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haarlem

haarlem

haarlem Sentence Examples

  • of Amsterdam, connected by steam-tramway with Haarlem and Amsterdam, and on the North Holland canal.

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  • In 1254 it received a charter from William II., count of Holland, similar to that of Haarlem, but in the 15th century duke Philip the Good of Burgundy made the impoverishment of the town, due to ill-government, the excuse for establishing an oligarchical regime, by charters of 1436 and 1437.

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  • As the captial of the ancient district of Kennemerland between den Helder and Haarlem, Alkmaar frequently suffered in the early wars between the Hollanders and the Frisians, and in 1517 was captured by the united Gelderlanders and Frisians.

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  • Dordrecht, Leiden, Haarlem, Delft, Vlaardigen, Rotterdam in Holland, and Middleburg and Zierikzee in Zeeland, repeated with modifications the characteristics of the communes of Flanders and Brabant.

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  • The primatial see was placed at Malines (Mechlin), having under it Antwerp, Hertogenbosch, Roermond, Ghent, Bruges, and Ypres constituting the Flemish province; the second archbishopric was at Cambray, with Tournay, Arras, St Omer, and Namur, - the Walloon province; the third at Utrecht, with Haarlem, Middleburg, Leeuwarden, Groningen and Deventer, - the northern (Dutch) province.

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  • The famous defence of Haarlem, lasting through the winter of 1572 to July 1573, cost the besiegers 12,000 lives, and gave of the insurgent provinces time to breathe.

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  • The example Siege Haarlem of Haarlem was followed by Alkmaar, and with better and success.

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  • Van der Aa, Biographisch woordenboek der Nederlanden (22 vols., Haarlem, 1852-1878).

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  • ABRAHAM KUENEN (1828-1891), Dutch Protestant theologian, the son of an apothecary, was born on the 16th of September 1828, at Haarlem, North Holland.

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  • By the generosity of friends he was educated at the gymnasium at Haarlem and afterwards at the university of Leiden.

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  • sacristan) being merely the title which he bore as an official of the great parish church of Haarlem.

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  • See Peter Scriver, Beschryvinge der Stad Harlem (Haarlem, 1628); Scheltema, Levensschets van Laurens d.

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  • Koster (Haarlem, 1834); Van der Linde, De Haarlemsche Costerlegende (Hague, 1870).

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  • Other noteworthy buildings are the Gothic town hall, founded in 1449 and rebuilt in 1690, and the weigh-house, built by Pieter Post of Haarlem (1608-1669) and adorned with a fine relief by Barth.

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  • Tuyn, Oude Hollandsche Dorpen aan de Zuiderzee (Haarlem, 1900).

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  • C. de Jongke (Haarlem, 1858); Annales des Provinces-Unies, by J.

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  • Haarlem >>

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  • PETER SCHRIJVER (1576-1660), Dutch author, better known as Scriverius, was born at Haarlem on the 12th of January 1576.

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  • historic (1611, 4 parts); Beschryvinghe van Out Batavien (Arnheim, 1612); Het oude gontsche Chronycxken van Hollandt, edited by him, and printed at Amsterdam in 1663; Principes Hollandiae Zelandiae et Frisiae (Haarlem, 1650), translated (1678) into Dutch by Pieter Brugman.

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  • HAARLEM, a town of Holland in the province of North Holland, on the Spaarne, having a junction station 11 m.

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  • Haarlem is the seat of the governor of the province of North Holland, and of a Roman Catholic and a Jansenist bishopric. In appearance it is a typical Dutch town, with numerous narrow canals and quaintly gabled houses.

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  • At, the head of the scientific institutions of Haarlem may be placed the Dutch Society of Sciences (Hollandsche Maatschappij van Wetenschappen), founded in 1752, which possesses valuable collections in botany, natural history and geology.

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  • Besides these there are a museum of ecclesiastical antiquities, chiefly relating to the bishopric of Haarlem; the old weigh-house (1598) and the orphanage for girls (1608), originally an almshouse for old men, both built by the architect Lieven de Key of Ghent.

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  • The staple industries of Haarlem have been greatly modified in the course of time.

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  • But about the close of the 18th century this remarkable prosperity had also come to an end, and it was not till after the Belgian revolution of 1830-1831 that Haarlem began to develop the manufactures in which it is now chiefly engaged.

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  • Market-gardening, especially horticulture, is extensively practised in the vicinity, so that Haarlem is the seat of a large trade in Dutch bulbs, especially hyacinths, tulips, fritillaries, spiraeas and japonicas.

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  • Haarlem, which was a prosperous place in the middle of the 12th century, received its first town charter from William II., count of Holland and king of the Romans, in 1245.

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  • In 1572 Haarlem joined the revolt of the Netherlands against Spain, but on the 13th of July 1573, after a seven months' siege, was forced to surrender to Alva's son Frederick, who exacted terrible vengeance.

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  • See Karl Hegel, Steidle and Gilden (Leipzig, 1891); Allan, Geschiedenis en beschrijving van Haarlem (Haarlem, 1871-1888).

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  • Haarlem Lake >>

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  • of Haarlem.

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  • It is connected by steam tramway with Haarlem and The Hague respectively, and with the seaside resorts of Katwyk and Noordwyk.

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  • The earliest "pensionaries" in Holland were those of Dort (1468) and of Haarlem (1478).

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  • The success which followed his labours not only in the town of Utrecht, but also in Zwolle, Deventer, Kampen, Amsterdam, Haarlem, Gouda, Leiden, Delft, Zutphen and elsewhere, was immense; according to Thomas Kempis the people left their business and their meals to hear his sermons, so that the churches could not hold the crowds that flocked together wherever he came.

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  • Chantepie de la Saussaye, Geschiednis van den Godsdienst der Germanen (Haarlem, 1900); The Religion of the Teutons (Boston, 1902) F.

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  • north of Haarlem to twice that distance south, hyacinths, tulips, narcissus and crocuses being the flowers chiefly cultivated.

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  • Other ancient towns are Zandpoort, Bakenes, Haarlem and Bennebroek, once the seat of a nunnery removed hither from Egmond by Dirk II.

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  • Of the drained lakes south of the former Y, the most important is the Haarlem Lake.

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  • springs containing iron have been discovered, such as the Wilhelminabron at Haarlem.

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  • Supplements to the large collection of 1687 were published at Haarlem, 1806; Leiden, 1809; and Haarlem, 1829.

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  • Ijzerman, &c., Dwars door Sumatra, Tocht van Padang naar Siak (Haarlem, 1895); A.

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  • at the High Blinkert, near Haarlem.

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  • Teyler (Haarlem), ser.

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  • The largest towns are Amsterdam, Rotterdam, the Hague, Utrecht, Groningen, Haarlem, Arnhem, Leiden, Nijmwegen, Tilburg.

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  • The first line was that between Amsterdam and Haarlem, opened in 1839 by the Holland railway company (Hollandsch Yzeren Spoorweg Maatschappij).

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  • The two longitudinal lines are the railway den Helder via Haarlem (1862-1867), 1 Rotterdam (1839-1847), and Zwaluwe (1869-1877) to Antwerp (1852-1855), belonging to the Holland railway company, and the State railway from Leeuwarden and Groningen (1870) (junction at Meppel, 1867) Zwolle (1866) - Arnhem (1865)- Nijmwegen (1879) - Venlo (1883) - Maastricht (1865).

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  • An electric tramway connects Haarlem and Zandvoort.

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  • Among societies of general utility are the Society for Public Welfare (Maatschappij tot nut van't algemeen, 1785), whose efforts have been mainly in the direction of educational reform; the Geographical Society at Amsterdam (1873); Teyler's Stichting or foundation at Haarlem (1778), and the societies for the promotion of industry (1777), and of sciences (1752) in the same town; the Institute of Languages, Geography and Ethnology of the Dutch Indies (1851), and the Indian Society at the Hague, the Royal Institute of Engineers at Delft (1848), the Association for the Encouragement of Music at Amsterdam, &c.

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  • Other Protestant bodies are the Walloons, who, though possessing an independent church government, are attached to the Low-Dutch Reformed Church; the Lutherans, divided into the main body of Evangelical Lutherans and a smaller division calling themselves the Re-established or Old Lutherans (Herstelde Lutherschen) who separated in 1791 in order to keep more strictly to the Augsburg confession; the Mennonites founded by Menno Simons of Friesland, about the beginning of the 16th century; the Baptists, whose only central authority is the General Baptist Society founded at Amsterdam in 1811; the Evangelical Brotherhood of Hernhutters or Moravians, who have churches and schools at Zeist and Haarlem; and a Catholic Apostolic Church (1867) at the Hague.

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  • In 1853 the Roman Catholic Church, which before had been a mission in the hands of papal legates and vicars, was raised into an independent ecclesiastical province with five dioceses, namely, the archbishopric of Utrecht, and the suffragan bishoprics of Haarlem, Breda, 's Hertogenbosch and Roermond, each with its own seminary.

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  • Besides an archbishop at Utrecht, the Old Catholics have bishops at Deventer and Haarlem, and a training college at Amersfoort.

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  • Schipperns (Haarlem, 1888); Friesland Meres and through the Netherlands, by H.

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  • Natural history is covered by various periodical publications of the Royal Zoological Society " Natura Artis Magistra " at Amsterdam, and the Natuurlijke Historie van Nederland (Haarlem, 1856-1863) written by specialists, and including ethnology and flora.

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  • A Flemish translation appeared at Haarlem in 1495.

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  • Francke, David Hume (Haarlem, 1907).

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  • Here the sect had gained considerable influence, through the adhesion of Rothmann, the Lutheran pastor, and several prominent citizens; and the leaders, Johann Matthyszoon or Matthiesen, a baker of Haarlem, and Johann Bockholdt, a tailor of Leiden, had little difficulty in obtaining possession of the town and deposing the magistrates.

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  • Hofmann (Haarlem, 1883-1885); Erbkam, Gesch.

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  • 1748); Tielmann Janssen van Bracht, Martyrologia Mennonitarum (Haarlem, 1615 - 1631); Joh.

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  • Nevertheless the epidemic spread in the next few years over Spain and Germany, and a little later to Holland, where Amsterdam in1663-1664was again ravaged with a mortality given as 50,000, also Rotterdam and Haarlem.

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  • trans., Religion and Historic Faiths (London, 1907); Haarlem Series, Die Voornaamste Godsdiensten, beginning with Islam, by Dozy (1863 onwards); Soc. for Promotion of Christian Knowledge, Non-Christian Religions; Hibbert Lectures on The Origin and Growth of Religion (15 vols., beginning with F.

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  • van der Aa, Biographisch Woordenboek der Nederlanden (Haarlem, 1851-1879); J.

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  • In 1631 he formed the surviving members of the chapters of Utrecht and Haarlem into a collegiate body which became known as the chapter of Utrecht.

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  • 1767) two suffragan sees were created, that of Haarlem in 1742, that of Deventer in 1757.

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  • Soon he settled in Haarlem, as engraver on copper, and produced works which retain high values.

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  • It has communication by railway and canal in every direction; steam-tramways connect it with Edam, Purmerend, Alkmaar and Hilversum, and electric railways with Haarlem and the seaside resort of Zandvoort.

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  • The nucleus of this unsurpassed national collection of pictures was formed out of the collections removed hither from the Pavilion at Haarlem, consisting of modern paintings, and from the town-hall, the van der Hoop Museum and the Trippenhuis in Amsterdam.

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  • It was in the days of Duke Philip that Lorenz Koster of Haarlem contributed his share to the discovery of printing.

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  • The sieges of Haarlem, Neth er- Alkmaar and Leiden saved Holland from being lands.

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  • The following eighteen towns sent representatives: South Quarter - (I) Dordrecht, (2) Haarlem, (3) Delft, (4) Leiden, (5) Amsterdam, (6) Gouda, (7) Rotterdam, (8) Gorinchem, (9) Schiedam, (10) Schoonhoven, (11) Brill; North Quarter: - (12) Alkmaar, (13) Hoorn, (14) Enkhuizen, (15) Edam, (16) Monnikendam, (17) Medemblik, (18) Purmerend.

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  • The more important - that for the south quarter - consisted of ten members, (1) the senior member of the nobility, who sat for life, (2) representatives (for periods of three years) of the eight towns: Dordrecht, Haarlem, Delft, Leiden, Amsterdam, Gouda, Rotterdam and Gorinchem, with a tenth member (usually elected biennially) for the towns of Schiedam, Schoonhoven and Brill conjointly.

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  • eeuw (Haarlem, 1873); A.

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  • He began to practise medicine at Haarlem, but devoted himself mainly to lecturing on physical subjects.

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  • He was also entrusted with the care of the collection left to Haarlem by P. Teyler van der Hulst (1702-1778).

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  • He died at Haarlem on the 26th of December 1837.

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  • 9 De Vita propria sermonum inter liberos libri duo (Haarlem, 1817).

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  • Together with the Haarlem wood it is thought to be a remnant of the immense forest which once extended along the coast.

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  • With the assistance of the famous architect, Pieter Post of Haarlem, he transformed the Recife by building a new town adorned with splendid public edifices and gardens, which was called after his name Mauritstad.

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  • Veegens, Leven van Jaan Maurits, Graaf van Nassau-Siegen (Haarlem, 1840).

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  • HAARLEM LAKE (Dutch Harlemmer Meer), a commune of the province of North Holland, constituted by the law of the 16th of July 1855.

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  • The four lakes were formed into one by successive inundations, whole villages disappearing in the process, and by 1647 the new Haarlem Lake had an area of about 37,000 acres, which a century later had increased to over 42,000 acres.

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  • He served as a volunteer for the relief of Haarlem (1573) and again at Leiden (1574).

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  • Dixon, Edinburgh, 1887); Stokvis, Lecons de pharmacotherapie (Haarlem and Paris, 1898); Rabuteau, Traite de therapeutique et de pharmacologie (Paris, 1884); Vulpian, Les Substances toxiques et medicamenteuses (Paris, 1882); J.

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  • Friendly agents - chiefly Catholic priests - were the intermediaries who forwarded his correspondence from Dort, Haarlem, Amsterdam and Leiden to his proper address, which he kept completely secret; and Father Mersenne sent him objections and questions.

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  • of Amsterdam, connected by steam-tramway with Haarlem and Amsterdam, and on the North Holland canal.

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  • In 1254 it received a charter from William II., count of Holland, similar to that of Haarlem, but in the 15th century duke Philip the Good of Burgundy made the impoverishment of the town, due to ill-government, the excuse for establishing an oligarchical regime, by charters of 1436 and 1437.

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  • As the captial of the ancient district of Kennemerland between den Helder and Haarlem, Alkmaar frequently suffered in the early wars between the Hollanders and the Frisians, and in 1517 was captured by the united Gelderlanders and Frisians.

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  • (See Ceramics.) This industry was imported from Haarlem towards the end of the 16th century, and achieved an unrivalled position in the second half of the following century; but it did not survive the French occupation at the end of the 18th century.

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  • Dordrecht, Leiden, Haarlem, Delft, Vlaardigen, Rotterdam in Holland, and Middleburg and Zierikzee in Zeeland, repeated with modifications the characteristics of the communes of Flanders and Brabant.

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  • The primatial see was placed at Malines (Mechlin), having under it Antwerp, Hertogenbosch, Roermond, Ghent, Bruges, and Ypres constituting the Flemish province; the second archbishopric was at Cambray, with Tournay, Arras, St Omer, and Namur, - the Walloon province; the third at Utrecht, with Haarlem, Middleburg, Leeuwarden, Groningen and Deventer, - the northern (Dutch) province.

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  • The famous defence of Haarlem, lasting through the winter of 1572 to July 1573, cost the besiegers 12,000 lives, and gave of the insurgent provinces time to breathe.

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  • The example Siege Haarlem of Haarlem was followed by Alkmaar, and with better and success.

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  • Van der Aa, Biographisch woordenboek der Nederlanden (22 vols., Haarlem, 1852-1878).

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  • ABRAHAM KUENEN (1828-1891), Dutch Protestant theologian, the son of an apothecary, was born on the 16th of September 1828, at Haarlem, North Holland.

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  • By the generosity of friends he was educated at the gymnasium at Haarlem and afterwards at the university of Leiden.

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  • sacristan) being merely the title which he bore as an official of the great parish church of Haarlem.

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  • He probably perished in the plague that visited Haarlem in 1 4391 44 0; his widow is mentioned in the latter year.

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  • See Peter Scriver, Beschryvinge der Stad Harlem (Haarlem, 1628); Scheltema, Levensschets van Laurens d.

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  • Koster (Haarlem, 1834); Van der Linde, De Haarlemsche Costerlegende (Hague, 1870).

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  • Other noteworthy buildings are the Gothic town hall, founded in 1449 and rebuilt in 1690, and the weigh-house, built by Pieter Post of Haarlem (1608-1669) and adorned with a fine relief by Barth.

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  • Tuyn, Oude Hollandsche Dorpen aan de Zuiderzee (Haarlem, 1900).

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  • C. de Jongke (Haarlem, 1858); Annales des Provinces-Unies, by J.

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  • PETER SCHRIJVER (1576-1660), Dutch author, better known as Scriverius, was born at Haarlem on the 12th of January 1576.

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  • historic (1611, 4 parts); Beschryvinghe van Out Batavien (Arnheim, 1612); Het oude gontsche Chronycxken van Hollandt, edited by him, and printed at Amsterdam in 1663; Principes Hollandiae Zelandiae et Frisiae (Haarlem, 1650), translated (1678) into Dutch by Pieter Brugman.

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  • HAARLEM, a town of Holland in the province of North Holland, on the Spaarne, having a junction station 11 m.

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  • Haarlem is the seat of the governor of the province of North Holland, and of a Roman Catholic and a Jansenist bishopric. In appearance it is a typical Dutch town, with numerous narrow canals and quaintly gabled houses.

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  • At, the head of the scientific institutions of Haarlem may be placed the Dutch Society of Sciences (Hollandsche Maatschappij van Wetenschappen), founded in 1752, which possesses valuable collections in botany, natural history and geology.

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  • Besides these there are a museum of ecclesiastical antiquities, chiefly relating to the bishopric of Haarlem; the old weigh-house (1598) and the orphanage for girls (1608), originally an almshouse for old men, both built by the architect Lieven de Key of Ghent.

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  • The staple industries of Haarlem have been greatly modified in the course of time.

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  • But about the close of the 18th century this remarkable prosperity had also come to an end, and it was not till after the Belgian revolution of 1830-1831 that Haarlem began to develop the manufactures in which it is now chiefly engaged.

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  • Market-gardening, especially horticulture, is extensively practised in the vicinity, so that Haarlem is the seat of a large trade in Dutch bulbs, especially hyacinths, tulips, fritillaries, spiraeas and japonicas.

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  • Haarlem, which was a prosperous place in the middle of the 12th century, received its first town charter from William II., count of Holland and king of the Romans, in 1245.

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  • In 1572 Haarlem joined the revolt of the Netherlands against Spain, but on the 13th of July 1573, after a seven months' siege, was forced to surrender to Alva's son Frederick, who exacted terrible vengeance.

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  • See Karl Hegel, Steidle and Gilden (Leipzig, 1891); Allan, Geschiedenis en beschrijving van Haarlem (Haarlem, 1871-1888).

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  • Haarlem Lake >>

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  • of Haarlem.

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  • It is connected by steam tramway with Haarlem and The Hague respectively, and with the seaside resorts of Katwyk and Noordwyk.

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  • The earliest "pensionaries" in Holland were those of Dort (1468) and of Haarlem (1478).

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  • The success which followed his labours not only in the town of Utrecht, but also in Zwolle, Deventer, Kampen, Amsterdam, Haarlem, Gouda, Leiden, Delft, Zutphen and elsewhere, was immense; according to Thomas Kempis the people left their business and their meals to hear his sermons, so that the churches could not hold the crowds that flocked together wherever he came.

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  • Chantepie de la Saussaye, Geschiednis van den Godsdienst der Germanen (Haarlem, 1900); The Religion of the Teutons (Boston, 1902) F.

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  • north of Haarlem to twice that distance south, hyacinths, tulips, narcissus and crocuses being the flowers chiefly cultivated.

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  • Other ancient towns are Zandpoort, Bakenes, Haarlem and Bennebroek, once the seat of a nunnery removed hither from Egmond by Dirk II.

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  • Of the drained lakes south of the former Y, the most important is the Haarlem Lake.

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  • springs containing iron have been discovered, such as the Wilhelminabron at Haarlem.

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  • Supplements to the large collection of 1687 were published at Haarlem, 1806; Leiden, 1809; and Haarlem, 1829.

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  • In 1299 John I., count of Holland, granted to the people of Rotterdam the same rights as were enjoyed by the burghers of Beverwijk, which were identical with those of Haarlem (K.

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  • Ijzerman, &c., Dwars door Sumatra, Tocht van Padang naar Siak (Haarlem, 1895); A.

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  • at the High Blinkert, near Haarlem.

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  • Teyler (Haarlem), ser.

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  • The largest towns are Amsterdam, Rotterdam, the Hague, Utrecht, Groningen, Haarlem, Arnhem, Leiden, Nijmwegen, Tilburg.

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  • The first line was that between Amsterdam and Haarlem, opened in 1839 by the Holland railway company (Hollandsch Yzeren Spoorweg Maatschappij).

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  • The two longitudinal lines are the railway den Helder via Haarlem (1862-1867), 1 Rotterdam (1839-1847), and Zwaluwe (1869-1877) to Antwerp (1852-1855), belonging to the Holland railway company, and the State railway from Leeuwarden and Groningen (1870) (junction at Meppel, 1867) Zwolle (1866) - Arnhem (1865)- Nijmwegen (1879) - Venlo (1883) - Maastricht (1865).

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  • An electric tramway connects Haarlem and Zandvoort.

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  • Among societies of general utility are the Society for Public Welfare (Maatschappij tot nut van't algemeen, 1785), whose efforts have been mainly in the direction of educational reform; the Geographical Society at Amsterdam (1873); Teyler's Stichting or foundation at Haarlem (1778), and the societies for the promotion of industry (1777), and of sciences (1752) in the same town; the Institute of Languages, Geography and Ethnology of the Dutch Indies (1851), and the Indian Society at the Hague, the Royal Institute of Engineers at Delft (1848), the Association for the Encouragement of Music at Amsterdam, &c.

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  • Other Protestant bodies are the Walloons, who, though possessing an independent church government, are attached to the Low-Dutch Reformed Church; the Lutherans, divided into the main body of Evangelical Lutherans and a smaller division calling themselves the Re-established or Old Lutherans (Herstelde Lutherschen) who separated in 1791 in order to keep more strictly to the Augsburg confession; the Mennonites founded by Menno Simons of Friesland, about the beginning of the 16th century; the Baptists, whose only central authority is the General Baptist Society founded at Amsterdam in 1811; the Evangelical Brotherhood of Hernhutters or Moravians, who have churches and schools at Zeist and Haarlem; and a Catholic Apostolic Church (1867) at the Hague.

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  • In 1853 the Roman Catholic Church, which before had been a mission in the hands of papal legates and vicars, was raised into an independent ecclesiastical province with five dioceses, namely, the archbishopric of Utrecht, and the suffragan bishoprics of Haarlem, Breda, 's Hertogenbosch and Roermond, each with its own seminary.

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  • Besides an archbishop at Utrecht, the Old Catholics have bishops at Deventer and Haarlem, and a training college at Amersfoort.

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  • Schipperns (Haarlem, 1888); Friesland Meres and through the Netherlands, by H.

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  • Natural history is covered by various periodical publications of the Royal Zoological Society " Natura Artis Magistra " at Amsterdam, and the Natuurlijke Historie van Nederland (Haarlem, 1856-1863) written by specialists, and including ethnology and flora.

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  • A Flemish translation appeared at Haarlem in 1495.

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  • Francke, David Hume (Haarlem, 1907).

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  • Here the sect had gained considerable influence, through the adhesion of Rothmann, the Lutheran pastor, and several prominent citizens; and the leaders, Johann Matthyszoon or Matthiesen, a baker of Haarlem, and Johann Bockholdt, a tailor of Leiden, had little difficulty in obtaining possession of the town and deposing the magistrates.

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  • Hofmann (Haarlem, 1883-1885); Erbkam, Gesch.

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  • 1748); Tielmann Janssen van Bracht, Martyrologia Mennonitarum (Haarlem, 1615 - 1631); Joh.

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  • Nevertheless the epidemic spread in the next few years over Spain and Germany, and a little later to Holland, where Amsterdam in1663-1664was again ravaged with a mortality given as 50,000, also Rotterdam and Haarlem.

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  • trans., Religion and Historic Faiths (London, 1907); Haarlem Series, Die Voornaamste Godsdiensten, beginning with Islam, by Dozy (1863 onwards); Soc. for Promotion of Christian Knowledge, Non-Christian Religions; Hibbert Lectures on The Origin and Growth of Religion (15 vols., beginning with F.

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  • 1498-1543 or 1544) having taken the Anabaptist teaching to Holland, there arose in Haarlem a preacher of vengeance, Jan Matthisson or Matthyszoon (Matthys) (d.

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  • van der Aa, Biographisch Woordenboek der Nederlanden (Haarlem, 1851-1879); J.

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  • In 1631 he formed the surviving members of the chapters of Utrecht and Haarlem into a collegiate body which became known as the chapter of Utrecht.

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  • 1767) two suffragan sees were created, that of Haarlem in 1742, that of Deventer in 1757.

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  • Soon he settled in Haarlem, as engraver on copper, and produced works which retain high values.

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  • It has communication by railway and canal in every direction; steam-tramways connect it with Edam, Purmerend, Alkmaar and Hilversum, and electric railways with Haarlem and the seaside resort of Zandvoort.

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  • The nucleus of this unsurpassed national collection of pictures was formed out of the collections removed hither from the Pavilion at Haarlem, consisting of modern paintings, and from the town-hall, the van der Hoop Museum and the Trippenhuis in Amsterdam.

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  • It was in the days of Duke Philip that Lorenz Koster of Haarlem contributed his share to the discovery of printing.

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  • The sieges of Haarlem, Neth er- Alkmaar and Leiden saved Holland from being lands.

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  • The following eighteen towns sent representatives: South Quarter - (I) Dordrecht, (2) Haarlem, (3) Delft, (4) Leiden, (5) Amsterdam, (6) Gouda, (7) Rotterdam, (8) Gorinchem, (9) Schiedam, (10) Schoonhoven, (11) Brill; North Quarter: - (12) Alkmaar, (13) Hoorn, (14) Enkhuizen, (15) Edam, (16) Monnikendam, (17) Medemblik, (18) Purmerend.

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  • The more important - that for the south quarter - consisted of ten members, (1) the senior member of the nobility, who sat for life, (2) representatives (for periods of three years) of the eight towns: Dordrecht, Haarlem, Delft, Leiden, Amsterdam, Gouda, Rotterdam and Gorinchem, with a tenth member (usually elected biennially) for the towns of Schiedam, Schoonhoven and Brill conjointly.

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  • eeuw (Haarlem, 1873); A.

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  • He began to practise medicine at Haarlem, but devoted himself mainly to lecturing on physical subjects.

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  • He was also entrusted with the care of the collection left to Haarlem by P. Teyler van der Hulst (1702-1778).

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  • He died at Haarlem on the 26th of December 1837.

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  • 9 De Vita propria sermonum inter liberos libri duo (Haarlem, 1817).

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  • Together with the Haarlem wood it is thought to be a remnant of the immense forest which once extended along the coast.

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  • With the assistance of the famous architect, Pieter Post of Haarlem, he transformed the Recife by building a new town adorned with splendid public edifices and gardens, which was called after his name Mauritstad.

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  • Veegens, Leven van Jaan Maurits, Graaf van Nassau-Siegen (Haarlem, 1840).

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  • HAARLEM LAKE (Dutch Harlemmer Meer), a commune of the province of North Holland, constituted by the law of the 16th of July 1855.

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  • The four lakes were formed into one by successive inundations, whole villages disappearing in the process, and by 1647 the new Haarlem Lake had an area of about 37,000 acres, which a century later had increased to over 42,000 acres.

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  • He served as a volunteer for the relief of Haarlem (1573) and again at Leiden (1574).

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  • Dixon, Edinburgh, 1887); Stokvis, Lecons de pharmacotherapie (Haarlem and Paris, 1898); Rabuteau, Traite de therapeutique et de pharmacologie (Paris, 1884); Vulpian, Les Substances toxiques et medicamenteuses (Paris, 1882); J.

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