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gwyn

gwyn

gwyn Sentence Examples

  • A history of the British forms is given in Gwyn Jeffreys's British Conchology (1862), and by Forbes and Hanley in British Mollusca.

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  • In the preface it is stated that Howel, "seeing the laws and customs of the country violated with impunity, summoned the archbishop of Menevia, other bishops and the chief of the clergy, the nobles of Wales, and six persons (four laymen and two clerks) from each comot, to meet at a place called Y Ty Gwyn ar Da y, or the white house on the river Tav, repaired thither in person, selected from the whole assembly twelve of the most experienced persons, added to their number a clerk or doctor of laws, named Bllgywryd, and to these thirteen confided the task of examining, retaining, expounding and abrogating.

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  • The principal buildings are the parish church of St Thomas (restored 1874), the church of St David (r866), a Roman Catholic church, and Baptist, Calvinistic, Methodist, Congregational and Wesleyan chapels; the intermediate and technical schools (1895), Davies's endowed (elementary) school (1789), the Gwyn Hall (1888), the town hall, with corn exchange in the basement storey, and the market-house.

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  • "HENRY GWYN JEFFREYS MOSELEY (1887-1915), British physicist; was born Nov.

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  • NELL GWYN [ELEANOR] (1650-1687), English actress, and mistress of Charles II., was born on the 2nd of February 1650/I, probably in an alley off Drury Lane, London, although Hereford also claims to have been her birthplace.

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  • Her father, Thomas Gwyn, appears to have been a broken-down soldier of a family of Welsh origin.

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  • Nell Gwyn, who sold oranges in the precincts of Drury Lane Theatre, passed, at the age of fifteen, to the boards, through the influence of the actor Charles Hart and of Robert Duncan or Dungan, an officer of the guards who had interest with the management.

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  • As an actress Nell Gwyn was largely indebted to Dryden, who seems to have made a special study of her airy, irresponsible personality, and who kept her supplied with parts which suited her.

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  • See Peter Cunningham, The Story of Nell Gwyn, edited by Gordon Goodwin (1903); Waldron's edition of John Downes's Roscius Anglicanus (1789); Osmund Airy, Charles II.

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  • It is so called in memory of Idris Gawr, celebrated in the Triads as one of the three "Gwyn Serenyddion," or "Happy Astronomers," of Wales, who is traditionally supposed to have made his observations on this peak.

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  • Howel, son of Cadell, commonly known as Howel Dda the Good, is ever celebrated in Welsh history as the framer, or rather the codifier, of the ancient laws of his country, which were promulgated to the people at his hunting lodge, Ty Gwyn ar Taf, near the modern Whitland.

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  • Adjectives having y or w are made feminine by a-affection, due to the lost feminine ending -a; thus gwyn, " white," fem.

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  • By Barbara Villiers, Mrs Palmer, afterwards countess of Castlemaine and duchess of Cleveland, mistress en titre till she was superseded by the duchess of Portsmouth, he had Charles Fitzroy, duke of Southampton and Cleveland, Henry Fitzroy, duke of Grafton, George Fitzroy, duke of Northumberland, Anne, countess of Sussex, Charlotte, countess of Lichfield, and Barbara, a nun; by Louise de Keroualle, duchess of Portsmouth, Charles Lennox, duke of Richmond; by Lucy Walter, James, duke of Monmouth and Buccleuch, and a daughter; by Nell Gwyn, Charles Beauclerk, duke of St Albans, and James Beauclerk; by Catherine Peg, Charles Fitz Charles, earl of Plymouth; by Lady Shannon, Charlotte, countess of Yarmouth; by Mary Davis, Mary Tudor, countess of Derwentwater.

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  • Jusserand (1902); The Story of Nell Gwyn and the Sayings of Charles II., by P. Cunningham, ed.

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  • Gwyn Jeffreys, conchologist, Sir W.

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  • At the mouth of the river Conway in North Wales the sea mussel is crushed in large quantities in order to extract pearls of an inferior quality which are occasionally found in these as in other Lamellibranch molluscs (Gwyn Jeffreys).

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  • 1 Of the three derivations assigned to this name, the first is by Drayton in 1613 (Polyolbion, Song 9), where it is said to be the Welsh pen gwyn, or "white head"; the second, which seems to meet with Littre's approval, deduces it from the Latin pinguis (fat), which idea has given origin to the German name, Fettgdnse, for these birds; the third supposes it to be a corruption of "pin-wing" (Ann.

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  • The national anthem will be sung by Gwyn Hughes Jones.

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  • brake caliper in position sheared, whilst taking Gwyn out for a spin.

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  • Gwyn and Kay moved to St David's Diocese early in 1970 where he served a second curacy at Pembroke Dock.

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  • MP Gwyn Prosser, who led the delegation, said they were given " a very good hearing.

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  • Gwyn wrote: good hymnody has an enduring quality.

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  • Mae tri chynnig hanfodol yn y Papur Gwyn, ac mae tri chynnig hanfodol yn y Papur Gwyn, ac mae llawer o gefnogaeth i'r cyntaf o bob tu.

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  • Gwyn: Of course he's not so repugnant in this game.

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  • starlit morning when Meredith Gwyn returned home, and gave his horse into Jack's charge.

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  • A history of the British forms is given in Gwyn Jeffreys's British Conchology (1862), and by Forbes and Hanley in British Mollusca.

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  • In the preface it is stated that Howel, "seeing the laws and customs of the country violated with impunity, summoned the archbishop of Menevia, other bishops and the chief of the clergy, the nobles of Wales, and six persons (four laymen and two clerks) from each comot, to meet at a place called Y Ty Gwyn ar Da y, or the white house on the river Tav, repaired thither in person, selected from the whole assembly twelve of the most experienced persons, added to their number a clerk or doctor of laws, named Bllgywryd, and to these thirteen confided the task of examining, retaining, expounding and abrogating.

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  • The principal buildings are the parish church of St Thomas (restored 1874), the church of St David (r866), a Roman Catholic church, and Baptist, Calvinistic, Methodist, Congregational and Wesleyan chapels; the intermediate and technical schools (1895), Davies's endowed (elementary) school (1789), the Gwyn Hall (1888), the town hall, with corn exchange in the basement storey, and the market-house.

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  • "HENRY GWYN JEFFREYS MOSELEY (1887-1915), British physicist; was born Nov.

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  • NELL GWYN [ELEANOR] (1650-1687), English actress, and mistress of Charles II., was born on the 2nd of February 1650/I, probably in an alley off Drury Lane, London, although Hereford also claims to have been her birthplace.

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  • Her father, Thomas Gwyn, appears to have been a broken-down soldier of a family of Welsh origin.

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  • Nell Gwyn, who sold oranges in the precincts of Drury Lane Theatre, passed, at the age of fifteen, to the boards, through the influence of the actor Charles Hart and of Robert Duncan or Dungan, an officer of the guards who had interest with the management.

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  • As an actress Nell Gwyn was largely indebted to Dryden, who seems to have made a special study of her airy, irresponsible personality, and who kept her supplied with parts which suited her.

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  • See Peter Cunningham, The Story of Nell Gwyn, edited by Gordon Goodwin (1903); Waldron's edition of John Downes's Roscius Anglicanus (1789); Osmund Airy, Charles II.

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  • He preached a funeral sermon on Nell Gwyn (d.

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  • It is so called in memory of Idris Gawr, celebrated in the Triads as one of the three "Gwyn Serenyddion," or "Happy Astronomers," of Wales, who is traditionally supposed to have made his observations on this peak.

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  • Howel, son of Cadell, commonly known as Howel Dda the Good, is ever celebrated in Welsh history as the framer, or rather the codifier, of the ancient laws of his country, which were promulgated to the people at his hunting lodge, Ty Gwyn ar Taf, near the modern Whitland.

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  • Adjectives having y or w are made feminine by a-affection, due to the lost feminine ending -a; thus gwyn, " white," fem.

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  • By Barbara Villiers, Mrs Palmer, afterwards countess of Castlemaine and duchess of Cleveland, mistress en titre till she was superseded by the duchess of Portsmouth, he had Charles Fitzroy, duke of Southampton and Cleveland, Henry Fitzroy, duke of Grafton, George Fitzroy, duke of Northumberland, Anne, countess of Sussex, Charlotte, countess of Lichfield, and Barbara, a nun; by Louise de Keroualle, duchess of Portsmouth, Charles Lennox, duke of Richmond; by Lucy Walter, James, duke of Monmouth and Buccleuch, and a daughter; by Nell Gwyn, Charles Beauclerk, duke of St Albans, and James Beauclerk; by Catherine Peg, Charles Fitz Charles, earl of Plymouth; by Lady Shannon, Charlotte, countess of Yarmouth; by Mary Davis, Mary Tudor, countess of Derwentwater.

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  • Jusserand (1902); The Story of Nell Gwyn and the Sayings of Charles II., by P. Cunningham, ed.

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  • Gwyn Jeffreys, conchologist, Sir W.

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  • At the mouth of the river Conway in North Wales the sea mussel is crushed in large quantities in order to extract pearls of an inferior quality which are occasionally found in these as in other Lamellibranch molluscs (Gwyn Jeffreys).

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  • 1 Of the three derivations assigned to this name, the first is by Drayton in 1613 (Polyolbion, Song 9), where it is said to be the Welsh pen gwyn, or "white head"; the second, which seems to meet with Littre's approval, deduces it from the Latin pinguis (fat), which idea has given origin to the German name, Fettgdnse, for these birds; the third supposes it to be a corruption of "pin-wing" (Ann.

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  • Gwyn: Of course he 's not so repugnant in this game.

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  • Proceeding relative to Roger Gwyn, the seminary priest.

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  • It was four o'clock in the starlit morning when Meredith Gwyn returned home, and gave his horse into Jack 's charge.

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  • Tents were pitched opposite the Gwyn and then a few minutes were wiled away in the traditional manner.

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