Grotius sentence example

grotius
  • Two authors exercised a weighty influence on his mind - Francis Bacon and Grotius.
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  • He was no follower of their ideas, indeed often opposed to them; but he derived from Bacon an increasing stimulus towards the investigation of certain great problems of history and philosophy, while Grotius proved valuable in his study of philosophic jurisprudence.
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  • On these grounds it has been sought to establish a close relation between Vico and Grotius.
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  • Vico may have derived from Grotius the idea of natural law; but his discovery of the historic evolution of law was first suggested to him by his study of Roman law.
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  • Abroad its navigators monopolized the commerce of the world, and explored unknown seas; at home the Dutch school of painting reached its acme in Rembrandt (1607-1669); and the philological reputation of the country was sustained by Grotius, Vossius and the elder Heinsius.
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  • It is remarkable for its fine tower and chime of bells, and contains the splendid allegorical monument of William the Silent, executed by Hendrik de Keyser and his son Pieter about 1621, and the tomb of Hugo Grotius, born in Delft in 1583, whose statue, erected in 1886, stands in the market-place outside the church.
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  • Locke had spent some years in Holland, the country of Grotius, who, with help from other great lawyers, and under a misapprehension as to the meaning of the Roman jus gentium, shaped modern concepts of international law by an appeal to law of nature.
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  • Heresy has been treated as a crime to be tried in and punished by the ordinary courts of the country, as in the cases of Servetus and Grotius.
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  • With the systematic study of the Latin, and to a slight extent also of the Greek classics, he conjoined that of logic in the prolix system of Crousaz; and he further invigorated his reasoning powers, as well as enlarged his knowledge of metaphysics and jurisprudence, by the perusal of Locke, Grotius and Montesquieu.
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  • In his extensive work Tractatus de legibus ac deo legislatore (reprinted, London, 1679) he is to some extent the precursor of Grotius and Samuel Pufendorf.
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  • Though his method is throughout scholastic, he covers the same ground, and Grotius speaks of him in terms of high respect.
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  • What is known as " Erastianism " would be better connected with the name of Grotius.
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  • In his Biblia Illustrata (4 vols.), written from the point of view of a very strict belief in inspiration, his object is to refute the statements made by Hugo Grotius in his Commentaries.
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  • Here the son received his education, until in 1595 he entered the university of Leiden, where he became the lifelong friend of Hugo Grotius, and studied classics, Hebrew, church history and theology.
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  • Through his father's lectures Christian came under the influence of the political philosophy of Hugo Grotius and Samuel Pufendorf, and continued the study of law at Frankfort-on-Oder.
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  • These claims gave rise to vigorous opposition by other powers and led to the publication of Grotius's work (1609) called Mare liberum.
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  • Names like Shakespeare, Grotius, Bacon, Hobbes appear in half a dozen different places.
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  • He belonged to the party of Oldenbarneveldt and Grotius, and brought down the displeasure of the government by a copy of Latin verses in honour of their friend Hoogerbeets.
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  • His learning made him the equal and the friend of Grotius, and of the foremost contemporary scholars.
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  • Gradually the dispute pervaded all classes of society, and the religious questions became entangled with political issues; the partisans of the house of Orange espoused the cause of the stricter Calvinism, whereas the bourgeois oligarchy of republican tendencies, led by Oldenbarnevelt and Hugo Grotius, stood for Arminianism.
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  • In 1617 Prince Maurice of Orange committed himself definitely to the Calvinistic party, found an occasion for throwing Oldenbarnevelt and Grotius into prison, and in November of that year called a synod intended to crush the Arminians.
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  • His editorial labours included the publication of various works of his predecessors, and of Epistolae ecclesiasticae praestantium ac eruditorum virorum (Amsterdam, 1684), chiefly by Jakobus Arminius, Joannes Uytenbogardus, Konrad Vorstius (1569-1622), Gerhard Vossius (1577-1649), Hugo Grotius, Simon Episcopius (his grand-uncle) and Gaspar Barlaeus; they are of great value for the history of Arminianism.
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  • The principles of international law he reduces to those of the law of nature, and combats, in so doing, many of the positions taken up by Grotius.
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  • Barbeyrac also translated Grotius's De Jure Belli et Pacis, Cumberland's De Legibus Naturae, and Pufendorf's smaller treatise De Officio Hominis et Civis.
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  • Even in the 16th and 17th centuries scholars like Grotius and Michaelis met with violent opposition for the same cause.
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  • The presence within half a century of the date of its foundation of such scholars as Justus Lipsius, Joseph Scaliger, Francis Gomarus, Hugo Grotius, Jacobus Arminius, Daniel Heinsius and Guardas Johannes Vossius, at once raised Leiden university to the highest European fame, a position which the learning and reputation of Jacobus Gronovius, Hermann Boerhaave, Tiberius Hem sterhuis and David Ruhnken, among others, enabled it to maintain down to the end of the 18th century.
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  • Even Grotius, who reduced the tendencies existing in his time to a sort of orderly expression, addressed himself to the law of war as the positive part of international jurisprudence and dealt only with peace as its negative alternative.
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  • After a year spent in acquiring the language and making acquaintance with the leading men of France, Grotius returned home.
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  • Of the Germanicus Scaliger says - "A better text than that which Grotius has given, it is impossible to give"; but it is probable that Scaliger had himself been the reviser.
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  • Grotius vied with the Latinists of his day in the composition of Latin verses.
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  • The choice of the states fell upon Grotius, though he was but twenty years of age, and had not offered himself for the post.
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  • There was some talk at this time in Paris of calling Grotius to be librarian of the royal library.
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  • Grotius had already passed from occupation with the classics to studies more immediately connected with his profession.
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  • It has always been a question what it was that determined Grotius, when an exile in Paris in 1625, to that particular subject, and various explanations have been offered; among others a casual suggestion of Peiresc in a letter of early date.
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  • The discovery of the MS. of the De jure praedae discloses the whole history of Grotius's ideas, and shows that from youth upwards he had steadily read and meditated in one direction, that, namely, of which the famous De jure belli was the mature product.
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  • The De jure praedae further demonstrates that Grotius was originally determined to this subject, not by any speculative intellectual interest, but by a special occasion presented by his professional engagements.
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  • Grotius undertook to prove that Heemskirk's prize had been lawfully captured.
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  • A short treatise which was printed in 1609, Grotius says without his permission, under the title of Mare liberum, is nothing more than a chapter - the 12th - of the De jure praedae.
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  • It was necessary to Grotius's defence of Heemskirk that he should show that the Portuguese pretence that Eastern waters were their private property was untenable.
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  • Grotius maintains that the ocean is free to all nations.
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  • It was not till many years afterwards that the jealousies between England and Holland gave importance to the novel doctrine broached in the tract by Grotius, a doctrine which Selden set himself to refute in his Mare clausum (1632).
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  • Grotius, when he was only thirty, was made pensionary of the city of Rotterdam.
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  • Though the mediating views in the great religious conflict between Catholic and Protestant, by which Grotius was afterwards known, had been arrived at by him by independent reflection, yet it could not but be that he would be confirmed in them by finding in England a developed school of thought of the same character already in existence.
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  • How highly Casaubon esteemed Grotius appears from a letter of his to Daniel Heinsius, dated London, 13th of April 1613.
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  • After Grotius's return from England the exasperation of theological parties in Holland rose to such a pitch that it became clear that an appeal to force would be made.
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  • A form of edict drawn by Grotius was published by the states, recommending mutual toleration, and forbidding ministers in the pulpit from handling the disputed dogmas.
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  • The states of Holland sent a commission, of which Grotius was chairman, to Utrecht, with the view of strengthening the hands of their friends, the Remonstrant party, in that city.
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  • There were conferences in which Grotius met Prince Maurice, and taught him that Olden Barneveldt was not the only man of capacity in the ranks of the Remonstrants whom he had to fear.
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  • On the early morning of the 31st of July the prince's coup d'etat against the liberties of Utrecht and of Holland was carried out; the civic guard was disarmed - Grotius and his colleagues saving themselves by a precipitate flight.
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  • The grand pensionary, Olden Barneveldt, the leader of the Remonstrant party, Grotius and Hoogerbeets were arrested, brought to trial, and condemned - Olden Barneveldt to death, and Grotius to imprisonment for life and confiscation of his property.
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  • Grotius had now before him, at thirty-six, no prospect but that of a lifelong captivity.
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  • The ingenuity of Madame Grotius at length devised a mode of escape.
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  • Madame Grotius, perceiving this, prevailed on her husband to allow himself to be shut up in it at the usual time.
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  • The chest was carried to the house of a friend, where Grotius was released.
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  • Grotius was now reduced to great straits.
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  • In 1623 the president Henri de Méme lent him his château of Balagni near Senlis (dep. Oise), and there Grotius passed the spring and summer of that year.
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  • The achievement would have been impossible, but for the fact that Grotius had with him the first draft of the work made in 1604.
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  • Grotius hoped that his fame would soften the hostility of his foes, and that his country would recall him to her service.
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  • Theological rancour, however, prevailed over all other sentiments, and, after fruitless attempts to re-establish himself in Holland, Grotius accepted service under Sweden, in the capacity of ambassador to France.
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  • But Grotius sank rapidly, and died on the 29th of August 1645.
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  • Grotius combined a wide circle of general knowledge with a profound study of one branch of law.
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  • Grotius's philological skill, however, was not sufficient to enable him to work up to this ideal.
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  • As in many other points Grotius inevitably recalls Erasmus, so he does in his attitude towards the great schism.
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  • Grotius was, however, animated by an ardent desire for peace and concord.
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  • An Amsterdam minister, James Laurent, published his Grotius papizans (1642), and it was continually being announced from Paris that Grotius had "gone over."
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  • The true interpretation of Grotius's mind appears to be an indifference to dogmatic propositions, produced by a profound sentiment of piety.
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  • Grotius read the classics as a humanist, for the sake of their contents, not as a professional scholar.
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  • Grotius was a great jurist, and his De jure belli et pacis (Paris, 1625), though not the first attempt in modern times to ascertain the principles of jurisprudence, went far more fundamentally into the discussion than any one had done before him.
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  • But it is in the larger questions to which he opened the way that the merit of Grotius consists.
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  • The distinction between religion on the one hand and law and morality on the other is not indeed clearly conceived by Grotius, but he wrestles with it in such a way as to make it easy for those who followed him to seize it.
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  • These positions, though Grotius's religious temper did not allow him to rely unreservedly upon them, yet, even in the partial application they find in his book, entitle him to the honour of being held the founder of the modern science of the law of nature and nations.
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  • A fuller analysis, and some notice of the predecessors of Grotius, will be found in Hely, Etude sur le droit de la guerre de Grotius (Paris, 1875).
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  • The chief writings of Grotius have been named.
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  • The work of the Abbe Hely contains a life of Grotius.
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  • Grotius's theological works were collected in 3 vols.
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  • In the year 1618 was published The True Honour of Navigation and Navigators, by John Wood, D.D., dedicated to Sir Thomas Smith, governor to the East India Company, and about the same time appeared the well-known treatise of Hugo Grotius, De veritate religionis christianae, written for the express use of settlers in distant lands.
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  • Grotius also persuaded seven law students of Lubeck to go to the East as missionaries; the best known of them was Peter Heiling, who worked for 20 years in Abyssinia.
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  • The sentences of Grotius and Hoogerbeets were commuted to perpetual imprisonment.
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  • St Mary's church contains a monument marking the original tomb of Hugo Grotius, who died in Rostock in 1645, though his remains were afterwards removed to Delft.
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  • But humanism, first of all in its protagonist Erasmus, afterwards in the long 'a ' list of critical scholars and editors, Lipsius, Heinsius sc and Grotius, in the printers Elzevir and-Plantin, developed ship. itself from the centre of the Leiden university with massive energy, and proved that it was still a motive force of intellectual progress.
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  • He took rooms first on the Veerkay with the widow Van de Velde, who in her youth had assisted Grotius to escape from his captivity at Loewenstein.
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  • He encouraged Grotius when only a youth of sixteen to edit Capella; the early death of the younger Douza he wept as that of a beloved son; Daniel Heinsius, from being his favourite pupil, became his most intimate friend.
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  • Thus Herbert sought to do for the religion of nature what his friend Grotius was doing for natural law, - making a new application of the standard of Vincent of Lerins, Quod semper, quod ubique, quod ab omnibus.
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  • He occupied himself during this time in meditating upon what he had read in the works of Grotius and Hobbes.
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  • In the De jure naturae et gentium Pufendorf took up in great measure the theories of Grotius and sought to complete them by means of the doctrines of Hobbes and of his own ideas.
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  • Descartes and Spinoza had speculated there; it had been the home of Erasmus and Grotius; it was now the refuge of Bayle.
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  • The democratic principle argued for in the Second Treatise, while in advance of the practice of his age, was in parts anticipated by Aquinas and Bodin, as well as by Grotius and Hooker.
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  • Albericus Gentilis (1557-1611) and Hugo Grotius (1583-1645) were the first to give a systematic account.
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  • This conception Grotius took, and gave it additional force and solidity by using the principles of this natural law for the determination of international rights and duties, it being obvious that independent nations, in their corporate capacities, were still in that " state of nature " in their mutual relations.
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  • It was not, of course, assumed that these laws were universally obeyed; indeed, one point with which Grotius is especially concerned is the natural right of private war, arising out of the violation of more primary rights.
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  • The ideas above expressed were not peculiar to Grotius; in particular the doctrine of the " fundamental pact " as the jural basis of government had long been maintained, especially in England, where the constitution historically established readily suggested such a compact.
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  • At the same time the rapid and remarkable success of Grotius's treatise (De jure belli et pacis) brought his view of Natural Right into prominence, and suggested such questions as - " What is man's ultimate reason for obeying these laws?
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  • As regards his conception of the Law of Nature, he takes it in the main immediately from Grotius and Pufendorf, more remotely from the Stoics and the Roman jurists.
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  • In the 17th century, indeed, the treatise of Pufendorf on the Law of Nature, in which the general view of Grotius was re- stated with modifications, partly designed to effect a compromise with the doctrine of Hobbes, seems to have been a good deal read at Oxford and elsewhere.
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  • His theory of the state, despite Grotius and Jurieu, rejected as odious and even impious the notion of any popular rights, anterior and superior to his own.
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  • Among his correspondents were Vossius, Grotius and Huet.
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  • Like Erasmus, Grotius sought to end the religious schism and urged the papacy to reconcile with the Protestant faiths.
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  • But Vico was opposed to Grotius, especially as regards his conception of the origin of society, and therefore of law.
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  • Grotius holds that its origin was not divine, but human, and neither collective, spontaneous nor unconscious, but personal, rational and conscious.
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  • If Socinianism had challenged natural theology - Christ, according to it, was the prophet who first revealed the way to eternal life - it had glorified the natural powers of man; and the learning of the Arminian divines (friends of Grotius and Locke) had helped to modernize Christian apologetics upon rational lines.
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  • It has been attributed to Beza, Hotman, Casaubon and Duplessis-Mornay, by divers writers on various grounds - to the last-named on the very respectable authority of Grotius.
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  • In the annals of precocious genius there is no greater prodigy on record than Hugo Grotius, who was able to make good Latin verses at nine, was ripe for the university at twelve, and at fifteen edited the encyclopaedic work of Martianus Capella.
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  • But it was a ruse of the Jesuit party, who wished to persuade the public that the opposition to the appointment of Isaac Casaubon did not proceed from theological motives, since they were ready to appoint a Protestant in the person of Grotius.
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  • Grotius sought to find some mean term in which the two hostile parties of Remonstrants and Anti-remonstrants, or as they were subsequently called Arminians and Gomarists (see Remonstrants), might agree.
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  • Some little relief he got through the intervention of Etienne d'Aligre, the chancellor, who procured a royal mandate which enabled Grotius to draw, not all, but a large part of his pension.
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  • The opposition collapsed; the recalcitrant provincial states were purged; and the leaders of the party of state rights - the advocate himself, Hugo de Groot (see GROTIUs), pensionary of Rotterdam, and Hoogerbeets, pensionary of Leiden, were arrested and thrown into prison.
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