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guienne

guienne

guienne Sentence Examples

  • In the last year of the war she was accompanied into Guienne by the duc de Nemours, her intimacy with whom gave La Rochefoucauld an excuse for abandoning her, and who himself immediately returned to his old mistress the duchesse de Chevreuse.

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  • - Guienne (Rouergue).

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  • The great governments were: Alsace, Saintonge and Angoumois, Anjou, Artois, Aunis, Auvergne, Beam and Navarre, Berry, Bourbonnais, Bourgogne (Burgundy), Bretagne (Brittany),, Champagne, DauphinC, Flandre, Foix, Franche-Comt, Guienne and Gascogne (Gascony), Ile-de-France, Languedoc, Limousin, Lorraine, Lyonnais.

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  • - Guienne (Prigord).

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  • Guienne (Bordelais, Bazadais).

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  • - Guienne (Quercy).

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  • - Guienne; Gascogne.

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  • Guienne; Gascogne; Languedoc.

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  • He was mixed up with the sordid intrigues which preceded the deposition of Edward II., and supplied Queen Isabella and Mortimer in Paris with money in 1325 from the revenues of Guienne, of which province he was treasurer.

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  • A treaty with the English which secured the district of Agenais for France was followed by a feudal war in Guienne.

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  • His son, Robert II., took part in the wars in Navarre, Sicily, Guienne and Flanders, and was killed at the battle of Courtrai in 1302.

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  • In 1789 Armagnac was a province forming part of the Gouvernement-general of Guienne and Gascony; it was divided into two parts, High or White Armagnac, with Auch for capital, and Low or Black Armagnac. At the Revolution the whole of the original Armagnac was included in the department of Gers.

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  • In 1469 Batarnay was sent to keep watch upon the duke of Guienne's intrigues, which began to appear dangerous.

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  • In 1512 he gained his first military experience in Guienne, and in the following year he commanded the army of Picardy.

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  • At the end of the ancien regime it formed part of the "Gouvernement" of Guienne, and at the Revolution it was incorporated in the department of Lotet-Garonne, of which it constitutes nearly the whole.

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  • He displayed administrative ability and great loyalty to the central government as intendant in Guienne in 1627, and in 1628 negotiated the boundary delimitation with Spain.

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  • In order to justify his newly-won laurels, Luynes undertook an expedition against the Protestants, but died of a fever in the midst of the campaign, at Longueville in Guienne, on the 15th of December 1621.

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  • For nearly ten years he was engaged in fighting against the English in the south and the west of France, recovering from them the provinces of Poitou, Guienne and Auvergne, and thus powerfully contributing to the establishment of a united France.

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  • It was believed to be of English origin, and the long tenure of Gascony and Guienne by the English certainly provided abundant opportunity for the introduction of English colonists.

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  • These details of his education (which, like most else that is known about him, come from his own mouth) are not only interesting in themselves, but remind the reader how, not far from the same time, Rabelais, the other leading writer of French during the Renaissance, was exercising himself, though not being exercised, in plans of education almost as fantastic. At six years old Montaigne was sent to the college de Guienne at Bordeaux, then at the height of its reputation.

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  • At thirteen Montaigne left the college de Guienne and began to study law, it is not known where, but probably at Toulouse.

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  • before he became king, and after his accession was made master of the wardrobe, lieutenant-general in Auvergne (1576) and Guienne (1610), and marshal of France in 1614.

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  • His son, Gaston Jean Baptiste de Roquelaure (1617-1683), a celebrated wit, was created duke and peer of France in 1652, and was appointed governor of Guienne in 1679.

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  • In 1294, at the beginning of the hostilities against England, he invaded Guienne and took La Reole and Saint-Sever.

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  • In the reign of Charles IV., the Fair, he fought yet again in Guienne (1324), and died at Perray (Seine-et-Oise) on the 16th of December 1325.

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  • He was for many years principal of the Guienne College at Bordeaux.

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  • of England, of his wife Eleanor of Guienne, of Richard I.

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  • Cardinal Beaufort, and after him Suffolk, sought by working for peace to secure at least Guienne and Normandy.

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  • But his home administration was unpopular, whilst the incapacity of Edmund Beaufort ended in the loss of all Normandy and Guienne.

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  • Three years later he was appointed military governor of the province of Guienne, in which post he became intimate with IVlontesquieu.

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  • In 1152 by a marriage with Eleanor of Aquitaine, the divorced wife of the French king Louis VII., he acquired Poitou, Guienne and Gascony; but in doing so incurred the ill-will of his suzerain from which he suffered not a little in the future.

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  • of England, then busied with the Scottish War, and seized Guienne.

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  • The duke then made him lieutenant-general in Languedoc and Guienne.

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  • He showed generosity in assigning a considerable income to be divided annually among the peasant proprietors of upper Guienne.

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  • He was concerned in the Fronde of 1651, but soon afterwards became reconciled with Mazarin, and in 16J4 married the cardinal's niece, Anne Marie Martinozzi (1639-1672), and secured the government of Guienne.

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  • While John, after two inroads, turned back to his Guienne possessions on the 3rd of July, it was not until three weeks later that the emperor concentrated his forces at Valenciennes, and in the interval Philip Augustus had countermarched northward and concentrated an army at Peronne.

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  • Guienne was conquered in 1451 by Duncis, but not subdued, and another expedition was necessary in 1453, when Talbot was defeated and slain at Castillon.

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  • Balue thereupon joined Guillaume de Harancourt, bishop of Verdun, in an intrigue to induce Charles of France to demand Champagne and Brie in accordance with the king's promise to Charles the Bold, instead of distant Guienne where the king was determined to place him.

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  • Then Louis, inducing his brother to accept Guienne, - where, surrounded by faithful royal officers, he was harmless for the time being, - undertook to play off the Lancastrians against Edward IV.

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  • Paris was to be attacked from Flanders and Guienne at the same time.

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  • Arnaud Amanieu, lord of Albret, helped to take Guienne from the English.

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  • which broke out in Guienne in 1337,were the disputes arising in connexion with the French possessions of the English kings, in respect to which they were vassals of the kings of France; the pretensions of Edward III.

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  • In 1346, while the French were trying to invade Guienne, Edward III.

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  • Du Guesclin, having been appointed Constable, defeated the English at Pontvallain in 1370, at Chize in 1373, and drove them from their possessions between the Loire and the Gironde, while the duke of Anjou retook part of Guienne.

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  • recommenced war in Artois and Guienne and against Charles the Bad, but failed in his attempt to reunite Brittany and France.

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  • During this time Dunois in Guienne was taking Bordeaux and Bayonne.

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  • Guienne revolted against France, whereupon Talbot returned there with an army of 5000 men, but was vanquished and killed at Castillon on the 17th of July 1453.

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  • Joseph Justus Scaliger (1540-1609), the greatest scholar of modern times, was the tenth child and third son of Julius Caesar Scaliger and Andiette de Rogues Lobejac. Born at Agen in 1540, he was sent when twelve years of age, with two younger brothers, to the college of Guienne at Bordeaux, then under the direction of Jean Gelida.

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  • The duke of Berry, excluded by this arrangement, was compensated by the government of Languedoc and Guienne.

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  • The two elder sons of Charles VI., Louis, duke of Guienne, and John, duke of Touraine, died in 1415 and 1417, and Charles, count of Ponthieu, became heir apparent.

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  • At this time, through the alliance and support of Philip of Burgundy, the English had extended their conquest over the whole of France north of the Loire in addition to their possession of Guienne; and while the infant HenryVl.

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  • On the 2nd of February 1576, after several vain attempts, he escaped from the court, joined the combined forces of Protestants and of opponents of the king, and obtained by the treaty of Beaulieu (1576) the government of Guienne.

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  • Excluded from it by the treaty of Nemours (1585) he began the "war of the three Henrys" by a campaign in Guienne (1586) and defeated Anne, duc de Joyeuse, at Coutras on the 10th of October 1587.

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  • Only Guienne and southern Aquitaine held Touraine out for King John, partly because they preferred a weak and distant master to such a strenuous and OU~ grasping prince as King Philip, partly because they were far more alien in blood and language to their French neighbors than were Normans or Angevins.

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  • Gascony being, as usual, out of hand, he crossed to Bordeaux in 1286, and abode in Guienne for no less than three years, reducing the duchy to such order as it had never known before, settling all disputed border questions with the new king of France, Philip IV., founding many new towns, and issuing many useful statutes and ordinances.

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  • out in Guienne.

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  • But it was possible for patriotic Scots to contend that they had done so only in their capacity as English baronsfor they held much land south of Tweedand topoint to the similarity of their position to that of the English king when he did homage for his duchy of Guienne at Paris, without; thereby admitting any suzerainty of the French crown Over England or Ireland.

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  • When called to account for the doings of his subjects, as well as for certain disputes in Gascony, the English king promised redress, and, on the suggestion of Philip, surrendered, as a formal act of apology, the six chief fortresses of Guienne, which were to be restored when reparation had been made.

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  • Norfolk, who had been designated to lead the expedition to Guienne, declared that though he was ready to follow his master to Flanders in his capacity of marshal, he would not be drafted off to Gascony against his own will.

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  • When France had grown strong, under Philip Augustus, the house of Plantagenet still retained a broad territory in Gascony and Guienne, and the house of Capet could not but covet the possession of the largest surviving feudal appanage which marred the solidarity of their kingdom.

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  • Fortunately for the duke of Guienne the majority of his subjects had no desire to become Frenchmen; the Gascons felt no national sympathy with their neighbors of the north, and the towns in especial were linked to England by close ties of commerce, and had no wish whatever to break off their allegiance to the house of Plantagenet.

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  • The root of the Hundred Years War, now just about to commence, must be sought in the affairs of Guienne, and not in any of the other causes which complicated and obscured the outbreak of hostilities.

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  • It was Philip, however, who actually began the war, by declaring Guienne and the other continental dominions of Edward III.

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  • A far more fatal bar to Edwards claim than the existence of Charles of Navarre was the fact that the peers of France, when summoned to decide the succession question nine years before, had decided that Philip of Valois had the sole valid claim to the crown, and that Edward had then done homage to him for Guienne.

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  • many long-lost regions of Guienne to the English suzerainty (Oct.

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  • There was also constant bickering on the borders of Guienne.

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  • Since Sluys the enemy had never disputed the command of the seas; but in 1372 a Spanish fleet- joined the French, and destroyed off La Rochelle a squadron which was bringing reinforcements for Guienne.

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  • By 1374 little was left of the great possessions which the English had held beyond the Channel save Calais, and the coast slip from Bordeaux to Bayonne, which formed the only loyal part of the duchy of Guienne.

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  • After two long truces, which filled the years 1390-1395, a definitive peace was at last concluded, by which the English king kept Calais and the coaststrip of Guienne, from Bordeaux to Bayonne, which had never been lost to the enemy.

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  • expected breach with France had at last come to Warwith pass; the duke of Orleans, without any declaration of renewed, war, had entered Guienne, while a French fleet attacked the south-west of England, and burnt Plymouth.

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  • 6, 1435), at which the English were offered peace and the retention of Normandy and Guienne if they would evacuate Paris and the rest of France.

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  • Indeed in 1452 he conseqted to abandon his protests, and to lend his aid to the other party for a great national object, the recovery of Guienne.

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  • For a moment the quarrel of York and Somerset was suspended, and the last English army that crossed the seas during theHundredYearsWar landed in Guienne, joined the insurgents, and for a time swept all before it.

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  • restored Guienne to Edward I., gave him the hand of Philips sister for himself and that of the kings daughter for his son (1298).

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  • The political unity of the kingdom was only fettered by the existence of four large isolated fiels: Flanders on the north, Brittany on the west, Burgundy on the east and Guienne on the south.

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  • for his possessions in Guienne, Edward at Years last brought himself to itthough certainly only after War, lengthy negotiations, and even threats of war in 1331.

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  • had taken reprisals against him in 1336 by making his parlement declare the forfeiture of Edwards lands and castles in Guienne; but the Hundred Years War, at first-simply a feudal quarrel between vassal and suzerain, soon became a great national conflict, in consequence of what was occurring in Flanders.

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  • To attack the English through their colonies, Guienne and Flanders, was to injure them in their most vital interests cloth and claret; for England sold her wool to Bruges in order to pay Bordeaux for her wine.

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  • had given Guienne in fief, provoked the nobles of Gascony to complain to Charles V.

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  • Normandy was lost to them at Formigny (1450), and Guienne, English since the 12th century, at Castillon (1453).

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  • of Berry distant Guienne.

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  • There were three principal theatres of war: in the north Normandy and the valley of the Loire, where Orleans, the general centre of reform, ensured communications between the south and Germany; in the south-west Gascony and Guienne; in the south-east Lyonnais and Vivarais.

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  • The English power in Guienne was weakened by the disastrous Spanish expedition of the Black Prince, whom Charles summoned before the parlement of Paris in January 1369 to answer the charges preferred against him by his subjects, thus expressly repudiating the English supremacy in Guienne.

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  • In the last year of the war she was accompanied into Guienne by the duc de Nemours, her intimacy with whom gave La Rochefoucauld an excuse for abandoning her, and who himself immediately returned to his old mistress the duchesse de Chevreuse.

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  • - Guienne (Rouergue).

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  • The great governments were: Alsace, Saintonge and Angoumois, Anjou, Artois, Aunis, Auvergne, Beam and Navarre, Berry, Bourbonnais, Bourgogne (Burgundy), Bretagne (Brittany),, Champagne, DauphinC, Flandre, Foix, Franche-Comt, Guienne and Gascogne (Gascony), Ile-de-France, Languedoc, Limousin, Lorraine, Lyonnais.

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  • - Guienne (Prigord).

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  • Guienne (Bordelais, Bazadais).

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  • - Guienne (Quercy).

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  • - Guienne; Gascogne.

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  • Guienne; Gascogne; Languedoc.

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  • He was mixed up with the sordid intrigues which preceded the deposition of Edward II., and supplied Queen Isabella and Mortimer in Paris with money in 1325 from the revenues of Guienne, of which province he was treasurer.

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  • A treaty with the English which secured the district of Agenais for France was followed by a feudal war in Guienne.

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  • His son, Robert II., took part in the wars in Navarre, Sicily, Guienne and Flanders, and was killed at the battle of Courtrai in 1302.

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  • In 1789 Armagnac was a province forming part of the Gouvernement-general of Guienne and Gascony; it was divided into two parts, High or White Armagnac, with Auch for capital, and Low or Black Armagnac. At the Revolution the whole of the original Armagnac was included in the department of Gers.

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  • In 1469 Batarnay was sent to keep watch upon the duke of Guienne's intrigues, which began to appear dangerous.

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  • In 1512 he gained his first military experience in Guienne, and in the following year he commanded the army of Picardy.

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  • At the end of the ancien regime it formed part of the "Gouvernement" of Guienne, and at the Revolution it was incorporated in the department of Lotet-Garonne, of which it constitutes nearly the whole.

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  • He displayed administrative ability and great loyalty to the central government as intendant in Guienne in 1627, and in 1628 negotiated the boundary delimitation with Spain.

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  • In order to justify his newly-won laurels, Luynes undertook an expedition against the Protestants, but died of a fever in the midst of the campaign, at Longueville in Guienne, on the 15th of December 1621.

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  • For nearly ten years he was engaged in fighting against the English in the south and the west of France, recovering from them the provinces of Poitou, Guienne and Auvergne, and thus powerfully contributing to the establishment of a united France.

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  • It was believed to be of English origin, and the long tenure of Gascony and Guienne by the English certainly provided abundant opportunity for the introduction of English colonists.

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  • These details of his education (which, like most else that is known about him, come from his own mouth) are not only interesting in themselves, but remind the reader how, not far from the same time, Rabelais, the other leading writer of French during the Renaissance, was exercising himself, though not being exercised, in plans of education almost as fantastic. At six years old Montaigne was sent to the college de Guienne at Bordeaux, then at the height of its reputation.

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  • At thirteen Montaigne left the college de Guienne and began to study law, it is not known where, but probably at Toulouse.

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  • before he became king, and after his accession was made master of the wardrobe, lieutenant-general in Auvergne (1576) and Guienne (1610), and marshal of France in 1614.

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  • His son, Gaston Jean Baptiste de Roquelaure (1617-1683), a celebrated wit, was created duke and peer of France in 1652, and was appointed governor of Guienne in 1679.

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  • of England (probably Richard, duke of Gloucester), and the duke of Guienne, brother of Louis XI., and heir presumptive of the French monarchy.

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  • In 1294, at the beginning of the hostilities against England, he invaded Guienne and took La Reole and Saint-Sever.

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  • In the reign of Charles IV., the Fair, he fought yet again in Guienne (1324), and died at Perray (Seine-et-Oise) on the 16th of December 1325.

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  • He was for many years principal of the Guienne College at Bordeaux.

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  • of England, of his wife Eleanor of Guienne, of Richard I.

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  • Cardinal Beaufort, and after him Suffolk, sought by working for peace to secure at least Guienne and Normandy.

    0
    0
  • But his home administration was unpopular, whilst the incapacity of Edmund Beaufort ended in the loss of all Normandy and Guienne.

    0
    0
  • Three years later he was appointed military governor of the province of Guienne, in which post he became intimate with IVlontesquieu.

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    0
  • In 1152 by a marriage with Eleanor of Aquitaine, the divorced wife of the French king Louis VII., he acquired Poitou, Guienne and Gascony; but in doing so incurred the ill-will of his suzerain from which he suffered not a little in the future.

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  • of England, then busied with the Scottish War, and seized Guienne.

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  • The duke then made him lieutenant-general in Languedoc and Guienne.

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  • He showed generosity in assigning a considerable income to be divided annually among the peasant proprietors of upper Guienne.

    0
    0
  • He was concerned in the Fronde of 1651, but soon afterwards became reconciled with Mazarin, and in 16J4 married the cardinal's niece, Anne Marie Martinozzi (1639-1672), and secured the government of Guienne.

    0
    0
  • While John, after two inroads, turned back to his Guienne possessions on the 3rd of July, it was not until three weeks later that the emperor concentrated his forces at Valenciennes, and in the interval Philip Augustus had countermarched northward and concentrated an army at Peronne.

    0
    0
  • Guienne was conquered in 1451 by Duncis, but not subdued, and another expedition was necessary in 1453, when Talbot was defeated and slain at Castillon.

    0
    0
  • Balue thereupon joined Guillaume de Harancourt, bishop of Verdun, in an intrigue to induce Charles of France to demand Champagne and Brie in accordance with the king's promise to Charles the Bold, instead of distant Guienne where the king was determined to place him.

    0
    0
  • Then Louis, inducing his brother to accept Guienne, - where, surrounded by faithful royal officers, he was harmless for the time being, - undertook to play off the Lancastrians against Edward IV.

    0
    0
  • Paris was to be attacked from Flanders and Guienne at the same time.

    0
    0
  • Arnaud Amanieu, lord of Albret, helped to take Guienne from the English.

    0
    0
  • which broke out in Guienne in 1337,were the disputes arising in connexion with the French possessions of the English kings, in respect to which they were vassals of the kings of France; the pretensions of Edward III.

    0
    0
  • In 1346, while the French were trying to invade Guienne, Edward III.

    0
    0
  • Du Guesclin, having been appointed Constable, defeated the English at Pontvallain in 1370, at Chize in 1373, and drove them from their possessions between the Loire and the Gironde, while the duke of Anjou retook part of Guienne.

    0
    0
  • recommenced war in Artois and Guienne and against Charles the Bad, but failed in his attempt to reunite Brittany and France.

    0
    0
  • During this time Dunois in Guienne was taking Bordeaux and Bayonne.

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    0
  • Guienne revolted against France, whereupon Talbot returned there with an army of 5000 men, but was vanquished and killed at Castillon on the 17th of July 1453.

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    0
  • Joseph Justus Scaliger (1540-1609), the greatest scholar of modern times, was the tenth child and third son of Julius Caesar Scaliger and Andiette de Rogues Lobejac. Born at Agen in 1540, he was sent when twelve years of age, with two younger brothers, to the college of Guienne at Bordeaux, then under the direction of Jean Gelida.

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  • The duke of Berry, excluded by this arrangement, was compensated by the government of Languedoc and Guienne.

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  • The two elder sons of Charles VI., Louis, duke of Guienne, and John, duke of Touraine, died in 1415 and 1417, and Charles, count of Ponthieu, became heir apparent.

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  • Arthur was three times married: (1) to Margaret of Burgundy, duchess of Guienne (d.

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  • At this time, through the alliance and support of Philip of Burgundy, the English had extended their conquest over the whole of France north of the Loire in addition to their possession of Guienne; and while the infant HenryVl.

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    0
  • On the 2nd of February 1576, after several vain attempts, he escaped from the court, joined the combined forces of Protestants and of opponents of the king, and obtained by the treaty of Beaulieu (1576) the government of Guienne.

    0
    0
  • Excluded from it by the treaty of Nemours (1585) he began the "war of the three Henrys" by a campaign in Guienne (1586) and defeated Anne, duc de Joyeuse, at Coutras on the 10th of October 1587.

    0
    0
  • Only Guienne and southern Aquitaine held Touraine out for King John, partly because they preferred a weak and distant master to such a strenuous and OU~ grasping prince as King Philip, partly because they were far more alien in blood and language to their French neighbors than were Normans or Angevins.

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    0
  • Gascony being, as usual, out of hand, he crossed to Bordeaux in 1286, and abode in Guienne for no less than three years, reducing the duchy to such order as it had never known before, settling all disputed border questions with the new king of France, Philip IV., founding many new towns, and issuing many useful statutes and ordinances.

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  • out in Guienne.

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  • But it was possible for patriotic Scots to contend that they had done so only in their capacity as English baronsfor they held much land south of Tweedand topoint to the similarity of their position to that of the English king when he did homage for his duchy of Guienne at Paris, without; thereby admitting any suzerainty of the French crown Over England or Ireland.

    0
    0
  • When called to account for the doings of his subjects, as well as for certain disputes in Gascony, the English king promised redress, and, on the suggestion of Philip, surrendered, as a formal act of apology, the six chief fortresses of Guienne, which were to be restored when reparation had been made.

    0
    0
  • Norfolk, who had been designated to lead the expedition to Guienne, declared that though he was ready to follow his master to Flanders in his capacity of marshal, he would not be drafted off to Gascony against his own will.

    0
    0
  • When France had grown strong, under Philip Augustus, the house of Plantagenet still retained a broad territory in Gascony and Guienne, and the house of Capet could not but covet the possession of the largest surviving feudal appanage which marred the solidarity of their kingdom.

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  • Fortunately for the duke of Guienne the majority of his subjects had no desire to become Frenchmen; the Gascons felt no national sympathy with their neighbors of the north, and the towns in especial were linked to England by close ties of commerce, and had no wish whatever to break off their allegiance to the house of Plantagenet.

    0
    0
  • The root of the Hundred Years War, now just about to commence, must be sought in the affairs of Guienne, and not in any of the other causes which complicated and obscured the outbreak of hostilities.

    0
    0
  • It was Philip, however, who actually began the war, by declaring Guienne and the other continental dominions of Edward III.

    0
    0
  • A far more fatal bar to Edwards claim than the existence of Charles of Navarre was the fact that the peers of France, when summoned to decide the succession question nine years before, had decided that Philip of Valois had the sole valid claim to the crown, and that Edward had then done homage to him for Guienne.

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    0
  • many long-lost regions of Guienne to the English suzerainty (Oct.

    0
    0
  • There was also constant bickering on the borders of Guienne.

    0
    0
  • Since Sluys the enemy had never disputed the command of the seas; but in 1372 a Spanish fleet- joined the French, and destroyed off La Rochelle a squadron which was bringing reinforcements for Guienne.

    0
    0
  • By 1374 little was left of the great possessions which the English had held beyond the Channel save Calais, and the coast slip from Bordeaux to Bayonne, which formed the only loyal part of the duchy of Guienne.

    0
    0
  • After two long truces, which filled the years 1390-1395, a definitive peace was at last concluded, by which the English king kept Calais and the coaststrip of Guienne, from Bordeaux to Bayonne, which had never been lost to the enemy.

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  • expected breach with France had at last come to Warwith pass; the duke of Orleans, without any declaration of renewed, war, had entered Guienne, while a French fleet attacked the south-west of England, and burnt Plymouth.

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  • 6, 1435), at which the English were offered peace and the retention of Normandy and Guienne if they would evacuate Paris and the rest of France.

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  • The struggle only ceased in 1444, when the English council, in which a peace party had at last been formed, concluded a two-year truce with King Charles, which they hoped to turn into a permanent treaty, on the condition that their king should retain what he held in Normandy and Guienne, but sign away his claim to the French crown, and relinquish the few places outside the two duchies which were still in his power-terms very similar to those rejected at Arras nine years before but there was now much less to give up. To mark the reconciliation of the two powers Henry VI.

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  • Indeed in 1452 he conseqted to abandon his protests, and to lend his aid to the other party for a great national object, the recovery of Guienne.

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  • For a moment the quarrel of York and Somerset was suspended, and the last English army that crossed the seas during theHundredYearsWar landed in Guienne, joined the insurgents, and for a time swept all before it.

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  • had finally cost her the long-loyal Guienne, as well as all the ephemeral conquests of his own sword.

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  • restored Guienne to Edward I., gave him the hand of Philips sister for himself and that of the kings daughter for his son (1298).

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  • The political unity of the kingdom was only fettered by the existence of four large isolated fiels: Flanders on the north, Brittany on the west, Burgundy on the east and Guienne on the south.

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  • for his possessions in Guienne, Edward at Years last brought himself to itthough certainly only after War, lengthy negotiations, and even threats of war in 1331.

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  • had taken reprisals against him in 1336 by making his parlement declare the forfeiture of Edwards lands and castles in Guienne; but the Hundred Years War, at first-simply a feudal quarrel between vassal and suzerain, soon became a great national conflict, in consequence of what was occurring in Flanders.

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  • To attack the English through their colonies, Guienne and Flanders, was to injure them in their most vital interests cloth and claret; for England sold her wool to Bruges in order to pay Bordeaux for her wine.

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  • had given Guienne in fief, provoked the nobles of Gascony to complain to Charles V.

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  • Normandy was lost to them at Formigny (1450), and Guienne, English since the 12th century, at Castillon (1453).

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  • of Berry distant Guienne.

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  • There were three principal theatres of war: in the north Normandy and the valley of the Loire, where Orleans, the general centre of reform, ensured communications between the south and Germany; in the south-west Gascony and Guienne; in the south-east Lyonnais and Vivarais.

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  • Despite the victory ~89) of Guise at Dormans, the agreement between the duke of Alencon and John Casimirs German army obliged the royal party to grant all that the allied forces demanded of them in the peace of Monsieur, signed at Beaulieu on the 6th of May 1576, the duke of Alencon receiving the appanage of Anjou, Touraine and Berry, the king of Navarre Guienne, ~,ie0u~~r and Cond Picardy, while the Protestants were granted (1576).

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  • The English power in Guienne was weakened by the disastrous Spanish expedition of the Black Prince, whom Charles summoned before the parlement of Paris in January 1369 to answer the charges preferred against him by his subjects, thus expressly repudiating the English supremacy in Guienne.

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