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grows

grows Sentence Examples

  • A variety also grows in woods named A.

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  • This grows under oaks, in clusters - a most unusual character for the mushroom, and is said to be excellent for the table.

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  • It grows harder when you meet that one life, doesn't it?

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  • The tree grows to the height of 150 ft.

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  • It grows harder when you meet that one life, doesn't it?

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  • Her mind grows through its ceaseless activity.

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  • In many Laminariaceae the thallus also grows regularly in thickness by division of its surface layer, adding to the subjacent permanent tissue and thus forming a secondary meristem.

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  • The mulberry grows in the valleys of the Rhne and its tributaries, the lsre, the Drme, the Ardche, the Gard and the Durance, and also along the coast of the Mediterranean.

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  • The day kiri grows tired of him, he's going to my behavior modification training, Dusty assured him.

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  • This I am sure will occur if he is to guess my condition, which grows more noticeable as my time draws closer.

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  • The herbage for the most part grows with marvellous rapidity after a spring or autumn shower and forms a natural shelter for the more stable growth of nutritious grasses.

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  • These branch, and may be packed or interwoven to form a very solid structure; but each grows in length independently of the others and retains its own individuality, though its growth in those types with a definite external form is of course correlated with that of its neighbors and is subject to the laws governing the general form of the body.

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  • The herbage for the most part grows with marvellous rapidity after a spring or autumn shower and forms a natural shelter for the more stable growth of nutritious grasses.

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  • And we notice that her face grows more expressive each day.

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  • across, also belongs to this group. It grows in the backwaters of the Amazon, often covering the surface for miles; the seeds are eaten under the name water maize.

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  • Although this plant is popularly termed the "meadow mushroom," it never as a rule grows in meadows.

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  • The Dark One is the most powerful, and he grows more so, as the population of the worlds increase.

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  • Every time a vamp is created, my power grows.

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  • There is also a gigantic lily (Doryanthes excelsa) which grows to a height of 15 feet.

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  • The mangrove grows on the shores of the west coast in profusion.

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  • The oak grows most luxuriantly on deep strong clays, calcareous marl or stiff loam, but will flourish in nearly any deep well-drained soil, excepting peat or loose sand; in marshy or moist places the tree may grow well for a time, but the timber is rarely sound; on hard rocky ground and exposed hillsides.

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  • The Turkey oak in southern England grows twice as fast as Q.

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  • virens, the live oak of the southern states; more or less abundant on the Atlantic coasts of the Carolinas and Florida, its true home is the country around the Mexican Gulf, where it rarely grows more than 50 or 60 m.

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  • The stem sometimes grows 80 or 90 ft.

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  • When first sucked up by the insect from an infected man it passes into its stomach, and thence makes its way into the thoracic muscles, and there for some time it grows.

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  • Esparto grass, which grows freely in the vicinity, is the spartum, or Spanish broom, which gave the town its Roman designation of Carthago Spartaria.

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  • It may be mentioned that the Bactrian camel, which is a shorter-legged and more ponderous animal than the Arabian species, grows an enormously long and thick winter coat, which is shed in blanket-like masses in spring.

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  • The sugar-cane flourishes, the cotton-plant ripens to perfection, date-trees are seen in the gardens, the rocks are clothed with the prickly-pear or Indian fig, the enclosures of the fields are formed by aloes and sometimes pomegranates, the liquorice-root grows wild, and the mastic, the myrtle and many varieties of oleander and cistus form the underwood of the natural forests of arbutus and evergreen oak.

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  • Among the chief industrial plants is tobacco, which grows wherever suitable soil exists.

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  • Knowledge grows, not by mechanical addition, but by organic transformation.

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  • It grows in small rings, which give it the appearance of growing in tufts, though it is really closely and evenly distributed over the whole scalp. The figures of the men are muscular and well-formed and generally pleasing; a straight, well-formed nose and jaw are by no means rare, and the young men are often distinctly good-looking.

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  • Protohydra occurs in oysterbanks and Monobrachium also grows on the shells of bivalves, and both these hydroids probably fish in the currents produced by the lamellibranchs.

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  • Amphibrachium grows in the tissues of a sponge, Euplectella, and protrudes its hydranth into the canal-system of the sponge; and Lar grows on the tubes of the worm Sabella.

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  • In the first place, buds may be produced only from the hydrorhiza, which grows out and branches to form a basal stolon, typically net-like, spreading over the substratum to which the founderpolyp attached itself.

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  • In Tubularia by a process of decapitation the hydranths may separate off and give rise to a separate individual, while the remainder of the body grows a new hydranth.

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  • 43, A); in this the mouth is formed distally as a perforation (B); next the sides of the tube so formed bulge out laterally near the attachment to form the umbrella, while the distal undilated portion of the tube represents the manubrium (C); the umbrella now grows out into a number of lobes or lappets, and the tentacles and tentaculocysts grow out, the former in a notch between two lappets, the latter on the apex of each lappet (D, E); finally, the velum arises as a growth of the ectoderm alone, the whole bud shapes itself, so to speak, and the little medusa is separated off by rupture of the thin stalk connecting it with the parent (F).

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  • The spore cell gives rise to a " sporelarva," which is set free in the coelenteron and grows into a medusa.

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  • The ovum of Hydromedusae is usually one of a large number of odgonia, and grows at the expense of its sister-cells.

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  • The planula may fix itself (I) by one end, and then becomes the hydrocaulus and hydranth, while the hydrorhiza grows out from the base; or (2) partly by one side and then gives rise to Modified from a plate by L.

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  • 11) grows upon the tubes of the worm Sabella and produces a medusa known as Willia.

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  • - The genus Monobrachium is a colonyforming hydroid which grows upon the shells of bivalve molluscs, each polyp having but a single tentacle.

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  • The tree grows well in Britain, and acquires occasionally a considerable size.

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  • The primitive cell sends colorless tubelets (rhizoids, rh.) into the mud on which it grows.

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  • The basal cell has less chlorophyll than the others, and is expanded and fixed firmly to the rock on which the plant grows by the basal surface, rh, thus forming a rudimentary rhizoid.

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  • Each branch grows simply by the transverse division of its apical cell.

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  • This may have a radial stem-like organization, a central cell-thread giving off from every side a number of short sometimes unicellular branches, which together form a cortex round the central thread, the whole structure having a cylindrical form which only branches when one of the short cell-branches from the central thread grows out beyond the general surface and forms in its turn a new central thread, from whose cells arise new short branches.

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  • On germination of the seed the radicle first grows out, increasing in size as a whole, and soon adding to its tissues by cell division at its apical growing-point.

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  • The increasing development of the wood as the tree grows older is largely due to the demands for the conduction of water and mineral matters dissolved in it, which are made by the increased number of leaves which from year to year it bears, and which must each be put into communication with the central mass by the formation of new vascular bundles.

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  • As the tube grows down the hair it maintains its own independence, and does not fuse with the contents of the root-hair, whose protoplasm remains quite distinct and separate.

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  • If a root is similarly illuminated, a similar change of direction of growth follows, but in this case the organ grows away from the light.

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  • As the sieve plate grows these non-cellulose regions swell and gradually become converted into the same kind of mucous substance as that contained in the tube; the two cells are thus placed in open communication.

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  • Thus the stream bed, from which at first the water might be blown away into a new channel by a gale of wind, ultimately grows to be the strongest line of the landscape.

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  • The young corm, at first about the diameter of the flower-stalk, grows continuously, till in the following July it attains the size of a small apricot.

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  • Owing to its southern exposure, its sheltered position, and a copious rainfall, vegetation, in part of a sub-tropical character, grows in great profusion.

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  • In germination of the seed the root of the embryo (radicle) grows out to get a holdfast for the plant; this is generally followed by the growth of the short stem immediately above the root, the so-called "hypocotyl," which carries up the cotyledons above the ground, where they spread to the light and become the first green leaves of the plant.

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  • This is what the nobility of office, if left unchecked, naturally grows into.

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  • The most striking trees in the forest region are, in the basin of the Cavalla, the giant Funtumia elastica, which grows to an altitude of 200 ft.; various kinds of Parinarium, Oldfieldia and Khaya; the bombax or cotton tree, giant dracaenas, many kinds of fig; Borassus palms, oil palms, the climbing Calamus palms, and on the coast the coconut.

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  • Coffee of several species is indigenous and grows wild.

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  • The bracken grows in low sandy tracts near the coast.

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  • Intolerant reliance upon force presents greater difficulties to them; soon it grows quite obsolete.

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  • The Scotch pine still grows on all sandy spaces, and the maple (Acer tatarica and A.

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  • In Britain the tree grows to a height of 40 ft., in its native soil to .70 or 90 ft.

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  • The cypress, which grows no more when once cut down, was regarded as a symbol of the dead, and perhaps for that reason was sacred to Pluto; its branches were placed by the Greeks and Romans on the funeral pyres and in the houses of their departed friends.

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  • The mesquite grows some distance from water, and is especially common near the Colorado river.

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  • The cypress still grows wild in the higher regions; the lower hills and the valleys, which are extremely fertile, are covered with olive woods.

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  • It v e mires very little moisture, grows luxuriantly on the thin calcareous soil of Yucatan and is cultivated almost exclusively by the large landowners.

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  • This variety, which seems to have been originally bred in Silesia, is not less well-flavoured than the normally coloured tench, and grows to the same size, viz., to 6 and even 8 lb.

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  • Here, too, grows Spanish moss, used by upholsterers.

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  • Love grows with the knowledge of its object, he proceeds, and at the highest stage self-love is so merged in love to God that we love ourselves only for God's sake or because God has loved us.

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  • The seeds are harvested from various grasses, especially from Aristida oligantha, a species known as " ant rice," which often grows in quantity close to the site selected for the nest, but the statement that the ants deliberately sow this grass is an error, due, according to Wheeler, to the sprouting of germinating seeds.

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  • These segments spring apparently from the top of the ovary - the real explanation, however, being that the end of the flower-stalk or "thalamus," as it grows, becomes dilated into a sort of cup or tube enclosing and indeed closely adhering to the ovary, so that the latter organ appears to be beneath the perianth instead of above it as in a lily, an appearance which has given origin to the term "inferior ovary."

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  • The sal grows to a large size, and is more gregarious than the teak.

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  • It grows in marshy places; and is cultivated in China, the fruit having a supposed value as a diuretic and anti-phthisic. It was cultivated by John Gerard, author of the famous Herball, at the end of the 16th century as a tender annual.

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  • There are thus substantial reasons for believing that the nephridium grows backwards from a funnel as does the coelomoduct.

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  • In both the cavity originally or immediately continuous with the coelom appears first in the funnel and grows backwards.

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  • In this Annelid later the sac in question joins its fellow, passing beneath the nerve cord exactly as in the leech, and also grows out to reach the exterior.

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  • The best wine grows in Kakhetia, a district lying north-east and east of Tiflis; this district alone yields nearly 8 million gallons annually.

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  • The fungus mycelium grows between the cuticle and the epidermis, the former being ultimately ruptured by numerous short branches bearing spores (conidia) by means of which the disease is spread.

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  • But when it grows in dense woods, where the lower branches decay and drop off early, only a small head of foliage remaining at the tapering summit, its stem, though frequently of great height, is rarely more than 11 or 2 ft.

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  • This species prefers a peaty soil, and often grows luxuriantly in very moist situations.

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  • Extensive woods of this fir exist on the southern Alps, where the tree grows up to nearly 4000 ft.; in the Rhine countries it forms great part of the extensive forest of the Hochwald, and occurs in the Black Forest and in the Vosges; it is plentiful likewise on the Pyrenees and Apennines.

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  • But in Aplysia the mantle is reflected over the edge of the shell, and grows over its upper surface so as to completely enclose it, excepting at the small central area s where the naked shell is exposed.

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  • This forms the nucleus of the adult shell, and, as the animal grows, becomes enclosed by a reflection of the mantle-skirt.

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  • The foot now protrudes below the mouth, and the post-oral hemisphere of the trochosphere grows more rapidly then the anterior or velar area.

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  • The external part of the lateral field subsequently 14 grows up, and by coalescence with its fellow forms the t6 tergite or dorsal part of the segment.

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  • In some midges and in caddis-flies the serosa becomes ruptured and absorbed, while the germ band, still clothed with the amnion, grows around the yolk.

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  • In regions where climatic conditions are favourable, cotton grows more or less successfully on almost all kinds of soil; it can be grown on light sandy soils, loams, heavy clays and sandy " bottom " lands with varying success.

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  • As the jar works off, or grows more feeble, by reason of the downward advance of the drill, it is ' tempered ' to the proper strength by letting down the temper-screw to give the jars more play.

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  • On the northern inland downs liquorice grows wild and is collected by the peasants and sent down to Alexandretta.

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  • The pine-apple grows in abundance.

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  • The theme of world-mastery grows dark with the darkness of the Nibelung's mind.

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  • The soil is fertile and produces rubber, cotton, sugar, coffee, cocoa, tobacco and nutmegs, all of which are exported; pimento (allspice) grows wild in the greatest profusion.

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  • Among the larger trees are the mountain cedar, reaching to 100 ft.; the gob, which bears edible berries in appearance something like the cherry with the taste of an apple, grows to some 80 ft., and is found fringing the river beds; the hassadan, a kind of euphorbia, attaining a height of about 70 ft.; and the darei, a fig tree.

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  • A species of lizard grows nearly 4 ft.

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  • From the southern boundary line for two and a half degrees north the prairie is dry, but of good soil, which grows excellent crops when irrigated.

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  • The beautiful ceiba (Bombax ceiba L., Ceiba pentandra) or silk cotton tree is the giant of the Cuban forests; it often grows to a height of 100 to 150 ft.

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  • The majagua tree grows as high as 40 ft.; from its bark is made cordage of the finest quality, which is scarcely affected by the atmosphere.

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  • Yams and sweet-potatoes, yuccas, malangas, cacao, rice - which is one of the most important foods of the people, but which is not yet widely cultivated on a profitable basis - and Indian corn, which grows everywhere and yields two crops yearly, may be mentioned also.

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  • Providence is known as the "pine barrens," from the tree which principally grows in this rocky soil.

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  • In these marshes grows the nipa palm, from which a liquor is distilled - there are a number of small distilleries here.

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  • The tree grows well on dry and rocky soil without rain for a considerable period of the year, and flourishes at high altitudes up to about 4000 ft.

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  • The tree grows about 30 ft.

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  • The tree grows most abundantly in a sporadic manner in the dense moist forests of the basin of the Rio San Juan, where the rain falls for nine months in the year.

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  • It has been found that although the tree grows well in many different countries and different localities, it only furnishes a satisfactory yield of rubber in mountainous districts, such as those of Assam and certain parts of Ceylon and Java.

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  • The production of rubber by this tree merits further investigation, as it grows readily in nearly every district of W.

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  • These pits are not isolated, but are connected by an ectodermal ridge, which grows in at the margin of the mantle and forms a continuous band somewhat resembling the ectodermal primordium of vertebrate teeth.

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  • The second segment grows downwards like a skirt surrounding the third segment, which is destined to form the stalk.

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  • The pseudo-deltidium (so named by Bronn in 1862) is a single plate which grows from the apex of the delthyrium downwards, and may completely close the aperture.

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  • wh, Roots from k', which grows at expense of k.

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  • Prominent among the storks is the great black-headed white crane, called the jaburd (Mycteria americana), which is found along the Amazon and down the coast and grows to a height of 42 ft.

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  • Indian corn grows luxuriantly everywhere, but it does not mature well in the humid regions of the Amazon region and the coast.

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  • Other wild fruits are the so-called Cape gooseberry (not native to Natal) and the kaw apple or Dingaan apricot, which grows on a species of ebony tree.

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  • Some have held that it is a prickly shrub, Zizyphus Lotus, which bears a sweet-tasting fruit, and still grows in the old home of the Lotophagi.

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  • This factor is the Record of the Past, which grows and develops by laws other than those affecting the perishable bodies of successive generations of mankind, and exerts an incomparable influence upon the educable brain, so that man, by the interaction of the Record and his educability, is removed to a large extent from the status of the organic world and placed in a new and unique position, subject to new laws and new methods of development unlike those by which the rest of the living world is governed.

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  • The plant is indigenous and grows well, but, unlike cacau, it requires much manual labour in its cultivation and picking and does not seem to be favoured by the planters.

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  • They are traversed by the Anapus, with its tributary the Cyane, the latter famous for the papyrus planted by the Arabs, which here alone in Europe grows wild in the stream.

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  • It grows on the four-horned altar before the house, or in a pot placed in one of the front windows, and is worshipped every morning by all the female members of every Hindu household.

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  • This principle, which shows itself clearly at first in the conception that the various nations are under angelic rulers, who are in a greater or less degree in rebellion against God, as in Daniel and Enoch, grows in strength with each succeeding age, till at last Satan is conceived as "the ruler of this world" (John xii.

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  • The mycelium of Sphaceloma grows just beneath the cuticle of the vine, through which it soon bursts, giving rise to a number of minute hyphae, which bear conidia.

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  • In the winter months the deeper layers of the soil act as a shelter to the organism, which again grows towards the surface during the summer.

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  • It grows well, and ripens its fruit in the southern and midland counties of England; but large trees may be seen as far north as Ross-shire in sheltered places.

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  • The cochineal insect is found on the cactus which grows in abundance in the vicinity, and the town is known throughout Ecuador for its manufacture of boots and shoes, and for a cordage made from cabuya, the fibre of the agave plant.

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  • From the under surface a root with a well-developed sheath grows downwards into the water.

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  • i.) states that gorillas only leave the depths of the forest to enter the outlying clearings in the neighbourhood of human settlements when they are attracted by some special fruit or succulent plant; the favourite being the fruit of the "mejom," a tall cane-like plant (perhaps a kind of Amomum) which grows abundantly on deserted clearings.

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  • In the higher regions the principal trees are various species of fig, tamarind, carob and numerous kinds of cactiform Euphorbia, of which one, the Euphorbia arborea, grows to a height of 20 ft.

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  • In the cultivated upland valleys all over Arabia the Zizyphus j ujuba, called by some travellers lotus, grows to a large tree; its thorny branches are clipped yearly and used to fence the cornfields among which it grows.

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  • The tree from which myrrh is extracted grows in many places, but the industry is chiefly carried on at Suda, 60 m.

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  • Jalap has been known in Europe since the beginning of the 17th century, and derives its name from the city of Jalapa in Mexico, near which it grows, but its botanical source was not accurately determined until 1829, when Dr. J.

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  • Jalap has been cultivated for many years in India, chiefly at Ootacamund, and grows there as easily as a yam, often producing clusters of tubers weighing over 9 lb; but these, as they differ in appearance from the commercial article, have not as yet obtained a place in the English market.

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  • It grows in Mexico along the mountain range of the Sierra Gorda in the neighbourhood of San Luis de la Paz, from which district it is carried down to Tampico, whence it is exported.

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  • It grows to a vertical height of from 50 to 80 ft.

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  • It still grows on Lebanon, though for several centuries it was believed to be restricted to a small grove in the Kadisha valley at 6000 ft.

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  • The deodar forms forests on the mountains of Afghanistan, North Beluchistan and the north-west Himalayas, flourishing in all the higher mountains from Nepal up to Kashmir, at an elevation of from 5500 to 12,000 ft.; on the peaks to the northern side of the Boorung Pass it grows to a height of 60 to 70 ft.

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  • It is an account of a little garden that he used to tend with his own hands, and is largely made up of descriptions of the various herbs he grows there and their medicinal and other uses.

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  • The date palm grows wild, as has been already related, in Jerba.

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  • This grows to a height of about 3 ft., the lower part of the stoutish stem being furnished with leaves, while near the top is developed a crown of large pendant flowers surmounted by a tuft of bright green leaves like those of the lower part of the stem, only smaller.

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  • The plant grows freely in good garden soil, preferring a deep welldrained loam, and is all the better for a top-dressing of manure as it approaches the flowering stage.

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  • Sometimes the Polystomum-larva attaches itself to a young tadpole, and in that case grows so rapidly as to become mature in five weeks.

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  • the body grows backwards and the ventral sucker comes to occupy a relatively more anterior position.

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  • 8 A, 9 A), but in many Cheilostomes the frontal surface is protected by a calcareous shield, which grows from near the free edges of the vertical walls and commonly increases in thickness as the zooecium grows older by the activity of the "epitheca," a layer of living tissue outside it.

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  • (iv.) In the Microporidae and Steganoporellidae the body-cavity becomes partially subdivided by a calcareous lamina ("cryptocyst," Jullien) which grows from the proximal and lateral sides in a plane parallel to the frontal membrane and not far below it.

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  • While the figure of Samuel grows in grandeur, the disastrous fate of Saul invited explanation, which is found in his previous acts of disobedience (I Sam.

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  • The youth grows up strong, swift-footed and of great personal beauty, but, naturally enough, of very limited intelligence.

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  • The text shows a curious mingling of sources; the real primitive Perceval story, the Enfances, is omitted; he grows up in his father's house and goes to court at his wish.

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  • Grass grows, however, to the very edges of the crater.

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  • This wild waste is known as the Sundarbans, from the sundari tree, which grows in abundance in the seaboard tracts.

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  • Tortrix scytale, one of the "coral-snakes" of tropical South America, is beautiful coral-red with black rings, grows to nearly a yard in length, and is said sometimes to be worn as a necklace by native ladies.

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  • It grows to a length of 5 ft., climbs extremely well, feeds chiefly on mice, and becomes very tame.

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  • It grows rarely to a length of 4 ft.; it never bites, and feeds chiefly on frogs, toads and fishes, but mice are never taken.

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  • It grows to a length of 2 or 3 ft.

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  • This creature is semi-aquatic and lives chiefly on fishes; it grows to a length of about 5 ft.; the general colour is reddish to dark brown, FIG.

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  • It grows to a length of 6 ft., lives in swamps, plantations, forests, on the plains and on the hills, and is very prolific, producing dozens of young, which at birth are 10 in.

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  • The former still grows thickly, especially in the valley of the Kadisha; the horizontal is the prevailing variety.

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  • It grows from a whitish root-stock which sends up in the spring a few long-stalked, arrow-shaped leaves of a polished green, often marked with dark blotches.

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  • It is almost universally found, in cases of successful experiment, that the glass ball, for example, takes a milky or misty aspect, that it then grows black, reflections disappearing, and that then the pictures emerge.

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  • Suan, another rice-like cereal, not cultivated, grows spontaneously in the paddy fields.

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  • Above this grows a species of pine, which becomes dwarfed and disappears at an altitude of about 6000 ft., beyond which is a zone of lichen and moss covered or almost bare rock.

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  • 1), a hedgerow tree, generally grows in drier situations.

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  • BIBIRINE, or Bebeerine, C19H21N03, an alkaloid obtained from the bark and fruit of the greenheart tree, Nectandra rodiaei, called bibiru or sipiri in Guiana, where the tree grows.

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  • Among the fish may be mentioned the tunny, dolphin, mackerel, sardine, sea-bream, dentice and pagnell; wrasse, of exquisite rainbow hue and good for food; members of the herring family, sardines, anchovies, flying-fish, sea-pike; a few representatives of the cod family, and some flat fish; soles (very rare); Cernus which grows to large size; several species of grey and red mullet; eleven species of Triglidae, including the beautiful flying gurnard whose colours rival the angel-fish of the West Indies; and eighteen species of mackerel, all migratory.

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  • Buchanan's large model they can be trusted to give a good account of the vertical distribution of temperature, provided the water grows cooler as the depth increases.

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  • The entire valley of the Rio Grande, from El Paso to Brownsville, grows many species of cactus, and other prickly coriaceous shrubs.

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  • vitifolium) grows wild, and is also cultivated.

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  • The favourite food of the American beaver is the water-lily (Nuphar luteum), which bears a resemblance to a cabbage-stalk, and grows at the bottom of lakes and rivers.

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  • It grows profusely on dry rocks and walls, especially on the western coasts, and bears a spike of drooping greenish cup-shaped flowers.

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  • A rank grass, Festuca Cookii, grows thickly in places up to 300 ft., with Azorella, Cotula plumosa, &c. Sir J.

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  • It has a school of the industrial arts and sciences, grows good wine, and makes bricks.

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  • The number of the flocks grows, and the average size diminishes even more rapidly.

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  • In the Synoptists, Jesus " grows in favour with God and man," passes through true human experiences and trials, prays alone on the mountain-side, and dies with a cry of desolation; here the Logos' watchword is " I am," He has deliberately to stir up emotion in Himself, never prays for Himself, and in the garden and on the cross shows but power and self-possession.

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  • The Columbia plain is for the most part treeless and, except where irrigated, grows principally bunch-grass or, in its lower and more arid parts, sagebrush.

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  • Over the greater part of the plains little now grows save veld, the coarse long grass of South Africa.

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  • The tobacco plant also grows wild.

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  • The Great Plains are covered for the most part only with bunch grass which grows in tufts, leaving the ground visible between, and except in May and June presents a yellow and withered appearance.

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  • Wheat grows chiefly in the east and north-east parts of the state, especially in Brown, Spink, Roberts, Day and Grant counties, the largest crop in 1899 being that of Brown county, 3,3 20, 57 0 bush., or about one-twelfth of the state's product.

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  • Corn grows throughout the western half of the state, and especially in the south-western parts, in Lincoln, Clay, Union, Yankton and Bonhommie counties, the largest crop in 1899 being that of Lincoln county, 3,914,840 bush., nearly one-eleventh of the state crop. Oats has a distribution similar to that of corn, the largest crop in 1899 being that of Minnehaha county, 1,666,110 bush., about one-nineteenth of the state crop. Barley grows principally in the eastern and southern parts of the state - Minnehaha, Moody, Lake and Brookings counties - the largest crop in 1899 being that of Minnehaha county, 932,860 bush., more than one-seventh of the state.

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  • The summers are short, but as there are sixteen hours of sunlight per day in midsummer, vegetation grows rapidly.

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  • The teak tree grows all over the hill districts north of latitude 15°, but seems to attain its best development on the west, and on the east does not appear to be found south of 17°.

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  • It grows wild in woods in some parts of England, and in Europe, northern Asia and the Alleghany Mountains of North America.

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  • Batavia Bay is rendered secure by a number of islands at its mouth, but grows very shallow towards the shore.

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  • To become a medusa, the actinula grows scarcely at all in the direction of the principal axis, but greatly along a plane at right angles to it.

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  • Many plants produce, in addition to ordinary open flowers, so-called cleistogamous flowers, which remain permanently closed but which notwithstanding produce fruit; in these the corolla is inconspicuous or absent and the pollen grows from the anther on to the stigma of the same flower.

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  • The two most important tobaccogrowing districts are: the Black Patch, in the extreme south-west corner of the state, which with the adjacent counties in Tennessee grows a black heavy leaf bought almost entirely by the agents of foreign governments (especially Austria, Spain and Italy) and called " regie " tobacco; and the Blue Grass Region, as far east as Maysville, and the hill country south and east, whose product, the red and white Burley, is a fine-fibred light leaf, peculiarly absorbent of licorice and other adulterants used in the manufacture of sweet chewing tobacco, and hence a peculiarly valuable crop, which formerly averaged 22 cents a pound for all grades.'

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  • Kentucky also grows considerable quantities of cherries, pears, plums and peaches, and, for its size, ranks high in its crops of strawberries, blackberries and raspberries.

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  • It grows to a length of three feet and inhabits marshes in North and South Carolina, Florida and Texas.

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  • I) is the frilled lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingi), which is restricted to Queensland and the north coast, and grows to a length of 3 ft., including the long tapering tail.

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  • It grows only to a length of 10 in., and is not uncommon in the flats of South and West Australia.

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  • ocellata, which grows to a length of 18 or 20 in., and is brilliantly green, ornamented with blue eye-like spots on the sides.

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  • One of the finest of the endemic flowering plants of the group is the boraginaceous "Chatham Island lily" (M y ousitidium nobile), a gigantic forget-me-not, which grows on the shingly shore in a few places only, and always just on the high-water mark, where it is daily deluged by the waves; while dracophyllums, leucopogons and arborescent ragworts are characteristic forms in the vegetation.

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  • To produce a medusa the actinula grows greatly along a plane at right angles to the vertical axis of the body, whereby the aboral surface of the actinula becomes the exumbrella, and the peristome becomes the subumbrella.

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  • There are remains of ancient forests consisting of wild olive trees and the camel thorn, near which grows the ngotuane, a plant with a profusion of fine, strongly scented yellow flowers.

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  • It grows to a gigantic size, from 200 to 300 ft.

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  • In England the tree grows well in warm situations, but suffers much in severe winters - its graceful form rendering it ornamental in the park or garden, where it sometimes grows 30 or 40 ft.

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  • "In the course of a very few years, as the recollection of the man's personality becomes misty, his origin grows mysterious, his career takes a legendary hue, his birth and death were both supernatural; in the next generation the names of the elder gods get introduced into the story, and so the marvellous tradition works itself into a myth, until nothing but a personal incarnation can account for such a series of prodigies.

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  • Its highly nutritious leaves and stems are usually consumed by folding the sheep upon it where it grows, there is no green food upon which they fatten faster.

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  • As one advances northward the timber grows smaller and includes fewer species of trees, and finally the timber line is reached, near Churchill on the west coast of Hudson Bay and somewhat farther south on the Labrador side.

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  • Brings Up A Large Family, And Founds A Settlement Which Grows Into Several Parishes And Finally Becomes The Centre Of The Electoral, District Of " Rivardville," Which Returns Him To Parliament.

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  • Wheat grows as far south as Patagonia, and as far north as the edge of the Arctic Circle; it flourishes throughout Europe, and across the whole of northern Asia and in Japan; it is cultivated in Persia, and raised largely in India, as far south as the Nizam's dominions.

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  • Spring never begins till April, and it is the middle of June before the heat grows genial.

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  • These two layers, therefore, when once formed cannot increase in thickness; as the mantle grows in extent its border passes beyond the formed parts of the two outer layers, and the latter are covered internally by a deposit of nacreous matter.

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  • a man grows grey.

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  • The pyrethrum grows best in soil of a loamy texture; this should be well manured and deeply trenched up before planting, and should be mulched in the spring by a surface dressing of half-decayed manure.

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  • When standing in an open space, the larch grows of a nearly conical shape, with the lower branches almost reaching the ground, while those above gradually diminish in length towards the top of the trunk, presenting a very symmetrical form; but in dense woods the lower parts become bare of foliage, as with the firs under similar circumstances.

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  • It forms extensive woods in Russia, but does not extend to Scandinavia, where its absence is somewhat remarkable, as the tree grows freely in Norway and Sweden where planted, and even multiplies itself by self-sown seed, according to F.

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  • In Germany a fungus (Polyporus Laricis) grows on the roots and stems of decaying larches, which was formerly in esteem as a drastic purgative.

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  • It grows as rapidly and attains as large a size in British habitats suited to it as in its home on the Alps, and often produces equally good timber.

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  • The red larch grows usually on higher and drier ground, ranging from the Virginian mountains to the shores of Hudson Bay; the black larch is found often on moist land, and even in swamps.

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  • In the Coelentera, whatever subsequent changes of shape the little sac may undergo as it grows up to be polyp or jelly-fish, the original arch-enteron remains as the one cavity pervading all regions of the body.

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  • drias), which now grows freely in Cyrenaica, though it has medicinal properties, has not those ascribed to silphium.

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  • The soil in which the mulberry grows, and the age and condition of the trees, are important factors in the success of silkworm cultivation; and it has been too often proved that the mulberry will grow in situations where, from the nature of the leaf the trees put forth and from other circumstances, silkworms cannot be profitably reared.

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  • The mamane (Sophora chrysophylla), which furnishes the best posts, grows principally on the high slopes of Mauna Kea and Hualalai.

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  • The kukui grows along streams and gulches; from its nuts, which are very oily, the natives used to make candles, and it is still frequently called the candlenut tree.

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  • Personal religious conviction grows out of the tribal (corporate) religious bond.

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  • The castor-oil plant is common, and the wax tree grows plentifully in the neighbourhood of Lai-yang in the east, giving rise to a considerable trade in the wax produced by the wax insects.

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  • Various finishing processes, and particularly the mercerizing of yarn and cloth, have increased the possibilities in cotton materials, and while staples still form the bulk of our foreign trade, it seems that as the stress of competition in these grows acute, more and more of our energy may be transferred to the production of goods which appeal to a growing taste or fancy.

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  • Guinea grass grows abundantly on the hillsides, affording excellent pasturage; the forests, though few, include the mahogany and other useful trees.

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  • These defects will no doubt be overcome as concrete grows in popularity as a building material and its aesthetic treatment is better understood.

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  • This is derived chiefly from Lecanora esculents, which grows unattached on the ground in layers from 3 to 6 in.

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  • Southward, the Danube encircles a vast fen, tenanted only by waterfowl and herds of half-wild swine, while the plain which extends to the north-east and east only grows fertile at some distance inland.

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  • For example, in the genus Primula, a highly characteristic genus of the alpine flora, whose members are among the most striking ornaments of the rocks, the single northern species, P. farinosa, grows only in marshy meadows.

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  • The soil in which the stock grows is a point demanding attention.

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  • tuberoses is a handsome fleshy-rooted plant, very impatient of being disturbed, and preferring good peat soil; it grows I to 12 ft.

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  • C. alpinus, 6 in., grows in dense tufts, and bears sulphur-yellow flowers in May.

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  • It is really a biennial, but grows itself so freely as to become perennial in the garden.

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  • Ferulago, with more finely cut leaves, grows 5 to 6 ft.

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  • Grows anywhere.

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  • It grows 2 ft.

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  • Grows in any garden soil.

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  • P. decandra, the North American Poke Weed or Red Ink plant, grows 5 to io ft.

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  • Pavonia, the peacock tiger flower, from Mexico, grows to 2 ft.

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  • It has large white flowers and grows freely in peaty soil in shady borders.

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  • in height according to the climate in which it grows, being arborescent in tropical latitudes.

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  • Sea-aster flourishes in the Wadden of Friesland and Groningen, the Dollart and the Zeeland estuaries, giving place nearer the shore to sandspurry (Spergularia), or sea-poa or floating meadow grass (Glyceria maritima), which grows up to the dikes, and affords pasture for cattle and sheep. Along the coast of Overysel and in the Biesbosch lake club-rush, or scirpus, is planted in considerable quantities for the hat-making industry, and common sea-wrack (Zostera marina) is found in large patches in the northern half of the Zuider Zee, where it is gathered for trade purposes during the months of June, July and August.

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  • More generally the hypha below the septum grows forwards again, and repeats this process several times before the terminal conidium falls, and so a chain of conidia results, the oldest of which terminates the series (Erysiphe); when the primary branch has thus formed a basipetal series, branches may arise from below and again repeat this process, thus forming a tuft (Penicillium).

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  • Klebs has shown that the development of zoosporangia or of oogonia and pollinodia respectively in Saprolegnia is dependent on the external conditions; so long as a continued stream of suitable food-material is ensured the mycelium grows on without forming reproductive organs, but directly the supplies of nitrogenous and carbonaceous food fall below a certain degree of concentration sporangia are developed.

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  • The fruit-body before it ruptures may reach the size of a hen's egg and is white in colour; from this there grows out a hollow cylindrical structure which can be distinguished at the distance of several yards by its disgusting odour.

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  • to carbonic acid as it meets the outer air on escaping from the mouth of the converter, and generates a true flame which grows.

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  • shortens and suddenly grows quiet when the last of the carbon has burnt away, and no flame-forming substance remains.

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  • With further transfer of the carbon from the graphitic to the combined state, the matrix itself grows weaker (EF); but this weakening is offset in a measure by the continuing decrease of discontinuity due to the decreasing proportion of graphite.

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  • The history of furs can be read in Marco Polo, as he grows eloquent with the description of the rich skins of the khan of Tatary; in the early fathers of the church, who lament their introduction into Rome and Byzantium as an evidence of barbaric and debasing luxury; in the political history of Russia, stretching out a powerful arm over Siberia to secure her rich treasures; in the story of the French occupation of Canada, and the ascent of the St Lawrence to Lake Superior, and the subsequent contest to retain possession against England; in the history of early settlements of New England, New York and Virginia; in Irving's Astoria; in the records of the Hudson's Bay Company; and in the annals of the fairs held at Nizhniy Novgorod and Leipzig.

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  • The oak - a highly venerated tree in Poland, though not so much as in Lithuania - grows in forests only on the most fertile land, but it is of common occurrence in conjunction with the beech, elm, &c. The maples (Ater platanoides and A.

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  • The basbab or calabash tree, known in the eastern Sudan as the tebeldi and locally Homr, is fairly common and being naturally hollow the trees collect water, which the natives regularly tap. Another common source of water supply is a small kind of water melon which grows wild and is also cultivated.

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  • Moreover, that grain unsown grows there abundantly [fruges ibi non seminatas abundare] ' is not a fabulous fancy, but is based on trustworthy accounts of the Danes."

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  • It is annual, requires rich but friable soil, grows to about 3 or 4 ft.

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  • It is annual, grows 4 to 5 ft.

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  • P. maximum is the Guinea grass, native of tropical Africa; it is perennial, grows 8 ft.

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  • Oleanders flourish round the lake, and the large papyrus grows at `Ain et-Tin as well as at the mouth of the Jordan.

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  • It grows luxuriantly in the south of Ireland, where it was introduced in 1798, and also flourishes on the west coast of Scotland, and is generally cultivated as an ornamental garden plant in Europe.

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  • 1) says "everything that is eaten and is watched over and grows out of the ground is liable to tithe."

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  • "We do not award praise to beings which submit merely in virtue of their nature; but we do award high praise to beings which submit because their attitude is one of love; and so submitting because their inspiring motive is one and the same, they are confirmed and strengthened by one and the same indwelling power, of which the force ever grows, so that it never ceases to stir.

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  • high all over, but in Travancore and Ceylon it grows continuously and is only pruned when found expedient at intervals of 15 months to 2 years.

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