Guayaquil sentence example

guayaquil
  • The climate of Piura is modified by the lower latitude, and also by the vicinity of the forests of Guayaquil.
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  • The Guayaquil author, Olmedo, who wrote the famous ode on the victory of Junin, and the Limenians Felipe Pardo and Manuel Segura are names well known wherever the Spanish language is spoken.
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  • The line then runs almost due north to the south shore of the Gulf of Guayaquil, following the western water parting of the lower Tumbez valley.
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  • The Guayas or Guayaquil river is in part an estuary extending northward from the Gulf of Guayaquil, bordered by mangrove swamps and mud banks formed by the silt brought down from the neighbouring mountains.
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  • In addition to these three river systems, there are a large number of short streams on the coast flowing into the Pacific and Gulf of Guayaquil, only two of which have any special importance in the present undeveloped state of the country.
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  • Immediately north of the Gulf of Guayaquil is the Bay of Santa Plena, with a small port of the same name, which has a good, well-sheltered anchorage and is the landing-place of the West Coast cable.
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  • The Gulf of Guayaquil, which lies between the Ecuadorean and Peruvian coasts, is the largest gulf on the Pacific coast of South America between Panama and Chiloe.
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  • Immediately west of the Guayas river the Estero Salado, which comprises a great many shallow tide-water channels, or bayous, penetrates as far inland as Guayaquil, but is used only by canoes.
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  • There are few islands off the coast of Ecuador, and only one of any considerable size - that of Puna in the Gulf of Guayaquil, which is 29 m.
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  • It has a population of 200, chiefly centred in the village of Puna, at its north-east extremity, which is a shipping port and health resort for the city of Guayaquil.
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  • Midway in the outer part of the Gulf of Guayaquil is Amortajada or Santa Clara island, whose resemblance to a shrouded corpse suggested the name which it bears.
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  • North of the Gulf of Guayaquil there are only two small islands on the coast of more than local interest.
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  • Most of the country between the Andes and the sea is covered by Tertiary and Quaternary beds; but the range of hills which runs north-west from Guayaquil is formed of Cretaceous and porphyritic rocks similar to those of the Andes.
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  • For instance, Guayaquil has a hot humid climate and mangrove swamps line the shores of Guayas down to the gulf; at Santa Elena, about 60 m.
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  • It is to be noted that the Gulf of Guayaquil separates the humid, forestcovered coastal plain of Ecuador from the arid, barren coast of Peru, the two regions being widely dissimilar.
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  • The population of the provincial capitals is in some cases over-estimated, especially for Guayaquil and Quito, neither of which could have had 50,000 at the date of this estimate.
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  • Communications.-The first railway to be completed in Ecuador was the line between Guayaquil and Quito, 290 m.
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  • The national capital is connected with the submarine cable at Santa Elena (via Guayaquil) and at Tumaco, in Colombia.
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  • Guayaquil is provided with tramway and telephone lines.
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  • The oceangoing foreign trade of the country is carried wholly in foreign vessels, for the regular lines of which Guayaquil is a principal port of call.
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  • The total trade of the republic in 1905, according to returns published by the Guayaquil Chamber of Commerce, amounted to only £3,429,955, of which £ 1, 573,3 8 9 (1 5,733, 8 9 1 sucres) were credited to imports, and £1,856,566 (18,565,668 sucres) to exports.
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  • Of these totals, all but £127,532 of the imports and £441,679 of the exports passed through the port of Guayaquil.
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  • In 1820 the people of Guayaquil took up the cry of liberty; and in spite of several defeats they continued the contest, till at length, under Antonio Jose de Sucre, who had been sent to their assistance by Bolivar, and reinforced by a Peruvian contingent under Andres de Santa Cruz, they gained a complete victory on May 22, 1822, in a battle fought on the side of Mount Pichincha, at a height of 10,200 ft.
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  • A disagreement with Peru in 1828 resulted in the invasion of Ecuador and the temporary occupation of Cuenca and Guayaquil by Peruvian forces; but peace was restored in the following year after the Ecuadorian victory at Tarqui.
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  • He abdicated in 1859 and left the country, after refusing to ratify the treaty with Peru, by which the defender of Guayaquil had obtained the raising of the siege.
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  • A revolution headed by General Veintemilla, the Radical leader, then military commandant at Guayaquil, broke out in 1876, and on the 14th of December of that year the government forces under General Aparicio were completely routed at Galte.
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  • His power was first restricted to Guayaquil and Esmeraldas, and finally General Rinaldo Flores drove him from Guayaquil, and Veintemilla fled (July 1883) to Peru.
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  • Guayaquil is also the seat of a university corporation with faculties of law and medicine.
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  • A peculiarity of Guayaquil is that the upper floors in the business streets project over the walks, forming covered arcades.
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  • The exports of the province are almost wholly transported on these rivers, and are shipped either at Guayaquil, or at Puna, its deep-water port, 62 in.
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  • The Guayas river is navigable up to Guayaquil for steamers drawing 22 ft.
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  • Santiago de Guayaquil was founded on St James's day, the 25th of July 1535, by Sebastian de Benalcazar, but was twice abandoned before its permanent settlement in 1537 by Francesco de Oreliana.
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  • Owing to the flimsy construction of its buildings Guayaquil has been repeatedly burned, the greater fires occurring in 1707, 1764, 1865, 1896 and 1899.
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  • The department belongs partly to the arid coastal plain that extends from the Gull of Guayaquil southward nearly to Valparaiso, and partly to a broken mountainous region belonging to the Western Cordilleras.
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  • The consequence of this careful breeding is, that the women of Guayaquil are considered (and justly) the finest along the whole Pacific coast.
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  • Purity of descent was not, however, quite so strictly maintained as at Guayaquil.
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  • Guayaquil sarsaparilla is obtained chiefly in the valley of Alausi, on the western side of the equatorial Andes.
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  • In some varieties, as the Guayaquil and Mexican, the whole plant, including the rootstock, is pulled up.
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  • Latacunga stands on the old road between Guayaquil and Quito and has a station on the railway between those cities.
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  • The alluvial valley of the Guayas, above Guayaquil, is celebrated for the richness of its vegetation, which, in fruit alone, includes cacao, coffee, coco-nuts, pine-apples, oranges, lemons, guayavas (Psidium pomiferum), guavas (Inga spectabilis), shaddocks (or grape-fruit), pomegranates, apricots, chirimoyas (Anooa Chirimolia), granadillas (Passiflora quadrangularis), paltas (Persea gratissima, otherwise known as " alligator pears "), tunas (Cactus), mangoes (Man,gifera Indica), pacays (Prosopis dulcis), aji (Chile pepper), and many others of less importance.
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