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guatemala

guatemala

guatemala Sentence Examples

  • Small parts of British Honduras and Guatemala are also included in it.

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  • Small parts of British Honduras and Guatemala are also included in it.

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  • The Church now has, besides these missions, others in India (1834), Siam (1840), China (1846),(1846), Colombia (1856), Brazil (1859),(1859), Japan (1859), Laos (1867),(1867), Mexico (transferred in 1872 by the American and Foreign Christian Union), Chile (transferred in 1873 by the same Union; first established in 1845), Guatemala (1882),(1882), Korea (1884)(1884) and the Philippine Islands (1899).

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  • About 1530 he appears to have revisited the Spanish court, but on what precise errand is not known; the confusion concerning this period of his life extends to the time when, after visits to Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru and Guatemala, he undertook an expedition in 1537 into Tuzulutlan, the inhabitants of which were, chiefly through his tact, peaceably converted to Christianity, mass being celebrated for the first time amongst them in the newly founded town of Rabinal in 1538.

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  • Hernan Cortes overran and conquered Mexico from 1518 to 1521, and the discovery and conquest of Guatemala by Alvarado, the invasion of Florida by De Soto, and of Nueva Granada by Quesada, followed in rapid succession.

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  • Its chief home is in the mountains near Coban in Vera Paz, but it also inhabits forests in other parts of Guatemala at an elevation of from 6000 to 9000 ft.

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  • - Santo Domingo, Mexico, Panama, Lima, Guatemala, Guadalajara, Bogota, La Plata, Quito, Chile, Buenos Aires.

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  • Hernan Cortes overran and conquered Mexico from 1518 to 1521, and the discovery and conquest of Guatemala by Alvarado, the invasion of Florida by De Soto, and of Nueva Granada by Quesada, followed in rapid succession.

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  • Guatemala, the line terminating E.

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  • The Indians in part of Guatemala raise cotton, although the boll weevil is abundant.

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  • Probably by unconscious selection of surviving plants through long ages this type has been evolved in Guatemala, and experiments have been made to develop weevil-resistant races in the United States.

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  • America its natural occurrence appears to be limited to west of the Andes, but the tree is abundant in Mexico, Guatemala and Nicaragua.

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  • It is found also in Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Cuba and Hayti, and in Panama with another species of Castilloa, and on the W.

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  • AMATITLAN, or SAN Juan De Amatitlan, the capital of a department bearing the same name in Guatemala, on Lake Amatitlan, 15 m.

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  • of Guatemala city by the transcontinental railway from Puerto Barrios to San Jose.

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  • ATITLAN, or Santiago De Atitlan, a town in the department of Solola, Guatemala, on the southern shore of Lake Atitlan.

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  • The peaks of the Guatemala Cordillera rise round it, culminating near its southern end in the volcanoes of San Pedro (7000 ft.) and Atitlan (11,719 ft.).

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  • Other governments known as captain-generalships were cut out of the viceroyalties at different periods - Guatemala in 1527, Venezuela in 1773, Cuba in 1777 and Chile in 1778.

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  • Otto Stoll's studies in Guatemala, Berendt's in Central America, Ernst's in Venezuela, Im Thurn's in Guiana, those of Ehrenreich, von den Steinen, Meyer in Brazil, or of Bandelier, Bastian, Briihl, Middendorf, von Tschudi in Peru, afford the historian of comparative sociology ample groundwork for a comprehensive grasp of South American tribes.

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  • It is the MS. of Father Francisco Ximenez, Historia de la Provincia de San Vicente de Chiapa y Guatemala, in three big volumes in folio, which contain the famous Spanish translation of the Quiche myths or the " Popol-Vuh."

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  • ATITLAN, or Santiago De Atitlan, a town in the department of Solola, Guatemala, on the southern shore of Lake Atitlan.

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  • The peaks of the Guatemala Cordillera rise round it, culminating near its southern end in the volcanoes of San Pedro (7000 ft.) and Atitlan (11,719 ft.).

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  • i.) gives a map of the so-called " Mexican empire," which may be roughly described as reaching from the present Zacatecas to beyond Guatemala; it is noticeable that both these names are of Mexican origin, derived respectively from words for " straw " and " wood."

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  • In Mexico itself the languages of the Nahua nations, of which the Aztec is the best-known dialect, show no connexion of origin with the language of the Otomi tribes, nor either of these with the languages of the regions of the ruined cities of Central America, the Quiche of Guatemala and the Maya of Yucatan.

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  • to the neighbourhood of Lake Peteu in Guatemala.

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  • of Agriculture, in Guatemala.

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  • The former is found in Mexico, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama; the latter in Guatemala, Nicaragua and Costa Rica.

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  • In July of the following year he died at Madrid, whither he had gone to urge (and with success) the necessity of restoring a court of justice which had been suppressed in Guatemala.

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  • Seler, Mexico and Guatemala (Berlin, 1896); Justo Serra (editor), Mexico: Its Social Evolution, &c. (2 vols., Mexico, 1904); J.

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  • Among the most curious documents of early America is the Popol-Vuh or national book of the Quiche kingdom of Guatemala, a compilation of traditions written down by native scribes, found and translated by Father Ximenez about 1700, and published by Scherzer (Vienna, 1857) and Brasseur de Bourbourg (Paris, 1861).

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  • As in the Guatemala traditions, we hear of ancient migration from the Mexican legendary region of Tula; and here the leaders are four famous chiefs or ancestors who bear the Aztec name of the Tutul-Xiu, which means " Bird-Tree."

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  • pestilence, a few only of the survivors remaining in the land, while the rest migrated into Yucatan and Guatemala.

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  • Another very important MS. was discovered by Dr Lehmann, in Guatemala.

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  • The investigations made by Dr Walter Lehmann in Central America (1907-1909), prove that these Mexican elements were extended through Guatemala, Salvador, a small part of Nicaragua (the territory of the Nicaraos) and on several places in the peninsula of Nicoya (Costa Rica) amongst the autochthonous Chorotega or Mangue.

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  • It is an error of the Spanish authorities to pretend that the Pipil civilization in Guatemala and Salvador is not older than the time of King Ahuitzotl (c. 1482-1486).

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  • The separation of the Pipils from the chief tribes of the Nahuatl branch happened centuries before the conquest, and they developed a singular and characteristic civilization, which can be seen in the wonderful stone-reliefs and sculptures of Sta Lucia de Cozumalhuapa on the Pacific coast of Guatemala.

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  • It may be possible either that these tribes are the autochthonous inhabitants who dwelt in Guatemala, Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua before the immigration of the prehistoric Maya peoples; or else that they invaded this region after it had been deserted by a prehistoric oriental branch of the Maya family.

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  • If we can be sure - and the linguistic evidence admits of no doubt - that the Chorotega had their centre in Nicaragua and thence extended north-westwards, it may be hoped that Chorotegan remains will be found in the vast territory occupied for many centuries by the Maya peoples in the Pacific part of Guatemala.

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  • In comparing these ruins in Yucatan, Chiapas, Guatemala and Honduras, it is evident that, though they are the work of two or more nations highly distinct in language, yet these nations had a common system of pictorial or written characters.

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  • The relation between the wall paintings of Teotihuacan and ornaments at Chichen Itza, as also the existence of sculptured stone yokes in Teotihuacan, in the country of the Totonacs, in Guatemala.

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  • New Spain in its widest meaning includes the audiencias or judicial districts of Manila, San Domingo and Guatemala, and the viceroy had some sort of authority over them: but in its narrower meaning it comprised the audiencia district of Mexico and the subordinate audiencia district of Guadalajara, which together extended from Chiapas and Guatemala to beyond the eastern boundary of the modern state of Texas and northwards, eventually, to Vancouver's Island.

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  • In the course of the 18th century this came to consist of the following divisions: (1) .the kingdom of Mexico, which included the peninsula of Yucatan but not the present state of Chiapas or a part of Tabasco, these belonging to Guatemala.

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  • Miramon's government had violated the British Legation; the Spanish minister, the papal legate and the representatives of Guatemala and Ecuador were expelled from the country for undue interference on behalf of the reactionaries; the payments of the British loan were suspended by Juarez's Congress in Interven- July 1861; and various outrages had been committed on the persons and property of Europeans for which no redress could be obtained.

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  • There were some frontier difficulties with the United States, and with Guatemala, which revived a claim dropped since 1858 to a portion of the state of Chiapas; and there was considerable internal progress, aided by a too liberal policy of subsidies to railways and even to lines of steamships.

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  • In1888-1890and1894-1895a boundary dispute with Guatemala became serious.

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  • But Guatemala gave way at the threat of war (Jan.

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  • Ranging from Canada in the north to Guatemala in the south, and chiefly frequenting the open plains on both sides of the chain of the Rocky Mountains, the coyote, under all its various local phases, is a smaller animal than the true wolf, and may apparently be regarded as the New World representative of the jackals, or perhaps, like the Indian wolf (C. pallipes), as a type intermediate between wolves and jackals.

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  • GUATEMALA (sometimes incorrectly written Guatimala), a name now restricted to the republic of Guatemala and to its chief city, but formerly given to a captaincy-general of Spanish America, which included the fifteen provinces of Chiapas, Suchitepeques, Escuintla, Sonsonate, San Salvador, Vera Paz and Peten, Chiquimula, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Totonicapam, Quezaltenango, Sololá, Chimaltenango and Sacatepeques, - or, in other words, the whole of Central America (except Panama) and part of Mexico.

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  • The republic of Guatemala is situated between 13° 42' and 17° 49' N., and 88° io' and 92° 30' W.

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  • Guatemala is bounded on the W.

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  • Guatemala is naturally divided into five regions - the lowlands of the Pacific coast, the volcanic mountains of the Sierra Madre, the so-called plateaus immediately north of these, the mountains of the Atlantic versant and the plain of Peten.

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  • It is known near Guatemala city as the Sierra de las Nubes, and enters Mexico as the Sierra de Istatan.

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  • "water," 12,139 ft.), so named in 1541 because it destroyed the forme(capital of Guatemala with a deluge of water from its flooded crater; and Pacaya (8390), a group of igneous peaks which were in eruption in 1870.

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  • The mean elevation is greatest in the west (Altos of Quezaltenango) and least in the east (Altos of Guatemala).

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  • Between Honduras and Guatemala the frontier is formed by the Sierra de Merendon.

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  • (5) The great plain of Peten, which comprises about one-third of the whole area of Guatemala, belongs geographically to the Yucatan Peninsula, and consists of level or undulating country, covered with grass or forest.

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  • Guatemala is richly watered.

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  • There are several extensive lakes in Guatemala.

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  • On the borders of Salvador and Guatemala there is the Lake of Guija, about 20 m.

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  • The geology, fauna and flora of Guatemala are discussed under Central America.

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  • The average rainfall is very heavy, especially on the Atlantic slope, where the prevailing winds are charged with moisture from the Gulf of Mexico or the Caribbean Sea; at Tual, a high station on the Atlantic slope, it reaches 195 in.; in central Guatemala it is only 27 in.

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  • In Guatemala, as in other parts of Central America (q.v.), each of the three climatic zones, cold, temperate and hot (Berra fria, tierra templada, tierra caliente) has its special charac' eristics, and it is not easy to generalize about the climate of the country as a whole.

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  • The minerals discovered in Guatemala include gold, silver, lead, tin, copper, mercury, antimony, coal, salt and sulphur; but it is uncertain if many of these exist in quantities sufficient to repay exploitation.

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  • The vegetable products of Guatemala include coffee, cocoa, sugar-cane, bananas, oranges, vanilla, aloes, agave, ipecacuanha, castor-oil, sarsaparilla, cinchona, tobacco, indigo and the wax-plant (111yrica cerifera).

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  • - The inhabitants of Guatemala, who tend to increase rapidly owing to the high birth-rate, low mortality, and low rate of emigration, numbered in 1903 1,842,134, or more than one-third of the entire population of Central America.

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  • The Itzas, Mopans, Lacandons, Chols, Pokonchi and the Pokomans who inhabit the large settlement of Mixco near the capital, all belong to the Maya family; but parts of central and eastern Guatemala are peopled by tribes distinct from the Mayas and not found in Mexico.

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  • The capital of the republic, Guatemala or Guatemala la Nueva (pop. 1905 about 97,000) and the cities of Quezaltenango (31,000), Totonicapam (28,000), Coban (25,000), Solola (17,000), Escuintla (12,000), Huehuetanango (12,000), Amatitlan (io,000) and Atitlan (9000) are described under separate headings.

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  • Guatemala joined the Postal Union in 1881; but its postal and telegraphic services have suffered greatly from financial difficulties.

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  • The telephonic systems of Guatemala la Nueva, Quezaltenango and other cities are owned by private companies.

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  • The natural resources of Guatemala are rich but undeveloped; and the capital necessary for their development is not easily obtained in a country where war, revolution and economic crises recur at frequent intervals, where the premium on gold has varied by no less than 500% in a single year, and where many of the wealthiest cities and agricultural districts have been destroyed by earthquake in one day (18th of April 1902).

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  • At the beginning of the 19th century, Guatemala had practically no export trade; but between 1825 and 1850 cochineal was largely exported, the centre of production being the Amatitlan district.

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  • Guatemala is surpassed only by Brazil and the East Indies in the quantity of coffee it exports.

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  • During the colonial period, the cocoa of western Guatemala and Soconusco was reserved on account of its fine flavour for the Spanish court.

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  • Guatemala was conquered by the Spaniards under Pedro de Alvarado between 1522 and 1524.

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  • Honduras now joined with Salvador, and Nicaragua and Costa Rica with Guatemala.

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  • The archbishop of Guatemala and the Jesuits were driven into exile as intriguers in the interests of the Clericals.

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  • A well-armed force, which included a body of adventurers from San Francisco (U.S.A.) was organized by General Barillas, the ex-president, and invaded Guatemala in March 1906 from Mexico, British Honduras and Salvador.

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  • Ocos was captured by his lieutenant, General Castillo, and the revolution speedily became a war, in which Honduras, Costa Rica and Salvador were openly involved against Guatemala, while Nicaragua was hostile.

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  • Besides the works cited under Central America see the interesting narrative of Thomas Gage, the English missionary, in Juarros, Compendio de la historia de Guatemala (1808-1818, 2 vols.; new ed., 1857), which in Bailly's English translation (London, 1823) long formed the chief authority.

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  • See also C. Juan Anino, La Republica de Guatemala (Guatemala, 1894); T.

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  • Brigham, Guatemala, The Land of the Quetzal (London, 1887); J.

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  • Lemale, Guia geografica de los centros de poblacion de la republica de Guatemala (Guatemala, 1882); F.

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  • de Fuentes y Guzman, Historia de Guatemala o Recordacion Florida (Madrid, 1882); A.

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  • (Guatemala, 1897); Otto Stoll, Reisen and Schilderungen aus den Jahren 1878-1883 (Leipzig, 1886); J.

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  • Mendez, Guia del immigrante en la republica de Guatemala (Guatemala, 1895); Karl Sapper, "Grundziige der physikalischen Geographie von Guatemala," Erganzungshef t No.

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  • 115, Petermann's Mitteilungen (Gotha, 1894); Anuaria de estadistica de la republica de Guatemala (Guatemala); Memoria de la Secretaria de Instruction Publica (Guatemala, 1899); Handbook of Guatemala, revised (Bureau of the American Republics, Washington, 1897); United States Consular Reports (Washington); British Foreign Office Diplomatic and Consular Reports (London).

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  • Guatemala, Guatemala >>

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  • The third Pan-American Conference was held in the months of July and August 1906, and was attended by the United States, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Salvador and Uruguay.

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  • Farther to the south, on the borders of Guatemala and British Honduras, there exists a perfectly distinct species, M.

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  • It is not found farther north than Guatemala, or south of Paraguay.

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  • In Guatemala Elaps fulvus is mimicked by Pliocerus equalis; in Mexico Elaps corallinus by Homalocranium semicinctum, and in Brazil, Elaps lemniscatus by Oxyrhopus trigeminus.

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  • The bishop of Leon, whose diocese is included in the archiepiscopal province of Guatemala, is the spiritual head of the Roman Catholics.

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  • Granada was founded in 1524 on the isthmus between the two lakes as the capital of a separate government, which, however, was soon attached as a special province to the captaincy general of Guatemala, which comprised the whole of Central America and the present Mexican state of Chiapas.

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  • He was succeeded in 1883 by Dr Cardenas, during whose presidency the attempt of General Barrios to unite the five Central American states was a cause of war between Guatemala and Honduras on one side, and Salvador, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica on the other.

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  • While Dr Sacasa was president of Honduras, Salvador and Guatemala signed a treaty, under which the United States of Central America were to be formed.

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  • He went to America in 1531, and after serving his order zealously in Peru, Guatemala and Mexico, was chosen to explore the country north of Sonora, whose wealth was pictured in the hearsay stories of Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca.

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  • P. Ayacahuite, the common white pine of Mexico, spreads southwards on to the mountains of Guatemala, it is a large tree with glaucous foliage like P. Strobus, and yields a valuable resin.

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  • In 1528 he explored the coast of Guatemala and Yucatan, and in 1532 he led 300 volunteers to reinforce Pizarro in Peru.

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  • The varieties of sarsaparilla met with in commerce are the following: Jamaica, Lima, Honduras, Guatemala, Guayaquil and Mexican.

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  • On the Continent, especially in Italy, the varieties having a white starchy bark, like those of Honduras and Guatemala, are preferred.

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  • Guatemala sarsaparilla is very similar to that of Honduras, but has a more decided orange hue, and the bark shows a tendency to split off.

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  • by the state of Campeche and Guatemala, S.

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  • by Guatemala and Chiapas, and W.

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  • The Grijalva, also called Tabasco, the upper course of which is known as the Chiapas, has its most distant sources in western Guatemala and flows N.W.

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  • The Usumacinta likewise has its sources in western Guatemala.

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  • It forms the boundary between Guatemala and Chiapas until the frontier of Tabasco is reached, where its N.W.

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  • His Code of Reform and Prison Discipline was adopted by Guatemala.

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  • Even in Guatemala, though the younger sons of a divine race succeed in making the earth where the elder son (as usual) failed, they all had a supply of clay as first material.

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  • Guatemala >>

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  • Tartans denote different clans in Scotland and in Guatemala a woman's blouse can indicate the village commune from which she comes.

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  • We went to Guatemala, where we saw the sacred cave underneath the Mayan citadel destroyed by the conquistadors in the 1520s.

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  • horseback excursion Private Student Residences Our school in Guatemala is the only school in Antigua which offers accommodation in private student residences.

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  • The white kidney bean itself originates in Central America, in Mexico and Guatemala.

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  • returnee communities in the state of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.

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  • sanitation engineer in Guatemala " .

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  • The Church now has, besides these missions, others in India (1834), Siam (1840), China (1846),(1846), Colombia (1856), Brazil (1859),(1859), Japan (1859), Laos (1867),(1867), Mexico (transferred in 1872 by the American and Foreign Christian Union), Chile (transferred in 1873 by the same Union; first established in 1845), Guatemala (1882),(1882), Korea (1884)(1884) and the Philippine Islands (1899).

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  • Its chief home is in the mountains near Coban in Vera Paz, but it also inhabits forests in other parts of Guatemala at an elevation of from 6000 to 9000 ft.

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  • Guatemala, the line terminating E.

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  • to the neighbourhood of Lake Peteu in Guatemala.

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  • of Agriculture, in Guatemala.

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  • The Indians in part of Guatemala raise cotton, although the boll weevil is abundant.

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  • Probably by unconscious selection of surviving plants through long ages this type has been evolved in Guatemala, and experiments have been made to develop weevil-resistant races in the United States.

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  • (3) The Bethlehemite Order of Guatemala, a nursing community founded in 1650 by Pedro Betancourt (d.

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  • America its natural occurrence appears to be limited to west of the Andes, but the tree is abundant in Mexico, Guatemala and Nicaragua.

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  • It is found also in Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Cuba and Hayti, and in Panama with another species of Castilloa, and on the W.

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  • AMATITLAN, or SAN Juan De Amatitlan, the capital of a department bearing the same name in Guatemala, on Lake Amatitlan, 15 m.

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  • of Guatemala city by the transcontinental railway from Puerto Barrios to San Jose.

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  • Other governments known as captain-generalships were cut out of the viceroyalties at different periods - Guatemala in 1527, Venezuela in 1773, Cuba in 1777 and Chile in 1778.

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  • - Santo Domingo, Mexico, Panama, Lima, Guatemala, Guadalajara, Bogota, La Plata, Quito, Chile, Buenos Aires.

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  • Otto Stoll's studies in Guatemala, Berendt's in Central America, Ernst's in Venezuela, Im Thurn's in Guiana, those of Ehrenreich, von den Steinen, Meyer in Brazil, or of Bandelier, Bastian, Briihl, Middendorf, von Tschudi in Peru, afford the historian of comparative sociology ample groundwork for a comprehensive grasp of South American tribes.

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  • vii., Wheeler Surveys, &c. (Washington, 1879); Charles Rau, The Palenque Tablet, Smithsonian Contributions, Washington; Caecilie Seler, Auf alten Wegen in Mexico and Guatemala (Berlin, 1900); Harlan I.

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  • i.; Washington Matthews, Navaho Legends (Cambridge, Mass.); Anne Cary Maudslay and Alfred Percival Maudslay, A Glimpse at Guatemala (London, 1899) (Maudslay's whole series in Biologia Centrali Americana, 1889-1902, are valuable); H.

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  • The former is found in Mexico, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama; the latter in Guatemala, Nicaragua and Costa Rica.

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  • About 1530 he appears to have revisited the Spanish court, but on what precise errand is not known; the confusion concerning this period of his life extends to the time when, after visits to Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru and Guatemala, he undertook an expedition in 1537 into Tuzulutlan, the inhabitants of which were, chiefly through his tact, peaceably converted to Christianity, mass being celebrated for the first time amongst them in the newly founded town of Rabinal in 1538.

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  • In July of the following year he died at Madrid, whither he had gone to urge (and with success) the necessity of restoring a court of justice which had been suppressed in Guatemala.

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  • province of the Spanish captaincy-general of Guatemala until 1821.

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  • Barrios, president of Guatemala, to restore federal unity to Central America failed in 1885, and had little influence on Costa Rican affairs.

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  • Mejico, or Mexico,) officially styled Estados Unidos Mexicanos and Republica Mexicana, a federal republic of North America extending from the United States of America southward to Guatemala and British Honduras, and lying between the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea on the east.

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  • The boundary line with Guatemala, for a long time in dispute, was fixed by the treaties of 1882 and 1895.

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  • Less is definitely known of the elevated regions of Chiapas, on the border of Guatemala, which are separated from the great Mexican Plateau by the low Isthmus of Tehuantepec (718 ft.

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  • Of the Suchiate and Hondo, which form part of Mexico's southern boundary, the first is a short, impetuous mountain torrent flowing into the Pacific, and the other a sluggish lowland stream rising in north-eastern Guatemala and flowing north-east through a heavily forested region to Chetumal Bay.

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  • They are found on the borders of Guatemala and consist of limestones and dolomites with Productus.

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  • Seler, Mexico and Guatemala (Berlin, 1896); Justo Serra (editor), Mexico: Its Social Evolution, &c. (2 vols., Mexico, 1904); J.

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  • i.) gives a map of the so-called " Mexican empire," which may be roughly described as reaching from the present Zacatecas to beyond Guatemala; it is noticeable that both these names are of Mexican origin, derived respectively from words for " straw " and " wood."

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  • In Mexico itself the languages of the Nahua nations, of which the Aztec is the best-known dialect, show no connexion of origin with the language of the Otomi tribes, nor either of these with the languages of the regions of the ruined cities of Central America, the Quiche of Guatemala and the Maya of Yucatan.

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  • Among the most curious documents of early America is the Popol-Vuh or national book of the Quiche kingdom of Guatemala, a compilation of traditions written down by native scribes, found and translated by Father Ximenez about 1700, and published by Scherzer (Vienna, 1857) and Brasseur de Bourbourg (Paris, 1861).

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  • It is worth while to mention these few early incidents of the Rational legend of Guatemala, because their Biblical incidents show how native tradition incorporated matter learnt from the white men.

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  • As in the Guatemala traditions, we hear of ancient migration from the Mexican legendary region of Tula; and here the leaders are four famous chiefs or ancestors who bear the Aztec name of the Tutul-Xiu, which means " Bird-Tree."

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  • pestilence, a few only of the survivors remaining in the land, while the rest migrated into Yucatan and Guatemala.

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  • Another very important MS. was discovered by Dr Lehmann, in Guatemala.

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  • It is the MS. of Father Francisco Ximenez, Historia de la Provincia de San Vicente de Chiapa y Guatemala, in three big volumes in folio, which contain the famous Spanish translation of the Quiche myths or the " Popol-Vuh."

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  • The investigations made by Dr Walter Lehmann in Central America (1907-1909), prove that these Mexican elements were extended through Guatemala, Salvador, a small part of Nicaragua (the territory of the Nicaraos) and on several places in the peninsula of Nicoya (Costa Rica) amongst the autochthonous Chorotega or Mangue.

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  • It is an error of the Spanish authorities to pretend that the Pipil civilization in Guatemala and Salvador is not older than the time of King Ahuitzotl (c. 1482-1486).

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  • The separation of the Pipils from the chief tribes of the Nahuatl branch happened centuries before the conquest, and they developed a singular and characteristic civilization, which can be seen in the wonderful stone-reliefs and sculptures of Sta Lucia de Cozumalhuapa on the Pacific coast of Guatemala.

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  • It may be possible either that these tribes are the autochthonous inhabitants who dwelt in Guatemala, Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua before the immigration of the prehistoric Maya peoples; or else that they invaded this region after it had been deserted by a prehistoric oriental branch of the Maya family.

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  • If we can be sure - and the linguistic evidence admits of no doubt - that the Chorotega had their centre in Nicaragua and thence extended north-westwards, it may be hoped that Chorotegan remains will be found in the vast territory occupied for many centuries by the Maya peoples in the Pacific part of Guatemala.

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  • In comparing these ruins in Yucatan, Chiapas, Guatemala and Honduras, it is evident that, though they are the work of two or more nations highly distinct in language, yet these nations had a common system of pictorial or written characters.

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  • The relation between the wall paintings of Teotihuacan and ornaments at Chichen Itza, as also the existence of sculptured stone yokes in Teotihuacan, in the country of the Totonacs, in Guatemala.

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  • plates; Berlin, 1890); Carl Sapper, Das niirdliche Mittel-Amerika (Braunschweig, 1897); Caecilie Saler, Auf alten Wegen in Mexico and Guatemala (Berlin, 1900); Eduard K.

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  • New Spain in its widest meaning includes the audiencias or judicial districts of Manila, San Domingo and Guatemala, and the viceroy had some sort of authority over them: but in its narrower meaning it comprised the audiencia district of Mexico and the subordinate audiencia district of Guadalajara, which together extended from Chiapas and Guatemala to beyond the eastern boundary of the modern state of Texas and northwards, eventually, to Vancouver's Island.

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  • In the course of the 18th century this came to consist of the following divisions: (1) .the kingdom of Mexico, which included the peninsula of Yucatan but not the present state of Chiapas or a part of Tabasco, these belonging to Guatemala.

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  • Miramon's government had violated the British Legation; the Spanish minister, the papal legate and the representatives of Guatemala and Ecuador were expelled from the country for undue interference on behalf of the reactionaries; the payments of the British loan were suspended by Juarez's Congress in Interven- July 1861; and various outrages had been committed on the persons and property of Europeans for which no redress could be obtained.

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  • There were some frontier difficulties with the United States, and with Guatemala, which revived a claim dropped since 1858 to a portion of the state of Chiapas; and there was considerable internal progress, aided by a too liberal policy of subsidies to railways and even to lines of steamships.

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  • In1888-1890and1894-1895a boundary dispute with Guatemala became serious.

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  • But Guatemala gave way at the threat of war (Jan.

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  • Ranging from Canada in the north to Guatemala in the south, and chiefly frequenting the open plains on both sides of the chain of the Rocky Mountains, the coyote, under all its various local phases, is a smaller animal than the true wolf, and may apparently be regarded as the New World representative of the jackals, or perhaps, like the Indian wolf (C. pallipes), as a type intermediate between wolves and jackals.

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  • GUATEMALA (sometimes incorrectly written Guatimala), a name now restricted to the republic of Guatemala and to its chief city, but formerly given to a captaincy-general of Spanish America, which included the fifteen provinces of Chiapas, Suchitepeques, Escuintla, Sonsonate, San Salvador, Vera Paz and Peten, Chiquimula, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Totonicapam, Quezaltenango, Sololá, Chimaltenango and Sacatepeques, - or, in other words, the whole of Central America (except Panama) and part of Mexico.

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  • The republic of Guatemala is situated between 13° 42' and 17° 49' N., and 88° io' and 92° 30' W.

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  • Guatemala is bounded on the W.

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  • Guatemala is naturally divided into five regions - the lowlands of the Pacific coast, the volcanic mountains of the Sierra Madre, the so-called plateaus immediately north of these, the mountains of the Atlantic versant and the plain of Peten.

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  • It is known near Guatemala city as the Sierra de las Nubes, and enters Mexico as the Sierra de Istatan.

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  • "water," 12,139 ft.), so named in 1541 because it destroyed the forme(capital of Guatemala with a deluge of water from its flooded crater; and Pacaya (8390), a group of igneous peaks which were in eruption in 1870.

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  • The mean elevation is greatest in the west (Altos of Quezaltenango) and least in the east (Altos of Guatemala).

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  • Between Honduras and Guatemala the frontier is formed by the Sierra de Merendon.

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  • (5) The great plain of Peten, which comprises about one-third of the whole area of Guatemala, belongs geographically to the Yucatan Peninsula, and consists of level or undulating country, covered with grass or forest.

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  • Guatemala is richly watered.

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  • There are several extensive lakes in Guatemala.

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  • On the borders of Salvador and Guatemala there is the Lake of Guija, about 20 m.

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  • The geology, fauna and flora of Guatemala are discussed under Central America.

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  • The average rainfall is very heavy, especially on the Atlantic slope, where the prevailing winds are charged with moisture from the Gulf of Mexico or the Caribbean Sea; at Tual, a high station on the Atlantic slope, it reaches 195 in.; in central Guatemala it is only 27 in.

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  • In Guatemala, as in other parts of Central America (q.v.), each of the three climatic zones, cold, temperate and hot (Berra fria, tierra templada, tierra caliente) has its special charac' eristics, and it is not easy to generalize about the climate of the country as a whole.

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  • The minerals discovered in Guatemala include gold, silver, lead, tin, copper, mercury, antimony, coal, salt and sulphur; but it is uncertain if many of these exist in quantities sufficient to repay exploitation.

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  • The vegetable products of Guatemala include coffee, cocoa, sugar-cane, bananas, oranges, vanilla, aloes, agave, ipecacuanha, castor-oil, sarsaparilla, cinchona, tobacco, indigo and the wax-plant (111yrica cerifera).

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  • - The inhabitants of Guatemala, who tend to increase rapidly owing to the high birth-rate, low mortality, and low rate of emigration, numbered in 1903 1,842,134, or more than one-third of the entire population of Central America.

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  • The Itzas, Mopans, Lacandons, Chols, Pokonchi and the Pokomans who inhabit the large settlement of Mixco near the capital, all belong to the Maya family; but parts of central and eastern Guatemala are peopled by tribes distinct from the Mayas and not found in Mexico.

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  • The capital of the republic, Guatemala or Guatemala la Nueva (pop. 1905 about 97,000) and the cities of Quezaltenango (31,000), Totonicapam (28,000), Coban (25,000), Solola (17,000), Escuintla (12,000), Huehuetanango (12,000), Amatitlan (io,000) and Atitlan (9000) are described under separate headings.

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  • Guatemala joined the Postal Union in 1881; but its postal and telegraphic services have suffered greatly from financial difficulties.

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  • The telephonic systems of Guatemala la Nueva, Quezaltenango and other cities are owned by private companies.

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  • The natural resources of Guatemala are rich but undeveloped; and the capital necessary for their development is not easily obtained in a country where war, revolution and economic crises recur at frequent intervals, where the premium on gold has varied by no less than 500% in a single year, and where many of the wealthiest cities and agricultural districts have been destroyed by earthquake in one day (18th of April 1902).

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  • At the beginning of the 19th century, Guatemala had practically no export trade; but between 1825 and 1850 cochineal was largely exported, the centre of production being the Amatitlan district.

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  • Guatemala is surpassed only by Brazil and the East Indies in the quantity of coffee it exports.

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  • During the colonial period, the cocoa of western Guatemala and Soconusco was reserved on account of its fine flavour for the Spanish court.

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  • Guatemala was conquered by the Spaniards under Pedro de Alvarado between 1522 and 1524.

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  • In Guatemala the Clerical, Conservative or antiFederal party was supreme; after a protracted struggle it overthrew the Liberals or Federalists, and declared the country an independent republic, with Rafael Carrera (1814-1865) as president.

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  • Honduras now joined with Salvador, and Nicaragua and Costa Rica with Guatemala.

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  • The archbishop of Guatemala and the Jesuits were driven into exile as intriguers in the interests of the Clericals.

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  • A well-armed force, which included a body of adventurers from San Francisco (U.S.A.) was organized by General Barillas, the ex-president, and invaded Guatemala in March 1906 from Mexico, British Honduras and Salvador.

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  • Ocos was captured by his lieutenant, General Castillo, and the revolution speedily became a war, in which Honduras, Costa Rica and Salvador were openly involved against Guatemala, while Nicaragua was hostile.

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  • Besides the works cited under Central America see the interesting narrative of Thomas Gage, the English missionary, in Juarros, Compendio de la historia de Guatemala (1808-1818, 2 vols.; new ed., 1857), which in Bailly's English translation (London, 1823) long formed the chief authority.

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  • See also C. Juan Anino, La Republica de Guatemala (Guatemala, 1894); T.

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  • Brigham, Guatemala, The Land of the Quetzal (London, 1887); J.

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  • Lemale, Guia geografica de los centros de poblacion de la republica de Guatemala (Guatemala, 1882); F.

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  • de Fuentes y Guzman, Historia de Guatemala o Recordacion Florida (Madrid, 1882); A.

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  • P. Maudslay, A Glimpse at Guatemala, and some Notes on the Ancient Monuments of Central America (London, 1899); Gustavo Niederlein, The Republic of Guatemala (Philadelphia, 1898); Ramon A.

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  • Salazar, Historia del disenvolvimiento intelectual de Guatemala, vol.

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  • (Guatemala, 1897); Otto Stoll, Reisen and Schilderungen aus den Jahren 1878-1883 (Leipzig, 1886); J.

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  • Mendez, Guia del immigrante en la republica de Guatemala (Guatemala, 1895); Karl Sapper, "Grundziige der physikalischen Geographie von Guatemala," Erganzungshef t No.

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  • 115, Petermann's Mitteilungen (Gotha, 1894); Anuaria de estadistica de la republica de Guatemala (Guatemala); Memoria de la Secretaria de Instruction Publica (Guatemala, 1899); Handbook of Guatemala, revised (Bureau of the American Republics, Washington, 1897); United States Consular Reports (Washington); British Foreign Office Diplomatic and Consular Reports (London).

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  • The third Pan-American Conference was held in the months of July and August 1906, and was attended by the United States, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Salvador and Uruguay.

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  • Farther to the south, on the borders of Guatemala and British Honduras, there exists a perfectly distinct species, M.

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  • It is not found farther north than Guatemala, or south of Paraguay.

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  • In Guatemala Elaps fulvus is mimicked by Pliocerus equalis; in Mexico Elaps corallinus by Homalocranium semicinctum, and in Brazil, Elaps lemniscatus by Oxyrhopus trigeminus.

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  • The bishop of Leon, whose diocese is included in the archiepiscopal province of Guatemala, is the spiritual head of the Roman Catholics.

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  • Granada was founded in 1524 on the isthmus between the two lakes as the capital of a separate government, which, however, was soon attached as a special province to the captaincy general of Guatemala, which comprised the whole of Central America and the present Mexican state of Chiapas.

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  • He was succeeded in 1883 by Dr Cardenas, during whose presidency the attempt of General Barrios to unite the five Central American states was a cause of war between Guatemala and Honduras on one side, and Salvador, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica on the other.

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  • While Dr Sacasa was president of Honduras, Salvador and Guatemala signed a treaty, under which the United States of Central America were to be formed.

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  • He went to America in 1531, and after serving his order zealously in Peru, Guatemala and Mexico, was chosen to explore the country north of Sonora, whose wealth was pictured in the hearsay stories of Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca.

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  • P. Ayacahuite, the common white pine of Mexico, spreads southwards on to the mountains of Guatemala, it is a large tree with glaucous foliage like P. Strobus, and yields a valuable resin.

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  • In 1528 he explored the coast of Guatemala and Yucatan, and in 1532 he led 300 volunteers to reinforce Pizarro in Peru.

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  • The varieties of sarsaparilla met with in commerce are the following: Jamaica, Lima, Honduras, Guatemala, Guayaquil and Mexican.

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  • On the Continent, especially in Italy, the varieties having a white starchy bark, like those of Honduras and Guatemala, are preferred.

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  • Guatemala sarsaparilla is very similar to that of Honduras, but has a more decided orange hue, and the bark shows a tendency to split off.

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  • by the state of Campeche and Guatemala, S.

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  • by Guatemala and Chiapas, and W.

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  • The Grijalva, also called Tabasco, the upper course of which is known as the Chiapas, has its most distant sources in western Guatemala and flows N.W.

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  • The Usumacinta likewise has its sources in western Guatemala.

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  • It forms the boundary between Guatemala and Chiapas until the frontier of Tabasco is reached, where its N.W.

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  • ITZA, an American-Indian people of Mayan stock, inhabiting the country around Lake Peten in northern Guatemala.

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  • His Code of Reform and Prison Discipline was adopted by Guatemala.

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  • Even in Guatemala, though the younger sons of a divine race succeed in making the earth where the elder son (as usual) failed, they all had a supply of clay as first material.

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  • In 2001, this successful program expanded to provide cross-border services to the returnee communities in the state of Huehuetenango in Guatemala.

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  • Click here to view Andy 's Weblog - " Experiences as a water and sanitation engineer in Guatemala ".

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  • Guatemala has a tropical climate along the El Peten Lowlands and the Caribbean coast, although it is more temperate in the highlands.

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  • Guatemala adoption is a route taken by many American couples wishing to adopt children.

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  • Adopting a child from Guatemala not only fulfills parents dreams of becoming a mother and father, but also provides a child with a future that often offers better prospects that s/he might have in Guatemala.

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  • Dan and Kay Finley, missionaries with Lutheran Bible Translators, have assisted in Guatemala adoption procedures during their 10 years living and working in Guatemala.

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  • Adoptive parents can make a big difference in the lives of the precious children from Guatemala."

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  • The process to adopt a child from Guatemala typically takes between four and ten months, although the process may take longer in some cases.

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  • Although some adoptions are arranged privately, the majority of adoptions in Guatemala are facilitated with the help of adoption agencies.

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  • Those interested in pursuing adoption from Guatemala need to be careful and selective in the professional or agency they choose to work with.

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  • Look for honest, up front agencies that admit the possibility of the laws regarding Guatemala could change.

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  • Although costs vary depending on the agency or professional involved, legal and other fees, documentation, travel, and many other aspects of the Guatemala adoption process add up to substantial expenses.

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  • LTK would like to thank Dan and Kay Finley for sharing their experience with the adoption process in Guatemala.

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  • Though U.S. citizens adopted children from 106 different countries in 2001, nearly three-fourth of all children came from only five countries: China (25%), Russia (22%), South Korea (10%), Guatemala (8%), and Ukraine (6%).

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  • International shipping is available to all countries except Venezuela, Guatemala, Nigeria and Zanzibar.

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  • In that season two contestants from Survivor: Palau were allowed to compete again in Survivor: Guatemala.

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  • She was the 10th person voted out of Survivor Palau, and the runner-up in Survivor Guatemala.

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  • province of the Spanish captaincy-general of Guatemala until 1821.

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  • Barrios, president of Guatemala, to restore federal unity to Central America failed in 1885, and had little influence on Costa Rican affairs.

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  • Mejico, or Mexico,) officially styled Estados Unidos Mexicanos and Republica Mexicana, a federal republic of North America extending from the United States of America southward to Guatemala and British Honduras, and lying between the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea on the east.

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  • The boundary line with Guatemala, for a long time in dispute, was fixed by the treaties of 1882 and 1895.

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  • Less is definitely known of the elevated regions of Chiapas, on the border of Guatemala, which are separated from the great Mexican Plateau by the low Isthmus of Tehuantepec (718 ft.

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  • They are most violent from San Blas southward to the Guatemala frontier, and some of the Spanish towns on or near this coast have suffered severely.

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  • They are found on the borders of Guatemala and consist of limestones and dolomites with Productus.

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  • It is worth while to mention these few early incidents of the Rational legend of Guatemala, because their Biblical incidents show how native tradition incorporated matter learnt from the white men.

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  • They are most violent from San Blas southward to the Guatemala frontier, and some of the Spanish towns on or near this coast have suffered severely.

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