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grasses

grasses Sentence Examples

  • 'All its birds and all its blossoms, all its flowers and all its grasses.'

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  • Many years ago, before people came to live on the earth, great trees and tall grasses and huge ferns and all the beautiful flowers cover the earth.

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  • The hay made from clover, sainfoin and grasses under rotation generally gives a bigger average yield than that from permanent grass land.

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  • He smelled of sweet rain and dark grasses, his taste just as exotic.

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  • On the mesas alfalfa could be substituted for the native grasses and be used for stock when the pasturage of the lower plains is not available.

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  • Grasses and herbage in great variety constitute the most valuable element of Australian flora from the commercial point of view.

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  • Under hay are included the produce of clover, sainfoin and rotation grasses, and also that of permanent meadow.

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  • of hay per acre less than that from clover, sainfoin and grasses under rotation.

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  • Hay and forage are the most important crops, and Vermont grasses for grazing have been favourably known since the close of the 18th century.

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  • Francis Darwin later demonstrated that the tips of the plumules of grasses were sensitive parts.

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  • In India proper, with a dryer climate, grasses and Leguminosae take the lead in the number of species.

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  • With the growing of grasses as the chief agricultural product, farming in Nevada is necessarily extensive rather than intensive.

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  • The rains are quickly absorbed by the light porous soil and leave only temporary effects on the surface, where arboreal growth is stunted and grasses are commonly thin and harsh.

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  • The forests throughout most of the state have a luxuriant undergrowth consisting of a great variety of shrubs, flowering plants, grasses, ferns and mosses, and the display of magnolias, azaleas, kalmias, golden rod, asters, jessamines, smilax, ferns and mosses is often one of unusual beauty.

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  • Its wild grasses are luxuriant and a shrubby growth is found along many of its streams. The decline in stock-breeding resulted in a considerable growth of trees and chaparral over the greater part of the plain.

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  • In the absence of artificial grasses and roots, hay was very valuable; it constituted almost the only winter food for live stock, which were consequently in poor condition in spring.

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  • He was one of the first to use oil-cake and bone-manure, to distinguish the feeding values of grasses, to appreciate to the full the beneficial effects of stock on light lands and to realize the value of long leases as an incentive to good farming.

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  • Other species attack the stalks of grasses and corn (Cephus pygmaeus).

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  • The seeds are harvested from various grasses, especially from Aristida oligantha, a species known as " ant rice," which often grows in quantity close to the site selected for the nest, but the statement that the ants deliberately sow this grass is an error, due, according to Wheeler, to the sprouting of germinating seeds.

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  • Hay is made of the native prairie grasses, which grow luxuriantly.

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  • The number of species of orchids is greater than that of any other monocotyledonous order - not even excepting grasses - amounting to 6000, contained in 400 genera.

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  • The mountain-sides are commonly clothed with pine forests, and the plains with grasses or shrubs.

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  • Fibres and vegetable grasses, wool, hides and skins, cotton, sugar, iron and steel and their manufactures, chemicals, coal, and leather and its manufactures are the leading imports; provisions, leather and its manufactures, cotton and its manufactures, breadstuffs, iron and steel and.

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  • In the semi-arid districts on the south slope of the mountains the flora consists chiefly of dry grasses, acacias, yuccas and cactuses.

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  • The greater part of the country is covered either with tall coarse grasses (these open plains being called ban), or more commonly with thick thorn-bush or jungle, among which rise occasional isolated trees.

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  • Lichtenstein has established the fact that from the egg of the Aphis of Pistachio galls, Anopleura lentisci, is hatched an apterous insect (the gall-founder), which gives birth to young Aphides (emigrants), and that these, having acquired wings, fly to the roots of certain grasses (Bromus sterilis and Hordeum vulgare), and by budding underground give rise to several generations of apterous insects, whence finally comes a winged brood (the pupifera).

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  • The high veld is admirably adapted for the raising of stock, its grasses being of excellent quality and the climate good.

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  • He moved around her and stepped onto thick green grasses.

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  • The herbage for the most part grows with marvellous rapidity after a spring or autumn shower and forms a natural shelter for the more stable growth of nutritious grasses.

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  • Treub found on Krakatoa four species of composites and two grasses.

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  • Improved varieties, obtained by cross-impregnation either naturally or artificially brought about, were carefully propagated and generally adopted, and increased attention was bestowed on the cultivation of the natural grasses.

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  • There are manufactures of paper, hats, leather, ropes, porcelain, majolica, soap, spirits, and ornaments made of palm leaves and grasses.

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  • For winter quarters they build more elaborate houses of conical or dome-like form, composed of sedges, grasses and similar materials plastered together with mud.

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  • o150s swelling), a cereal (Avena sativa) belonging to the tribe Avenece of the order Gramineae or grasses.

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  • The appearance of the prairie section of the province is that of undulating meadows, with rounded sloping ridges covered with shorter grasses, which serve for the support of great herds of cattle and horses.

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  • The south and central region was the land of the bison, its grasses affording a great pasture ground for tens of thousands of "buffaloes."

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  • Practically nothing has yet been done in the study of native grasses and the introduction of exotic species.

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  • fruticosa in the north and w_th thick grasses (poor in species) in the southern and drier parts.

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  • Nearly all the species of plants which grow on these prairies are common to Europe (paeonics, Hemerocallis, asters, pinks, gentians, violets, Cypripedium, Aquilegia, Delphinium, aconites, irises and so on), but here the plants attain a much greater size; a man standing erect is often hidden by the grasses.

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  • The midland region is characterized by grass lands (the Natal grasses are long and coarse) and by considerable areas of flat-topped thorn bush mimosa.

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  • They feed chiefly on roots and grasses, in search of which they often travel considerable distances; and when eating they sit on their haunches, holding their food in their fore-paws.

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  • 025 or 03%, respond freely to applications of phosphates; probably in such cases even the weak acid is capable of dissolving out phosphates from the humus or other compounds which yield little or none to the roots of grasses and clovers.

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  • Weeds, therefore, which need sour conditions for development are checked by liming and the better grasses and clovers are encouraged.

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  • Though almost waterless, it is in fact better wooded and richer in pasture than any part of the Hamad; the sand-hills are dotted with ghada, a species of tamarisk, and other bushes, and several grasses and succulent plants - among them the adar, on which sheep are said to feed for a month without requiring water - are found in abundance in good seasons.

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  • The most numerously represented family is the Compositae, the grasses being next in number.

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  • The district is famed for its stock, and the fine quality of its grain; also for the character of the English grasses laid down there, which flourish in a rich black loam on a limestone formation.

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  • The flora of the Great Plains region, consisting principally of nutritious grasses, enters the north-western portion of the state and extends south to the Edwards Plateau and east into the Prairie Plains region.

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  • The low country along the coast is covered chiefly with grasses and rushes, but scattered over it are clumps of live oak, called "mottes."

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  • Grasses representing several species also cover most of the Great Plains, the uplands in the southern portion of the Coastal Plain, and the treeless portions of the Prairie Plains and the Trans-Pecos region.

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  • - The predominant feature of the flora is the grasses of the prairie.

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  • Good pasture grasses are numerous, but pasture lands are limited.

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  • They split the silicious rocks with stonehammers,and then chipped Metal- Gold, silver, copper, pure or mixed with tin or silver, thread, but in the Gulf states the existence of excellent cane and grasses gave opportunity for several varieties of weaving.

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  • Coming to a country without useful animals, cereals, rich grasses or fruit trees, the colonists had to bring all these necessaries with them.

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  • „How much more extensive is grazing - of the more scientific order - than agriculture, is seen at once from the figures of the amount of land broken up, for crops or other purposes, and the amount under sown grasses.

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  • With the exception of narrow strips of woodland along the courses of the larger streams, the rest of the state consists of treeless prairie-lands, which are usually covered with valuable grasses.

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  • The prairies of the more humid regions are covered with valuable grasses, and with masses of showy native flowers, which bloom from spring to autumn.

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  • The flora of the high plateaus consists chiefly of grasses, notably various kinds of alfa or esparto, and aromatic herbs.

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  • There is but little natural vegetation to be seen - ragged yucca trees, many species of agave and cactus, scrubby mesquite bushes, sage bushes and occasional clumps of coarse grasses.

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  • The denuded mountain slopes and plateaus of southern Mexico are due to the prehistoric inhabitants who cleared away the tropical forest for their Indian corn fields, and then left them to the erosive action of the tropical rains and subsequent occupation by coarse grasses.

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  • A more probable cause is found in the fineness of the prairie soil, which is inimical to the growth of young trees in competition with the grasses and annual plants.

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  • The leading imports in 1909 were as follows, indicating in each case, when not evidently unnecessary, the value of finished manufactures and of unmanufactured materials: Silk (manufactured, $32,963,162; unmanufactured, $75,512,401); hides and skins, other than fur skins ($103,758,277); sugar and molasses ($91,535,466); fibres, vegetables and textile grasses (manufactured, $33,511,696; unmanufactured, $54,860,698); coffee ($86,524,006); chemicals ($86,401,432); cotton (manufactured, $68,380,780; raw and waste, $1 5,421,854); rubber (manufactured, $1,462,541, unmanufactured, $83,682,013); wool (manufactured, $22,058,712; unmantifactured, $55,530,366); and wood (manufactured, $43,620,591; unmanufactured, $13,584,172).

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  • - Passing westward by rail from the forest-covered Archean with its rugged granite hills, the flat prairie of Manitoba with its rich grasses and multitude of flowers comes as a very striking contrast, introducing the Interior Continental plain in its most typical development.

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  • On the prairies and the foot-hills of the Rocky Mountains a great variety of grasses are found, several years' collection resulting in 42 genera and 156 species.

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  • Of the best hay and pasture grasses, Agropyrum Elymus, Stipa, Bromus, Agrostis, Calamagrostes and Poa, there are 59 species.

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  • Besides the grasses there are leguminous plants valuable for pasture - Astragalus, Vicia (wild vetch), Lathyrus (wild pea) of which there are many species.

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  • The Seed Control Act of 1905 brings under strict regulations the trade in agricultural seeds, prohibiting the sale for seeding of cereals, grasses, clovers or forage plants unless free from weeds specified, and imposing severe penalties for infringements.

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  • Experiments are also conducted to test the merits of new or untried varieties of cereals and other field crops, of grasses, forage plants, fruits, vegetables, plants and trees; and samples, particularly of the most promising cereals, are distributed freely among farmers for trial, so that those which promise to be most profitable may be rapidly brought into general cultivation.

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  • Alfalfa and grasses grow well.

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  • SORGHUM, a genus of grasses belonging to the tribe Andropogoneae, and including one of the most important tropical grains, Sorghum vulgare, great millet, Indian millet or Guinea corn.

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  • Speaking of its cultivation, Eduard Hackel (in his article on "Grasses" in Die natiirlichen Pflanzenfamilien) says the culture of Sorghum probably had its origin in Africa, where a variety Sorghum vulgare.

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  • Most of the native grasses are too coarse for grazing, and some of 1 The Chinese name for the Hawaiian Islands means " Sandalwood Islands."

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  • Of grasses indeed there are many forms, some peculiar to Tibet, but no trees or shrubs at any elevation higher than 15,000 ft., except in the Kharo Pass of central Tibet, where Waddell has recorded trees (?

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  • (Gentiana acaulis) and London pride (Saxifrage umbrosa),, Cerastium tomentosum, Stachys lavata and the beautiful evergreen Veronica rupestris with sheets of bright blue flowers, close to the ground, or by some of the finer grasses very carefully selected, such as the sheep's fescue (Festuca ovina) or its glaucous-leaved variety.

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  • It is of the utmost importance that a good selection of grasses be made, and that pure seeds should be obtained (see Grass And Grassland).

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  • The bamboo family are elegant arborescent grasses.

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  • Rank grasses (lalang, glaga), which cover great areas in Java, have an even wider range in Sumatra, descending to within 700 or Boo ft.

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  • of sea-level; wherever a space in the forest is cleared these aggressive grasses begin to take possession of the soil, and if once they are fully rooted the woodland has great difficulty in re-establishing itself.

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  • Layer upon layer of clay is deposited by the sea in front of the dikes, until new fringe has been added to the coast-line on which sea grasses begin to grow.

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  • He found that the species really consisted of six distinct races, each having a more or less narrow range of grasses on which it can live.

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  • The form Tritici is the least sharply marked and will grow on wheat, barley, rye and oat but not on the other grasses.

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  • The form Avenae will grow on oat and many grasses but not on the other three cereals mentioned.

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  • In the last-named family the single morphological species Erysiphe graminis is found growing on the cereals, barley, oat, wheat, rye and a number of wild grasses (such as Poa, Bromus, Dactylis).

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  • On each of these host-plants the fungus has become specialized so that the form on barley cannot infect the other three cereals or the wild grasses and so on.

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  • Both grasses and climate are against sheep-farming on a large scale.

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  • Numerous other species belonging to the vast genus Panicum - the largest among !'f grasses, of which the following are among the most important - are also cultivated Setaria italica.

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  • in tropical or subtropical countries for their grain or as fodder grasses, or both, each variety of soil, from swamp to desert, having its characteristic forms.

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  • The form of the leaf shows a very great variety ranging from the narrow linear form with parallel sides, as in grasses or the needle-like leaves of pines and firs to more or less rounded or orbicular - descriptions of these will be found in works on descriptive botany - FIG.

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  • In sedges the sheath forms a complete investment of the stem, whilst in Leaf grasses it is split on one side.

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  • Such arrangements as 2, 3 ands are common in Monocotyledons, as in grasses, sedges and lilies.

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  • Thus the earth and the roots of grasses absorb the useful matters not only from the water that passes over it, but from that which passes through it.

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  • Amongst grasses the highest place must be assigned to ryegrass, especially - to the Italian variety, commonly called Lolium italicum.

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  • Sometimes this action is exerted upon the finer grasses, irri- but happily also upon some of the less profitable constituents of the miscellaneous herbage.

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  • Amongst the grasses which may be spared, Aira caespitosa, Briza media and Cynosurus cristatus are generally much reduced by irrigation.

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  • Useful grasses which are increased are Lolium perenne and Alopecurus pratensis, and among those of less value Avena favescens, Dactylis glomerata and Poa pratensis.

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  • All the sluices should be substantially built at first with stones and mortar, to prevent the leakage of water; for, should water from a leak be permitted to find its way into the meadow, that portion of it will stagnate and produce coarse grasses.

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  • Without this occasional drying of the soil the finer grasses and the leguminous plants will infallibly be lost; while a scum of confervae and other algae will collect upon the surface and choke the higher forms of vegetation.

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  • For, though grass will grow even under ice, yet if ice be formed under and around the roots of the grasses the plants may be thrown out by the expansion of the water at the moment of its conversion into ice.

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  • The growth is less checked by early frosts; and whatever advantages to the vegetation may accrue by occasional excessive warmth in the atmosphere in the early months of the year are experienced more by the irrigated than by the ordinary meadow grasses by reason of the abundant development of roots which the water has encouraged.

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  • In south Germany the so-called Fruchtwechsel is practised, the fields being sown with grain crops every second year, and with pease or beans, grasses, potatoes, turnips, &c., in the intermediate years.

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  • The Arundo Donax, the tallest of European grasses, is largely grown for vine-stakes.

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  • At this time he based his classification, like Caesalpinus, chiefly upon the fruit, and he distinguished several natural groups,, such as the grasses, Labiatae, Umbelliferae and Papilionaceae.

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  • The classification of the Methodus was extended and improved in the Historia plantarum, but was disfigured by a large class of Anomalae, to include forms that the other orders did not easily admit, and by the separation of the cereals from other grasses.

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  • But the presence of a second cotyledon in grasses is extremely doubtful, and though there may be ground for reconsidering the position of Nymphaeaceae, their association with the grasses as a distinct class is not warranted by a comparative examination of the members of the two orders.

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  • Formerly the island appears to have been wooded, but it now presents only a few bushes (Edwardsia, Broussonetia, &c.), ferns, grasses, sedges, &c. The natives grow bananas in the shelter of artificial pits, also sugar-canes and sweet potatoes, and keep a few goats and a large stock of domestic fowls, and a Tahitian commercial house breeds cattle and sheep on the island.

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  • shows the total area, the cultivated area and the area under grain crops, green crops, grasses and miscellaneous crops.

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  • Only a little more than one-fourth of the area of Scotland is cultivated, while in England only one-fourth is left uncultivated; but it should be borne in mind that " permanent pasture " does not include the mountainous districts, which not only form so large a proportion of the surface but also, in their heaths and natural grasses, supply a scanty herbage for sheep and cattle, 9,104,388 acres being used for grazing in 1905.

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  • In 1905 the yield of hay from clover, sainfoin and rotation grasses amounted to 666,985, tons, or 31.19 cwts.

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  • Great numbers of grasses and flowering plants which once beautified the prairie landscape are still found on uncultivated lands, and there are about 80 species of trees, of which the oak, hickory, maple and ash are the most common.

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  • When abroad he sought out varieties of grasses, trees, rice and olives for American experiment, and after his return from France received yearly for twenty-three years, from his old friend the superintendent of the Jardin des plantes, a box of seeds, which he distributed to public and private gardens throughout the United States.

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  • Hats are made of palm leaves, alaca leaves, banana leaves, split bamboo and various grasses.

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  • In the United Kingdom, under the name of "coir" matting, a large amount of a coarse kind of carpet is made from coco-nut fibre; and the same material, as well as strips of cane, Manila hemp, various grasses and rushes, is largely employed in various forms for making door mats.

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  • angustifolia, leaves of the date palm (Phoenix sylvestris), of the dwarf palm (Chamaerops Ritchiana), of the Palmyra palm (Borassus flabelliformis), of the coco-nut palm (Cocos nucifera)andof the screw pine (Pandanus odoratissimus), the munja or munj grass (Saccharum Munja) and allied grasses, and the mat grasses Cyperus textilis and C. Pangorei, from the last of which the well-known Palghat mats of the Madras Presidency are made.

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  • Several useful household articles are made from the different kinds of grasses.

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  • The grasses are dyed in all shades and plaited to form attractive designs suitable for the purposes to which they are to be applied.

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  • over much of the state, and consist of flat or gently rolling country, barren of tree growth, but often covered with nutritious grasses, and affording pasturage for vast numbers of live stock.

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  • Various species of nutritious grasses cover much of the plains and foothills, and even clothe the mountain peaks.

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  • Agriculture began in the narrow but fertile river valleys, and stock-raising became an important industry, as the native grasses are especially nutritious.

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  • Linseed is subject to extensive and detrimental adulterations, resulting not only from careless harvesting and cleaning, whereby seeds of the flax dodder, and other weeds and grasses are mixed with it, but also from the direct admixture of cheaper and inferior oil-seeds, such as wild rape, mustard, sesame, poppy, &c., the latter adulterations being known in trade under the generic name of " buffum."

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  • The native grasses are especially adapted for fodder.

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  • These native grasses, even the thin bunch varieties of dry hills, are surprisingly nutritious, comparing very favourably with cultivated grasses.

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  • s Out of the vast mass of undifferentiated powers certain functional deities appear; and the Kami of Japan to-day who preside over the gilds and crafts of industry and agriculture, over the trees and grasses of the field, the operations of the household, and even the kitchenrange, the saucepan, the rice-pot, the well, the garden, the scarecrow and the privy, have their counterparts in the lists of ancient Rome, the indigitamenta over whose contents Tertullian and Augustine made merry.

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  • The minute flowers are arranged in spikelets somewhat as in grasses, and these again in larger spike-like or panicled inflorescences.

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  • In the arctic zone they form to% of the flora; they will flourish in soils rich in humus which are too acid to support grasses.

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  • Gigantic reeds and grasses occupy the low lands near the banks of the great river; expanses of fertile rice-land come next; a little higher up, dotted with villages encircled by groves of bamboos and fruit trees of great size and beauty, the dark forests succeed, covering the interior table-land and mountains.

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  • Jungle will not grow on these depressions, and they are covered either with water, reeds, high grasses or rice cultivation.

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  • This is soon impregnated with the seeds of the Saccharum spontaneum and other grasses that have been partly brought by the winds and partly deposited by the water.

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  • antarctica), 2 and Winter's bark (Drimys Winteri), intermingled with a dense undergrowth composed of a great variety of shrubs and plants, among which are Maytenus magellanica, Arbutus rigida, Myrtus memmolaria, two or three species of Berberis, wild currant (Ribes antarctica), a trailing blackberry, tree ferns, reed-like grasses and innumerable parasites.

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  • The coffee and cotton plants are indigenous; of grasses there are various kinds of millet, including Paspalum exile, the so-called hungry rice or Sierra Leone millet.

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  • Coarse grasses are the characteristic vegetation of the tableland.

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  • On the plains where grasses cannot find sufficient moisture their place is taken by " bush," composed mainly of stunted mimosas, acacias, euphorbia, wild pomegranate, bitter aloes and herbaceous plants.

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  • BAMBOO, the popular name for a tribe of grasses, Bambuseae, which are large, often tree-like, with woody stems. The stems spring from an underground root-stock and are often crowded to form dense clumps; the largest species reach 120 ft.

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  • The slender stem is hollow, and, as generally in grasses, has well-marked joints or nodes, at which the cavity is closed by a strong diaphragm.

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  • The flower differs from that of the majority of grasses in having usually three lodicules and six stamens.

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  • The fruit in Bambusa, Arundinaria and other genera resembles the grain generally characteristic of grasses, but in Dendrocalamus and others it is a nut, while rarely, as in Melocanna, it is fleshy and suggests an apple in size and appearance.

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  • Among the more important productions, the potato, oca (Oxalis tuberosa), quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) and some coarse grasses characterize the puna region, while barley, an exotic, is widely grown for fodder.

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  • There are fine indigenous grasses that spring up over the mesas after the summer rains, furnishing range for live-stock; some are extraordinarily independent of the rainfall.

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  • Even in the Mexican border, desert oak, juniper and manzanita cover the mountains, and there is a vigorous though short-lived growth of grasses and flower from July to October.

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  • The over-stocking of the ranges has caused much loss in the past, and the almost total eradication of fine native grasses over extended areas.

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  • It is by no means certain that even the higher rate is greater than that exhibited by a tropical bamboo which will grow over a foot a day, or even common grasses, or asparagus, during the active period of cell-division, though the phenomenon is here complicated by the phase of extension due to intercalation of water.

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  • The most valuable field crop in 1907 was hay and forage, consisting mostly of clover and cultivated grasses; in 1899 the value of this crop was 20.2% of that of all crops.

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  • With the exception of some stunted willows the islands are practically destitute of trees, but are covered with a luxuriant growth of herbage, including grasses, sedges and many flowering plants.

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  • Grasses grow luxuriantly in the river bottoms and wherever the tundra moss is destroyed to give them footing.

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  • The grasses are killed by the frosts in September.

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  • of the Arctic circle, save along Bering Sea; also that there is little doubt of the practicability of successfully cultivating buckwheat, barley and oats, and possibly also rye and wheat; that grasses for grazing grow generally and often in abundance; and in general that the possibilities of interior Alaska as a live-stock country are very considerable.

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  • GRASSES,' a group of plants possessing certain characters in common and constituting a family (Gramineae) of the class Monocotyledons.

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  • No plant is correctly termed a grass which is not a member of this family, but the word is in common language also used, generally in combination, for many plants of widely different affinities which possess some resemblance (often slight) in foliage to true grasses; e.g.

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  • In agriculture the word has an extended signification to include the various fodder-plants, chiefly leguminous, often called " artificial grasses."

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  • Singularly enough, the sexual system of Linnaeus (1735) served to mark off more distinctly the true grasses from these allies, since very nearly all of the former then known fell under his Triandria Digynia, whilst the latter found themselves under his other classes and orders.

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  • - The general type of true grasses is familiar in the cultivated cereals of temperate climates - wheat, barley, rye, oats, and in the smaller plants which make up pastures and meadows and form a principal factor of the turf of natural downs.

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  • Most cereals and many other grasses are annual, and possess a tuft of very numerous slender root-fibres, much branched and of great length.

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  • The underground stem or rootstock (rhizome) of perennial grasses is usually well developed, and often forms very FIG.

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  • Good examples are the oat, cock's-foot (Dactylis) and other British grasses.

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  • The aerial leaf-bearing branches (culms) are a characteristic feature of grasses.

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  • In wheat, barley and most of the British native grasses they are a development, not of the culm, but of the base of the leaf-sheath.

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  • A few of the lower internodes may become enlarged and subglobular, forming nutriment-stores, and grasses so characterized are termed " bulbous " (Arrhenatherum, Poa bulbosa, &c.).

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  • In grasses of temperate climates branching is rare at the upper nodes of the culm, but it is characteristic of the bamboos and many tropical grasses.

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  • As a rule it is split down its whole length, thus differing from that of Cyperaceae which is almost invariably (Eriospora is an exception) a complete tube; in some grasses, however (species of Poa, Bromus and others), the edges are united.

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  • In Anomochloa there are several nearly equal ribs and in some broad-leaved grasses (Bambuseae, Pharus, Leptaspis) the venation becomes tesselated by transverse connecting veins.

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  • In dry-country grasses the blades are often folded on the midrib, or rolled up. The rolling is effected by bands of large wedge-shaped cells - motor-cells - between the nerves, the loss of turgescence by which, as the air dries, causes the blade to curl towards the face on which they occur.

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  • - This possesses an exceptional importance in grasses, since, their floral envelopes being much reduced and the sexual organs of very great uniformity, the characters employed for classification are mainly derived from the arrangement of the flowers and their investing bracts.

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  • 13, i) is peculiar to grasses FIG.

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  • Rarely the inflorescence consists of very few flowers; thus Lygeum Spartum, the most anomalous of European grasses, has but two or three large uniflorous spikelets, which are fused together at the base, and have no basal glumes, but are enveloped in a large, hooded, spathe-like bract.

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  • - Flowers of Grasses (enlarged).

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  • - Pistils of Grasses (much enlarged).

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  • Grasses are generally wind - pollinated, though selffertilization sometimes occurs.

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  • In some grasses there is a small scale-like appendage opposite the scutellum, the epiblast.

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  • especially in relation to the origin of the vascular bundles which supply them, favours the view that the scutellum and pileole are highly differentiated parts of a single cotyledon,and this view is in accord with a comparative study of the seedling of grasses and of other monocotyledons.

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  • Such grasses often cause harm to sheep by catching in the wool and boring through the skin.

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  • A peculiar method of distribution occurs in some alpine and arctic grasses, which grow under conditions where ripening of the fruit is often uncertain.

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  • best distinctions are found in the position of the embryo in relation to the endosperm - lateral in grasses, basal in Cyperaceae - and in the possession by Gramineae of the 2-nerved palea below each flower.

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  • The same characters will distinguish grasses from the other glumiferous orders, Restiaceae, and Eriocaulonaceae, which are besides further removed by their capsular fruit and pendulous ovules.

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  • Some Commelinaceae and Marantaceae approach grasses in foliage; the leaves of Allium, &c., possess a ligule; the habit of some palms reminds one of the bamboos; and Juncaceae and a few Liliaceae possess an inconspicuous scarious perianth.

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  • Many are savanna grasses, in various parts of the tropics, for instance the large genus Andropogon, Elionurus and others.

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  • Miscanthus and Erianthus, nearly allied to Saccharum, are tall reed-like grasses, with large silky flower-panicles, which are grown for ornament.

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  • Panicum, a very polymorphic genus, and one of the largest in the order, is widely spread in all warm countries; together with species of Paspalum they form good forage grasses in the South American savannas and campos.

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  • Leersia is a genus of swamp grasses, one of which L.

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  • Calamagrostis and Deyeuxia are tall, often reed-like grasses, occurring throughout the temperate and arctic zones and upon high mountains in the tropics.

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  • Species of Chloris are grown as ornamental grasses.

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  • 20) is the very common weed in paths and waste places; P. pratensis and P. trivialis are also common grasses of meadows, banks and pastures, the former is the " June grass " or " Kentucky blue grass " of North America; P. alpine.

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  • Glyceria fluitans, manna-grass, socalled from the sweet grain, is one of the best fodder grasses for swampy meadows; the grain is an article of food in central Europe.

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  • Festuca (fescue) is also a large and widely distributed genus, but found especially in the temperate and cold zones; it includes valuable pasture grasses, such as F.

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  • - Grasses are the most universally diffused of all flowering plants.

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  • In tropical regions, where Leguminosae is the leading order, grasses closely follow as the second, whilst in the warm and temperate regions of the northern hemisphere, in which Compositae takes the lead, Gramineae again occupies the second position.

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  • Grasses also characterize steppes and savannas, where they form scattered tufts.

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  • As the colder latitudes are entered the grasses become relatively more numerous, and are the leading family in Arctic and Antarctic regions.

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  • A remarkable feature of the distribution of grasses is its uniformity; there are no great centres for the order, as in Compositae, where a marked preponderance of endemic species exists; and the genera, except some of the smallest or monotypic ones, have usually a wide distribution.

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  • Many grasses are almost cosmopolitan, such as the common reed, Phragmites communis; and many range throughout the warm regions of the globe, e.g.

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  • While numerous remains of grass-like leaves are a proof that grasses were widespread and abundantly developed in past geological ages, especially in the Tertiary period, the fossil remains are in most cases too fragmentary and badly preserved for the determination of genera, and conclusions based thereon in explanation of existing geographical distribution are most unsatisfactory.

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  • (1896); John Percival, Agricultural Botany (chapters on " Grasses," 2nd ed., London, 1902).

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  • Many kinds of grasses and flowers abound.

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  • Every natural hollow is full of water, around the margin of which long grasses, reeds and other aquatic plants grow in the greatest profusion, often making it difficult to say where the land ends and the water begins.

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  • Ascension was originally destitute of vegetation save on the summit of Green Mountain, which owes its verdure to the mists which frequently enshroud it, but the lower hills have been planted with grasses and shrubs.

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  • " Cereals, chiefly maize, with green crops and fields of gourds, alternate with fallow land overgrown by coarse grasses, weeds and stunted shrubs.

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  • Indian corn and abundant grasses give to Missouri, as to the other central prairie states, a sound basis for her livestock interests.

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  • These plains include the extensive llanos of the Orinoco tributaries where coarse, hardy grasses and occasional clumps of palms are almost the only vegetation to be seen.

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  • The grass of the interior plains is of a coarse character and yellowish colour, very different from the meadow grasses of England.

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  • Wet land, if in grass, produces only the coarser grasses, and many subaquatic plants and mosses, which are of little or no value for pasturage; its herbage is late in spring, and fails early in autumn; the animals grazed upon it are unduly liable to disease, and sheep, especially, to foot-rot and liver-rot.

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  • The destruction of the grasses on the hillsides by overgrazing in recent years has increased the flooding by temporary streams, and consequently has tended to deepen and increase the gulleys and channels of the mountains and valleys.

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  • The hay crop, 865,000 tons in 1909, is made quite largely from wild grasses and grains cut green; on the irrigated lands alfalfa is grown extensively for the cattle and sheep, which are otherwise almost wholly dependent for sustenance upon the bunch grass of the semi-arid plains.

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  • Artificial grasses are also much cultivated, and fruits largely, especially in the Koh Daman.

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  • Buffalo and bunch, and other short native prairie grasses, very nutritious ranging food but unavailable as hay, once covered the plains and pastured immense herds of buffalo and other animals, but with increasing settlement they have given way generally to exotic bladed species, valuable alike for pasture and for hay, except in the western regions.

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  • On the northern slopes, at the higher levels, Juniperus pseudo-Sabina is the only tree that grows on the mountains, and luxuriant meadow grasses cover the syrts.

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  • WHEAT (Triticum), the most important and the most generally diffused of cereal grasses.

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  • Erysiple graminis, a mildew of grasses, has caused great loss in various countries; Dilophia graminis sometimes causes deformities of the leaves and inflorescence; another somewhat similar fungus, Ophiobolus graminis, attacks the leaves and stalks near the ground, completely destroying the plants.

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  • The grasses are of the greatest importance to the inhabitants, for upon them they are dependent for the keep of their live stock.

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  • The prairies are covered with valuable bunch, grama and dropseed grasses; in the extreme N.W.

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  • The hay crop of 1899 was grown on 1,095,706 acres and amounted to 1,617,905 tons, but nearly one-half of this was made from wild grasses; since then the amounts of fodder obtained from alfalfa, Kafir corn, sorghum cane and timothy have much increased, and that obtained from wild grasses has decreased; in 1909 the acreage was 900,000 and the crop 810,000 tons.

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  • Of the grasses of Africa alfa is very abundant in the plateaus of the Atlas range.

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  • Grazing and fodder are not wanting, and besides the reeds peculiar to Seistan there are two grasses which merit notice - that called bannu, with which the bed of the Hamun abounds on the south and the taller and less salt kirta on the higher ground.

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  • On the lowlands they feed on dry grasses, and in Tibet on small woody plants.

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  • A very few trees and shrubs, and some grasses, are strictly endemic to the plains and to Nebraska.

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  • Grasses are perhaps the most noteworthy vegetable forms. Nebraska claims a greater variety of native hay and forage species than grow in any other state of the Union.

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  • No less than 200 grasses, at least 154 being wild or commonly cultivated, had been listed in 1904.

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  • The native prairie grasses have been in considerable part displaced by grasses introduced from more humid regions.

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  • Alfalfa and other cultivated grasses are encroaching on the whole region, and even the natural arid-land bunch grasses make excellent grazing.

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  • Wild, salt and prairie grasses make up the bulk of the forage acreage, but the cultivated crops - especially millet and Hungarian grasses and alfalfa - are more important.

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  • 14), or branching as in palms. A spike bearing female flowers only, and covered with scales, is a strobilus, as in the hop. In grasses FIG.

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  • (Spikelet), Grasses.

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  • Of this nature are the scales on the petals in Lychnis, Silene and Cynoglossum, which are formed in the same way as the ligules of grasses.

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  • The anthers are called introrse when they dehisce by the surface next to the centre of the flower; they are extrorse when they dehisce by the outer surface; when they dehisce by the sides, as in Iris and some grasses, they are laterally dehiscent.

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  • In Monocotyledons, as in grasses, there is often only one, while in Dicotyledons they number from three upwards; when numerous, the pores are either scattered irregularly, or in a regular order, frequently forming a circle round the equatorial surface.

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  • 83), the mere elasticity of the filaments is sufficient to effect this; in other plants pollination is effected by the wind, as in most of our forest trees, grasses, &c., and in such cases enormous quantities of pollen are produced.

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  • Among the few Monocotyledons are leaves and fruits of palms, and traces of grasses and sedges.

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  • Monocotyledons form one-sixth of the known Miocene flora, 25 of them being grasses and 39 sedges; but most of these need further study, and are very insufficiently characterized.

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  • Detection and typing of maize streak virus and other distantly related geminiviruses of grasses by polymerase chain reaction amplification of a conserved viral sequence.

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  • brushy areas or in areas of long grasses.

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  • The wetland area revealed a pair of Black-headed Wagtails and two Black-headed buntings feeding in the grasses.

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  • Lateral stems, or stolons, formed by these grasses result in a dense turf canopy, even at low mowing heights.

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  • Over the voices came a light little chuckle, stirring the grasses around me.

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  • close-cropped moorland grasses.

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  • The grasses were also becoming quite coarse with a loss of small flowering plants.

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  • Look out for plants like sea holly, sea campion, sea spurge and grasses such as marram and sand couch grass.

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  • For a variety of colored grasses, visit crocus.

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  • Biological control can include choosing resistant turf grass cultivars or using soil bacteria to help improve the turf grasses ' health.

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  • dominance of grasses such as purple moor-grass and wavy hair-grass.

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  • The long grasses were still soaked from yesterday's downpour.

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  • They know the slow growing fine fescue and bent grasses, only require gentle refinement to produce high quality putting surfaces.

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  • foliaged grasses in the border or a container.

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  • Among the attractive grasses, such as quaking-grass and meadow foxtail, you will find yellow rattle, an indicator species of old grassland.

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  • Neil is a passionate plantsman and has several gold medals to his name including five consecutive Golds at Chelsea for his grasses.

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  • ornamental grasses are an important part of the autumn garden, giving structure, form and texture.

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  • grazed saltmarshes have been abandoned, leading to domination of the mid to upper marsh by rank grasses.

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  • intensive grazing by animals in some places has caused changes in the variety of grasses.

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  • grazing by sheep reduces the sand trapping ability of the dune grasses.

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  • This means both the heap of dung and the coarse grasses that grow from that heap of dung and the coarse grasses that grow from that heap.

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  • Popular food plants include holly, ivy, cabbage, nasturtium, honesty, long grasses, cuckoo flower, blackthorn.

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  • The nursery specializes in perennials, grasses and woodland plants including hosta and hemerocallis (daylilies ).

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  • Molina and other grasses occur on the flatter areas on the small hummocks to the left of the photo.

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  • Then we have cereals and grasses and brassicas, which include kale, swede, mangels, turnip and rape.

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  • leaved grasses.

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  • Data from these studies will be used to identify grasses to be grown in soil microcosms.

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  • The wood contains several scarce and locally distributed grasses, sedges and rushes including hairy woodrush, pendulous sedge and wood millet.

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  • The cup-shaped nest is made from dry grasses and lined with finer grasses and hair.

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  • Among the short turf, fine grasses, sea plantain, buck's-horn plantain, sea pink and spring squill are prominent.

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  • ranker grasses and scrub species might seed in, shading out some of the more interesting low-growing vegetation.

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  • Italian ryegrass is one of the most important forage grasses in temperate regions.

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  • The mountain skyline is open, with upland grasses and rocky screes on the slopes leading to the summits.

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  • The meadow floods regularly, as indicated by the damp-loving grasses, including the uncommon brown sedge.

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  • Patches of acid peat with heather and acid grasses or with cotton sedge are found on the remnants of the former bogs.

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  • Between the long grasses there are small plots of land dotted with tin shacks roofed with dried palm branches.

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  • Other components of the ground flora such as grasses, dwarf shrubs and ferns are common.

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  • Pernicious weeds - these include morning glory, sheep sorrel, ivy and several types of grasses.

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  • twayblade orchids among the grasses and wild flowers.

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  • Holidays where limbs are in contact with forest undergrowth or tall grasses put people at particular risk from these infections.

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  • Control of invasive weeds of grassland in environmentally sensitive areas Disease resistance markers in forage grasses.

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  • wiry grasses " .

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  • They are actually giant grasses but differ by having woody stems or culms and a unique life cycle.

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  • The great plains are covered with edible grasses, divided into two classes, pasto duro (hard grass) and pasto blando, or tierno (soft grass) - the former tall, coarse, nutritious and suitable for horses and cattle, and the latter tender grasses and herbs, including clovers, suitable for sheep and cattle.

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  • Vast areas of land have been ploughed and sown with lucerne (alfalfa); magnificent permanent pasturage has been created where there were coarse and hard grasses in former days, and Argentina has been able to add baled hay to her list of exports.

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  • Into these underground chambers the ants carry seeds of grasses and other plants of which they accumulate large stores.

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  • JOB'S TEARS, in botany, the popular name for Coix LachrymaJobi, a species of grass, of the tribe maydeae, which also includes the maize (see Grasses).

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  • The land that has been lost to the plough is found to be still further augmented when an inquiry is instituted into the area devoted to clover, sainfoin and grasses under rotation.

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  • Farther north we come to the urmans of West Siberia, dense thickets of trees often rising from a treacherous carpet of thickly interlaced grasses, which conceals deep marshes, where even the bear has learnt to tread circumspectly.

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  • The general characteristic of the flora is the prevalence of herbaceous over forest growths; the high veld is covered by short sweet grasses of excellent quality for pasturage; grass is mingled with protea scrub in the middle veld; the banken veld has a richer flora, the valley levels are well wooded, scattered timber trees clothe their sides and the hills are covered with aloe, euphorbia, protea and other scrub growths.

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  • The practice is confined to poorer types of land, such as heaths covered with furze and bracken or fens and clay areas smothered with rank grasses and sedges.

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  • Missing the perfume-laden air of the Occident, a visitor is prone to infer paucity of blossoms. But if some familiar European flowers are absent, they are replaced by others strange to Western eyesa wealth of lespedeza and Indigo-fera; a vast variety of lilies; graceful grasses like the eulalia and the ominameshi (Patriaa scabiosaefolia); the richly-hued Pyrus japonica; azaleas, diervillas and deutzias; the kikyo (Platycodon grandifiorum), the giboshi (Funkia ovala), and many another.

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  • Among the land plants may be noted the blue anemone; the ranunculus along the road-sides, with a strong perfume of violets; the Malta heath, which flowers at all seasons; Cynomorium coccineum, the curious " Malta fungus," formerly so valued for medicinal purposes that a guard was set for its preservation under the rule of the Knights; the pheasant's-eye; three species of mallow and geranium; Oxalis cernua, a very troublesome imported weed; Lotus edulis; Scorpiurus subvillosa, wild and cultivated as forage; two species of the horseshoe-vetch; the opium poppy; the yellow and claret-coloured poppy; wild rose; Cartaegus azarolus, of which the fruit is delicious preserved; the ice-plant; squirting cucumber; many species of Umbelliferae; Labiatae, to which the spicy flavour of the honey (equal to that of Mt Hymettus) is ascribed; snapdragons; broom-rape; glass-wort; Salsola soda, which produces when burnt a considerable amount of alkali; there are fifteen species of orchids; the gladiolus and iris are also found; Urginia scilla, the medicinal squill, abounds with its large bulbous roots near the sea; seventeen species of sedges and seventy-seven grasses have been recorded.

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  • The use of non-foodstuffs, or cellulosic materials, such as grasses, reeds, straws, peat, waste wood, sawdust, etc., is not yet possible, for, although research work is in progress to discover a process that could be worked on a commercial basis in those regions where such materials exist in sufficient abundance, it has not so far led to any definite results.

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  • 5); or the anthers are loosely fixed on long thread-like filaments as in grasses (fig.

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  • The lowland pasture, from 2000 to 5000 ft., is composed of more vigorous grasses, with an undergrowth of an exceptionally succulent character.

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  • The bamboo family are elegant arborescent grasses (see Bamboo).

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  • In the leaves of some plants there exists a midrib with large veins running nearly parallel to it from the base to the apex of the lamina, as in grasses (fig.

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  • It is absent in sessile leaves, and this is also C. frequently the case when a sheath is present, as in grasses (fig.

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  • above freezing, the severity of frosts in winter is thus obviated, and the growth, especially of the roots of grasses, is encouraged; (2) nourishment or plant food is actually brought on to the soil, by which it is absorbed and retained, both for the immediate and for the future use of the vegetation, which also itself obtains some nutrient material directly; (3) solution and redistribution of the plant food already present in the soil occur mainly through the solvent action of the carbonic acid gas present in a dissolved state in the irrigation-water; (4) oxidation of any excess of organic matter in the soil, with consequent production of useful carbonic acid and nitrogen compounds, takes place through the dissolved oxygen in the water sent on and through the soil where the drainage is good; and (5) improvement of the grasses, and especially of the miscellaneous herbage, of the meadow is promoted through the encouragement of some at least of the better species and the extinction or reduction of mosses and of the innutritious weeds.

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  • MAIZE, or Indian Corn, Zea Mays (from ea or "eca, which appears to have been " spelt," Triticum spelta, according to the description of Theophrastus), a plant of the tribe Maydeae of the order Gramineae or grasses (see fig.

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  • Various species of nutritious grasses cover much of the plains and foothills, and even clothe the apparently barren mountain peaks.

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  • The stiffness of the blade, which becomes very marked in dry-country grasses, is due to the development of girders of thick-walled mechanical tissue which follow the course of all or the principal veins (fig.

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  • The flower with its palea is thus sessile in the axil of a floriferous glume, and in a few grasses (Leersia (fig.

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  • Poa, a large genus widely distributed in temperate and cold countries, includes many meadow and alpine grasses; eight species are British; P. annua (fig.

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  • Some 320 species of fern have been collected, and there are large numbers of spiny and prickly plants, as well as numerous grasses, reeds and rushes, many of them of great service in the native manufactures of mats, hats, baskets, &c.

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  • Nothing can surpass in beauty the rank grasses and bright flowers that grow on the lowlands and rolling uplands of a virgin prairie - now hardly to be found in the state.

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  • In grasses the outer scales or glumes of the spikelets are sterile bracts (fig.

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  • Degenerations take place in the calyx, so that it becomes dry, scaly and glumaceous (like the glumes of grasses), as in the rushes (Juncaceae); hairy, as in Compositae; or a mere rim, as in some Umbelliferae and Acanthaceae, and in Madder (Rubia tinctorum, fig.

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  • The filament is usually of sufficient solidity to support the anther in an erect position; but sometimes, as in grasses, and other wind-pollinated flowers, it is very delicate and hair-like, so that the anther is pendulous (fig.

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  • When, however, the attachment is very narrow, and an articulation exists, the anthers are movable (versatile) and are easily turned by the wind, as in Tritonia, grasses (fig.

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  • The lobes of a stigma are flat and pointed as in Mimulus and Bignonia, fleshy and blunt, smooth or granular, or they are feathery, as in many grasses (fig.

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  • Taking first this most northerly locality, in Grinnell Land, we find the flora to comprise 2 horsetails, i i Conifers (including the living Pinus Abies), 2 grasses, a sedge, 2 poplars, a willow, 2 birches, 2 hazels, an elm, a Viburnum, a water-lily, and a lime.

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  • Where dunes are fairly stable ranker grasses and scrub species might seed in, shading out some of the more interesting low-growing vegetation.

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  • These grasses generally occur slightly higher up the beach profile than the true strandline species.

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  • Turnips are sometimes grown, but suffer greatly from being choked by the natural grasses produced by superabundant moisture.

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  • They are flavored with oat, brome and orchard grasses and only sweetened with organic fruits.

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  • We took a walk in the gardens and Charles was delighted to find several Twayblade Orchids among the grasses and wild flowers.

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  • Eggs are laid on various species of grasses but particularly cock's-foot, wavy hair-grass and common bent.

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  • The only vegetation it supports is a covering of wiry grasses .

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  • Here is a list of safe grasses for you to grow by the back door or near a window, where your cat may like to hang out.

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  • These grasses are safe for them, and are sold at many health food stores and some pet stores.

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  • Grasses will provide very important fiber for your cat and something safe they can play with.

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  • There are special grasses that you can grow indoors for your kitten to chew on.

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  • Biofuels are organic in nature, and can be made from a wide variety of sources such as corn, sugar cane, animal fat, sunflower seeds, wild grasses, and soybeans.

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  • There are quite a few materials in use, like reeds, grasses (such as bamboo), cotton, and polylactic acids (PLA), which are derived from agricultural crops like corn.

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  • They remind one of the reed chair seats in a typical French country kitchen as well as the fields of grasses that blow through Provence.

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  • You can find assembled wheat decorations from design stores and catalog retailers, or you can make your own from the discarded tops of the wheat (if you live in the country), or wheat-like grasses at craft stores.

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  • Place a large rustic vase of dried grasses on the mantel or coffee table, and add a bowl of fruits, like apples and oranges.

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  • You may use stencils to add other elements to the background such as grasses, pastures, tree lines, cityscapes, mountain range, and other elements.

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  • Buy colorful small bowls and place wheat grasses in them.

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  • Use a variety of different colored Easter basket grasses and place a yellow patch, a green patch and a pink (or purple) patch spaced along the length of the table like a bird's nest.

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  • Adding other fall plants, such as ripe grasses (wheat, rye, etc.), twigs, or pine cones to arrangements.

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  • Don't underestimate the earthy beauty of adding berries and grasses to your bouquet for an original touch.

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  • As far as grasses are concerned, you can add wheat or rye for even more (or alternative) texture.

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  • In lieu of the grasses, you could just opt for leaves in the beautifully rich fall colors.

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  • Grains and grasses are also popular for fall bouquets.

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  • You see, as the years went on, I became allergic to dogs, cats, dust, pollen and grasses.

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  • To do this, ticks will crawl up trees, shrubs, plants, tall grasses, fences, etc. and wait for animals and humans to come in contact and then drop off and attach themselves onto their unsuspecting victims.

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  • Additionally, Timberwolf includes a blend of herbs, grasses, nuts and berries to round out the nutritional content.

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  • Many parks treat the grasses with chemicals and pesticides.

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  • Brome Grass (Bromus) - At least one of this large genus of grasses is very graceful and worthy of culture-that is B. brizaeformis, a hardy biennial about 2 feet high, with large, graceful, and drooping heads.

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  • It is more valuable for cutting and drying than any of the Quaking Grasses.

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  • Cloud Grass (Agrostis) - A family of grasses, the annual kinds graceful when dried.

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  • It is fitted for association with such grasses as Arundo conspicua.

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  • S. calamagrostis, S. capillata, and S. elegantissima are other good Feather Grasses.

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  • Fescue Grass (Festuca) - Annual and perennial grasses, containing few species for the garden.

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  • Hair Grass (Aira) - Graceful grasses, of which one of the prettiest is A. pulchella, with hair-like stems, growing in light tufts 6 inches high.

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  • Hordeum - Grasses, of which the Barley is the most familiar type, few of ornamental value except H. jubatum (Squirrel-tail Grass), which has long feathery spikes.

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  • It grows in any soil in open places, is easily raised as an annual, and is one of the most distinct dwarfer grasses.

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  • Mays is one of the noblest of the grasses that thrive in our climate, almost indispensable to our gardens, with its fine appearance either isolated or associated with other fine-leaved plants.

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  • Love Grass (Eragrostis) - Grasses, some of which are worth cultivating for their elegant feathery panicles.

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  • Millet Grass (Milium) - Grasses, some of them graceful.

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  • Pennisetum - P. longistylum is one of the most elegant of grasses, 1 to 1 1/2 feet high; the flower-spikes, borne on slender stems, are from 4 to 6 inches long, of singular twisted form, and enveloped in a purplish feathery down.

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  • Poa - Perennial and annual grasses, few worth cultivating.

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  • It is one of the boldest and handsomest of hardy grasses for the margins of artificial water or streams, associated with such things as the Typhas, Acorus, Bulrush, and Water Dock.

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  • Quaking Grass (Briza) - A graceful family of grasses, American and European.

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  • Ribbon Grass (Phalaris) - Garden grasses useful in the wild garden or beside water, where the spreading roots can do no harm.

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  • Wild Rice (Zizania) - A small group of hardy grasses, excellent for planting in water, or in wet ground at the waterside.

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  • Never fertilize during droughts, when grasses naturally go dormant.

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  • Feed northern lawns planted with cool-season grasses in the fall.

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  • Summer is the peak growth period for warm-season grasses that are typically grown in the south.

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  • A mix of flowering broad-leaf species and turf grasses is resilient, low maintenance and can be very attractive.

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  • Grasses benefit from being planted in the fall as well.

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  • In addition to a vast collection of unique hydrangea varieties, visitors will have an opportunity to preview a wide selection of annuals, perennials, grasses, trees and other shrubs.

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  • As grubs, they feed upon the roots of plants, especially turf grasses.

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  • As they grow, spiderlings build increasingly larger webs at ever greater heights, until they reach maturity and construct their trademark two-foot diameter web between tree limbs, tall grasses or other suitably elevated, sunny location.

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  • Fall is the time of year when grasses and other plants prepare for winter dormancy.

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  • Cool season grasses include Kentucky bluegrass, fescue, and blends suited for northern climates.

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  • Warm or hot season grasses such as zoysia grass remain green during the heat of the summer but turn brown during the winter.

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  • Among the various types of grasses planted in the average lawn, the cool season grasses benefit most from fall preparation.

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  • Grass-fed beef is beef that grazes entirely on grasses throughout the life of the animal.

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  • An organic bedding bassinet is usually made of reeds or grasses woven into a basket shape with handles.

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  • The materials used in the bassinet are organically produced and sustainable, meaning that the reeds and grasses grow back quickly after being harvested.

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  • The most common are legumes and grasses.

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  • Yet, sheep that eat non-organic grasses and foods will inevitably have small amounts of pesticides and fertilizers in their coat, or in the wool you buy.

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  • Their entire systems are engineered to digest grasses.

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  • These highly concentrated supplements are a blend of antioxidant-rich whole foods, such as herbs, fruits, vegetables, and cereal grasses.

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  • Water soaks into the ground and from this nourishing energy springs plantlife in the form of grasses, bamboo, trees and all kinds of plants.

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  • They are able to juice grasses and leafy greens.

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  • Dry grasses, such as wheat or rye, can also help to create textural appeal.

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  • Centerpieces for Thanksgiving are often made out of Indian corn, decorative pumpkins, dried grasses, fall leaves and twigs.

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  • Flower arrangements and arrangements of other natural materials, such as leaves, pine cones, tree nuts, and grasses, create a nice atmosphere without overwhelming the surroundings.

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  • It seems that some people attract mosquitoes like magnets, while others can trek through moist and tall grasses unscathed.

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  • Mosquitoes are the most active from dawn to dusk and are attracted to areas with standing water and tall grasses, such as marshes and wetlands.

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  • Indian corn, quinoa, mandioca, possibly the potato, cotton and various fruits, including the strawberry, were already known to the aborigines, but with the conqueror came wheat, barley, oats, flax, many kinds of vegetables, apples, peaches, apricots, pears, grapes, figs, oranges and lemons, together with alfalfa and new grasses for the plains.

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  • On the dome-like tops of such mountains as are too high for trees are large clusters of rhododendrons and patches of grasses fringed with flowers.

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  • Grasses grow luxuriantly, and the savannahs of central Cuba are, in this respect, excellent cattle ranges.

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  • The smaller size of the flocks and the breeding of sheep for meat rather than for wool, the cultivation of English grasses and of extensive crops of turnips and other roots on which to fatten sheep and lambs, all tend to change sheep-farming from the mere grazing of huge mobs on wide, unimproved runs held by pastoral licences.

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  • The character of the soil and the moist cool climate enable English grasses to be sown almost everywhere, and 13,000,000 acres are now laid down with these.

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  • So profitable was sheep-farming seen to be that energetic settlers began to burn off the bracken and cut and burn the forest in the North Island and sow English grasses on the cleared land.

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  • In the forest regions of eastern Washington the underbrush is light, but grasses and a great variety of flowering plants abound.

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  • Grasses, mosses and Arctic flowering plants are abundant, but there are no trees excepting occasional dwarf willows.

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  • The mountain valleys are covered with little except grasses; on the higher parts of the mountains there are barren rocks or only a scant growth of timber; but many of the lower mountain slopes, especially those along the western border, are clothed with heavy timber, ponderosa pine, lodgepole pine, Douglas-fir and western larch being the principal species.

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  • fescue grasses often works best.

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