Grubs sentence example

grubs
  • Their food was the meat they killed in the chase, or seeds and roots, grubs or reptiles.
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  • I got talking to a guy who fishes wasp grubs.
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  • The ichneumon pierces the body of a caterpillar and lays her eggs where the grubs will find abundant animal food.
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  • The larvae are white, fleshy, apodal grubs, with a series of tubercles along each side of the body; the head is round, and bears strong jaws, and sometimes rudimentary ocelli.
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  • It is supposed that these beetles secrete a sweet substance on which the ants feed, but they have been seen to devour the ants' eggs and grubs.
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  • European predator anglers were already switched on to this type of lure, using large shad bodies and curly tail grubs in the main.
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  • They like to scratch for insects and grubs, but you will still have to provide chicken feed.
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  • Beetle grubs feed upon turf roots, ruining lawns.
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  • As grubs, they feed upon the roots of plants, especially turf grasses.
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  • Nematodes feast upon beetle grubs, injecting a bacteria into the grub and feasting on the bacteria, which kills the larvae.
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  • Ensure you water your lawn well after applying grub killers to it, as this will ensure the product to get deep into the soil where these grubs are.
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  • In many cases you can simply remove the offending bugs (like grubs and slugs) when you see them and relocate them to another part of the yard (or another yard).
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  • The vegetable-feeders attack leaves, herbaceous or woody stems and roots; frequently different parts of a plant are attacked in the two active stages of the life-history; the cockchafers, for example, eating leaves, and their grubs gnawing roots.
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  • It has been suggested that the power of stridulation would be advantageous to wood-boring grubs, the sound warning each of the position of its neighbour, so that adjacent burrowers may not get in each other's way.
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  • The Nitidulidae are a large family with 1600 species, among which members of the genus Meligethes are often found in numbers feeding on blossoms, while others live under the bark of trees and prey on the grubs of boring beetles.
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  • Honey forms the staple nourishment of many ants, some of the workers seeking nectar from flowers, working it up into honey within their stomachs and regurgitating it so as to feed their comrades within the nest, who, in their turn, pass it on to the grubs.
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  • These do not drop, but as the grubs develop the cotton is ruined and the bolls usually become discoloured and crack, their contents being rendered useless.
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  • The feeding habits of the adult may agree with that of the larva, or differ, as in the case of wasps which feed their grubs on flies, but eat principally vegetable food themselves.
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  • The Sapygidae are parasitic on bees, while the Scoliidae are large, robust and hairy insects, many of which prey upon the grubs of chafers.
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  • Thus he showed that the weevils of granaries, in his time commonly supposed to be bred from wheat, as well as in it, are grubs hatched from eggs deposited by winged insects.
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  • As is the case with other water-bugs, this insect is predaceous and feeds upon aquatic grubs or worms. The body is richly supplied with long hairs, which serve to entangle bubbles of air for purposes of respiration.
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  • Along this channel the nectar is drawn into the pharynx and passes, mixed with saliva, into the crop or "honey-bag"; the action of the saliva changes the saccharose into dextrose and levulose, and the nectar becomes honey, which the bee regurgitates for storage in the cells or for the feeding of the grubs.
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  • A new product for the control of chafer grubs is due to be launched in the UK during April.
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  • The nematode enters the bodies of vine weevil grubs, infecting them with a fatal bacterial disease from its gut.
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  • Gall-fly grubs are provided with vegetable food through the eggs being laid by the mother insect within plant tissues.
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  • Toucans in confinement feed mainly on fruit, but little seems amiss to them, and they swallow grubs, reptiles and small birds with avidity.
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  • In a fresh state it is poisonous and fatal to vegetation, and is often used for this reason to dress land infested with wireworms, grubs, club-root fungus, &c.
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  • All young grubs are at first fed with a specially nutritious food, discharged from the worker's stomach, to which is added a digestive secretion derived from special salivary glands in the worker's head.
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  • It shows a portion of honeycomb (natural size) not precisely as it appears when the frame containing it is lifted out of the hive, but as would be seen on two or more combs in the same hive, namely, the various cells built for - and occupied by - queens, drones and workers; also the larvae or grubs in the various stages of transformation FIG.
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  • This consisted of animal meat and offal, honey, insects such as witchetty grubs, some marine life plus seasonal vegetation.
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  • Stridulating organs among beetle-larvae have been noted, especially in the wood-feeding grub of the stag-beetles (Lucanidae) and their allies the Passalidae, and in the dung-eating grubs of the dor-beetles (Geotrupes), which belong to the chafer family (Scarabaeidae).
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  • Beetles and larvae are frequently carnivorous in habit, hunting for small insects under stones, or pursuing the soft-skinned grubs of beetles and flies that bore in woody stems or succulent roots.
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  • The grubs, when hatched, start galleries nearly at right angles to this, and when fully grown form oval cells in which they pupate; from these the young beetles emerge by making circular holes directly outward through the bark.
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  • The series of paired spiracles on most of the trunk-segments is well displayed, as a rule, in terrestrial larvae - caterpillars and the grubs of most beetles, for example.
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  • Metamorphosis in Diptera is complete; the larvae are utterly different from the perfect insects in appearance, and, although varying greatly in outward form, are usually footless grubs; those of the Muscidae are generally known as maggots.
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