
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  • Besides these detached forts and their connecting roads, the north of Britain was defended by Hadrian's wall (figs.
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  • - Hadrian's Wall.
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  • This turf wall is certainly older than the stone wall, and, as our ancient writers mention two wall-builders, Hadrian and Septimius Severus, the natural inference is that Hadrian built his wall of turf and Severus reconstructed it in stone.
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  • The reconstruction probably followed in general,the line of Hadrian's wall in order to utilize the existing ditch, and,this explains why the turf wall itself survives only at special points.
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  • - Section of Hadrian's Wall.
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  • Others have ascribed it to Agricola, or have thought it to be the wall of Hadrian, or even assigned it to pre-Roman natives.
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  • The two facts that are clear about it are, that it is a Roman work, no older than Hadrian (if so old), and that it was not intended, like the wall, for military defence.
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  • Hadrian Allcroft, Earthwork of England (1909).
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  • For the wall of Hadrian see John Hodgson, History of Northumberland (1840); J.
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  • (Leipzig, 1899); Kate Norgate, England under the Angevin kings (London, 1887); and P. Scheffer-Boichorst, " Hat Papst Hadrian IV.
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  • Hatra successfully withstood siege, however, and Hadrian abandoned Mesopotamia, setting the boundary at the Euphrates.
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  • AELIA CAPITOLINA, the city built by the emperor Hadrian, A.D.
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  • Within the grounds, which comprise nearly 1500 acres, is the mausoleum erected by the 10th duke, a structure resembling in general design that of the emperor Hadrian at Rome, being a circular building springing from a square basement, and enclosing a decorated octagonal chapel, the door of which is a copy in bronze of Ghiberti's gates at Florence.
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  • DIOGENIANUS, of Heraclea on the Pontus (or in Caria), Greek grammarian, flourished during the reign of Hadrian.
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  • 35), though some restoration, as well as the building of a new temple, was undertaken by Hadrian.
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  • contains a more developed form of the myth of Nero redivivus in which a panegyric on him (137-141) has been brought up to date by some Jew or Christian, and eulogies of Hadrian and his successors (48-51) side by side with the legend of the miserable death of Titus in quittance of his destruction of Jerusalem (411-413) which probably represents the hope of the zealots who survived it.
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  • Still, Augustus resorted thither; here Tiberius recovered from a dangerous illness, and here Hadrian probably built himself a villa.
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  • The ruins of the villa attributed to Hadrian stand in the plain near the church of S.
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  • the villa of the Quintilii on the Via Appia, that known as Setta Bassi on the Via Latina, and that of Hadrian near Tibur, the largest of all.
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  • Ascents of the mountain were not infrequent in those days - one was made by Hadrian.
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  • ANTINOÃœS, a beautiful youth of Claudiopolis in Bithynia, was the favourite of the emperor Hadrian, whom he accompanied on his journeys.
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  • After his death, Hadrian caused the most extravagant respect to be paid to his memory.
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  • I I; Spartianus, Hadrian).
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  • Philip - or rather the compiler who made excerpts from him - says that he was at the head of an Alexandrian school (the catechetical), that he lived in the time of Hadrian and Antoninus, to whom he addressed his Apology, and that Clement of Alexandria was his pupil; but these statements are more than doubtful.
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  • HADRIAN'S WALL, the name usually given to the remains of the Roman fortifications which defended the northern frontier of the Roman province of Britain, between the Tyne and the Solway.
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  • The defensive wall was probably first erected by Hadrian about A.D.
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  • 6.3) for a decree of Hadrian respecting the Jews, but he is best known as the writer of a Dialogue (between Papiscus, an Alexandrian Jew, and Jason, who represents the author) on the witness of prophecy to Jesus Christ, which was approvingly defended by Origen against the reproaches of Celsus.
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  • Few emperors visited Sicily; Hadrian was there, as everywhere, in A.D.
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  • ARISTIDES Until 1878 our knowledge of the early Christian writer Aristides was confined to the statement of Eusebius that he was an Athenian philosopher, who presented an apology "concerning the faith" to the emperor Hadrian.
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  • Harris is followed by Harnack and others in supposing that it was only through a careless reading of this inscription that the work was supposed to have been addressed to Hadrian.
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  • There are, however, no internal grounds for rejecting the thriceattested dedication to Hadrian his predecessor, and the picture of primitive Christian life which is here found points to the earlier rather than to the later date.
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  • It is possible that the Apology was read to Hadrian in person when he visited Athens, and that the Syriac inscription was prefixed by a scribe on the analogy of Justin's Apology, a mistake being made in the amplification of Hadrian's name.
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  • It was not till the reign of Hadrian that city life on the Phrygian plateau became rich and vigorous, with its material circumstances of temples, theatres and baths.
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  • The attitude of the Rabbinic doctors to a Greek education does not seem to have been hostile till the time of Hadrian.
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  • That circumcision (though perhaps not till puberty) was regularly practised is proved by the mummies (agreeing with the testimony of Herodotus and the indications of the early tomb sculptures) until an edict of Hadrian forbade it: after that, only priests were circumcised.
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  • After this there was a strong archaistic fashion, much like that under Hadrian; in both cases it may have arrested decay, but it did not lift the art up again.
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  • South of MedInet Habu a small temple was built by Hadrian and Antoninus.
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  • Hadrian, who twice visited Egypt (A.n.
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  • 1 These statute law commissioners, as one may call them, set to work forthwith, and completed their task in fourteen months, distributing the constitutions which they placed in the new collection into ten books, in general conformity with the order of the Perpetual Edict as settled by Salvius Julianus and enacted by Hadrian.
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  • The constitutions contained in it number 4652, the earliest dating from Hadrian, the latest being of course Justinian's own.
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  • A circus, other colonnades and great numbers of baths were built, and new aqueducts to supply them bore the names of Caesars, the finest being the work of Hadrian.
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  • Most of the sculpture decorated a bath restored by Hadrian.
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  • 300 that we read of " the Caledonians and other Picts "; in the 4th century they frequently harried the Romans up to the wall of Hadrian, between Tyne and Solway.
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  • It lay south of the city, near the outer wall, and, if Epiphanius is to be believed, was already in existence when Hadrian (130-131) visited Jerusalem (De mens.
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  • The Jews were mainly country-folk from the time of their settlement in Canaan to their final expulsion from the land by Titus and Hadrian, and the soil of Israelitish Palestine was better adapted to the raising of sheep and oxen than to the production of grain.
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  • His master was executed by Hadrian, and Simon's anti-Roman sentiments led to his own condemnation by Varus c. 161 A.D.
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  • restored the royal power by murdering four of the ephors and abolishing the office, and though it was revived by Antigonus Doson after the battle of Sellasia, and existed at least down to Hadrian's reign (Sparta Museum Catalogue, Introd.
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  • At Athens Antiochus began to build a vast temple of Zeus Olympius, in place of one begun by Peisistratus; but it was only finished by Hadrian in A.D.
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  • 70, and the rebellion under Hadrian, which led to the edict forbidding the Jews to enter Jerusalem, are matters proper to the history of the Jews.
    0
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  • At last Hadrian determined to stamp out this aggressive Jewish nationalism.
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  • Julius Severus, sent with an immense army by Hadrian, came to quell the insurrection.
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  • Hadrian then turned Jerusalem into a Roman colony, changed its name to Aelia Capitolina, built a temple of Jupiter on the site of the Jewish temple and (it is alleged) a temple of Venus on the site of the Holy Sepulchre, and forbade any Jew, on pain of death, to appear within sight of the city.
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  • The date of both has been a matter of dispute, Damophon being placed at dates varying from the 4th century B.C. to the age of Hadrian.
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  • South of the town are the villages of Genna, Guehda (with a temple dedicated to Ammon, Mut and Khonsu), Bulak (pop. 1012), Dakakin, Beris (pop. 1564), Dush (with remains of a fine temple bearing the names of Domitian and Hadrian), &c.
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  • According to some authorities he lived into the time of Hadrian; he himself mentions the coinage of the emperor Trajan.
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  • 131 by Hadrian, and stamped Adriane Petra on its coins in gratitude for the emperor's benefactions; the superb IIazne, probably a temple for the worship of Isis, and the Der, which resembles the IIazne in design, belong to this period.
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  • The springs of Baden were known to the Romans, and the foundation of the town is referred to the emperor Hadrian by an inscription of somewhat doubtful authenticity.
    0
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  • The state even afforded them protection against extreme cruelty on the part of their masters in respect of life and limb, but in laying down this rule English lawyers were able to follow the precedents set by late Roman jurisprudence, especially by measures of Hadrian, Antonine and Constantine the Great.
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  • The dux first appears in the Roman empire under the emperor Hadrian, and by the time of the Gordians has already a recognized place in the official hierarchy.
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  • Another most imposing structure is the theatre, dating from the time of the emperor Hadrian and built against a hill from the summit of which a colossal figure of the Virgin commands the town.
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  • After the reconstruction under Diocletian at the end of the 3rd century A.D., fifteen years (the indictio) - though probably used as early as the time of Hadrian - was recognized as the period for revaluation.
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  • ro), or in that of Hadrian, after the revolt of Bar-Cochebas.
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  • Hadrian, afterwards emperor, suppressed them, and expelled all Jews from Cyprus.
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  • In 129, under Hadrian, Dacia was divided into Dacia Superior and Inferior, the former comprising Transylvania, the latter Little Walachia, with procurators, probably both under the same praetorian legate (according to Brandis, the procurator of Dacia inferior was independent, but see A.
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  • Indeed it is said that Hadrian, conscious of the difficulty of retaining it, had contemplated its abandonment and was only deterred by consideration for the safety of the numerous Roman settlers.
    0
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  • On his death, however, Hadrian immediately reverted to the Augustan policy and restored the conquests.
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  • With the Roman Empire a profound peace had reigned since Hadrian (117), which was first disturbed by the attack of Marcus Aurelius and Aelius Verus in 162.
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  • Hadrian, who repaired the Via Appia from Beneventum to this point, made it a colony; it has ruins of the city walls, of an aqueduct, baths and an amphitheatre; nearly 400 inscriptions have also been discovered.
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  • The island was presented by Hadrian to Athens, but it appears again at a later date as "free and autonomous."
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  • But after the death of Trajan (117) Hadrian acknowledged Osroes and made Parthamaspates king of Edessa (Osroene); he also gave back to Osroes his daughter who had been taken prisoner by Trajan (Dio Cass.
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  • Indeed, Eusebius, who deals with him along with Clement and Ignatius (rather than Polycarp) under the reign of Trajan, and before referring at all to Hadrian's reign (A.D.
    0
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  • The satire in which the lines now appear was probably first published soon after the accession of Hadrian, when Juvenal was not an octogenarian but in the maturity of his powers.
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  • The time at which this satire was composed cannot be fixed with certainty, but some allusions render it highly probable that it was given to the world in the later years of Trajan, and before the accession of Hadrian.
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  • The date of the publication of Book III., containing the seventh, eighth and ninth satires, seems to be fixed by its opening line to the first years after the accession of Hadrian.
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  • Roman remains have been discovered in proximity to Hadrian's Wall.
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  • The origin of the Nazarenes or Ebionites as a distinct sect is very obscure, but may be dated with much likelihood from the edict of Hadrian which in 135 finally scattered the old church of Jerusalem.
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  • (Freiburg, 1907); also Wetzer and Welte, Kirchenlexikon, 2nd ed., and Herzog-Hauck, Realencyklopadie, 3rd ed., under "Hadrian VI."; H.
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  • The cruel rite had ceased in the Arcadian worship before Pliny wrote, but seems to have continued in Cyprus till the reign of Hadrian.
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  • His talents gained him the favourable notice of Hadrian, who appointed him praefect of the free towns in the province of Asia (125).(125).
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  • A colony was founded there in Roman times, and Hadrian made a harbour - no doubt at S.
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  • The most conspicuous monument is the triple Gate of Hadrian, flanked by a tower built by the empress Julia.
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  • Harnack (Chron.) under Hadrian.
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  • It was the favourite residence of many of the emperors; Nero made his first appearance on the stage in one of its theatres; Titus assumed the office of its archon; and Hadrian became its demarch.
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  • His references to Septimius Serenus and Alfius Avitus, who belonged to the school of "new poets" (poetae neoterici or novelli) of the reign of Hadrian and later, seem to show that he was a near contemporary of those writers.
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  • Having been refused a prize owing to the prejudice against African provincials, he left Rome in disgust, and after travelling for some time set up at Tarraco as a teacher of rhetoric. Here he was persuaded by an acquaintance to return to Rome, for it is generally agreed that he is the Florus who wrote the well-known lines quoted together with Hadrian's answer by Aelius Spartianus (Hadrian 16).
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  • Florus is important as being the first in order of a number of 2nd-century African writers who exercised a considerable influence on Latin literature, and also the first of the poetae neoterici or novelli (new-fashioned poets) of Hadrian's reign, whose special characteristic was the use of lighter and graceful metres (anapaestic and iambic dimeters), which had hitherto found little favour.
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  • Muller, De P. Annio Floro poeta et de Pervigilio Veneris (1855), and, for the poet's relations with Hadrian, F.
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  • Eyssenhardt, Hadrian and Florus (1882); see also F.
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  • AUGUSTAN HISTORY, the name given to a collection of the biographies of the Roman emperors from Hadrian to Carinus (A.D.
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  • The lives, which (with few exceptions) are arranged in chronological order, are distributed as follows: - To Spartianus: the biographies of Hadrian, Aelius Verus, Didius Julianus, Septimius Severus, Pescennius Niger, Caracallus, Geta (?); to Vulcacius Gallicanus: Avidius Cassius; to Capitolinus: Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, Verus, Pertinax, Clodius Albinus, the two Maximins, the three Gordians, Maximus and Balbinus, Opilius Macrinus (?); to Lampridius: Commodus, Diadumenus, Elagabalus, Alexander Severus; to Pollio: the two Valerians, the Gallieni, the so-called Thirty Tyrants or Usurpers, Claudius (his lives of Philip, Decius, and Gallus being lost); to Vopiscus: Aurelian, Tacitus, Florian, Probus, the four tyrants (Firmus, Saturninus, Proculus, Bonosus), Carus, Numerian, Carinus.
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  • Kornemann, Kaiser Hadrian and der letzte grosse Historiker von Rom (1905), according to whom "the last great historian of Rome" is Lollius Urbicus; O.
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  • Trajan deposed the dynasty, but Hadrian restored it.
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  • BARCOCHEBAS, BAR-COCHAB, or BAR Kokba ("son of a star"), the name given in Christian sources to one Simeon, the leader in the Jewish revolt against Rome in the time of Hadrian (A.D.
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  • west, containing churches, baths, and a great grain store, inscribed with Hadrian's name.
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  • Nothing certain is known of the date or nationality of the writer, but there is some reason for believing that he was an Alexandrian, who wrote in the time of Hadrian (some put him as late as the end of the 3rd century).
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  • 124 mentions repairs to the road made by Hadrian from the boundary of the territory of Clusium to Florence, a distance of 86 m.
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  • Perhaps the finest existing statue of her is the Diana of Versailles from Hadrian's Villa (now in the Louvre), in which she wears a short tunic drawn in at the waist and sandals on her feet; her hair is bound up into a knot at the back of her head, with a band over the forehead.
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  • Wilke (Der Urevangelist, 1838), was that the original narrative was the Gospel of Mark; that this was composed in the reign of Hadrian; and that after this the other narratives were modelled by other writers.
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  • At or near Balikisri was the Roman town of Hadrianutherae, founded, as its name commemorates, by the emperor Hadrian.
    0
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  • Augustus showed marked favour to the city, Hadrian twice visited it during his journeys in the East and accepted the title of eponymous patronomus.
    0
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  • Of statesmen the Peninsula was less prolific. The emperor Trajan, indeed, and his relative and successor Hadrian, were born in Spain, but they were both of Roman stock and Roman training.
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  • (excellent bibliography), and Wetzer and Welte, Kirchenlexikon, 2nd ed., under Hadrian IV."; also Oliver J.
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  • FLORUS, Roman historian, flourished in the time of Trajan and Hadrian.
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  • From certain similarities of style he has been identified with Publius Annius Florus, poet, rhetorician and friend of Hadrian, author of a dialogue on the question whether Virgil was an orator or poet, of which the introduction has been preserved.
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  • For the former purpose he seems to have made use of an already existent book, perhaps the ror 7 rwv ¢opt of Oenomaus of Gadara, a Syrian who wrote in the time of Hadrian.
    0
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  • The emperor Hadrian founded an educational institution, named after her the Athenaeum.
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  • In 668 Pope Vitalian sent Theodore of Tarsus to be archbishop of Canterbury, and about the same time came the African scholar Hadrian, who became abbot of St Augustine's at Canterbury.
    0
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  • He must, nevertheless, have been thirty years of age when he began to study with Hadrian.
    0
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  • Ill-health compelled him to leave Canterbury, and he returned to Malmesbury, where he was a monk under Maildulf for fourteen years, dating probably from 661, and including the period of his studies with Hadrian.
    0
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  • Hadrian, however, abandoning Trajan's forward policy in favour of a Euphrates boundary, restored it as a dependency of Rome.
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  • Hadrian had spent much of his reign touring the Roman world, and some of these showed the personifications of provinces greeting him.
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  • The emperor Hadrian represents the acme of that process of interaction.
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  • antiquityeror Hadrian is known to have collected Greek marbles and Egyptian antiquities.
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  • buildtorical Monuments Hadrian's Wall, is the most important monument built by the Romans in Britain.
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  • buildtorical Monuments Hadrian's Wall, is the most important monument built by the romans in Britain.
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  • defensive ditch situated just north of Hadrian's Wall.
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  • This road is built along the site of a Roman defensive ditch situated just north of Hadrian's Wall.
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  • The tour revolves around Hexham - historic abbey town and heart of Hadrian's Wall Country - and its rural environs.
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  • Over Hadrian's Wall An ascent from Ullswater to Little Mell Fell passes alpine enchanters nightshade.
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  • Hadrian improved on this idea, by building a continuous timber palisade backed by forts.
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  • A former whinstone quarry on the line of Hadrian's Wall and the Pennine Way which has been developed for recreation and wildlife.
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  • scale replica of Hadrian's Wall and two complete villages.
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  • triumphal arch named Hadrian's Arch.
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  • The wall, as opposed to the stone structure of Hadrian's, was a rampart made from stacked turves.
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  • The three girls, aged respectively twelve, ten and nine years, daughters of St Sophia who were martyred in Rome under Hadrian.
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  • unique insight into the daily life of a Roman soldier based on Hadrian's Wall.
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  • Hadrian didn't do anything wrong, David was just that one step ahead.
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  • Thus the Wall of Hadrian in north England (see Britain: Roman) is now sometimes styled the Limes Britannicus, the frontier of the Roman province of Arabia facing the desert the Limes Arabicus and so forth.
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  • Either Hadrian or, more probably, his successor Pius pushed out from the Odenwald and the Danube, and marked out a new frontier roughly parallel to but in advance of these two lines, though sometimes, as on the Taunus, coinciding with the older line.
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  • Each successive praetor adopted the edict of his predecessor, and added new equitable rules of his own, until the further growth of the irregular code was stopped by the praetor Salvius Julianus in the reign of Hadrian.
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  • The history of Jerusalem during the period between the foundation of the city of Aelia by the emperor Hadrian and the accession of Constantine the Great in 306 is obscure, but no important change appears to have been made in the size or fortifications of the city, which continued as a Roman colony.
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  • In the Roman Church the bishop blesses the oil of the sick used in extreme unctions on Holy Thursday at the Chrismal Mass,' using the following prayer of the sacramentaries of Gelasius and Hadrian: "Send forth, we pray Thee, 0 Lord, Thy holy spirit, the Paraclete from Heaven, into this fatness of oil, which Thou hast deigned to produce from the green wood for refreshment of mind and body; and through Thy holy benediction may it be for all that anoint, taste, touch, a protection of mind and body, of soul and spirit, unto the easing away of all pain, all weakness, all sickness of mind and body; wherefore Thou hast anointed priest, kings and prophets and martyrs with thy chrism, perfected by Thee, 0 Lord, blessed and abiding in our bowels in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ."
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  • Under Antoninus the "pursuit" of Christians was unknown; under Trajan and Hadrian it was forbidden (cf.
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  • It was Favorinus who, on being silenced by Hadrian in an argument in which the sophist might easily have refuted his adversary, subsequently explained that it was foolish to criticize the logic of the master of thirty legions.
    0
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  • This criticism is based on a perverse misreading of the historian's observations on the age of Trajan, Hadrian and the Antonines.
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  • Schlatter's Geschichte Israel's von Alexander dem Grossen bis Hadrian (2nd ed., 1906) is perhaps the least dependent upon Scharer and attempts more than others to interpret the fragmentary evidence available.
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  • But it seems more probable that the real author was Herennius Philo of Byblus, who was born during the reign of Nero and lived till the reign of Hadrian, and that the treatise in its present form is a revision prepared by a later Byzantine editor, whose name may have been Ammonius.
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  • Ptolemy catalogued nineteen stars jointly in this constellation and in the constellation Antinous, which was named in the reign of the emperor Hadrian (A.D.
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  • In for Hadrian was quaestor, in 10s tribune of the people, in 106 praetor.
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  • i) the adoption was entirely fictitious, the work of Plotina and Attianus, by whom Trajan's death was concealed for a few days in order to facilitate the elevation of Hadrian.
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  • He travelled by way of Athens, where he completed and dedicated the buildings (see Athens) begun during his first visit, chief of which was the Olympieum or temple of Olympian Zeus, on which occasion Hadrian himself assumed the name of Olympius.
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  • He ordered Jerusalem to be rebuilt (see Jerusalem) under the name of Aelia Capitolina, and made his way through Arabia to Egypt, where he restored 1 The chronology of Hadrian's journeys - indeed, of the whole reign - is confused and obscure.
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  • On the 21st of November 130, Hadrian (or at any rate his wife Sabina) heard the music which issued at sunrise from the statue of Memnon at Thebes (see Memnon).
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  • Hadrian then adopted Arrius Antoninus (see Antoninus Pius) on condition that he should adopt M.
    0
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  • Roman law owes much to Hadrian, who instructed Salvius Julianus to draw up an edictum perpetuum, to a great extent the basis of Justinian's Corpus juris (see M.
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  • Hadrian's celebrated dying address to his soul may here be quoted: "Animula vagula, blandula, Hospes comesque corporis, Quae nunc abibis in loca Pallidula, rigida, nudula; Nec, ut soles, dabis jocos?"
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  • The chief ancient authorities for the reign of Hadrian are: the life by Aelius Spartianus in the Scriptores historiae Augustae (see AUGUSTAN HISTORY and bibliography); the epitome of Dio Cassius (lxix.) by Xiphilinus; Aurelius Victor, Epit.
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  • The emperor Hadrian was the most lavish of all the benefactors of Athens.
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  • A Pantheon and temples of Hera and Zeus Panhellenius were likewise built by Hadrian; the aqueduct, which he began, was completed by Antoninus Pius (A.D.
    0
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  • SORANUS, Greek physician, born at Ephesus, lived during the reigns of Trojan and Hadrian (A.D.
    0
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  • i); the gerousia, however, continued to exist at least down to Hadrian's reign, consisting of twenty-three members annually elected, but eligible for re-election (Sparta Museum Catalogue, Nos.
    0
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  • Of the twenty-four cities which originally composed the league, only eighteen remained as members by the reign of Hadrian (see Achaean League).
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  • Sir William Tite, in describing a tessellated pavement found in 1854 on the site of the Excise Office (Bishopsgate Street), expresses the opinion that the finished character of the pavement points to a period of security and wealth, and fixes on the reign of Hadrian (A.D.
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  • Other extant works of Arrian are: Indica, a description of India in the Ionic dialect, including the voyage of Nearchus, intended as a supplement to the Anabasis; Acies Contra Alanos, a fragment of importance for the knowledge of Roman military affairs; Periplus of the Euxine, an official account written (iii) for the emperor Hadrian; Tactica, attributed by some to Aelianus, who wrote in the reign of Trajan; Cynegeticus, a treatise on the chase, supplementing Xenophon's work on the same subject; the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, attributed to him, is by a later compiler.
    0
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  • QUINTUS TERENTIUS SCAURUS, Latin grammarian, flourished during the reign of Hadrian (Aulus Gellius xi.
    0
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  • (1898), 4.93 The wine of Fundi is spoken of by ancient writers, though the ager Caecubus, the coast plain round the Lago di Fundi, was even more renowned, and Horace frequently praises its wine; and though Pliny the Elder speaks as if its production had almost entirely ceased in his day (attributing this to neglect, but even more to the excavation works of Nero's projected canal from the lacus Avernus to Ostia), Martial mentions it often, and it is spoken of in the inscription of a wine-dealer of the time of Hadrian, together with Falernian and Setian wines (Corpus inscript.
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  • 690) founded a school for the study of Greek, and with the help of an African monk named Hadrian made many of the English monasteries schools of Greek and Latin learning, so that, in the time of Bede (d.
    0
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  • 5, § 4) testifies that the belief in the immediate appearance of the Messianic king gave the chief impulse to the war that ended in the destruction of the Jewish state; after the fall of the temple the last apocalypses (Baruch, 4 Ezra) still loudly proclaim the near victory of the God-sent king; and Bar Cochebas, the leader of the revolt against Hadrian, was actually greeted as the Messiah by Rabbi Aqiba (cf.
    0
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  • One of his first acts was to persuade the senate to grant divine honours to Hadrian, which they had at first refused; this gained him the title of Pius (dutiful in affection).
    0
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  • The personification of Britannia as a female figure may be traced back as far as the coins of Hadrian and Antoninus Pius (early 2nd century A.D.); its first appearance on modern coins is on the copper of Charles II.
    0
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  • Close by were officers' quarters, generally built round a tiny cloistered court (ix., xi., xii.), 0 'Borcovicium (HousEsrf aas) ' - Plan of Housesteads (Borcovicium) on Hadrian's Wall.
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  • The other and more elaborate work was composed by Philo of Byblus (temp. Hadrian); he professed that he had used as his authority the writings of Sanchuniathon, an ancient Phoenician sage, who again derived his information from the mysterious inscribed stones (aµµovveis=o'mnrt, i.e.
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  • ANTINOÃœS, a beautiful youth of Claudiopolis in Bithynia, was the favourite of the emperor Hadrian, whom he accompanied on his journeys.
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  • A former whinstone quarry on the line of Hadrian 's Wall and the Pennine Way which has been developed for recreation and wildlife.
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  • Featuring the largest film set ever built in Ireland, KING ARTHUR features a scale replica of Hadrian 's Wall and two complete villages.
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  • On the edge of the site stands the triumphal arch named Hadrian 's Arch.
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  • Hadrian 's Wall Country is a walker 's paradise.
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  • Hadrian did n't do anything wrong, David was just that one step ahead.
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  • The emperor Hadrian, when he rebuilt the city, changed the name to Aelia Capitolina.
    3
    3