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guises

guises Sentence Examples

  • Irritated by his opposition, the Guises compelled him to leave the court, and he died on the 2nd of December of the same year.

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  • By habit a Catholic, but above all things fond of power, she was determined to prevent the Protestants from getting the upper hand, and almost equally resolved not to allow them to be utterly crushed, in order to use them as a counterpoise to the Guises.

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  • enabled Catherine de' Medici, the queen mother, to assert herself against the Guises, and become the regent of her ten-year-old son Charles IX.

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  • He was well known to and favoured by both Catherine de' Medici and the Guises, and was very soon released.

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  • He was simply Faust's "other self," appearing in various guises - as a bear, as a little bald man, as a monk, as an invisible presence ringing a bell - but always recognizable as the same "familiar."

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  • France was helpless, the tumult of Ambroise alarmed the Guises for their own lives and power, and the regent, long in bad health, was dying in Edinburgh castle.

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  • It was a consummation too ideal for that early date; and next year the regent, whose daughter was now queen of France and there mixed up with the persecuting policy of the Guises, forbade the reformed preaching in Scotland.

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  • Fortunately for Elizabeth, Francis died in 1560, and the French government passed into the hands of Catherine de Medici, who had no cause to love her daughter-in-law and the Guises.

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  • shone but with a reflected lightin his private life eflected from his old mistress, Diane de Poitiers, and in his political action reflected from the views of Mont morency or the Guises.

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  • Henry II.s resumption of war, without provocation and without allies, was a grave error; but more characterless than ever, the king was urged to it by the Guises, whose ffe~aV Ii.

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  • The Guises, strengthened by the failure of the conspiracy of Amboise, which had been aimed at them, abused the advantage due to their victory.

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  • After three years the Guises reopened hostilities against Coligny, whom they accused of having plotted the murder of their chief; while the Catholics, egged on by the Spaniards, rose against the Protestants, who had been made uneasy by an interview between Catherine and her daughter Elizabeth, wife of Philip II.

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  • A third party was once more formed, composed of moderates from the two camps, and it was recruited quite as much by jealousy of the Guises and by ambition as by horror at the massacres.

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  • and the Protestantism of Henry of Navarre, this party talked of re-establishing the authority of the king; but in reality it inclined more to the Guises, martyrs in the good cause, who were supported by Philip II.

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  • on the one handnow master of Portugal and delivered from William of Orange, involved in strife with the English Protestants, and desirous of avenging the injuries inflicted upon him by the Valois in the Netherlandsand the Guises on the other hand, whose cousin Mary Stuart was a prisoner of Queen Elizabeth, there was a common interest in supporting one another and pressing things forward.

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  • the follies of the League and to further the ambitions of the rebellious Guises?

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  • The Montmorencys, the DEpernons, the Birons, the Guises, were accustomed to consider their offices as hereditary property.

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  • Throughout its existence, the Writers ' Guild of Great Britain has opposed censorship in all its guises.

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  • You have been warned: rustic charms come in many guises!

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  • The Soldier's Tale is a morality fable in which the Devil appears in different guises.

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  • But when dealing with the sailing fraternity in all its various guises, this is not as simple as it sounds.

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  • glimpsed so fleetingly and in so many guises that it has become ourselves.

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  • Lord Mongo prowls mad angry in a quarry, adopting various guises and railing his gob against a gyrating void.

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  • The security issue has many guises No one wants to know that the external security threat is just getting worse.

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  • Yet, I go on stage in various guises with the sole intent of creating a mood of goodwill with me at its center.

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  • The computer, in its many different guises, has invaded the gallery space.

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  • We are now accustomed to tracing such gradual effects in numerous guises, from acid rain to global warming to pesticide residues.

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  • guises in order to frighten away both tomb robbers and evil spirits.

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  • Over the years this has become almost instinctive, knowing how film will respond to its various guises.

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  • The best of Gainsbourg, in all his guises, from louche lounge lizard through to seedy hipster.

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  • rustic charms come in many guises!

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  • Please note first that forensic statisticians can operate under various guises (further details can be found in the " Who employs forensic statisticians?

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  • These results should be seen as a wake up call for all right-thinking people to combat xenophobia in all its guises.

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  • and her daughter Mary in 1558 strengthened her position, and in 1559 she relinquished her conciliatory tactics to submit to the dictation of her relatives, the Guises, by falling more into line with their religious policy.

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  • Irritated by his opposition, the Guises compelled him to leave the court, and he died on the 2nd of December of the same year.

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  • The Thugs were a well-organized confederacy of professional assassins, who in gangs of whom 10 to 200 travelled in various guises through India, wormed themselves into the confidence of wayfarers of the wealthier class, and, when a favourable opportunity occurred, strangled them by throwing a handkerchief or noose round their necks, and then plundered and buried them.

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  • The queen-mother, however, soon grew weary of the domination of the Guises, and entered upon a course of secret opposition.

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  • By habit a Catholic, but above all things fond of power, she was determined to prevent the Protestants from getting the upper hand, and almost equally resolved not to allow them to be utterly crushed, in order to use them as a counterpoise to the Guises.

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  • by the new doctrines, or at least repelled by the flagrant power enjoyed by the Guises during the brief reign of Francis II.

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  • Persecution was revived by the Guises; Du Bourg, the brave defender of the Protestants, was burned as a heretic; yet Calvin could in the closing years of his life form a cheerful estimate that some three hundred thousand of his countrymen had been won over to his views.

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  • enabled Catherine de' Medici, the queen mother, to assert herself against the Guises, and become the regent of her ten-year-old son Charles IX.

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  • He was well known to and favoured by both Catherine de' Medici and the Guises, and was very soon released.

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  • He was simply Faust's "other self," appearing in various guises - as a bear, as a little bald man, as a monk, as an invisible presence ringing a bell - but always recognizable as the same "familiar."

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  • France was helpless, the tumult of Ambroise alarmed the Guises for their own lives and power, and the regent, long in bad health, was dying in Edinburgh castle.

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  • She was wise with the wisdom of the Guises, but sincere friends she had none, and with all her trained fascinations she made few, except in the circle of the Flemings, Beatons, Livingstones and Seatons.

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  • Her kinsmen, the Guises, fell from power, and were no longer to be feared by England, so that Elizabeth need not abandon her favourite, Lord Robert Dudley, in the hope of securing Scotland by her marriage with Arran.

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  • This fact, together with the strong Italian bias of the Valois, serves to explain in some degree the reason why the Counter-Reformation entailed those fierce entangled civil wars, massacres of St Bartholomew, murders of the Guises, regicides, treasons and empoisonments that terminated with the compromise of Henry IV.

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  • It was a consummation too ideal for that early date; and next year the regent, whose daughter was now queen of France and there mixed up with the persecuting policy of the Guises, forbade the reformed preaching in Scotland.

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  • Fortunately for Elizabeth, Francis died in 1560, and the French government passed into the hands of Catherine de Medici, who had no cause to love her daughter-in-law and the Guises.

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  • shone but with a reflected lightin his private life eflected from his old mistress, Diane de Poitiers, and in his political action reflected from the views of Mont morency or the Guises.

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  • Henry II.s resumption of war, without provocation and without allies, was a grave error; but more characterless than ever, the king was urged to it by the Guises, whose ffe~aV Ii.

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  • background, and his wife, Mary Stuart, queen of Scotland, who being a niece of the Guises brought her uncles, the constable Francis and the cardinal of Lorraine, into power.

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  • The Guises, strengthened by the failure of the conspiracy of Amboise, which had been aimed at them, abused the advantage due to their victory.

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  • in December 1560 compromised the influence of the Guises and again saved Protestantism.

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  • She had attained the age of forty-one when she at last came into power amidst the hopes and anxieties aroused by the fall of the Guises and the return of the Bourbons to fortune.

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  • After three years the Guises reopened hostilities against Coligny, whom they accused of having plotted the murder of their chief; while the Catholics, egged on by the Spaniards, rose against the Protestants, who had been made uneasy by an interview between Catherine and her daughter Elizabeth, wife of Philip II.

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  • The Guises set aside, Coligny, supported as he was by Jeanne dAlbret, queen of Navarre, now received all Charles IX.s Coligny favor.

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  • A murderous attack upon Coligny, who had opposed the candidature of Catherines favorite son, the duke of Anjou, for the throne of Poland, having only succeeded in wounding him and in exciting the Calvinist leaders, who were congregated in Paris for the occasion of Marguerite deValoismarriage with the king of Navarre,Catherine and the Guises resolved together to put them all to death.

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  • A third party was once more formed, composed of moderates from the two camps, and it was recruited quite as much by jealousy of the Guises and by ambition as by horror at the massacres.

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  • and the Protestantism of Henry of Navarre, this party talked of re-establishing the authority of the king; but in reality it inclined more to the Guises, martyrs in the good cause, who were supported by Philip II.

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  • The death of the duke of Anjou after his mad endeavour to establish himself in the Netherlands (1584), and the accession Union of Henry of Navarre, heir to the effeminate Henry III., between reversed the situations of the two parties: the Prothe Guises testants again became supporters of the principle of d, ,,, heredity and divine right; the Catholics appealed P to right of election and the sovereignty of the people.

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  • on the one handnow master of Portugal and delivered from William of Orange, involved in strife with the English Protestants, and desirous of avenging the injuries inflicted upon him by the Valois in the Netherlandsand the Guises on the other hand, whose cousin Mary Stuart was a prisoner of Queen Elizabeth, there was a common interest in supporting one another and pressing things forward.

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  • A definite agreement was made between them at Joinville (December 31, 1584), the religious and popular pretext being the danger of leaving the kingdom to the king of Navarre, and the ostensible end to secure the succession to a Catholic prince, the old Cardinal de Bourbon, an ambitious and violent man of mean intelligence; while the secret aim was to secure the crown for the Guises, - who had already attempted to fabricate for themselves a genealogy tracing their descent from Charlemagne.

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  • The pretensions of the Guises were, in fact, soon manifested in the declaration of Pronne (March 30, 1585) against the foul court of the Valois; they were again manifested in a The cornfurious agitation, fomented by the secret council mittee of of the League at Paris, which favored the Guises, Sixteen a~ and which now worked on the people through their Paris.

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  • But the duke of Guises audacity did not make Henry III.

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  • found himself wounded on his strongest side; and by Henry of Guises successes at Vimory andAuneau the Germans, who should have been his best auxiliaries against the League, were crushed (October-November 1587).

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  • the follies of the League and to further the ambitions of the rebellious Guises?

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  • The Montmorencys, the DEpernons, the Birons, the Guises, were accustomed to consider their offices as hereditary property.

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  • Please note first that forensic statisticians can operate under various guises (further details can be found in the Who employs forensic statisticians?

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  • These results should be seen as a wake up call for all right-thinking people to combat xenophobia in all its guises.

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  • You'll also find their smartphones in Europe though Vodafone, and throughout Asia under a variety of guises.

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  • These fabled swordsmen have been the subjects of films, plays and comic books and have shown up in a variety of guises.

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  • The focus here is on indie rock, in all its many guises.

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  • The Thugs were a well-organized confederacy of professional assassins, who in gangs of whom 10 to 200 travelled in various guises through India, wormed themselves into the confidence of wayfarers of the wealthier class, and, when a favourable opportunity occurred, strangled them by throwing a handkerchief or noose round their necks, and then plundered and buried them.

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  • The queen-mother, however, soon grew weary of the domination of the Guises, and entered upon a course of secret opposition.

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    1
  • Persecution was revived by the Guises; Du Bourg, the brave defender of the Protestants, was burned as a heretic; yet Calvin could in the closing years of his life form a cheerful estimate that some three hundred thousand of his countrymen had been won over to his views.

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  • She was wise with the wisdom of the Guises, but sincere friends she had none, and with all her trained fascinations she made few, except in the circle of the Flemings, Beatons, Livingstones and Seatons.

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  • in December 1560 compromised the influence of the Guises and again saved Protestantism.

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  • She had attained the age of forty-one when she at last came into power amidst the hopes and anxieties aroused by the fall of the Guises and the return of the Bourbons to fortune.

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  • The Guises set aside, Coligny, supported as he was by Jeanne dAlbret, queen of Navarre, now received all Charles IX.s Coligny favor.

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  • A murderous attack upon Coligny, who had opposed the candidature of Catherines favorite son, the duke of Anjou, for the throne of Poland, having only succeeded in wounding him and in exciting the Calvinist leaders, who were congregated in Paris for the occasion of Marguerite deValoismarriage with the king of Navarre,Catherine and the Guises resolved together to put them all to death.

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  • The pretensions of the Guises were, in fact, soon manifested in the declaration of Pronne (March 30, 1585) against the foul court of the Valois; they were again manifested in a The cornfurious agitation, fomented by the secret council mittee of of the League at Paris, which favored the Guises, Sixteen a~ and which now worked on the people through their Paris.

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  • found himself wounded on his strongest side; and by Henry of Guises successes at Vimory andAuneau the Germans, who should have been his best auxiliaries against the League, were crushed (October-November 1587).

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  • At the second assembly of the states of Blois, called together on account of the need for money(1588), all of Henry III.s enemies who were elected showed themselves even bolder than in 1576 in claiming the A;sas;I~nha~ control of the financial administration of the kingdom; Guises at but the destruction of the Armada gave Henry III., the second already exasperated by the insults he had received, ~

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  • At the second assembly of the states of Blois, called together on account of the need for money(1588), all of Henry III.s enemies who were elected showed themselves even bolder than in 1576 in claiming the A;sas;I~nha~ control of the financial administration of the kingdom; Guises at but the destruction of the Armada gave Henry III., the second already exasperated by the insults he had received, ~

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  • Her kinsmen, the Guises, fell from power, and were no longer to be feared by England, so that Elizabeth need not abandon her favourite, Lord Robert Dudley, in the hope of securing Scotland by her marriage with Arran.

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  • Diane, Montmorency and the Guises were all-powerful, and dismissed Cardinal de Tournon, de Longueval, the duchesse d'Etampes and all the late king's friends and officials.

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  • Diane, Montmorency and the Guises were all-powerful, and dismissed Cardinal de Tournon, de Longueval, the duchesse d'Etampes and all the late king's friends and officials.

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  • background, and his wife, Mary Stuart, queen of Scotland, who being a niece of the Guises brought her uncles, the constable Francis and the cardinal of Lorraine, into power.

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