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gwalior

gwalior

gwalior Sentence Examples

  • The City Of Gwalior is 76 m.

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  • In the Autobiography of Jahangir it is stated that the guru was imprisoned in the fortress of Gwalior, with a view to the realization of the fine imposed on his father Guru Arjan, but the Sikhs believe that the guru became a voluntary inmate of the fortress with the object of obtaining seclusion there to pray for the emperor who had been advised to that effect by his Hindu astrologers.

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  • Shuja was defeated and fled to Arakan, where he perished; Mahommed was captured, thrown into the fortress of Gwalior, and died after seven years' confinement.

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  • It lies in the extreme north-west of Bundelkhand, near Gwalior, and is surrounded on all sides by other states of Central India, except on the east where it meets the United Provinces.

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  • UJJAIN, or Ujain, a city of central India, in the state of Gwalior, on the right bank of the river Sipra, with a station on the branch of the Rajputana railway from Ratlam to Bhopal.

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  • Thence its northern and northeastern frontier marches with the Punjab and the United Provinces until it touches the river Chambal, where it turns south-eastward for about 200 m., dividing the states of Dholpur, Karauli, Jaipur and Kotah from Gwalior.

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  • The old palace begun by Man Sing in 1600 ranks second only to Gwalior.

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  • The Sind, rising near Sironj in Malwa, marks the frontier line of Bundelkhand on the side of Gwalior.

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  • It is traversed by the branch of the Indian Midland railway from Jhansi to Gwalior.

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  • Another march into India the following, year was made direct to Gwalior.

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  • Sindhia was overawed and forced to sign the treaty of Gwalior, consenting to aid in the extirpation of the Pindaris, whom he had hitherto protected.

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  • GUNA, a town and military station in Central India, in the state of Gwalior.

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  • After the Mutiny, it became the headquarters of the Central India Horse, whose commanding officer acts as ex-officio assistant to the resident of Gwalior; and its trade has developed rapidly since the opening of a station on a branch of the Great Indian Peninsula railway in 1899.

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  • GWALIOR, a native state of India, in the Central India agency, by far the largest of the numerous principalities comprised in that area.

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  • The railways, undertaken by the state, are: (I) from Bina on the Indian Midland to Goona; (2) an extension of this line to Baran, opened in 1899; (3) from Bhopal to Ujjain; (4) two light railways, from Gwalior to Sipri and Gwalior to Bhind, which were opened by the viceroy in November 1899.

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  • The Sindhia family, the rulers of the Gwalior state, belong to the Mahratta nation and originally came from the neighbourhood of Poona.

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  • But the real founder of the state of Gwalior was Mahadji Sindhia, a natural son of Ranoji, who, after narrowly escaping with his life from the terrible slaughter of Panipat in 1761 (when Jankoji was killed), obtained with some difficulty from the peshwa a re-grant of his father's possessions in Central India (1769).

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  • By the same treaty he was deprived of the forts of Gwalior and Gohad; but these were restored by Lord Cornwallis in 1805, when the Chambal river was made the northern boundary of the state.

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  • When, however, in 1816 he was called upon to assist in the suppression of the Pindaris, though by the treaty of Gwalior (1817) he promised his co-operation, his conduct was so equivocal that in 1818 he was forced to sign a fresh treaty by which he ceded Ajmere and other lands.

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  • The growth of turbulence and misrule now induced Lord Ellenborough to interpose, and a British force under Sir Hugh Gough advanced upon Gwalior (December 1843).

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  • The Mahratta troops were defeated simultaneously at Maharajpur and Punniar (December 29), with the result that the Gwalior government signed a treaty ceding territory with revenue sufficient for the maintenance of a contingent force to be stationed at the capital, and limiting the future strength of the Gwalior army, while a council of regency was appointed during the minority to act under the resident's advice.

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  • In 1857 the Gwalior contingent joined the mutineers; but the maharaja himself remained loyal to the British, and fled from his capital until the place was retaken and his authority restored by Sir Hugh Rose (Lord Strathnairn) on the 19th of June 1858.

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  • He was rewarded with the districts of Neemuch and Amjhera, but Gwalior fort was occupied by British troops and was only restored to his son in 1886 by Lord Dufferin.

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  • This total includes the new town of Lashkar or "the Camp" which is the modern capital of the state and old Gwalior.

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  • Another temple in the fortress of Gwalior is called the Teli-Mandir, or "Oilman's Temple."

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  • The most striking part of the Jain remains at Gwalior is a series of caves or rock-cut sculptures, excavated in the rock on all sides, and numbering nearly a hundred, great and small.

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  • The fort of Gwalior, within which the above buildings are situated, stands on an isolated rock.

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  • The old town of Gwalior, which is of considerable size, but irregularly built, and extremely dirty, lies at the eastern base of the rock.

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  • The fort of Gwalior was traditionally built by one Surya Sen, the raja of the neighbouring country.

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  • In 1196 Gwalior was captured by Mahommed Ghori; it then passed into the hands of several chiefs until in 1559 Akbar gained possession of it, and made it a state prison for captives of rank.

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  • On the dismemberment of the Delhi empire, Gwalior was seized by the Jat rana of Gohad.

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  • MORAR, a town of Central India, in the native state of Gwalior, 3 m.

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  • of Gwalior city.

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  • It was formerly a British military cantonment and residence of a political agent, but in 1886, when the fortress of Gwalior was restored to Sindhia, the troops at Morar were withdrawn to Jhansi, and the extensive barracks were likewise made over to Sindhia.

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  • This protection was subsequently withdrawn, the rana having been guilty of treachery, and in 1783 Sindhia succeeded in recapturing the fortress of Gwalior, and crushed his Jat opponent by seizing the whole of Gohad.

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  • In 1570 he obtained possession of Oudh and Gwalior, In 1572 he marched in person into Gujarat, defeated r the last of the independent sultans of Ahmedabad, and formed the province into a Mogul viceroyalty or subah.

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  • Another, Captain Popham, stormed the rockfortress of Gwalior, which was regarded as the key of Hindustan.

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  • In central India two military leaders, Sindhia of Gwalior and Holkar of Indore, alternately held the pre-eminency.

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  • In the same year a disputed succession at Gwalior, fomented by feminine intrigue, resulted in an outbreak of the overgrown army which the Sindhia family had been allowed to maintain.

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  • by Gwalior, Rajputana and the Punjab.

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  • The sandstone bed on which it rests is visible at a point just north of Goona, and in a small area round Bhilsa and Bhopal, as it is in those places freed from the layer of trap. The low-lying land includes roughly that part of the agency which lies to the east of the plateau and comprises the greater part of the political divisions of Bundelkhand and Baghelkhand and the country round Gwalior.

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  • These are the residencies of Gwalior and Indore, and the agencies of Baghelkhand, Bhopal, Bhopawar, Bundelkhand, Indore and Malwa.

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  • The is large states are Gwalior, Indore, Rewa, Bhopal, Dhar, Barwani, Datia, Orchha, Charkhari, Chhattarpur, Panna, Dewas (senior branch), Dewas (junior branch), Jaora and Ratlam.

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  • Malwa opium is produced in a large number of states in the Central India and Rajputana Agencies, chiefly Gwalior, Indore and Bhopal, in the former, and Mewar in the latter.

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  • On his return to Cawnpore Campbell found that General Windham was being attacked at that place by the Gwalior contingent.

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  • On the 6th of December he defeated the Gwalior contingent in the battle of Cawnpore, though he had only 5000 men against the enemy's 25,000.

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  • The The Gwalior contingent of Sindhia's army mutinied in the middle of June, and on the ist of July Holkar's troops revolted at Indore, and the resident, Henry Durand, was forced to leave the residency.

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  • News now arrived that the rebel army under Tantia Topi and the rani of Jhansi had attacked Sindhia, whose troops had gone over to the rebels and delivered Gwalior into their hands.

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  • Sir Hugh marched against Gwalior at once, captured the Morar cantonments on the 16th of June, and carried the whole of the Gwalior positions by assault on the 19th, thus restoring his state to Sindhia within ten days of taking the field.

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  • GWALIOR RESIDENCY, an administrative unit in the Central India agency, comprises Gwalior state and eleven smaller states and estates.

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  • belong to Gwalior State, and the agency also includes the small states of Raghugarh, Khaniadhana, Paron, Garha, Umri and Bhadaura, with the Chhabra pargana of Tonk.

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  • With the aid of the Gwalior contingent he pressed General Windham hard at Cawnpore on the 27th and 28th of November 1857, but was defeated by Sir Colin Campbell on the 6th of December.

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  • Captain Popham, with a small detachment, stormed the rock fortress of Gwalior, then deemed impregnable and the key of central India; and by this feat held in check Sindhia, the most formidable of the Mahratta chiefs.

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  • UJJAIN, or Ujain, a city of central India, in the state of Gwalior, on the right bank of the river Sipra, with a station on the branch of the Rajputana railway from Ratlam to Bhopal.

    0
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  • Thence its northern and northeastern frontier marches with the Punjab and the United Provinces until it touches the river Chambal, where it turns south-eastward for about 200 m., dividing the states of Dholpur, Karauli, Jaipur and Kotah from Gwalior.

    0
    0
  • In the Autobiography of Jahangir it is stated that the guru was imprisoned in the fortress of Gwalior, with a view to the realization of the fine imposed on his father Guru Arjan, but the Sikhs believe that the guru became a voluntary inmate of the fortress with the object of obtaining seclusion there to pray for the emperor who had been advised to that effect by his Hindu astrologers.

    0
    0
  • The old palace begun by Man Sing in 1600 ranks second only to Gwalior.

    0
    0
  • Shuja was defeated and fled to Arakan, where he perished; Mahommed was captured, thrown into the fortress of Gwalior, and died after seven years' confinement.

    0
    0
  • The Sind, rising near Sironj in Malwa, marks the frontier line of Bundelkhand on the side of Gwalior.

    0
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  • It lies in the extreme north-west of Bundelkhand, near Gwalior, and is surrounded on all sides by other states of Central India, except on the east where it meets the United Provinces.

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  • It is traversed by the branch of the Indian Midland railway from Jhansi to Gwalior.

    0
    0
  • Another march into India the following, year was made direct to Gwalior.

    0
    0
  • Sindhia was overawed and forced to sign the treaty of Gwalior, consenting to aid in the extirpation of the Pindaris, whom he had hitherto protected.

    0
    0
  • GUNA, a town and military station in Central India, in the state of Gwalior.

    0
    0
  • After the Mutiny, it became the headquarters of the Central India Horse, whose commanding officer acts as ex-officio assistant to the resident of Gwalior; and its trade has developed rapidly since the opening of a station on a branch of the Great Indian Peninsula railway in 1899.

    0
    0
  • GWALIOR, a native state of India, in the Central India agency, by far the largest of the numerous principalities comprised in that area.

    0
    0
  • The railways, undertaken by the state, are: (I) from Bina on the Indian Midland to Goona; (2) an extension of this line to Baran, opened in 1899; (3) from Bhopal to Ujjain; (4) two light railways, from Gwalior to Sipri and Gwalior to Bhind, which were opened by the viceroy in November 1899.

    0
    0
  • The Sindhia family, the rulers of the Gwalior state, belong to the Mahratta nation and originally came from the neighbourhood of Poona.

    0
    0
  • But the real founder of the state of Gwalior was Mahadji Sindhia, a natural son of Ranoji, who, after narrowly escaping with his life from the terrible slaughter of Panipat in 1761 (when Jankoji was killed), obtained with some difficulty from the peshwa a re-grant of his father's possessions in Central India (1769).

    0
    0
  • By the same treaty he was deprived of the forts of Gwalior and Gohad; but these were restored by Lord Cornwallis in 1805, when the Chambal river was made the northern boundary of the state.

    0
    0
  • When, however, in 1816 he was called upon to assist in the suppression of the Pindaris, though by the treaty of Gwalior (1817) he promised his co-operation, his conduct was so equivocal that in 1818 he was forced to sign a fresh treaty by which he ceded Ajmere and other lands.

    0
    0
  • The growth of turbulence and misrule now induced Lord Ellenborough to interpose, and a British force under Sir Hugh Gough advanced upon Gwalior (December 1843).

    0
    0
  • The Mahratta troops were defeated simultaneously at Maharajpur and Punniar (December 29), with the result that the Gwalior government signed a treaty ceding territory with revenue sufficient for the maintenance of a contingent force to be stationed at the capital, and limiting the future strength of the Gwalior army, while a council of regency was appointed during the minority to act under the resident's advice.

    0
    0
  • In 1857 the Gwalior contingent joined the mutineers; but the maharaja himself remained loyal to the British, and fled from his capital until the place was retaken and his authority restored by Sir Hugh Rose (Lord Strathnairn) on the 19th of June 1858.

    0
    0
  • He was rewarded with the districts of Neemuch and Amjhera, but Gwalior fort was occupied by British troops and was only restored to his son in 1886 by Lord Dufferin.

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  • The City Of Gwalior is 76 m.

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  • This total includes the new town of Lashkar or "the Camp" which is the modern capital of the state and old Gwalior.

    0
    0
  • Another temple in the fortress of Gwalior is called the Teli-Mandir, or "Oilman's Temple."

    0
    0
  • The most striking part of the Jain remains at Gwalior is a series of caves or rock-cut sculptures, excavated in the rock on all sides, and numbering nearly a hundred, great and small.

    0
    0
  • The fort of Gwalior, within which the above buildings are situated, stands on an isolated rock.

    0
    0
  • The old town of Gwalior, which is of considerable size, but irregularly built, and extremely dirty, lies at the eastern base of the rock.

    0
    0
  • The fort of Gwalior was traditionally built by one Surya Sen, the raja of the neighbouring country.

    0
    0
  • In 1196 Gwalior was captured by Mahommed Ghori; it then passed into the hands of several chiefs until in 1559 Akbar gained possession of it, and made it a state prison for captives of rank.

    0
    0
  • On the dismemberment of the Delhi empire, Gwalior was seized by the Jat rana of Gohad.

    0
    0
  • Gwalior Residency >>

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  • MORAR, a town of Central India, in the native state of Gwalior, 3 m.

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  • of Gwalior city.

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  • It was formerly a British military cantonment and residence of a political agent, but in 1886, when the fortress of Gwalior was restored to Sindhia, the troops at Morar were withdrawn to Jhansi, and the extensive barracks were likewise made over to Sindhia.

    0
    0
  • This protection was subsequently withdrawn, the rana having been guilty of treachery, and in 1783 Sindhia succeeded in recapturing the fortress of Gwalior, and crushed his Jat opponent by seizing the whole of Gohad.

    0
    0
  • In 1570 he obtained possession of Oudh and Gwalior, In 1572 he marched in person into Gujarat, defeated r the last of the independent sultans of Ahmedabad, and formed the province into a Mogul viceroyalty or subah.

    0
    0
  • Another, Captain Popham, stormed the rockfortress of Gwalior, which was regarded as the key of Hindustan.

    0
    0
  • In central India two military leaders, Sindhia of Gwalior and Holkar of Indore, alternately held the pre-eminency.

    0
    0
  • In the same year a disputed succession at Gwalior, fomented by feminine intrigue, resulted in an outbreak of the overgrown army which the Sindhia family had been allowed to maintain.

    0
    0
  • by Gwalior, Rajputana and the Punjab.

    0
    0
  • The sandstone bed on which it rests is visible at a point just north of Goona, and in a small area round Bhilsa and Bhopal, as it is in those places freed from the layer of trap. The low-lying land includes roughly that part of the agency which lies to the east of the plateau and comprises the greater part of the political divisions of Bundelkhand and Baghelkhand and the country round Gwalior.

    0
    0
  • These are the residencies of Gwalior and Indore, and the agencies of Baghelkhand, Bhopal, Bhopawar, Bundelkhand, Indore and Malwa.

    0
    0
  • The is large states are Gwalior, Indore, Rewa, Bhopal, Dhar, Barwani, Datia, Orchha, Charkhari, Chhattarpur, Panna, Dewas (senior branch), Dewas (junior branch), Jaora and Ratlam.

    0
    0
  • Malwa opium is produced in a large number of states in the Central India and Rajputana Agencies, chiefly Gwalior, Indore and Bhopal, in the former, and Mewar in the latter.

    0
    0
  • On his return to Cawnpore Campbell found that General Windham was being attacked at that place by the Gwalior contingent.

    0
    0
  • On the 6th of December he defeated the Gwalior contingent in the battle of Cawnpore, though he had only 5000 men against the enemy's 25,000.

    0
    0
  • The The Gwalior contingent of Sindhia's army mutinied in the middle of June, and on the ist of July Holkar's troops revolted at Indore, and the resident, Henry Durand, was forced to leave the residency.

    0
    0
  • News now arrived that the rebel army under Tantia Topi and the rani of Jhansi had attacked Sindhia, whose troops had gone over to the rebels and delivered Gwalior into their hands.

    0
    0
  • Sir Hugh marched against Gwalior at once, captured the Morar cantonments on the 16th of June, and carried the whole of the Gwalior positions by assault on the 19th, thus restoring his state to Sindhia within ten days of taking the field.

    0
    0
  • GWALIOR RESIDENCY, an administrative unit in the Central India agency, comprises Gwalior state and eleven smaller states and estates.

    0
    0
  • belong to Gwalior State, and the agency also includes the small states of Raghugarh, Khaniadhana, Paron, Garha, Umri and Bhadaura, with the Chhabra pargana of Tonk.

    0
    0
  • With the aid of the Gwalior contingent he pressed General Windham hard at Cawnpore on the 27th and 28th of November 1857, but was defeated by Sir Colin Campbell on the 6th of December.

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  • Gwalior Residency >>

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