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guns

guns Sentence Examples

  • The prizes were sporting guns made by Mr Pape and presented by him to the promoters of the show.

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  • The prizes were sporting guns made by Mr Pape and presented by him to the promoters of the show.

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  • On the i r th of October, when they began their march, the road along the Danube was swept into the river, carrying with it several guns and teams, and hours were consumed in passing the shortest distances.

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  • This time, however, Bennigsen, with over 60,000 men in position and 15,000 Prussians expected to arrive next morning, had no desire to avoid a battle, and deployed for action, his front protected by great batteries of guns, many of them of heavy calibre, numbering some 200 in all.

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  • In this battle the Allies Battle of numbered about 18,000 with 18 guns, French nearly Vimiera, 14,000, with 20 guns.

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  • Among the field guns on the brow of the hill the general in command of the rearguard stood with a staff officer, scanning the country through his fieldglass.

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  • She flushed, sensing he wasn't talking about knives and guns.

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  • The competition included both men and women, and all were having a great time dousing the watchers—and even the paraders passing in the opposite direction—with water guns.

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  • She doesn't believe in guns.

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  • In the course of 1551 one of the factions of Kazan offered the whole khanate to the young tsar, and on the 20th of August 1552 he stood before its walls with an army of 150,000 men and 50 guns.

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  • A greater volume of fire can thus be obtained, but the great height of the cavalier makes it an easy target for a besieger's guns.

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  • It is a military town, with provision stores, an arsenal and an arms workshop. Its walls are armed with steel guns.

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  • In it are mounted some modern guns.

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  • Pointers are employed to mark game for guns, and are especially' useful in low cover such as that afforded by turnip fields.

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  • The Somali are a fighting race and all go armed with spear, shield and short sword (and guns when they can get them).

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  • But the buccaneers or pirates who had made their retreat here offered heavy opposition; in 1680 there was an attack by the Spaniards, and in July 1703 the French and Spaniards made a descent on New Providence, blew up the fort, spiked the guns, burnt the church and carried off the governor, with the principal inhabitants, to Havana.

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  • On principle an ordu would have with it 30 batteries of field artillery, 3 batteries of horse artillery and 3 batteries of mountain artillery, or in all 36 batteries with 216 guns, all batteries being 6 guns strong.

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  • In 1904 the total strength of the artillery was given as 198 field batteries (1188 guns), 18 horse batteries (108 guns), 40 mountain batteries (240 guns) and 12 howitzer batteries (72 guns): total 268 batteries (1608 guns).

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  • The guns are of various Krupp types.

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  • guns in three turrets, and three pairs of 9.2-in.

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  • guns, and a few smaller guns (boat and field).

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  • guns in four turrets as main armament, and fourteen 4-in.

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  • guns, and a few boat and field guns as secondary armament.

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  • On the receipts side of this budget were comprised the Austrian indemnity for the annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (£T2,50o,000), cash and securities belonging to the deposed sultan (£TI,600,000), sale of old guns (£T300,000), sale of lands and other property recovered from civil list encroachments (£T908,000), and finally the unexpected balance of the proceeds of the 1908 loan (£T6J5,000), the whole forming an aggregate total of £T5,963,000.

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  • Tradition avers that but forty days were needed for the completion of the work, six thousand men being employed night and day; guns and troops were hurriedly put in, and all navigation of the Bosporus was stopped.

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  • These were: the cession to Turkey of Azov with all its guns and munitions, the razing of all the forts recently built on the frontier by Russia, the renunciation by the tsar of all claim to interfere with the Tatars under the dominion of the Crimea or Poland, or to maintain a representative at Constantinople, and Russia's consent to Charles's return to Sweden.'

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  • With Sebastiani's encouragement the Porte resisted these demands; in one day a thousand guns were ranged along both sides of the Bosporus; and after a stay of ten days the British fleet was ordered to leave, and was considerably damaged by the fire of the forts while passing down.

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  • The arsenal of Vienna was ransacked for guns, stores and appliances, and preparations in the island pushed on as fast as possible.

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  • At length when both sides were exhausted by their efforts he sent forward nearly a hundred guns which tore asunder by their case-shot fire the enemy's line and marched his reserve right through the gap. Had he possessed an adequate cavalry force the victory would have been decisive.

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  • The enemy's escape annoyed him greatly, the absence of captured guns and prisoners reminded him too much of his Russian experiences, and he redoubled his.

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  • Blucher did not succeed in overtaking the French, but the latter, near Hanau, found their way barred by Wrede with 50,000 men and over loo guns in a strong position.

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  • They were divided into: prames, ship-rigged, of 35 metres long and 8 wide, carrying 12 guns; chaloupes cannonieres, of 24 metres long and 5 wide, carrying 5 guns and brig-rigged; bateaux cannoniers, of 19 metres long by 1.56 wide, carrying 2 guns and mere boats.

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  • Wellesley began to land his troops, unopposed, near Figueira da Foz at the mouth of the Mondego; and the Spanish victory of Baylen having relieved Cadiz from danger, Spencer now joined him, and, without waiting for Moore the army, under 15,000 in all (which included some Portuguese)"with 18 guns, advanced towards Lisbon.

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  • Campaign in Portugal, 1808.--The first skirmish took place at Obidos on the 15th of August 1808, against Delaborde's division (5000 men with 5 guns), which fell back to Roleia (Rorica or Roliga).

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  • The allied loss was about 500: the French 600 and three guns.'

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  • The losses were: Allies about Boo, French 2000 and 13 guns.

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  • For these reasons he marched by land; and as the roads north of the Tagus were deemed impassable for guns, while transport and supplies for a large force were also difficult to procure, he sent Sir John Hope, with the artillery, cavalry and reserve ammunition column, south of the river, through Badajoz to Almaraz, to move thence through Talavera, Madrid and the Escurial Pass, involving a considerable detour; while he himself with the infantry, marching by successive divisions, took the shorter roads north of the Tagus through Coimbra and Almeida, and also by Alcantara and Coria to Ciudad Rodrigo and Salamanca.

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  • Napoleon, directly he realized Moore's proximity, had ordered Soult to Astorga to cut him off from Galicia; recalled his other troops from their march towards Lisbon and Andalusia, and, with 50,000 men and 150 guns, had left Madrid himself (Dec. 22).

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  • Battle of In this battle the French numbered about 20,000 with Corunna, 4 o guns; the British 15,000 with 9 very light guns.

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  • The Portuguese being in his rear, and Wellesley closing with him, the only good road of retreat available lay through Amarante, but he now learned that Beresford had taken this important point from Silveira; so he was then compelled, abandoning his guns and much baggage, to escape, with a loss of some s000 men, over the mountains of the Sierra Catalina to Salamonde, and thence to Orense.

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  • As they neared Barrosa, Victor attacked them, the Allies numbering in the battle about 13,000 with 24 guns, 4000 being British; the French 9000, actually engaged, with 14 guns; but with 5000 more a few miles off and others in the French lines.

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  • The British loss was about 1200; the French 2000, 6 guns and an eagle.

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  • The Allies numbered Battle of about 33,000, with 42 guns; the French 45,000 with 30 guns.

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  • The battle is chiefly notable for the steadi- donor, ness with which the allied right, covered by the Light Division in squares, changed position in presence of the French cavalry; and for the extraordinary feat of arms of Captain Norman Ramsay, R.H.A., in charging through the French cavalry with his guns.

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  • In the meantime Soult (with 23,000 men and 50 guns), advancing to relieve Badajoz, compelled Beresford to suspend of the siege, and to take up a position with about 30,000 Battle Albuera, men (of whom 7000 were British) and 38 guns May behind the river Albuhera (or Albuera).

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  • At one time the right appeared to be broken, and 6 guns were lost, when a gallant advance of Sir Lowry Cole's division restored the day, Soult then falling back towards Seville.

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  • In September, Marmont joined with the army of the north under General Dorsenne, coming from Salamanca - their total force being 60,000, with roo guns - and succeeded (Sept.

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  • The Ciudad gallantry of the troops made it successful, though with Rodrigo, the loss of Generals Craufurd and McKinnon, and 1300 ulfrary s men, and Marmont's battering train of 150 guns here fell into the allied hands.

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  • Wellington had insufficient siege equipment and transport for heavy guns; five assaults failed, and Soult (having left Suchet in Valencia) and also the Army of Portugal were both approaching, so Wellington withdrew on the night of the Retreat 21st of October, and, directing the evacuation of from Madrid, commenced the "Retreat from Burgos."

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  • Each army had with it about 100 guns; and, during a heavy cannonade, Wellington on the 10th of November 1813 attacked this extended Passage of position of 16 m.

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  • The allied loss was about 2700; that of the French 4000, 51 guns, and all their magazines.

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  • On the morning of the 10th of December he fell, with 60,000 men and 40 guns, upon Hope, who with 30,000 men and 24 guns held a position from the sea, 3 m.

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  • In this battle the Allies and French were of about equal strength (3 7,000): the former having 48 guns, the latter 40.

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  • The allied loss was about 2000; the French 4000 and 6 guns.

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  • In the battle of Toulouse the French numbered about 40,000 (exclusive of the local National Guards) with 80 guns; the Allies under 52,000 with 64 of guns.

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  • For the siege of Burgos heavy guns were available in store on the coast; but he neither had, nor could procure, the transport to bring them up. By resource and dogged determination Wellington rose superior to almost every difficulty, but he could not overcome all; and the main teaching of the Peninsular War turns upon the value of an army that is completely organized in its various branches before hostilities break out.

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  • Among the manufactures are cut glass, stoves and ranges, kitchen furniture, guns, thread-cutting machines, brooms and agricultural implements.

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  • It is pleasantly situated in the valley of the Guns, and is dominated towards the west by the peaks of Altenhaus (2000 ft.) and of the Geschriebene Stein (2900 ft.).

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  • A considerable part of the armament is old, but the more modern vessels are armed with Armstrong rifled guns.

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  • In March 1897 a body of 1500 troops, with four guns, was despatched to bring the Jaguncoes to reason, but was totally defeated.

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  • Durban harbour is defended by batteries with heavy modern guns.

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  • On the night of the 23rd of May Smith made an unsuccessful attack on the Boer camp, losing his guns and fifty men killed and wounded.

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  • Later the rating was by guns.

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  • Thus in 1741 in the British navy there were six rates: 1st, loo guns; 2nd, 90; 3rd, 70 to 80; 4th, 50 to 60; 5th, 40; and 6th, 20.

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  • Gradually growing more or less ruinous it was acquired by government in 1855, repaired, strengthened and converted into a Tay defence, mounting several heavy guns.

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  • From that day the role of the Natal Field Force was changed from that of a mobile field army into that of a garrison, and two days later it was completely isolated, but not before General French had succeeded in escaping south by train, and the naval authorities had been induced by Sir George White's urgent appeals to send into the town a naval brigade with a few guns of sufficient range and calibre to cope with the heavy position artillery which Joubert was now able to bring into action against the town.

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  • But the flank attack became entangled in mass in a loop of the river and suffered heavily, and two batteries that formed part of the frontal attack came into action within a few hundred yards of unsuspected Boer trenches, with the result that ten guns were lost, as well as in all some r roo men.

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  • On the 6th of November he was severely handled and his guns and wagons captured at Bothaville.

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  • On the 10th of February De Wet, with five guns and 3000 men, carried out his promised invasion of Cape Colony.

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  • By judicious use of the railway Kitchener concentrated sufficient troops in the colony to cope with the attempt, and, after being hunted for eighteen days, De Wet escaped back into the Orange River Colony with the loss of all his guns, munitions of war and half his force.

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  • In March Babington, pursuing De la Rey after the latter's Lichtenburg misadventure, captured three guns and six maxims near Ventersdorp. In April Plumer occupied Pietersburg, the last remaining seat of government open to the enemy.

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  • In the south-eastern Transvaal Botha made a new effort to invade Natal, but, although he captured 300 men and three guns in an action on the 17th of September at Blood River Poort near Vryheid, his plans were rendered abortive by his failure to reduce the posts of Mount Prospect and Fort Itala in Zululand, which he attacked on the 26th, and he only escaped with difficulty from the converging columns sent against him.

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  • The number of field battalions was nearly doubled, two-thirds of the artillery received breech-loading rifled guns, the infantry had for some years had the breech-loading "needlegun," and steps were initiated to train an adequate number of staff officers to a uniform appreciation of strategical problems, based on Moltke's personal interpretation of Clausewitz's Vom Kriege.

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  • rifled guns with shrapnel shell were considered more than sufficient to make good the slight advantage then conceded to the breech-loader.

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  • In about two hours the t2 Prussian battalions and 3 batteries found themselves assailed by upwards of 40 Austrian battalions and zoo guns, and against such swarms of enemies each man felt that retreat from the wood across the open meant annihilation.

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  • The advantage of the breech-loader now began to assert itself, for the Austrian skirmishers who covered the front of the guns could only load when standing up, while the Prussians lay down or fired from cover.

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  • The defenders were therefore steadily driven up the hill, and then cleared the front to give the guns room to act.

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  • Occurring about 2.30, and almost simultaneously with the withdrawal of the Austrian guns on their left already alluded to, this may be said to have decided the battle, for although the Saxons still stood firm against the attacks of the Elbe army, and the reserves, both cavalry and infantry, attempted a series of counterstrokes, the advantage of position and moral was all on the side of the Prussians.

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  • The noise of the ship's guns, as the company sails off, wakes the poet to the real pleasures of a May morning.

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  • In consequence of the breakdown of some of his guns he imprudently halted at Turnham Green.

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  • 1914 the channel was known to be defended by a number of batteries, some of them armed with very heavy guns.

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  • If the batteries and their artillery were somewhat out of date, the fact remained that warships steaming up the defile would be compelled to pass these fortifications at very close quarters, when the lack of range of their guns would cease to tell.

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  • It had always been assumed during previous discussions on the question that warships adventuring the passage would try a rush, that they would endeavour to steam by the, batteries and drive the `defending gunners from their guns by concentrated fire.

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  • guns.

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  • Any Turkish battery that was chosen for target generally ceased firing before long; and the assailants were disposed to assume that the work was definitely put out of action, whereas all that had happened in reality was that the hostile gunners had been driven from their guns.

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  • The enemy's light guns, aided by effective searchlights, were offering a strenuous opposition to the small craft engaged on the all-important duty of clearing the channel of submerged defences.

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  • on finding nearly all the ammunition for their heaviest ordnance in the Narrows to be used up, viewed the prospect of a possible fresh fleet attack with some apprehension, as they were under the impression that the assailants had been beaten off on the 18th by the guns and not by the mines.

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  • It is true that Hamilton was expecting the arrival of the 42nd Division and of the 2nd French Division within a few days; but his losses had been extremely heavy, there were no depots at hand from which these losses could promptly be made good, and he was inferior to ` the Turks in artillery both as regards calibre of guns and as regards ammunition.

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  • Ottoman guns dominated the entire territory which the invaders had succeeded in the course of two months in conquering, as well as " V " and " W " beaches which were the landing-places chiefly used by them.

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  • The very few Ottoman guns which had been causing the freshly disembarked troops a good deal of annoyance during the 7th had been withdrawn for fear of capture, the defenders fully expecting a forward move by the Allies.

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  • Although sustained by a fair number of guns and with the moral support of the 53rd Division, which had disembarked during the night, the 10th and 11th Divisions could make no headway.

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  • Large bodies of infantry with a fair proportion of guns still remained on shore on the 17th, but of these roughly half - about io,000 men and a number of guns in each area - were removed that night, so that on the 18th only a meagre force, composed almost wholly of infantry and disposed almost entirely in the trenches, was holding a long front face to face with a numerically far stronger enemy.

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  • At nightfall the very few guns still to go were hurried off to the jetties.

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  • At Anzac, where conditions favoured the retreating troops less, it had been necessary to destroy some valuable war material at the last moment, and a few worn-out guns had purposely been abandoned.

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  • They moreover enjoyed an even more marked superiority in respect to artillery, and this the Ottoman commander-in-chief hastened to turn to account; the heavier guns which had been sweeping the Anzac and Suvla areas for months past were promptly transferred to the high ground overlooking the extremity of the peninsula or to positions on the Asiatic side of the Straits from which the extremity of the peninsula could be effectively taken in flank.

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  • The enemy's guns gave a good deal of trouble at the beaches, and caused many casualties.

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  • A large number of guns had been retained ashore in view of the danger of a determined attack by the Turks on the 8th, when the lines were thinly held; it had been decided to abandon several of these, worn-out ordnance being earmarked for the purpose.

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  • guns could have been turned on to the beaches, of which the range was exactly known, and embarkation, impeded as it was by the rough water, could hardly have been carried out without many casualties.

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  • The signory, at last realizing that Malatesta was a traitor, dismissed him; but it was too late, and he now behaved as though he were governor of Florence; when the troops attempted to enforce the dismissal he turned his guns on them.

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  • The strong resistance offered by these three guns seems to have led to the conclusion that towers of this description were specially formidable, and Martello towers were built in large numbers, and at heavy expense, along the shores of England, especially on the southern and eastern coasts, which in certain parts are lined with these towers at short intervals.

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  • They are structures of solid masonry, containing vaulted rooms for the garrison, and providing a platform at the top for two or three guns, which fire over a low masonry parapet.

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  • In 1770 Captain Cook here beached his ship the "Endeavour," to repair the damage caused by her striking a reef in the neighbourhood of the estuary, which he could only clear by throwing his guns overboard.

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  • During February 1905 reinforcements were sent up which raised the garrison of Sana to a strength of eight battalions, and in March a further reinforcement of about the same strength arrived, and fought its way into the capital with the loss of almost all its guns and train.

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  • This led to a material reduction in the army, which, as reorganized, consists of 4000 officers and men, divided into seven battalions of infantry of 300 men each, seven squadrons of cavalry of 125 men each, and one regiment of mountain artillery of 590 men, with six batteries of mountain guns.

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  • Hong-Kong or Victoria harbour constantly presents an animated appearance, as many as 240 guns having been fired as salutes in a single day.

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  • In June the Confederates set to work to raise one of these abandoned vessels, the frigate "Merrimac" of 3500 tons and 40 guns, and to rebuild it as an iron-clad.

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  • Accordingly, the vessel was built so low in the water that the waves glided easily over its deck except at the middle, where was constructed a revolving turret 1 for the guns, and though the vessel's iron armour had a thickness of 1 in.

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  • Dahlgren guns; her crew numbered 58, while that of the "Merrimac" numbered about 300.

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  • On the 8th of March about 1 p.m., the "Merrimac," commanded by Commodore Franklin Buchanan (1795-1871), steamed down the Elizabeth accompanied by two one-gun gun-boats, to engage the wooden fleet of the Federals, consisting of the frigate "Congress," 50 guns, and the sloop "Cumberland," 30 guns, both sailing vessels, anchored off Newport News, and 1 For the idea of the low free-board and the revolving turret Ericsson was indebted to Theodore R.

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  • to nightfall, the 65,000 French troops had lost 6800 men, or about ro %; the allies (82,500 engaged) had 12,200 killed and wounded, and left in the enemy's hands 15,000 prisoners (many wounded) and 133 guns.

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  • The French horsemen, gallantly led, drove off the guns, rode round Hohenzollern's infantry squares, and routed the cavalry of Lichtenstein, but they were unable to do more, and in the end they retired to their old position.

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  • Yedo, the shOLiterature guns capital, displaced KiOto as the centre of literary of the activity.

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  • of danger; or by beating him out of the jungle with a line of elephants, the guns being stationed at the points where he is most likely to break cover.

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  • Among the manufactures of Derby are pianos and organs, woollen goods, pins, keys, dress stays, combs, typewriters, corsets, hosiery, guns and ammunition, and foundry and machine-shop products.

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  • It has important iron and steel works and iron foundries, at which armour-plates, guns and projectiles are made for the Italian navy, also steel castings, machinery and rails, a royal arms factory, and lignite mining.

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  • No resistance was at first offered to the annexation; but, suddenly, in January 1865, the Bhutias surprised the English garrison at Dewangiri, and the post was abandoned with the loss of two mountain guns.

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  • Fortunately for the Prussians, Bazaine had issued similar orders to his subordinates, who, having their men better in hand, were able to obey; and as night began to close in the French broke off the action and retired under the guns of the Metz forts, convinced that at last they had "broken the spell" of German success.

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  • In this action the Germans brought 30,500 rifles and 150 guns on to the battlefield only out of more than 10o,000 with 300 guns which could have been engaged before darkness.

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  • Bazaine actually deployed 50,700 rifles and 206 guns to oppose them.

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  • he reached a position north of the Tronville copses whence his guns could fire into the left rear of the long line of Prussian guns (6th division and corps artillery) on the heights above Vionville and Flavigny.

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  • Their fire threw the latter into serious confusion and he had already decided to attack with his nearest division (de Cissey) in the direction of the steeple of Vionville, when his attention was caught by the outbreak of heavy firing in the copses below him, and the entry of fresh Prussian guns into action.

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  • Guns, cavalry, infantry, everything that could still stand were to take part in it.

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  • only 23,700 rifles, 8roo sabres and 126 guns had been brought into action by the Germans against 59,100 rifles, 6700 sabres, and 300 guns on the French side, and even at the close of the day the former had only deployed 47,100 rifles, 8300 sabres and 222 guns against 83,000 rifles, 8000 sabres and 432 guns including 24 mitrailleuses.

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  • At noon, just as the French infantry were falling in for midday roll-call, sufficient guns were in position, and suddenly opened fire.

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  • From the south also came the thunder of guns and no encouraging news from that quarter had as yet reached the prince's headquarters.

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  • and a long pause ensued, while the 220 guns, which [by ',degrees ', had unlimbered behind them, brought St Privat and Roncourt under fire.

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  • Corps was standing massed about Rezonville when von Manstein's guns opposite Amanvillers suddenly made themselves heard.

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  • the attack opened (battle of Servigny or Noisseville); but his opportunity had been allowed to slip, and though his first onset overwhelmed the German outposts, their main line held good, and masses of guns unlimbering over a front of some 4 m.

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  • Therefore about noon a general retirement under the guns of the forts took place, and the last serious hope of the French army had vanished.

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  • Some 120,000 men with 528 guns had been engaged against 60,000 Germans with 222 guns, and had been beaten off with a loss of 3500 men.

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  • Some 45 tanks were available, and owing to the absence of some of the corps artillery only 600 guns covered the advance.

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  • Their losses had been heavy; II divisions had been defeated with a loss of close on i i,000 prisoners and many guns; the artificial defences had not held up or even appreciably checked the British advance, which now threatened to turn from the N.

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  • 3 the io British divisions of the First Army had defeated 13 hostile divisions, and taken from them over 16,000 prisoners and 200 guns.

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  • The first few days of the British advance passed with little resistance from the enemy, who fell back rapidly under cover of the fire of light machine-guns and isolated field guns.

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  • Twenty-three tanks joined in the attack, which was preceded by no bombardment but was covered by the fire of 978 guns.

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  • The corps lost heavily, though some prisoners and guns were taken.

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  • The captures of the corps came to over 4,000 prisoners and 87 guns; the attacking strength of the Australians was less than 6,000 and the casualties were just over r,000 in all.

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  • The 18th was checked after capturing Ronssoy and the 12th and 58th after taking Epehy; 2,300 prisoners were taken and io guns.

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  • In the series of operations, described above, the Third and Fourth British Armies had engaged 15 divisions against 29 of the German Second and Seventeenth Armies, and had taken from them close on 12,000 prisoners and 100 guns.

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  • The Third Army will assist the Fourth Army with counter battery work on the enemy's guns in the region La Terriere-Villers Outreaux.

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  • It was hoped that the assembly of the attacking troops in the restricted zone opposite the crossing point, the rapid bridging of the dry canal, and the pushing forward of guns to cover the farther advance, and of reinforcements, ammunition and supplies to support it, could all be carried out with the necessary speed and security, although the difficulties to be faced were very great and the possible causes of contretemps numerous.

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  • Four thousand prisoners and roo guns had been taken in this day's advance of some 7,000 yd.

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  • During its course the First Army's line had been advanced close on eight miles; its four divisions had driven back the 13 German divisions engaged by the Seventeenth Army on their front, and taken from them over 7,000 prisoners, 205 guns and 950 machine-guns, besides inflicting losses in killed and wounded which certainly far outweighed their own casualties.

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  • Thirteen German divisions had been forced to give ground before 12 British, and had left behind them many prisoners and guns during the five days' fighting.

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  • 26 and went on for 56 hours; about 1,600 guns of all calibres took part in it, yet so formidable were the hostile defences that the task of the infantry still remained one of great difficulty.

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  • deep into the most formidable part of the hostile fortress, routed the four enemy divisions in its front and taken 4,200 prisoners and 70 guns.

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  • passing through found its task much simplified, and before nightfall had carried the Hindenburg reserve line on practically the whole of its front, taking a further Boo men and 20 guns in its advance.

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  • Despite the comparative failure of the Composite Corps the attack had on the whole been a brilliant success, seven Allied divisions having defeated nine enemy divisions ensconced in immensely powerful works, capturing from them 5,300 prisoners and ioo guns and effecting such a wide breach in the last German line of defence that its complete capture in a few days was assured.

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  • 5 the Fourth Army's 12 divisions had completely defeated 20 enemy divisions, driving them from a succession of defensive lines of unexampled strength and taking from them close on i 5,000 prisoners and 120 guns, and could claim for themselves with justice a preponderating share in the decisive victory of the war.

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  • on a front of 30, and had lost 67,000 prisoners, 680 guns and vast quantities of other material, besides their killed and wounded.

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  • In the heavy weather prevailing at the time the " Good Hope " and " Monmouth " could not fight their main-deck guns, and their broadside discharge (including " Glasgow ") was reduced to 2 9.2-in.

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  • guns), had been relegated by Rear-Adml.

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  • There can be little doubt that neither in guns nor in gunnery was the British squadron capable of meeting the enemy, and long before the fatal day it should have been reinforced by at least two cruisers of the 1st Cruiser Squadron, all of which were ships in long commission with good armament.

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  • The " Otranto " asked if she was to keep out of range, and not getting a clear reply drew out of line on the " Glasgow's " starboard quarter, a potent reminder that a ship that has no guns to fight and no speed to run away is a delusion and a snare.

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  • The " Monmouth " was listing so badly that she could not use her port guns.

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  • The squadron was weak in guns and gunnery.

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  • Hancock's superb presence and power over men never shone more clearly than when, as the 150 guns of the Confederate army opened the attack he calmly rode along the front of his line to show his soldiers that he shared the dangers of the cannonade with them.

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  • On the 2nd-13th of August 1704 Eugene and Marlborough set their forces in motion towards the hostile camps; several streams had to be crossed on the march, and it was seven o'clock (five hours after moving off) when the British of Marlborough's left wing, next the Danube, deployed opposite Blenheim, which Tallard thereupon garrisoned with a large force of his best infantry, aided by a battery of 24-pounder guns.

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  • Of the French and Bavarians 11,000 men, roo guns and 200 colours and standards were taken; besides the killed and wounded, the numbers of which were large but uncertain - many were drowned in the Danube.

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  • It is defended by several batteries armed with modern heavy guns.

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  • The king was accorded the title of " His Highness the Kabaka of Buganda," and his special salute was fixed at eleven guns.

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  • In front, near the centre, were the heavy guns and each infantry battalion had its own light artillery.

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  • The " Blue " brigadeGustavus's infantry wore distinctive colours - overran the Rdcken ' 'Battle Of Lutzen November 16th., 1632  :60,000 I German Armym Swedish Army battery of heavy guns, and the " Swedish " 1 and " Yellow " brigades engaged the left face of the Imperialist lozenge with success.

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  • On the extreme left, meanwhile, the " Green " brigade had come to close quarters with Wallenstein's infantry and guns about Liitzen, and the heavy artillery had gone forward to close range between the " Green " and the " Yellow " infantry.

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  • Wallenstein advanced in his turn, recaptured his guns and drove the Swedes over the road.

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  • Again the Imperialists were driven in and their guns recaptured, this time all along the line.

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  • to the east of Ndrdlingen, about Allerheim, with their right resting on a hill and the left on a castle, the guns with an infantry escort being placed on these points, and the village itself in the centre being also garrisoned and entrenched.

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  • Fighting cautiously at first with his leading line to gain time for his second to come up, he then charged and broke up the hostile right wing of cavalry, while some battalions of infantry scaled the hill and captured the Bavarian guns.

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  • Unlike Weert the marshal kept his troops in hand, and swung round upon the Bavarian infantry behind Allerheim, who were at the same time cannonaded by their lost guns.

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  • In particular, it was rendered practicable on board ship, and its application to the manipulation of heavy naval guns and other purposes on warships was not the least important of Armstrong's achievements.

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  • The guns constructed on this principle yielded such excellent results, both in range and accuracy, that they were adopted by the British government in 1859, Armstrong himself being appointed engineer of rifled ordnance and receiving the honour of knighthood.

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  • At the same time the Elswick Ordnance Company was formed to manufacture the guns under the supervision of Armstrong, who, however, had no financial interest in the concern; it was merged in the Elswick Engineering Works four years later.

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  • But while there was no doubt as to the shooting capacities of these guns, defects in the breech mechanism soon became equally patent, and in a few years caused a reversion to muzzle-loading.

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  • Armstrong resigned his position in 1863, and for seventeen years the government adhered to the older method of loading, in spite of the improvements which experiment and research at Elswick and elsewhere had during that period produced in the mechanism and performance of heavy guns.

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  • But at last Armstrong's results could no longer be ignored; and wire-wound breechloading guns were received back into the service in 1880.

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  • The use of steel wire for the construction of guns was one of Armstrong's early ideas.

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  • In replying to the guns of Fort Elsinore no execution was done, as the long range made it impossible to lay the guns (Lloyd and Hadcock, P. 33).

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  • Owing to the conical shape of the early muzzle-loading guns, if one trunnion were higher than the other, the " line of metal " would no longer be in the same vertical plane as the axis; in consequence of this, if a gun with, say, one wheel higher than the other were layed by this line, the axis would point off the target to the side of the lower wheel.

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  • Further, the inclination of the line of metal to the axis gave the gun a fixed angle of elevation varying from 1 ° in light guns to 2-1° in the heavier natures.

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  • Guns without dispart sights cannot be layed at elevations below the clearance angle.

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  • In the case of most guns it was used in conjunction with the dispart sight above referred to.

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  • This was of wood; the third sight, also of wood, was for guns without a dispart patch, which consequently could not be layed at elevations below the dispart.

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  • Such were the sights in use with smooth-bore guns in the first half of the last century.

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  • could be done by noting the amount of deflection for each range and applying it by means of a sliding leaf carrying the notch, and it is so done in howitzers; in most guns, however, it is found more convenient and sufficiently accurate to apply it automatically by inclining the socket through which the tangent scale rises.

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  • guns this angle was 2° 16'.

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  • Since the early days of rifled guns tangent sights have been improved in details, but the principles remain the same.

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  • Except for some minor differences the tangent sights were the same for all natures of guns, and for all services, but the development of the modern sight has followed different lines according to the nature and use of the gun, and must be treated under separate heads.

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  • Tilt of sights in field guns owing to the sinking of one wheel had long been recognized as a source of error, and allowed for by a rule-of-thumb correction, depending on the fact that the track of the wheels of British field artillery gun-carriages is 60", so that, for every inch one wheel is lower than the other, the whole system is turned through one degree - a_ hXl ?

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  • Scott's sight, though no longer used with quick-firing guns, is the precursor of all modern sights.

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  • Bethell, Modern Guns and Gunnery (Woolwich, 1907), and for sights used in the United States, Colonel O.

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  • In coast defence artillery, owing to the fact that the guns are on fixed mountings at a constant height (except for rise and fall of tide) above the horizontal plane on which their targets move, and that consequently the angle of sight and quadrant elevation for every range can be calculated, developments in sights, in a measure, gave way to improved means of giving quadrant elevation.

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  • The introduction of trunnionless guns recoiling axially through a fixed cradle enabled sights to be attached to the non-recoil parts of the mounting, so that the necessity of removing a delicate telescopic sight every round disappeared, and Q?'

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  • guns on field mountings; these sights admit of continuous laying, the eye need not be removed when the gun is fired.

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  • hidden and an artificial line of fire laid out and the guns layed for direction on pointers, or the line transferred to a distant aiming point.

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  • guns it is used for laying for direction.

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  • Special sights were introduced to overcome the difficulties of dis appearing guns, large guns firing through small ports, &c. Such were \ the Moncrieff reflecting sights, and the " chase sights " for the 10-in.

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  • guns very little change was made in the pattern of sights.

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  • As in mobile artillery, the introduction of trunnionless guns brought about a revolution in laying and sights.

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  • 0 With the introduction of quick-firing guns it was felt that the layer should have the same control over his gun as a marksman had over his rifle, and this would be Proceedings R.A.

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  • graduated The introduction of trunnionless guns was followed by that of rocking-bar sights (described above).

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  • Bethell, Modern Guns and Gunnery; Proceedings and Occasional Papers, R.A.

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  • Although it is mentioned in the 16th century, and coal was discovered there at the time of Peter the Great, it was not until 1 795 that an Englishman, Gascoyne or Gaskoin, established its first iron-works for supplying the Black Sea fleet and the southern fortresses with guns and shot.

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  • On February 27, 1815, Napoleon set sail from Elba with his force of l,000 men and 4 guns, determined to reconquer the throne of France.

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  • Vandamme's exhausted troops were unnerved at the sight of this fresh foe, and an incipient panic was only quelled by turning guns on the fugitives.

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  • Some delay was occasioned by a thunderstorm; but, as this passed over, the guns opened and the Old Guard and Milhaud's cuirassiers proceeded to form up opposite to Ligny.

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  • a crashing salvo of 60 guns gave the signal for a combined assault to be delivered by Gerard and the Guard, with Milhaud moving on their right flank.

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  • The Prussians lost about 12,000 men and 21 guns, and the French 850o; in Ligny more than 4000 dead lay on an area of about 400 sq.

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  • Corps), a force of 33,000 men and 11o guns, to follow the Prussians, penetrate their intentions and discover if they meditated uniting with Wellington in front of Brussels.

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  • Of his 156 guns, 78 belonged to the British artillery; but of his 67,600 men only 29,800 were British or King's German Legion troops, whereas all Napoleon's were Frenchmen and veterans.

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  • Napoleon drew up his army of 74,000 men and 246 guns in three lines, fully in view of the allies.

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  • ever, a battery of 80 French guns unlimbered on the long spur to the S.E.

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  • As D'Erlon's troops advanced the Dutch-Belgian brigade in front of the ridge, which had been subjected to an overwhelming fire from the 80 French guns at close range, turned about and retired in disorder through the main position.

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  • As the horsemen closed they were received with volleys of case from the guns, and the infantry formed into squares.

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  • The victors captured many guns, but were too exhausted to pursue the Russians, whose retirement was not made in the best order.

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  • Some of these had been prepared with interior parapets and platforms of concrete for medium guns.

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  • higher, for guns.

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  • The Russians, with the resources of the fleet at their disposal (just as at Sevastopol), used great numbers of machine guns and electric lights, and the available garrison at first was probably, including sailors, 47,000 men.

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  • guns and howitzers, and about 200 field and mountain guns).

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  • Small sorties, partial attacks' and duels between the Japanese guns and the generally more powerful ordnance of the fortress continued.

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  • At Pan-Lung the machine guns on the Wall prevented them from leaving the parallel.

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  • At Chi-Kuan Fort the terreplein of the fort had been covered with entanglements defended by machine guns on the gorge parapets, and the Japanese could make no way.

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  • Thirty-six guns swept the ground with shrapnel.

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  • But the fate of his predecessor had filled him with a lively terror of Kanaris and his fire-ships; he contented himself with a cruise round the coasts of Greece, and was happy Campaign to return to safety under the guns of the Dardanelles of 1823.

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  • Ibrahim at Krommydi with 2000 regular infantry, 400 cavalry and four guns.

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  • The English officers, who in vain tried to rally them, themselves only just escaped by scrambling into their boats and putting off to the war-vessels, whose guns checked the pursuit and enabled a remnant of the fugitives to escape.

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  • The navy, many of the officers of which are Danes and Norwegians, comprises a steel twin-screw cruiser of 2500 tons which serves as the royal yacht, four steel gunboats of between 500 and 700 tons all armed with modern quick-firing guns, two torpedo-boat destroyers and three torpedo boats, with other craft for river and coast work.

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  • They bought practically all of what is now Essex county from the Indians for "fifty double hands of powder, one hundred bars of lead, twenty axes, twenty coats, ten guns, twenty pistols, ten kettles, ten swords, four blankets, four barrels of beer, ten pairs of breeches, fifty knives, twenty horses, eighteen hundred and fifty fathoms of wampum, six ankers of liquor (or something equivalent), and three troopers' coats."

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  • Meanwhile the Polish army, 40,000 strong, with ioo guns, was assembling on the frontier.

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  • The fact that the Poles possessed a well-drilled army of 23,800 foot, 6800 horFe and 108 guns, which they were able to recruit to a total strength of 80,821 men with 158 guns, gave solidity to the rising.

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  • But hardly had this alliance been formed when a secret arrangement was come to between the two Indian powers, the result of which was that Colonel Smith's small force was met with a united army of 80,000 men and 100 guns.

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  • The siege corps was commanded by General von Tresckow and numbered at first io,000 men with twenty-four field guns - a force which appeared adequate for the reduction of the antiquated works of Vauban.

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  • These were planned in the days of short-range guns, and were therefore in 1870 open to an overwhelming bombardment by the rifled cannon of the attack.

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  • His general plan was to maintain as advanced a line as possible, to manoeuvre against the investing troops, and to support his own by the long range fire of his rifled guns.

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  • The German batteries, as more guns arrived, were extended from left to right, and on the 13th of December the Bosmont was captured, ground being also gained in front of Bellevue.

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  • army corps at the Lisaine, in which a part of the siege corps bore a share, put an end to the attempt to relieve Belfort, and the siege corps was promptly increased to a strength of 17,600 infantry, 4700 artillery and i too engineers, with thirtyfour field-guns besides the guns and howitzers of the siege train.

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  • Still, the guns of the attack were now steadily gaining the upper hand, and at last on the 8th of February the Germans entered the two Perches redoubts.

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  • The Perches ridge was crowned with a parallel and numerous batteries, which in the end mounted ninety-seven guns.

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  • the guns in the upper batteries could only be reached by ladders.

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  • At the base of the monument are muskets used by United States soldiers in that war and guns captured at Cerro Gordo.

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  • By means of a well-chosen value of n, determined by a few experiments, it is possible, pending further experiment, with the most recent design, to utilize Bashforth's experimental results carried out with old-fashioned projectiles fired from muzzle-loading guns.

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  • In the calculation of range tables for direct fire, defined officially as " fire from guns with full charge at elevation not exceeding 15°," the vertical component of the resistance of the FIG.

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  • To the south of the town stands a modern palace, defended by earthworks and Krupp guns.

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  • In a battle such as Chancellorsville or the Wilderness guns were almost valueless, since there was little open space in which they might be used.

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  • Mississippi river steamers were armed with heavy guns and protected by armour, boiler-plates, cotton bales, &c., and some fast cruisers were constructed for ocean work, one of them actually reaching the high speed of 17.75 m.

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  • On the 13th, 6000 men were landed, covered by the guns of the fleet, and, after Porter had subjected the works to a terrific bombardment, Fisher was brilliantly carried by storm on the 15th.

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  • Five heavy accurate shots from the Federal's turret guns crushed the enemy in a few minutes.

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  • During his eleven years' ministry (1876-1878 with Depretis, 1884-1891 with Depretis and Crispi, 1896-1898 with Rudini), he succeeded in creating large private shipyards, engine works and metallurgical works for the production of armour, steel plates and guns.

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  • away, is a level plain, which in 1835 (February 28) was the scene of a battle in which the army (2000 men, 16 guns) of Mahommed Shah, commanded by Sir H.

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  • Mauser rifles (1901 model) and carbines are used by the infantry and cavalry, and Schneider Canet quick-firing guns by the field and horse artillery.

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  • In the hope of relieving his financial difficulties, the king erected a mint, where money was coined of the "worst kind of old brass, guns and the refuse of metals, melted down together," of the nominal value of £1,568,800, with which his troops were paid, and tradesmen were compelled to receive it under penalty of being hanged in case of refusal.

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