Greenland sentence example

greenland
  • Along the west coast of Greenland the mountains are generally not quite so high, but even here peaks of 5000 and 6000 ft.
    23
    11
  • In 1693 New Castle (pop. 1900, 581), then including the greater part of the present township of Rye, was set apart from Portsmouth, and in 1703 Greenland (pop. 1900, 607) was likewise set apart.
    19
    9
  • Greenland is a Danish colony, inasmuch as the west coast and also the southern east coast belong to the Danish crown.
    8
    5
  • The east coast of Greenland F is in thii respect highly interesting.
    4
    1
  • The Petermann Spitze, near the shore of Franz Josef Fjord, measured by Payer and found to be 11,000 ft., has hitherto been considered to be the highest mountain in Greenland, but according to Nathorst it " is probably only two-thirds as high as Payer supposed," perhaps between 8000 and 9000 ft.
    14
    11
    Advertisement
  • Greenland, but as they are unfossiliferous sandstone, rapidly disintegrating, this cannot be known.
    4
    1
  • The interior of Greenland contains both summer and winter a pole of cold, situated in the opposite longitude to that of Siberia, with which it is well able to compete in extreme severity.
    4
    1
  • A submarine ridge, about 300 fathoms deep at its deepest, unites Greenland with Iceland (across Denmark Strait), the Faeroes and Scotland.
    4
    2
  • The result is that the east coast of Greenland has the largest system of typical fjords known on the earth's surface.
    5
    3
  • These icebergs float away, and are gradually melted in the sea, the temperature of which is thus lowered by cold stored up in the interior of Greenland.
    2
    0
    Advertisement
  • Numerous raised beaches and terraces, containing shells of marine mollusca, &c., occur along the whole coast of Greenland, and indicate that the whole of this large island has been raised, or the sea has sunk, in post-glacial times, after the inland ice covered its now icebare outskirts.
    3
    1
  • It is, however, likely that this formation occurs in Greenland, for in Dana Bay, Captain Feilden found a species of Spirifera and Productus mesolobus or costatus, though it is possible that these fossils represent the " Ursa stage " (Heer) of the Lower Carboniferous.
    3
    1
  • No Secondary rocks have been discovered in the extreme northern parts of West Greenland, but they are present on the east and west coasts in more southerly latitudes than Smith Sound.
    3
    1
  • This formation, one of the most widely spread in polar lands, though the most local in Greenland, is also the best known feature in its geology.
    4
    2
  • The Danish expeditions of 1899-1900 have added considerably to our knowledge of the Jurassic rocks of East Greenland.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • It thus appears that since early Tertiary times there has been a great change in the climate of Greenland.
    1
    0
  • Nathorst has suggested that the whole of Greenland is a "horst," in the subordinate folds of which, as well as in the deeper " graben," the younger rocks are preserved, often with a covering of Tertiary or later lava flows.'
    2
    1
  • It was long a common belief that the fauna and flora of Greenland were essentially European, a circumstance which would make it probable that Greenland has been separated by sea from America during a longer period of time than from Europe.
    2
    1
  • Of the sixty-one species of birds breeding in Greenland, eight are European-Asiatic, four are American, and the rest circumpolar or North Atlantic and North Pacific in their distribution.
    3
    2
  • The fact is, however, that most people who ever lived some time in Greenland always long to go back.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • For ecclesiastical purposes Danish Greenland is reckoned in the province of the bishop of Zeeland.
    1
    0
  • The Danish mission in Greenland has a yearly grant of £ 2000 from the trading revenue of the colony, besides a contribution of £880 from the state.
    1
    0
  • The Moravian mission, which had worked in Greenland for a century and a half, retired from the country in 1900.
    1
    0
  • The trade of Greenland has on the whole much decreased in modern times, and trading and missions cost the Danish state a comparatively large sum (about £i i,000 every year), although this is partly covered by the income from the royalty of the cryolite mines at Ivigtut.
    1
    0
  • It might be expected that there should be a decrease in the Greenland seal fisheries, caused by the European and American sealers catching larger quantities every year, especially along the coasts of Newfoundland and Labrador, and so actually diminishing the number of the animals in the Greenland seas.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The statistics of South Greenland, however, do not seem to demonstrate any such decrease.
    1
    0
  • The average number of seals killed annually is about 33,000.1 The 1 Owing to representations of the Swedish government in 1874 as to the killing of seals at breeding time on the east coast of Greenland, and the consequent loss of young seals left to die of starvation, the Seal Fisheries Act 1875 was passed in England to provide for the establishment of a close time for seal fishery in the seas in question.
    1
    0
  • The Eskimo population of Danish Greenland (west coast) seems to have decreased since the middle of the 18th century.
    1
    0
  • In the beginning of the 10th century the Norwegian Gunnbjdrn, son of Ulf Kraka, is reported to have found some islands to the west of Iceland, and he may have seen, without landing upon it, the southern part of the east coast of Greenland.
    1
    0
  • On his return to Iceland in 985 he called the land Greenland in order to make people more willing to go there, and reported so favourably on its possibilities that he had no difficulty in obtaining followers.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 986 he started again from Iceland with 25 ships, but only 14 of them reached Greenland, where a colony was founded on the south-west coast, in the present Julianehaab district.
    1
    0
  • When the Norsemen came to Greenland they found various remains indicating, as the old sagas say, that there had been people of a similar kind as those they met with in Vinland, in America, whom they called Skraeling (the meaning of the word is uncertain, it means possibly weak people); but the sagas do not report that they actually met the natives then.
    1
    0
  • In the beginning of the 12th century Greenland got its own bishop, who resided at Garolar, near the present Eskimo station Igoliko, on an isthmus between two fjords, Igaliksfjord (the old Einarsfjord) and Tunugdliarfik (the old Eriksfjord), inside the present colony Julianehaab.
    1
    0
  • Greenland, like Iceland, had a republican organization up to the years 1247 to 1261, when the Greenlanders were induced to swear allegiance to the king of Norway.
    1
    0
  • The last bishop appointed to Greenland died in 1540, but long before that date those appointed had never reached their sees; the last bishop who resided in Greenland died there in 1377.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The last ship that is known to have visited the Norse colony in Greenland returned to Norway in 1410.
    1
    0
  • For more than two hundred years Greenland seems to have been neglected, almost forgotten.
    1
    0
  • As to the discovery of Greenland by the Norsemen and its early history see Konrad Maurer's excellent paper, " Geschichte der Entdeckung Ostgronlands " in the report of Die zweite 1 Cf.
    1
    0
  • As to the general literature on Greenland, a number of the more important modern works have been noticed in footnotes.
    1
    0
  • Some thirty species of Balanoglossus are known, distributed among all the principal marine provinces from Greenland to New Zealand.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The total area is 176 acres, a large new dock, the Greenland, being opened in 1904.
    1
    0
  • This creature displays an almost unexampled frequency and extent of distribution in the whole North Sea, in the western parts of the Baltic, near the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland and the English coasts, so that it may be regarded as a characteristic North Sea echinoderm form.
    1
    0
  • Its former extensive trade with the West Indies has lately suffered owing to the enormous development of the North Sea ports, but it is still largely engaged in the Greenland whale and the oyster fisheries.
    1
    0
  • Instead of the expensive mile-long stout hemp lines used and since 1887 those of the prince of Monaco in his yachts, as by Ross, Maury introduced a ball of strong twine attached to a well as numerous Danish vessels in the sea between Iceland and cannon shot, which ran it out rapidly; when the bottom was Greenland, conspicuous amongst which were the expeditions reached the twine was cut and the depth deduced from the length in1896-1898on board the " Ingolf."
    0
    0
  • As the Arctic Basin is shut off from the North Atlantic by ridges rising to within 300 fathoms of the surface and from the Pacific by the shallow shelf of the Bering Sea, and as the ice-laden East Greenland and Labrador currents consist of fresh surface water which cannot appreciably influence the underlying mass, the Arctic region has no practical effect upon the bottom temperature of the three great oceans, which is entirely dominated by the influence of the Antarctic. The existence of deep-lying and extensive rises or ridges in high southern latitudes has been indicated by the deep-sea temperature observations of Antarctic expeditions.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Such old sea-ice when prevented from escaping forms the palaeocrystic sea of Nares; but, as a rule, it is carried southward in the .East Greenland and Labrador currents, and melted in the warmer seas of lower latitudes.
    0
    0
  • The Antarctic icebergs are of tabular form and much larger than those of Greenland, but in either case an iceberg rising to 200 ft.
    0
    0
  • A cyclonic circulation of the atmosphere is associated with a cyclonic circulation of the water of the ocean, as is well shown in the Norwegian Sea and North Atlantic between the Azores and Greenland.
    0
    0
  • North America is bathed in frigid waters around its broad northern shores; its mountains bear huge glaciers in the north-west; the outlying area of Greenland in the north-east is shrouded with ice; and in geologically recent times a vast ice-sheet has spread over its north-eastern third; while warm waters bring corals to its southern shores.
    0
    0
  • But the Greenland colony was obscure, the country was believed to form part of Europe, and the records of the farther explorations were contained in sagas which were only rediscovered by modern scholarship. Throughout the middle ages, legendary tales of mythical lands lying in the western ocean - the Isle of St Brandan, of Brazil and Antilia - had been handed down.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Commencing in the Arctic region, the Eskimo in his kayak, consisting of a framework of driftwood or bone covered with dressed sealskin, could paddle down east Greenland, up the west shore to Smith Sound, along Baffin Land and Labrador, and the shores of Hudson Bay throughout insular Canada and the Alaskan coast, around to Mount St Elias, and for many miles on the eastern shore of Asia.
    0
    0
  • While the majority of his researches bear on one or other of the subjects just mentioned, others deal with such widely different topics as the birds of Greenland, ocean temperatures, the Gulf Stream, barometric measurement of heights, arcs of meridian, glacier transport of rocks, the volcanoes of the Hawaiian Islands, and various points of meteorology.
    0
    0
  • In Westland the Miocene includes the Moutere gravels, which rest on the summit of Mount Greenland, 4900 ft.
    0
    0
  • As a straggler it has occurred within the Arctic Circle (as on the Varanger Fjord in Norway), as well as in Iceland and even Greenland; while it not unfrequently appears in Madeira and the Azores.
    0
    0
  • Their example was followed by the colony of Greenland.
    0
    0
  • Cryolite, a fluoride of aluminium and sodium, is extensively mined in Greenland and elsewhere for industrial purposes.
    0
    0
  • We may put out of the question the Scandinavian sea-rovers who sailed to Greenland about the 10th century.
    0
    0
  • In 1002 he came to Greenland, married Gudrid, widow of Red Eric's son Thorstein, and put himself at the head of a great expedition now undertaken from Ericsfiord for the further exploration and settlement of the western Vinland (south Nova Scotia?) lately discovered by Leif Ericsson.
    0
    0
  • Three vessels took part in the venture, with 160 men and some women, including Gudrid, and Freydis, a natural daughter of Red Eric. They first sailed north-west to the Vesterbygd or "Western Settlement" of Greenland, thence to Bear Island, and thence away to the south till they reached a country they named Helluland (some part of Labrador?) from its great flat slabs of stone (hellur).
    0
    0
  • Two Skraeling children were captured here and the expedition divided, Thorfinn making Greenland and Ericsfiord in safety with his own vessel, while the other was lost in the Irish Sea, only half the crew escaping to Ireland in the ship's boat.
    0
    0
  • He was a son of Eric the Red (Eirikr hinn raudi Thorvaldsson), the founder of the earliest Scandinavian settlements - from Iceland - in Greenland (985).
    0
    0
  • In 999 he went from Greenland to the court of King Olaf Tryggvason in Norway, stopping in the Hebrides on the way.
    0
    0
  • On his departure from Norway in 1000, the king commissioned him to proclaim Christianity in Greenland.
    0
    0
  • Leif took specimens of all these, and sailing away came home safely to his father's home in Brattahlid on Ericsfiord in Greenland.
    0
    0
  • On his voyage from this Vineland to Greenland, Leif rescued some shipwrecked men, and from this, and his discoveries, gained his name of "The Lucky" (hinn heppni).
    0
    0
  • Here occurs the earliest mention of Vinland, and here are also references of great interest to Russia and Kiev, to the heathen Prussians, the Wends and other Slav races of the South Baltic coast, and to Finland, Thule or Iceland, Greenland and the Polar seas which Harald Hardrada and the nobles of Frisia had attempted to explore in Adam's own day (before 1066).
    0
    0
  • It is a silicate, containing aluminium, magnesium and iron' brought originally from Greenland, and since found in a rock from the Vizagapatam district in India.
    0
    0
  • Their settlements in Greenland and Canada likewise came to an end, but Iceland, which was formerly uninhabited, remained a Scandinavian colony.
    0
    0
  • It was also for a long period the chief seat of the Greenland trade, but the Arctic seal and whale fishery is now extinct.
    0
    0
  • Among some flowering plants, however, the character has become one of specific rank, and among animals we have in the polar bear and the Greenland hare instances where partial albinism - for in them the eyes are black and other parts may be pigmented - has also become a specific character.
    0
    0
  • Cryolite (A1F 3.5NaF) is a double fluoride of aluminium and sodium, which is scarcely known except on the west coast of Greenland.
    0
    0
  • About the same time, and largely owing to the exertions of Olaf, Iceland, Greenland and the Orkney and Shetland islands were also evangelized.
    0
    0
  • Driven by persecution from Moravia, hunted into mountain-caves and forests, they had scarcely secured a place of refuge in Saxony before, " though a mere handful in numbers, yet with the spirit of men banded for daring and righteous deeds, they formed the heroic design, and vowed the execution of it before God, of bearing the gospel to the savage and perishing tribes of Greenland and the West Indies, of whose condition report had brought a mournful rumour to their ears.
    0
    0
  • Its total membership is under ioo,000, and it has some 350 missionaries, labouring in the most unpromising fields - Greenland, Labrador, Alaska, Central America, Tibet, and among the Hottentots.
    0
    0
  • It is doubtful whether the Eme-sal was ever really a woman's language similar in character to that of the Carib women of the Antilles, or that of the Eskimo women of Greenland.
    0
    0
  • These are the Hudson's Bay Co., Russian Fur Co., Alaska Commercial Co., North American Commercial Co., Russian Sealskin Co., Harmony Fur Co., Royal Greenland Fur Co., American Fur Co., Missouri Co.
    0
    0
  • Found in Alaska, Hudson Bay territory, Archangel and Greenland.
    0
    0
  • Animals of this species are generally small in size and inhabit the extreme northern sections of Hudson Bay, Newfoundland, Greenland, Labrador and Siberia.
    0
    0
  • The musk-ox inhabits the north part of Greenland and part of Canada, but in very limited numbers.
    0
    0
  • The young of the Greenland seals are called whitecoats on account of the early growth being of a yellowish white colour; the hair is to I in.
    0
    0
  • The main stream of Norsemen took a westerly course, striking Great Britain, Ireland and the Western Isles, and ultimately reached Iceland (in 874), Greenland (in 985) and Vinland (in r ood).
    0
    0
  • A century later Greenland was peopled from Iceland, and a colony existed for over four hundred years, when it was snuffed out, doubtless by hostile Eskimos.
    0
    0
  • It was from the young Greenland colony that an attempt was made to establish a new outpost in Vinland, but plans for permanent settlement were given up on account of the hostility of the natives, with whom the settlers felt powerless to grapple.
    0
    0
  • He did not go ashore (which seems strange), but sailed northward to Greenland.
    0
    0
  • Fifteen years later, according to this account, Leif Ericsson set out from Greenland in search of the lands that Biarni had seen, found them and named them - Helluland (Flat-stone-land), Markland (Forestland) and Vinland.
    0
    0
  • After his return to Greenland, several successive expeditions visited the new lands, none of which (strangely enough) experienced any difficulty in finding Leif's hut in the distant Vinland.
    0
    0
  • According to the Vinland saga in Hank's Book, Leif Ericsson, whose father, Eric the Red, had discovered and colonized Greenland, set out on a voyage, in 999, to visit Norway, the native land of his father.
    0
    0
  • Leif was converted and consented to become the king's emissary to Greenland, and the next year (1000) started on his return voyage.
    0
    0
  • Upon his arrival in Greenland, Leif presented the message of King Olaf, and seems to have attempted no further expeditions.
    0
    0
  • Later, in 1003, an Icelander, Thorfinn Karlsefni, who was visiting the Greenland colony, and who had married Gudrid, the widow of Leif's brother Thorstein, set out with four vessels and 160 followers to found a colony in the new lands.
    0
    0
  • Fearing continued trouble with them, Karlsefni resolved to return to Greenland.
    0
    0
  • At any rate, the incontrovertible facts of the Vinland voyages are that Leif and Thorfinn were historical characters, that they visited, in the early part of the 11th century, some part of the American continent south-west of Greenland, that they found natives whose hostility prevented the founding of a permanent settlement, and that the sagas telling of these things are, on the whole, trustworthy descriptions of actual experience.
    0
    0
  • A rare blue chalcedony is sometimes polished under the name of "sapphirine" - a term applied also to a distinct mineral (an aluminium-magnesium silicate) from Greenland.
    0
    0
  • At several stations in Greenland auroral curtains have been observed when passing right overhead to narrow to a thin luminous streak, exactly as a vertical sheet of light would seem to do to one passing underneath it.
    0
    0
  • Paulsen also gives data from two other stations in Greenland, viz.
    0
    0
  • Greenland lies to the north of Fritz's curve of maximum auroral frequency, and the suggestion has been made that the zone of maximum frequency expands to the south as sun-spots increase, and contracts again as they diminish, the number of auroras at a given station increasing or diminishing as the zone of maximum frequency approaches to or recedes from it.
    0
    0
  • In 1885 Messrs Garde and Eherlin made similar observations at Nanortalik near Cape Farewell in Greenland, but using a base of only 1250 metres (about 4 m.).
    0
    0
  • None of the results so obtained can be accepted without reserve, but there are several reasons for believing that the average height in Greenland is much below that in lower latitudes.
    0
    0
  • The Faeroe islands, which form an integral part of the kingdom of Denmark in the wider sense, are represented in the Danish parliament, but not the other dependencies of the Danish crown, namely Iceland, Greenland and the West Indian islands of St Thomas, St John and St Croix.
    0
    0
  • The administration of Greenland entails an annual loss which is posted on the budget of the ministry of finances.
    0
    0
  • Another extremely valuable publication of wide general interest, the Meddelelser om Gronland, is published by the commission for the exploration of Greenland.
    0
    0
  • Baffin or Baffin's Bay is part of the long strait which separates Baffin Land from Greenland.
    0
    0
  • The most important island on the east side is Disco, to the north of Disco Bay, Greenland.
    0
    0
  • Baffin Land is separated from Greenland by Baffin Bay and Davis Strait, from Ungava by Hudson Strait, from Keewatin and Melville Peninsula by Fox Channel and Fury-and-Hecla Strait, from Boothia Peninsula and North Somerset by the Gulf of Boothia and Prince Regent Inlet, and from North Devon by Lancaster Sound.
    0
    0
  • He sought to increase the influence of his archbishopric, sent missionaries to Finland, Greenland and the Orkney Islands, and aimed at making Bremen a patriarchal see for northern Europe, with twelve suffragan bishoprics.
    0
    0
  • The same author postulates an Arctic continent, bordering upon northern Europe, Greenland and North America; an African-Brazilian continent across the present south Atlantic, and a marine communication between Australia and India, where the faunas have much in common.
    0
    0
  • The exploration of Greenland has been continued, with few exceptions, by Danes who, besides throwing much light on problems in physical geography and Eskimo ethnography, have practically completed the map of the coasts.
    0
    0
  • Erichsen's lost diaries a small expedition in the sloop " Alabama " went to East Greenland in 1909.
    0
    0
  • In 1913 another traverse was made through the heart of Greenland by Capt.
    0
    0
  • The first in 1915 met with an accident, and had to winter in North Star Bay; the second in 1916 failed to get through Melville Bay, but the third in 1917 brought back safely those members of the expedition who had not previously returned via the Danish settlements in Greenland.
    0
    0
  • Similar methods have been employed with equal success by Rasmussen and other Danes in Greenland.
    0
    0
  • The " Maud " may be expected to emerge between Greenland and Spitsbergen not later than 1923.
    0
    0
  • The treaty transferring the Danish West Indies to the United States (1917) contained a clause recognizing Denmark's right to extend her economic and pojitical sphere over the whole of Greenland.
    0
    0
  • The history of Roman Catholicism in the New World begins with the Norse discoveries of Greenland and Vinland the Good.
    0
    0
  • On the coasts of the ancient ice-sea, in which the glacial clay was deposited, there were heaped-up masses of shells which belong to species still extant around Spitzbergen and Greenland.
    0
    0
  • In the North Atlantic Gaspar and Miguel Corte-Real penetrated as far as Greenland (their " Labrador ") in 1500-1501; but these voyages were politically and commercially unimportant.
    0
    0
  • A few, on the other hand, have a very restricted range, the Greenland right whale (Balaena mysticetus) being, for instance, limited to the zone of the northern circumpolar ice, while no corresponding species occurs in the southern hemisphere.
    0
    0
  • Though fruit-trees will not bear there is an abundance of edible berries; the rivers and lakes abound with trout, perch, pike and other fish, and in the lower waters with salmon; and the cod, herring, halibut and Greenland shark in the northern seas attract numerous Norwegian and Russian fishermen.
    0
    0
  • The earlier flows were probably contemporaneous with those of Greenland, the Faeroes, the western islands of Scotland and the north-east of Ireland.
    0
    0
  • The polar bear is an occasional visitant, being brought to the coast by the Greenland drift-ice.
    0
    0
  • To Greenland, Iceland's farthest colony, founded in the 10th century, we owe the two Lays of Atli, and probably HymiskviOa, which, though of a weirder, harsher cast, yet belong to the Western Isles school and not to Iceland.
    0
    0
  • Of later poets, down to more recent times, perhaps the best was Sigurd of Broadfirth, many of whose prettiest poems were composed in Greenland like those of Jon Biarnisson before him, c. 1750; John Thorlaksson's translation of Milton's great epic into Eddic verse is praiseworthy in intention, but, as may be imagined, falls far short of its aim.
    0
    0
  • It includes a mass of information on the law, religion, traditions, &c., of the heathen days in Iceland, and the lives of Eric, the real discoverer of Greenland, Biorn of Broadwick, a famous chief, and Snorri, the greatest statesman of his day.
    0
    0
  • Later is the Fostbreedrasaga (1015-1030), a very interesting story, told in a quaint romantic style, of Thorgeir, the reckless henchman of King Olaf, and how his death was revenged in Greenland by his sworn brother the true-hearted Thormod Coalbrow's poet, who afterward dies at Sticklestad.
    0
    0
  • The lost saga of Poet Helgi, of which only fragments remain, was also laid in Greenland.
    0
    0
  • This Jurassic and Rhaetic type occurs in England, Germany, Poland, Italy, East Greenland, North America, Japan, China and Persia (Map A, X.).
    0
    0
  • The Gleicheniaceae appear to have been represented by Triassic species in North America and Europe, and more abundantly in Jurassic, Weal den, or Lower Cretaceous rocks 3 4 in Belgium, Greenland, Poland s and elsewhere.
    0
    0
  • The Dip teridinae are represented also by species from Mesozoic rocks of Persia (Map B, D 2), Greenland (Map B, D 3), North America (D 4), South America (D 5) and China (D6).
    0
    0
  • One large specimen is figured by Heer from Lower Cretaceous rocks of Greenland, and by the side of the frond is shown a carpel with lateral ovules, as in the female flower of Cycas; but an examination of the type-specimen in the Copenhagen Museum led the present writer to regard this supposed carpel as valueless.
    0
    0
  • Williamsonia occurs in the Upper Gondwana rocks of India; it is recorded also from strata ranging from the Rhaetic to the Lower Cretaceous period in England, Portugal, Sweden, Bornholm, Greenland, Italy and North America.
    0
    0
  • Whatever doubt may be left as to the exact botanical position of these early Lower Cretaceous Angiosperms, it is clear that both Monocotyledons and Dicotyledons are represented by several types of leaves, and that the flora extended over wide areas in North America and Greenland, and is found again at a few points in Europe.
    0
    0
  • With regard to suggested American affinities, it must be borne in mind that the Neocomian Angiosperms are little known except in America and in Greenland, and that we therefore cannot yet say whether families now mainly American were not formerly of world-wide distribution.
    0
    0
  • Besides the Lower Cretaceous plants already mentioned, Heer has described from Greenland a flora of Cenomanian age, and another belonging to the Senonian.
    0
    0
  • Both of these floras suggest, however, that the climate of Greenland was somewhat colder than that of Westphalia, though scarcely colder than warm-temperate.
    0
    0
  • Other deposits of this age in France have furnished plants of a more varied aspect, including myrtles, araucarias, a bamboo and several fanleaved palms. Saporta points out the presence in these Paleocene deposits of certain types common, on the one hand, to the American Tertiary strata between the Missouri and the Rocky Mountains, and on the other, to the Tertiary flora of Greenland.
    0
    0
  • To this view of the Miocene age of the plant-bearing strata in Greenland and Spitsbergen there are serious objections, which we will again refer to when the flora has been described.
    0
    0
  • The Tertiary flora of Greenland is of great interest, from the extremely high latitude at which the plants flourished, thirty of the species having been collected so far north as lat.
    0
    0
  • From various parts of Greenland they now amount to at least 280.
    0
    0
  • But if this process is continuous from latitude to latitude, then we ought not to look for a flora of equivalent age in the warm-temperate Miocene deposits of central Europe, but should rather expect to find that the temperate plants of Greenland were contemporaneous with a tropical flora in central Europe.
    0
    0
  • Mr Gardner suggests, therefore, that the plant-beds of Greenland and Spitsbergen represent the period of greatest heat, and are therefore wrongly referred to the Miocene.
    0
    0
  • On 4th June American troop transports arrived in Greenland, to build airdromes.
    0
    0
  • It contributes between 10% to 40% to the total ammonium deposited on the central Greenland ice sheet during the Holocene.
    0
    0
  • The key to the front in front of 101st brigade was Greenland Hill.
    0
    0
  • The bog also provides habitats for upland birds, with the Greenland white-fronted goose being of particular note.
    0
    0
  • Well-defined mega-scale glacial lineations are present within the trough, produced by a palaeo-ice stream draining the Greenland Ice Sheet across the continental shelf.
    0
    0
  • Inter Moly produces molybdenum for use in steel production in Greenland.
    0
    0
  • Moraines Large end moraines Large end moraine associated with deposition at the margin of the Russell Glacier, a large outlet glacier in western Greenland.
    0
    0
  • Late spring Greenland storms Drown thousands of harp seal pups, Nothing on TV.
    0
    0
  • Other grounded migrants included two redstarts, four Whinchats, about 20 ' Greenland ' Wheatears and a Ring Ouzel.
    0
    0
  • Greenland got its name from the verdant pastures that attracted the Norse settlers under Eric the Red in 986.
    0
    0
  • There is credible evidence that the warm climate was worldwide and not merely anomalous warmth in the North Atlantic, ie, Greenland.
    0
    0
  • The mosquitos in Greenland are numerous, large and voracious, and their bites brought me out in large welts.
    0
    0
  • Norway defies the ban while some indigenous peoples in Greenland, Siberia and the US state of Alaska are allowed traditional subsistence whaling.
    0
    0
  • Rhabdopleura is no doubt of world-wide distribution, since it has been recorded in various localities from Greenland to South Australia, usually in water of not less than forty fathoms. Cephalodiscus, which for many years was known solely as the result of a single dredging by the " Challenger " from 2 4 5 fathoms in the Straits of Magellan, has recently been found in entirely different parts of the world, as for instance between Japan and Korea at ioo fathoms, at about half that depth off the south-east coast of Celebes, and between tide-marks on the coast of Borneo.
    0
    0
  • In Europe Heers Populus primaeva from the Lower Cretaceous in Greenland was long accepted as the oldest dicotyledonous plant.
    0
    0
  • The land mammals of Greenland are decidedly more American than European; the musk-ox, the banded lemming (Cuniculus torquatus), the white polar wolf, of which there seems to have been a new invasion recently round the northern part of the country to the east coast, the Eskimo and the dog - probably also the reindeer - have all come from America, while the other land mammals, the polar bear, the polar fox, the Arctic hare, the stoat (Mustela erminea), are perfectly circumpolar forms. The species of seals and whales are, if anything, more American than European, and so to some extent are the fishes.
    0
    0
  • The bladder-nose seal (Cystophora cristata), for instance, may be said to be a GreenlandAmerican species, while a Scandinavian species, such as the grey seal (Halichoerus grypus), appears to be very rare both in Greenland and America.
    0
    0
  • In the north, where the lichen-covered or ice-shaven rocks do not protrude, the ground is covered with a carpet of mosses, creeping dwarf willows, crow berries and similar plants, while the flowers most common are the andromeda, the yellow poppy, pedicularis, pyrola, &c. besides the flowering mosses; but in South Greenland there is something in the shape of bush, the dwarf birches even rising a few feet in very sheltered places, the willows may grow higher than a man, and the vegetation is less arctic and more abundant.
    0
    0
  • The trade of Greenland is a monopoly of the Danish crown, dating from 1774, and is administered in Copenhagen by a government board (Kongelige Gronlandske Handel) and in the country by various government officials.
    0
    0
  • On a voyage from Norway to Greenland Leif Ericsson (son of Eric the Red) discovered America in the year 1000, and a few years later Torfinn Karlsefne sailed with three ships and about 150 men, from Greenland to Nova Scotia to form a colony, but returned three years later (see Vinland).
    0
    0
  • Greenland belonged to the Norwegian crown till 1814, when, at the dissolution of the union between Denmark and Norway, neither it nor Iceland and the Faeroes were mentioned, and they, therefore, were kept by the Danish king and thus came to Denmark.
    0
    0
  • This may have been due in great part to the fact that the shipping and trade of Greenland became a monopoly of the king of Norway, who kept only one ship sailing at long intervals (of years) to Greenland; at the same time the shipping and trade of Norway came more and more in the hands of the Hanseatic League, which took no interest in Greenland.
    0
    0
  • In the 10th and 11th centuries Norse sea-rovers, starting from Iceland, had made small settlements in Greenland and had pushed as far as the coast of New England (or possibly Nova Scotia) in transient visits (see Vinland and Leif Ericsson).
    0
    0
  • What Ulfilas was to the Gothic tribes, what Columba and his disciples were to the early Celtic missions, what Augustine or Aidan was to the British Isles, what Boniface was to the churches of Germany and Anskar to those of Denmark and Sweden, that, on the discovery of a new world of missionary enterprise, was Xavier to India, Hans Egede to Greenland, Eliot to the Red Indians, Martyn to the church of Cawnpore, Marsden to the Maoris, Carey, Heber, Wilson, Duff and Edwin Lewis to India, Morrison, Gilmour, Legge, Hill, Griffith John to China, Gray, Livingstone, Mackenzie, Moffat, Hannington, Mackay to Africa, Broughton to Australia, Patteson to Melanesia, Crowther to the Niger Territory, Chalmers to New Guinea, Brown to Fiji.
    0
    0
  • The Danish work in Greenland is recorded mainly in Meddelelser om Gronland; in vol.
    0
    0
  • Other grounded migrants included two Redstarts, four Whinchats, about 20 ' Greenland ' Wheatears and a Ring Ouzel.
    0
    0
  • Only a thousand years ago Greenland was a verdant pasture, grazed by the flocks of the settling Vikings.
    0
    0
  • Scientists are predicting that sea levels on the East Coast will be affected by two huge sheets of ice that are melting in Antarctica and Greenland.
    0
    0
  • North of the fiftieth parallel the depths diminish towards the north-east, two long submarine ridges of volcanic origin extend north-eastwards to the southwest of Iceland and to the Faeroe Islands, and these, with their intervening valleys, end in a transverse ridge connecting Greenland, through Iceland and the Faeroe Islands, with Northwestern Scotland and the continental mass of Europe.
    2
    2
  • The second, the Irminger stream, passes up the west side of Iceland; and the third goes up the Greenland side of Davis Strait to Baffin Bay.
    3
    3
  • And one essentially similar but adapted to slightly cooler conditions existed as far north as the latitude of Greenland.
    1
    1
  • Some species, such as Anemone alpine, which are wanting in the Arctic flora of the Old World, he thinks must have reached Europe by way of Greenland from north-east America.
    4
    4
  • The discovery of the insularity of Greenland might again give rise to the argument as to the distinction between island and continent.
    3
    3
  • South America and North America follow this type most closely; Eurasia (the land mass of Europe and Asia) comes next, while Africa and Australia are farther removed from the type, and the structure of Antarctica and Greenland is unknown.
    3
    3
  • The great auk, once common on the British coasts, those of Denmark, the east coast of North America, then restricted to those of Newfoundland, Greenland and Iceland, has been killed by man, and the same fate has overtaken the Labrador duck, the Phillip Island parrot, Nestor productus, and the large cormorant of FIG.
    8
    8
  • Similarly the Greenland angekok is said to summon his torngak (which may be an ancestral ghost or an animal) by drumming; he is heard by the bystanders to carry on a conversation and obtain advice as to how to treat diseases, the prospects of good weather and other matters of importance.
    2
    3
  • Thus Claudius Clavus Swartha (Niger), who was at Rome in 1424, compiled a map of the world, extending westward as far as Greenland.
    1
    1
  • Northwards and eastwards it extends through the Parry Islands and Grinnell Land to north Greenland, reaching on the west coast as far south as Melville Bay; and it also occurs at Sabine Island on the east coast.
    2
    2
  • The Swedish expedition to Greenland in 1899 found musk-oxen in herds of varying size - some contained only a few individuals, and in one case there were sixty-seven.
    2
    3
  • Denmark Strait is the sea between it and Iceland, and the northern Norwegian Sea or Greenland Sea separates it from Spitsbergen.
    3
    3
  • The southern and south-western coasts have been known, as will be mentioned later, since the 10th century, when Norse settlers appeared there, and the names of many famous arctic explorers have been associated with the exploration of Greenland.
    1
    1
  • The communication between the Norse settlements in Greenland and the motherland Norway was broken off at the end of the 14th and the beginning of the 15th century, and the Norsemen's knowledge about their distant colony was gradually more or less forgotten.
    2
    2
  • The south and west coast of Greenland was then re-discovered by John Davis in July 1585, though previous explorers, as Cortereal, Frobisher and others, had seen it, and at the end of the 16th and the beginning of the 17th century the work of Davis (1586-1588), Hudson (1610) and Baffin (1616) in the western seas afforded some knowledge of the west coast.
    2
    2
  • As a whole the coasts are unusually mountainous, and Greenland forms in this respect an interesting exception, as there is no other known land of such a size so filled along its coasts on all sides with high mountains and deep fjords and valleys.
    3
    3
  • The whole interior of Greenland is completely covered by the so-called inland ice, an enormous glacier forming a regular shield-shaped expanse of snow and glacier ice, and burying all valleys and mountains far below its surface.
    1
    1
  • The ice-cap of Greenland must to some extent be considered as a viscous mass, which, by the vertical pressure in its interior, is pressed outwards and slowly flows towards the coasts, just as a mass of pitch placed on a table and left to itself will in the course of time flow outwards towards all sides.
    1
    1
  • The drainage of the interior of Greenland is thus partly given off in the solid form of icebergs, partly by the melting of the snow and ice on the surface of the ice-cap, especially near its western margin, and to some slight extent also by the melting produced on its under side by the interior heat of the earth.
    1
    1
  • Numerous glacial marks, however, such as polished striated rocks, moraines, erratic blocks, &c., prove that the whole of Greenland, even the small islands and skerries outside the coast, has once been covered by the inland ice.
    1
    1
  • In erratic blocks of sandstone, found on the Disco shore of the Waigat, have been detected a Sigillaria and a species of either Pecopterisor Gleichenia, perhaps of this age; and probably much of the extreme northern coast of Ellesmere Land, and therefore, in all likelihood, the opposite Greenland shore, contains a clearly developed Carboniferous Limestone fauna, identical with that so widely distributed over the North American continent, and referable also to British and Spitsbergen species.
    2
    2
  • Feilden notes as suggestive that, though the explorers have not met with this formation on the northern shores of Greenland, yet it was observed that a continuation of the direction of the known strike of the limestones of Feilden peninsula, carried over the polar area, passes through the neighbourhood of Spitsbergen, where the formation occurs, and contains certain species identical with those of the Grinnell Land rocks of this horizon.
    2
    2
  • These Miocene strata have not been found farther north on the Greenland shore than the region mentioned; but in Lady Franklin Bay, on the Grinnell Land side of Smith Sound, they again appear, so that the chances are they will be found on the opposite coast, though doubtless the great disintegration Greenland has undergone and is undergoing has destroyed many of the softer beds of fossiliferous rocks.
    2
    2
  • These parsissoks, elected at the rate of about one representative to 120 voters, wear a cap with a badge (a bear rampant), and aid the European members of the council in distributing the surplus profit apportioned to each district, and generally in advising as, to the welfare of that part of Greenland under their partial control.
    1
    1
  • Hence from the 10th to the 12th centuries there was great intercourse with Iceland and Greenland on the part of the English, Swedish and Danish, but at the end of the 13th century some change occurred, resulting in the southerly emigration of the Eskimos and the extinction of European civilization in Greenland.
    1
    1
  • In the end of the 9th century Iceland was colonized from Norway; and about 985 the intrepid viking, Eric the Red, discovered Greenland, and induced some of his Icelandic countrymen to settle on its inhospitable shores.
    2
    4
  • This settlement, with jurisdiction over all the territory now included in Portsmouth, New Castle and Greenland, and most of that in Rye, was known as " Strawberry Banke " until 1653, when it was incorporated (by the government of Massachusetts) under the name of Portsmouth.
    4
    6
  • Greenland forms the most prominent exception, its eastern coast being quite as much indented as its western.
    4
    6
  • Excluding some varieties of domestic dogs, wolves are the largest members of the genus, and have a wide geographical range, extending over nearly the whole of Europe and Asia, and North America from Greenland to Mexico, but are not found in South America or Africa, where they are replaced by other members of the family.
    4
    7
  • It is bounded on the east by the North Atlantic, the Norwegian and Greenland Seas-Jan Mayen, Iceland, the Faeroe Islands and the Shetlands being the only lands between it and Norway.
    2
    5
  • Ruysch (1508) returns to the old idea, and even joins Greenland (Gruenlant) to eastern Asia.
    0
    4