Grass sentence example

grass
  • She made grass grow.
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  • He brushed some grass from her back.
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  • I can make grass grow!
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  • No, it's daylight and I can see all the squiggly little things in the grass just fine.
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  • Grass tickled her feet, and she glanced down at the swath of green beneath her.
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  • The planet's energy warmed her, ran through her and into him, and grass grew beneath her feet.
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  • Grass had sprung up from boulders she touched, and she'd felt truly a part of her world for once in her life.
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  • He plucked a strand of grass and stuck it in his mouth.
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  • We would talk about the birds and flowers and grass and Jumbo and Pearl.
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  • The grass was as green as though it was springtime, and the golden ears of corn gathered together in heaps in the great fields looked very pretty.
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  • He watched the wolf disappear into the tall grass.
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  • He made no bones about the fact that my ass is grass and he's a lawn mower.
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  • It settled into the grass near the prisoner's feet.
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  • She'd thought the planet completely dead, but there was a bright patch of green grass beneath her and the pod.
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  • The latter prey on the various kinds of antelopes which swarm on the grass lands.
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  • They live in round grass huts with conical roofs.
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  • In the ensuing darkness, red and blue lights flashed his shadow on the wet grass.
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  • After a while they were riding around the side of a steep hill through tall grass.
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  • The three of them walked abreast along a narrow road consisting of no more than two bare strips of dirt in the grass.
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  • The adults ignored them, grazing contentedly on the deep grass.
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  • There was no shadow or footprints even though I seemed to be standing on grass.
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  • Alex caught Carmen and they both tumbled to the soft grass.
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  • She leaned against a wall, overlooking a stretch of rocky terrain punctuated with patches of yellow-green grass.
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  • Before he gave his Immortal soul to death, he.d never noticed how sweet the air was or how the grass sang as the wind whipped through it.
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  • Furious, she threw them and turned to find two of the beings kneeling by the grass, touching them.
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  • Even the ground was beginning to green with new shoots of grass.
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  • This arrangement is adopted in order to prevent excessive luxuriance in the grass.
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  • There are probably a half dozen of them waiting out there in the grass.
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  • Go back to the grass!
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  • The machete had sliced through his collarbone, and blood spurted from the wound into the courtyard.s grass.
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  • She set about wandering the halls once more, pausing to look out of large windows onto expanses of grass.
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  • She was too hot to cry, and she curled up on the grass.
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  • She motioned to the small patch of grass.
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  • While not strictly a meat-and-potatoes guy, he felt more comfortable with a meal he could recognize, like the week­day special at Uncle Sally's Galley, not something tiny and exotic, wrapped in dainty strands of imported grass.
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  • Ed perked his ears forward and snorted at something in the tall grass.
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  • They were in full bloom, their bright yellow blossoms contrasting starkly against the soft green of new grass.
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  • A real estate sign advertising a house for sale peeped out from tall grass beside the road.
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  • How many of the snakes relatives lurked in the grass?
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  • She shuddered involuntarily as it slowly uncoiled, stretched across the porch and eventually disappeared off the edge into the tall grass.
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  • Clara swung it back and forth, clipping the grass off neatly with each stroke.
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  • She took aim on a tall bunch of grass and swung the whip like a bat.
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  • No matter how hard she swung, the whip never managed to do more than maul the grass.
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  • She took a hacking swing at the grass.
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  • As the whip continued and reached the peak of its arch, he let it fall again, whipping more grass with the other side of the blade.
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  • With side to side swings, he quickly cut a small area of grass.
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  • She wrinkled her nose and hacked at the grass again.
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  • As the whip came across the grass, it lay over neatly, cut sharply by the whip.
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  • He watched with an amused expression as she quickly leveled a small area of grass.
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  • She hefted the whip and started working on another area of tall grass.
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  • I want to start on this grass early tomorrow morning while it's cool.
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  • I hate to tell you this, but you probably got the chiggers while you were cutting the grass.
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  • I did manage to get all that grass whacked down.
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  • Fleetingly, she registered the familiar scent of pine trees and grass and thought of how long it had been since she visited her family.
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  • Grass brushed the skin above her ankle, tickling her.
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  • She invented a deity of her own, a mysterious Corambe, half pagan and half Christian, and like Goethe erected to him a rustic altar of the greenest grass, the softest moss and the brightest pebbles.
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  • If the shape of the equipotential surfaces near it is influenced by trees, shrubs or grass, their influence will vary throughout the year.
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  • It grows in short grass in the temperate regions of all parts of the world.
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  • Like the mushroom, it grows in short open pastures and amongst the short grass of open roadsides; sometimes it appears on lawns, but it never occurs in woods or in damp shady places.
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  • Not satisfied with seed-sown grass or meadow turf, they experimented with seaside turf and found it answer admirably.
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  • Under the system of grazing practised throughout Australia it is customary to allow sheep, cattle and horses to run at large all the year round within enormous enclosures and to depend entirely upon the natural growth of grass for their subsistence.
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  • Among later residents commemorated is Edward Lloyd, who was the first person to show the value of esparto grass for the manufacture of paper, and thus started an industry which is one of the most important in Algeria.
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  • The district is famous for its melons, and also produces wine, olives, wheat and esparto grass.
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  • From Cartagena the principal exports are metallic ores, esparto grass, wine, cereals and fruit.
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  • Esparto grass, which grows freely in the vicinity, is the spartum, or Spanish broom, which gave the town its Roman designation of Carthago Spartaria.
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  • The natural grass meadows are extensive, and hay is grown all over the country, but especially in the P0 valley.
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  • Here we find open plant associations of Haifa or Esparto Grass (Stipa lenacissima) alternating with steppes of Chih (Artemisia herba-alba); and each plant association extends for several scores of miles.
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  • The quadrangle is larger than that of Shah Abbas; and at the eastern side is an immense blue dome, out of which quantities of grass were growing, the place being too sacred to be disturbed.
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  • They are of small size and live entirely on the ground, making nests of dried leaves, grass and sticks in holiow places and forming burrows in which they pass a great part of the day.
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  • The southern half of the country is mostly undulating grass land, well watered by streams and springs.
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  • It is built among picturesque hills on both sides of the river, and is in the midst of the famous Kentucky "blue grass region" and of a rich lumber-producing region.
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  • The grass vegetation is very rich, and, according to lists still incomplete, no fewer than 1654 flowering plants are known.
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  • There are broad plains covered with salt and alkali, and others supporting only scattered bunch grass, sage bush, cactus and other arid land plants.
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  • Two vegetable products, the " balsam bog " (Bolas glebaria) and the " tussock grass " (Dactylis caespitosa) have been objects of curiosity and interest ever since the first accounts of the islands were given.
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  • The seeds are harvested from various grasses, especially from Aristida oligantha, a species known as " ant rice," which often grows in quantity close to the site selected for the nest, but the statement that the ants deliberately sow this grass is an error, due, according to Wheeler, to the sprouting of germinating seeds.
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  • Other thriving local industries include the manufacture of oil, soap, flour, leather, alcohol and esparto grass rugs.
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  • Green crops, such as turnips, clover and rye grass, began to be alternated with grain crops, whence the name alternate husbandry.
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  • Nevertheless, the decade closed more hopefully than it opened, and found farmers taking a keener interest in grass land, in live stock and in dairying.
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  • The drought of 1898 was interrupted by copious rains in June, and these falling on a warm soil led to a rapid growth of grass and, as measured by yield per acre, an exceedingly heavy crop of hay.
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  • The most notable feature in connexion with the cropping of the land of the United Kingdom between 1875 and 1905 was the lessened cultivation of the cereal crops associated with an expansion in the area of grass land.
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  • Under the old Norfolk or four-course rotation (roots, barley, clover, wheat) land thus seeded with clover or grass seeds was intended to be ploughed up at the end of a year.
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  • Labour difficulties, low prices of produce, bad seasons and similar causes provided inducements for leaving the land in grass for two years, or over three years or more, before breaking it up for wheat.
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  • Whilst much grass land has been laid down with the intention from the outset that it should be permanent, at the same time some considerable areas have through stress of circumstances been allowed to drift from the temporary or rotation grass area to the permanent list, and have thus still further diminished the area formerly under the dominion of the plough.
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  • The column relating to permanent grass in Table IV.
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  • Comparing 1905 with 1875 the increase in permanent grass land amounted to over five million acres, or about 21%.
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  • The hay made from clover, sainfoin and grasses under rotation generally gives a bigger average yield than that from permanent grass land.
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  • Again, although from the richest old permanent meadow-lands very heavy crops of hay are taken season after season, the general average yield of permanent grass is about 3 cwt.
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  • Another field experiment of singular interest is that relating to the mixed herbage of permanent meadow, for which seven acres of old grass land were set apart in Rothamsted Park in 1856.
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  • They are effected chiefly by some alteration in the description of the root-crop, and perhaps by the introduction of the potato crop; by growing a different cereal, or it may be more than one cereal consecutively; by the growth of some other leguminous crop than clover, since " clover-sickness " may result if that crop is grown at too short intervals, or the intermixture of grass seeds with the clover, and perhaps by the extension by one or more years of the period allotted to this member of the rotation.
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  • More attention is thus being devoted to dairy produce, not only on grass farms, but on those that are mainly arable.
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  • The most able exponent of this subject in Great Britain was John Curtis, whose treatise on Farm Insects, published in 1860, is still the standard British work dealing with the insect foes of corn, roots, grass and stored corn.
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  • Sugar-canes suffer from the sugar cane borer (Diatioca sacchari) in the West Indies; tobacco from the larvae of hawk moths (Sphingidae) in America; corn and grass from various Lepidopterous pests all over the world.
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  • Grapes, barley, esparto grass, dry figs, almonds and zinc are exported.
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  • It was formerly supposed that this custom was peculiar to a single species, which was called the "gossamer" spider from the fact that the floating webs, when brought to the earth by rain or intercepted by bushes and trees, coat the foliage or grass with a sheeting of gossamer-like silk; but the habit is now known to be practised by the newly-hatched young of a great variety of species belonging to several distinct families.
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  • As instances of procryptic or celative coloration may be mentioned that of the species of the genus Dolomedes, one of the Lycosidae, which lives amongst reeds and is marked with a pair of longitudinal yellow lines which harmonize with the upright stalks of the vegetation, and Lycosa pitta, which lives on the sand, can scarcely be seen on account of its mottled pattern: Sparassus smargdulus and the species of Pecucetia, which are found amongst grass or low green herbage, are mostly green in colour, and Salticus scenicus is banded with white and black to match the grey tint of the rocks and stone walls on which it hunts its prey.
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  • All grass and weeds must be kept down, and the crust must be broken after every rain, but these seem to be the only principles upon which all agree.
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  • The largest of a group of beautiful lakes in the higher Andean valleys is the celebrated NahuelHuapi (Lion Grass), which is nearly 50 m.
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  • An ascent made by Dr Honda of the imperial university of Japan showed that, up to a height of 6000 ft., the mountain is clothed with primeval forests of palms, banyans, cork trees, camphor trees, tree ferns, interlacing creepers and dense thickets of rattan or stretches of grass higher than a man's stature.
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  • They burrow among tall grass.
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  • It is partly under grass and partly wooded, and is inhabited by Maoris, by whom it is regarded as holy ground.
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  • There are four classes in Somaliland: (I) nomads who breed ponies, sheep, cattle and camels, live entirely on milk and meat, and follow the rains in search of grass; (2) settled Somali, comparatively few, living in or near the coasts; (3) outcast races, not organized in tribes but living scattered all over Somaliland; they are hunters, workers in iron and leather, and the chief collectors of gum and resin; (4) traders.
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  • Blocks of dressed stone overgrown by grass lie in regular formation; a series of parallel revetment walls on hills commanding passes exist, as do relics of ancient water-tanks.
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  • The Haud (only the northern part of which is British territory - the rest is Abyssinian) consists partly of thorn jungle, the haud of the Somali, partly of rolling grass plains, called ban, and partly of semi-desert country called aror.
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  • The southern part of Alberta is covered by a short grass, very nutritive, but drying up in the middle of summer until the whole prairie is brown and unattractive.
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  • They feed chiefly on grass, but also on moss, lichens and tender shoots of the willow and pine.
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  • Leaving the higher mountains in about 5° 15' N., 40° E., the Ganale enters a large slightly undulating grass plain which extends south of the valley of the Daua and occupies all the country eastward to the junction of the two rivers.
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  • In those parts of the desert which have a hard level soil of clay, a few stunted mimosas, acacias and other shrubs are produced, together with rue, various bitter and aromatic plants, and occasionally tufts of grass.
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  • Several of the bazaars are vaulted over with brickwork, but the greater number are merely covered with flat beams which support roofs of dried leaves or branches of trees and grass.
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  • Between these two chains are round hills consisting of lavas or sometimes of volcanic tuffs, covered with the long silvery grass which also clothes vast prairies in Java and Sumatra.
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  • Other important crops in the order of their value are oats, hay and forage, Indian corn, barley, flax-seed, potatoes, rye, grass seeds, wild grass, clover, beans, peas, and miscellaneous vegetables and orchard products.
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  • Their houses, regularly ranged in streets, are built of adobes thatched with coarse grass.
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  • It lives entirely away from houses, commonly taking up its abode in wheat or hay fields, where it builds a round grass nest about the size of a cricket-ball, in which it brings up its young.
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  • In the alpine tracts of the north the narrowness of the valleys and the steep stony slopes strewn with debris, on which only lichens and mosses are able to grow, make every plot of green grass (even if it be only of Carex) valuable.
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  • In spring the traveller crosses a sea of grass above which the flowers of the paeony, aconite, Orobus, Carallic, Saussurea and the like wave 4 or 5 ft.
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  • Foxes will, however, often take up their residence in woods, or even in water-meadows with large tussocks of grass, remaining concealed during the day and issuing forth on marauding expeditions at night.
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  • The city is situated in the blue grass region of Missouri, and is a shippingpoint for horses and mules.
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  • This epoch, when grass grew even in High Street, long lingered in the popular memory as the " dark age."
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  • The chief buildings are of brick, but most of the natives dwell in grass tukls.
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  • The midland region is characterized by grass lands (the Natal grasses are long and coarse) and by considerable areas of flat-topped thorn bush mimosa.
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  • A grass belt separates the thorn bush from the districts carrying heavy timber, found mainly in the upland zone, along the sides of the mountains exposed to the rains and in kloofs.
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  • The Australian Eucalyptus and Casuarina in great variety, and many other imported trees, including syringas, wattles, acacias, willows, pines, cypress, cork and oak all thrive when properly planted and protected from grass fires.
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  • Since the first advent of white colonists many springs and pans and small streams have dried up, this desiccation being attributed, not so much to decreased rainfall, as to the burning off of the grass every winter, so that the water, instead of soaking in, runs off the hard, baked'ground into the larger rivers.
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  • Many regions suffer permanently from deficient rainfall; in others, owing to the absence of irrigation works, the water supply is lost, while the burning of the grass at the end of summer, a practice adopted by many farmers, tends to impoverish the soil and render it arid.
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  • After July the tactics of the Boer executive were simply directed towards putting off a crisis till the beginning of October, when the grass would be growing on the veld, and meanwhile towards doing all they could in their despatches to put the blame on Great Britain.
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  • Grass, Die russischen Sekten (Leipzig, 1906), Bd.
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  • The latter is known as the llanos of the Orinoco, a region described by Humboldt as a vast " sea of grass," with islands of wood scattered here and there.
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  • The decline in stock-raising would also suspend the practice of burning off the dead grass to improve the new pasturage.
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  • Much of this region is covered with gamelote, a tall, worthless, grass with sharp stiff blades.
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  • Syracuse rose again out of her desolation - grass, it is said, grew in her streets - and, with an influx of a multitude of new colonists from Greece and from towns of Sicily and Italy, once more became a prosperous city.
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  • Grass grew in the area of the Royal Exchange, at Whitehall, and in the principal streets of the city.
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  • Large areas of the plateau are covered with grass and occasional thorn trees.
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  • The majority of the buildings are grass tukls.
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  • On this should be laid at least a foot thick of coarse, hard, rubbly material, a layer of rough turf, grass side downwards, being spread over it to prevent the compost from working down.
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  • The new warp is allowed to lie fallow during the winter after being laid out in four-yard " lands " and becomes dry enough to be sown with oats and grass and clover seeds in the following spring.
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  • The nest is a neat structure of coarse grass and moss, mixed with earth, and plastered internally with mud, and here the female lays from four to six eggs of a blue colour speckled with brown.
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  • These central uplands of Tunisia in an uncultivated state are covered with alfa or esparto grass; but they also grow considerable amounts of cereals - wheat in the north, barley in the south.
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  • The principal exports are olive oil, wheat, esparto grass, barley, sponges, dates, fish (especially tunny), hides, horses, wool, phosphates, copper, zinc and lead.
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  • In the loftiest regions the pasture chiefly consists of a coarse grass (Stipa ychu), of which the llamas eat the upper blades and the sheep browse on the tender shoots beneath.
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  • A partridge called yutu frequents the long grass.
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  • The dried dung of the llama (taquia) is generally used as fuel, as in pre-Spanish times, for roasting ores, as also a species of grass called ichu (Stipa incana), and a singular woody fungus, called yareta (Azorella umbellifera), found growing on the rocks at elevations exceeding 12,000 ft.
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  • The cercaria swims freely for a time and either encysts directly on grass or weeds or it enters a second host which may be another mollusc, an insect, crustacean or fish, and then encysts.
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  • We have people whose tread was so light that no blade of grass bent beneath their weight.
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  • The platypus is aquatic in its habits, passing most of its time in the water or close to the margin of lakes and streams, swimming and diving with the greatest ease, and forming for the purpose of sleeping and breeding deep burrows in the banks, which generally have two orifices, one just above the water level, concealed among long grass and leaves, and the other below the surface.
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  • The passage at first runs obliquely upwards in the bank, sometimes to a distance of as much as 50 ft., and expands at its termination into a cavity, the floor of which is lined with dried grass and leaves, and in which, it is said, the eggs are laid' and the young brought up. Their food consists of aquatic insects, small crustaceans and worms, which are caught under water, the sand and small stones at the bottom being turned over with their bills to find them.
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  • Water-deer frequent the neighbourhood of the large Chinese rivers where they crouch amid the reeds and grass in such a manner as to be invisible, even when not completely concealed by the covert.
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  • Grass grows, however, to the very edges of the crater.
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  • The grass used for Japanese lawns loses its verdure in autumn and remains from November to March a greyish brown blot upon the scene.
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  • High relief carving corresponds to the kaisho, or most classical form of writing; medium relief to the gyosho, or semi-cursive style; and low relief to the sOsho or grass character.
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  • Acting upon that theory, the experts of TokyO and Nagoya have produced many very beautiful specimens of monochrome enamelyellow (canary or straw), rose du Barry, liquid-dawn, red, aubergine purple, green (grass or leaf), dove-grey and lapis lazuli bl,ue.
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  • This species chiefly frequents swampy grass jungle and is fond of a mud-bath.
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  • Lastly we have the white - Burchell's, or square-mouthedrhinoceros (Rhinoceros (Diceros) simus), the largest of the five, and differing from the other species in having a square truncated upper lip. In conformity with the structure of the mouth, this species lives entirely by browsing on grass, and is therefore more partial to open countries or districts where there are broad grassy valleys between the tracts of bush.
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  • The moccasin-snake ranges fromMassachusetts and Kansas to Florida and Texas and into Mexico, preferring swampy localities or meadows with high grass, where it hunts for small mammals and birds.
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  • Forest and pasture land do not properly exist: the place of the first is for the most part taken by a low brushwood; grass is not plentiful, and the higher ridges maintain alpine plants only so long as patches of snow continue to lie.
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  • The female makes her nest of moss, dried leaves and grass in the hollow of a tree, but sometimes in a hole among rocks or ruined buildings, and produces several young at a birth, usually from four to six.
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  • The process was introduced in 1858 by Deetken at Grass Valley, California, where the waste minerals, principally pyrites from tailings, had been worked for a considerable time by amalgamation.
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  • This species usually constructs its nest on the bottom, excavating a hollow in which a bed of grass, rootlets or fibres is prepared; walls are then raised, and the whole is roofed over with the like material.
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  • The prosperity of the town is largely due to the export trade in phosphates, esparto grass, oil, almonds, pistachio nuts, sponges, wool, &c. There is in the Gulf of Gabes a rise and fall of 5 ft.
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  • Their chief food is grass and seeds, but they also consume roots.
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  • The surface of the province is flat and low, chiefly open plains thinly covered with grass.
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  • The rich colour of the grass is due to the fertilizing quality of the decaying fungi, which are peculiarly rich in nitrogenous substances.
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  • The most complete and symmetrical grass rings are formed by Marasmius oreades, the fairy ring champignon, but the mushroom and many other species occasionally form rings, both on grass-lands and in woods.
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  • Straw or grass hats, straw mats, samshu (from the Shao-sing district), Chinese drugs, vegetable tallow and fish are among the chief exports; in 1904 the hats numbered 2,125,566, though in 1863 they had only amounted to 40,000, and the mats, mainly despatched to south China, average from 1,000,000, to 2,000,000.
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  • The corona obsidionalis was formed of grass and flowers plucked on the spot and given to the general who conquered a city.
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  • The bush is grouped in copses on meadows, which produce a coarse tall grass.
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  • The plateau is partly grass land without bush and forest, partly steppe covered with mimosa bush, which sometimes is almost impenetrable.
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  • The swampy regions of the Nile and of the Eastern province are characterized by an extravagant growth of papyrus and other rushes, of reeds and coarse grass.
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  • Most of the foreshores of New Guinea are eucalyptusdotted grass lands; iri the interior dense forests prevail to a height of many thousand feet.
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  • Vast tracts of the country have been, however, deforested by fire, and these are covered by the tall ineradicable grass, Imperata arundinacea.
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  • The remains, which include not only the skeleton and skin, but likewise the droppings, were found buried in grass which appears to have been chopped up by man, and it thus seems not only evident that these ground-sloths dwelt in the cave, but that there is a considerable probability of their having been kept there in a semi-domesticated state by the early human inhabitants of Patagonia.
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  • As the mountains of Valencia and Catalonia effectually bar out the fertilizing moisture of the sea-winds, much of the province is a sheer wilderness, stony, ash-coloured, scarred with dry watercourses, and destitute of any vegetation except thin grass and heaths.
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  • West of the dividing crest they are forest clad; east thereof their stony grimness is but slightly softened by growths of scrub and tussock grass.
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  • The swamps covered with flax and giant bulrushes were often redeemed to the eye by sheets of golden-plumed toe-toe, a kind of pampas grass.
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  • Over the greater part of the plains little now grows save veld, the coarse long grass of South Africa.
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  • The Great Plains are covered for the most part only with bunch grass which grows in tufts, leaving the ground visible between, and except in May and June presents a yellow and withered appearance.
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  • Mixed with the bunch grass are occasional patches of sage brush.
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  • The east is devoted chiefly to stock raising; for cattle, horses and sheep thrive well on the bunch grass except when it is covered with snow.
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  • The rest is open rice-land, alternating with great stretches of grass, reed jungle and bamboo scrub, much of which is under water for quite three months of the year.
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  • The food of the white bear consists chiefly of seals and fish, in pursuit of which it shows great power of swimming and diving, and a considerable degree of sagacity; but its food also includes the carcases of whales, birds and their eggs, and grass and berries when these can be had.
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  • Even the shoulder-blades are said to be put in requisition for cutting grass."
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  • The vegetation consists almost entirely of scrubby bushes of several varieties, including tamarisks and wild briers, of reeds (kamish), and of grass on the yaylaks (pasture-grounds) of the middle ranges.
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  • The southern slope of the range is gentle but short, the northern slope long and steep. Grass is able to grow, and animal life is more abundant.
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  • The dung of black cattle, horses, sheep, goats, &c., which contains sal ammoniac ready formed, is collected during the first four months of the year, when the animals feed on the spring grass, a kind of clover.
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  • Through a cleft in the rock a ray of light falls upon Iseult's face, Mark stops up the crevice with his glove (or with grass and flowers), and goes his way, determined to recall his wife and nephew.
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  • Another grass, Lygeum Spartum, with stiff rush-like leaves, growing in rocky soil on the high plains of countries bordering on the Mediterranean, especially of Spain and Algeria, is also a source of esparto.
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  • Behind the Tell is a lofty table-land with an average elevation of 3000 ft., consisting of vast plains, for the most part arid or covered with esparto grass, in the depressions of which are great salt lakes and swamps (Arabic, shats) fed by streams which can find no outlet to the sea through the encircling hills.
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  • The forests suffer great damage from fires, occasioned in part by the custom of burning up the grass every autumn, and in part by incendiarism.
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  • The chief exports are sheep and oxen, most of which are raised in Morocco and Tunisia, and horses; animal products, such as wool and skins; wine, cereals (rye, barley, oats), vegetables, fruits (chiefly figs and grapes for the table) and seeds, esparto grass, oils and vegetable extracts (chiefly olive oil), iron ore, zinc, natural phosphates, timber, cork, crin vegetal and tobacco.
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  • In the Sud Oranais an insurrection, fomented by a marabout named Bu-Amama, broke out in 1881, and the insurgents massacred the European labourers engaged in the collection of alfa (or esparto) grass.
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  • It has in the east the Karnap-chul steppe, covered with grass in early summer, and in the north an intrusion of the Kara-kum sand desert.
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  • The remainder of the state which lies east of the Tennessee river is divided into the Highland Rim Plateau and a lowland basin, eroded in the Highland Rim Plateau and known as the Blue Grass Region; this region is separated from the Highland Rim Plateau by a semicircular escarpment extending from Portsmouth, Ohio, at the mouth of the Scioto river, to the mouth of the Salt river below Louisville; it is bounded north by the Ohio river.
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  • This Blue Grass Region is like a beautiful park, without ragged cliffs, precipitous slopes, or flat marshy bottoms, but marked by rounded hills and dales.
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  • In its primeval state Kentucky was generally well timbered, but most of the middle section has been cleared and here the blue grass is now the dominant feature of the flora.
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  • The best soils are the alluvium in the bottom-lands along some of the larger rivers and that of the Blue Grass Region, which is derived from a limestone rich in organic matter (containing phosphorus) and rapidly decomposing.
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  • On the escarpment around the Blue Grass Region the soils are for the most part either cherty or stiff with clay and of inferior quality.
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  • The culture of tobacco, which is the second most valuable crop in the state, was begun in the north part about 1780 and in the west and south early in the 19th century, but it was late in that century before it was introduced to any considerable extent in the Blue Grass Region, where it was then in a measure substituted for the culture of hemp. By 1849 Kentucky ranked second only to Virginia in the production of tobacco, and in 1899 it was far ahead of any other state in both acreage and yield, there being in that year 384,805 acres, which was 34'9% of the total acreage in the continental United States, yielding 314,288,050 lb.
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  • The two most important tobaccogrowing districts are: the Black Patch, in the extreme south-west corner of the state, which with the adjacent counties in Tennessee grows a black heavy leaf bought almost entirely by the agents of foreign governments (especially Austria, Spain and Italy) and called " regie " tobacco; and the Blue Grass Region, as far east as Maysville, and the hill country south and east, whose product, the red and white Burley, is a fine-fibred light leaf, peculiarly absorbent of licorice and other adulterants used in the manufacture of sweet chewing tobacco, and hence a peculiarly valuable crop, which formerly averaged 22 cents a pound for all grades.'
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  • The high price received by the hill growers of the Burley induced farmers in the Blue Grass to plant Burley tobacco there, where the crop proved a great success, more than twice as much (sometimes 2000 lb) being grown to the acre in the Blue Grass as in the hills and twice as large patches being easily managed.
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  • So, although a price of 6'5 cents a pound covered expenses of the planter of Burley in the Blue Grass, who could use the same land for tobacco once in four years, this price did not repay the hill planter.
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  • The additional production of the Blue Grass Region sent the price of Burley tobacco down to this figure and below it.
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  • Wheat is grown both in the Blue Grass Region and farther west; 'and the best country for fruit is along the Ohio river between Cincinnati and Louisville and in the hilly land surrounding the Blue Grass Region.
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  • The thoroughbred Kentucky horse has long had a world-wide reputation for speed; and the Blue Grass Region, especially Fayette, Bourbon and Woodford counties, is probably the finest horse-breeding region in America and has large breeding farms. In Fayette county, in 1900, the average value of colts between the ages of one and two years was $377.78.
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  • In the Blue Grass Region many thoroughbred shorthorn cattle and fine mules are raised.
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  • There are mineral springs, especially salt springs, in various parts of the state, particularly in the Blue Grass Region; these are now of comparatively little economic importance; no salt was reported among the state's manufactures for 1905, and in 1907 only 736,920 gallons of mineral waters were bottled for sale.
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  • There was the same political rivalry between the slave-holding farmers of the Blue Grass Region and the " poor whites " of the mountain districts that there was in Virginia between the tide-water planters and the mountaineers.
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  • For a brief description of the Blue Grass Region, see James Lane Allen's The Blue Grass Region of Kentucky and other Kentucky Articles (New York, 1900).
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  • The rainy season completely changes the appearance of these plains, new grass appears, and wheat and Indian corn are cultivated.
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  • Cattle-raising was once the principal industry in the interior, but has been almost extinguished by the devastating droughts and increasing aridity caused by the custom of annually burning over the campos to improve the grass.
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  • A large part of the country is covered with grass or shrub, chiefly acacia.
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  • The increasing dryness of the land is partly, perhaps largely, attributable to the cutting down of timber trees both by natives and by whites, and to the custom of annually burning the grass, which is destructive to young wood.
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  • In the eastern district are stretches of grass land, both sweet and sour veld.
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  • In the " bush " are found tufts of tall coarse grass with the space between bare or covered with herbaceous creepers or water-bearing tubers.
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  • In grass countries, where "flying fences" are found, the rate of speed must of necessity be quicker than when about to take a Devonshire bank of some 7 ft.
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  • The true prairies, when first explored, were covered with a rich growth of natural grass and annual flowering plants.
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  • The southern part of the state includes the Everglades (qv.), a large area of low, flat, marshy land, overgrown with tall reedy grass, a veritable wilderness; thus giving Florida an unenvied first rank among the states in marsh area.
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  • It is chiefly composed of moss and wool, lined internally with grass, wool, feathers, and whatever soft material the locality affords.
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  • The city is in a blue grass country, in which much live stock is bred; and it is an important market for draft horses.
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  • On the eastern flanks of the ranges the forest is much thinner, and on the interior plateau and in many of the valleys largely gives way to open grass land.
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  • In this region cattle and horses can generally winter on the grass of the ranges without being fed, though in hard seasons there may be heavy losses.
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  • Austrian brome grass (Bromus inermis) and western rye grass (Agropyrum tenerum) are both extensively grown for hay in the North-West Provinces.
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  • The forests are extensive and fine, and are now superintended by government officials, called 8avod, XaKEs, in spite or with the connivance of whom the timber is being rapidly destroyed - partly from the merciless way in which it is cut by the proprietors, partly from its being burnt by the shepherds, for the sake of the rich grass that springs up after such conflagrations, and partly owing to the goats, whose bite kills all the young growths.
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  • They are exceedingly active and surefooted, having perhaps no equal in traversing rocks and precipitous ground; and they feed on moss, grass, and leaves of the plants which grow on the mountains.
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  • It only visits the land to deposit its single white egg, which is laid on a rocky ledge, where a shallow nest is made in the turf and lined with a little dried grass.
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  • The brown hare is a night-feeding animal, remaining during the day on its "form," as the slight depression is called which it makes in the open field, usually among grass.
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  • It is a strong grass, growing to a height of from 4 to 8 or even 16 ft.; the leaves are sheathing, solitary, and about 2 in.
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  • The rice plant is an annual grass with long linear glabrous leaves, each provided with a long sharply pointed ligule.
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  • The pili grass (Heteropogon contortus) is also noxious, for its awns get badly entangled in the wool of sheep. The native manienie (Stenotaphrum americanum) and kukai (Panicum pruriens), however, are relished by stock and are found on all the inhabited islands; the Bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon), a June grass (Poa annua), and Guinea grass (Panicum jumentorum) have also been successfully introduced.
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  • The Paspalum orbiculare is the large swamp grass with which the natives covered their houses.
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  • On the island of Niihau is a fine grass (Cyperus laevigatus), out of which the beautiful Niihau mats were formerly made; it is used in making Panama hats.
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  • The native dwellings are constructed of wood, or occasionally are huts thatched with grass at the sides and top. What little cooking is undertaken among the poorer natives is usually done outside.
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  • The nest, under a tussock of grass or a stone, is constructed of short dry straws, and usually lined with hair.
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  • Their food is entirely vegetable, especially grass roots and stalks, shoots of dwarf birch, reindeer lichens and mosses, in search of which they form, in winter, long galleries through the turf or under the snow.
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  • Coal and coke are largely exported, and corn, timber and esparto grass are imported.
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  • Of this farm he " tilled as much as kept half a dozen men," retaining also grass for a hundred sheep and thirty cattle.
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  • In spring the grass on the rolling plains is soon parched.
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  • The country is dotted over with large and small lakes, generally salt or alkaline, and intersected by streams, and the soil is boggy and covered with tussocks of grass, thus resembling the Siberian tundra and the Pamirs.
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  • The peculiar form of tussocky grass which prevails in the Pamirs is the characteristic feature of the Tibetan Chang-t'ang of the Tsaidam plains and of the bogs north-east of Lhasa.
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  • Lead is obtained among the mountains, and the more sheltered valleys produce grain, wine, oil, fruit and esparto grass.
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  • Guinea grass grows abundantly on the hillsides, affording excellent pasturage; the forests, though few, include the mahogany and other useful trees.
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  • On a rough estimate we may reckon that, of the space lying between the summits of the Alps and the low country on either side, one-quarter is available for cultivation, of which about one-half may be vineyards and corn-fields, while the remainder produces forage and grass.
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  • In the case of villa gardens there is usually little choice: the land to be occupied is cut up into plots, usually rectangular, and of greater or less breadth, and in laying out these plots there is generally a smaller space left in the front of the villa residence and a larger one behind, the front plot being usually devoted to approaches, shrubbery and plantations, flower beds being added if space permits, while the back or more private plot has a piece of lawn grass with flower beds next the house, and a space for vegetables and fruit trees at the far end, this latter being shut off from the lawn by an intervening screen of evergreens or other plants.
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  • Grass walks were common in English gardens during the prevalence of the Dutch taste, but, owing to the frequent humidity of the climate, they have in a great measure been discarded.
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  • In one the ground is turf, out of which flower-beds, of varied patterns, are cut; in the other the flower-beds are separated by gravel walks, without the introduction of grass.
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  • It is of the utmost importance that a good selection of grasses be made, and that pure seeds should be obtained (see Grass And Grassland).
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  • Form and repair lawns and grass walks by laying turf and sowing perennial grass-seeds; mow the lawns frequently; plant evergreens.
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  • If the lawn is thin in spots, these places may be raked over heavily and new grass seed sown.
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  • Be careful not to mow the grass too short in fall.
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  • Before winter, all tall grass and loose litter should be taken away; if this is not done, then the first snow should be tramped heavily around the plants, in order to destroy any nesting-places.
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  • On the west of the city a pretty road planted with trees and grass plots leads from the Zoological Gardens (1857), on the north to the small park overlooking the river.
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  • It is situated in the "Blue Grass Region," near the foothills of the Cumberland Mountains.
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  • Thyme and the small white dune-rose (Rosa pimpinellifolia) also grow in the dunes, and wall-pepper (Sedum acre), field fever-wort, reindeer moss, common asparagus, sheep's fescue grass, the pretty Solomon-seal (Polygonatum officinale), and the broadleaved or marsh orchis (Orchis latifolia).
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  • Sea-aster flourishes in the Wadden of Friesland and Groningen, the Dollart and the Zeeland estuaries, giving place nearer the shore to sandspurry (Spergularia), or sea-poa or floating meadow grass (Glyceria maritima), which grows up to the dikes, and affords pasture for cattle and sheep. Along the coast of Overysel and in the Biesbosch lake club-rush, or scirpus, is planted in considerable quantities for the hat-making industry, and common sea-wrack (Zostera marina) is found in large patches in the northern half of the Zuider Zee, where it is gathered for trade purposes during the months of June, July and August.
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  • In the northeastern districts the primeval forest gives place to park-like country, consisting of plains covered with high coarse grass, and dotted with occasional baobabs, as well as with wild plum, shea-butter, dwarf date, fan palms, and other small trees.
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  • All commerce and industry was at a standstill; grass grew in the streets of Bruges and Ghent; and the trade of Antwerp was transferred to Amsterdam.
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  • The lion lives chiefly in sandy plains and rocky places interspersed with dense thorn-thickets, or frequents the low bushes and tall rank grass and reeds that grow along the sides of streams and near the springs where it lies in wait for the larger herbivorous animals on which it feeds.
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  • Hungarian grass, Setaria italica (also called Panicum italicum), a native of eastern Asia is one of the most wholesome and palatable Indian cereals.
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  • Polish millet is P. sanguinale; P. frumentaceum, shamalo, a Deccan grass, is probably a native of tropical Africa; P. decompositum is the Australian millet, its grains being made into cakes by the aborigines.
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  • P. maximum is the Guinea grass, native of tropical Africa; it is perennial, grows 8 ft.
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  • The size of this depends water is usually preferable for grass land, thick for y P g upon the quantity of water required, but whatever its size its bottom at its origin should be as low as the bed of the river, in order that it may carry down as much as possible of the river mud.
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  • For, though grass will grow even under ice, yet if ice be formed under and around the roots of the grasses the plants may be thrown out by the expansion of the water at the moment of its conversion into ice.
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  • In spring the newly grown and tender grass will be easily destroyed by frost if it be not protected by water, or if the ground be not made thoroughly dry.
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  • For we are not dealing in these grass lands with a semi-aquatic plant like rice, nor are we supplying any lack of water in the soil, nor are we restoring the moisture which the earth cannot retain under a burning sun.
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  • It appears, however, that a very large share of the benefits of water-irrigation is attributable to the mere contact of abundance of moving water, of an even temperature, with the roots of the grass.
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  • During the years in which the soil is allowed to lie fallow, the grass and weeds which spring up serve as pasture for cattle, but the poverty of the pasture is such that at least two hectares are required for the maintenance of every animal.
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  • The southern part of the low coast is chiefly grass land, while the river mouths and arms of the bays are lined with mangroves.
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  • On Cameroon peak the forest ascends to 8000 ft.; above it is grass land.
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  • Towards the east the forest gradually grows thinner, assumes a park-like appearance, and finally disappears, wide grass uplands taking its place.
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  • In the deserts haifa grass and several kinds of thorn bushes grow; and wherever rain or springs have moistened the ground, numerous wild flowers thrive.
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  • In the absence of grass, the chief green food for cattle and horses is clover, grown largely in the basin lands of Upper Egypt.
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  • Above the tree line the vegetation continues only a comparatively short distance, consisting chiefly of tussocks of coarse grass, and occasional flowering.
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  • Ballades in Blue China (1880, enlarged edition, 1888), Ballads and Verses Vain (1884), selected by Mr Austin Dobson; Rhymes a la Mode (1884), Grass of Parnassus (1888), Ban and Arriere Ban (1894), New Collected Rhymes (1905).
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  • The park (Alameda de la Alhambra), which in spring is overgrown with wild-flowers and grass, was planted by the Moors with roses, oranges and myrtles; its most characteristic feature, however, is the dense wood of English elms brought hither in 1812 by the duke of Wellington.
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  • Sisyrinchium, blue-eyed grass, is a new-world genus extending FIG.
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  • Where the rock projects it more usually appears in low crags and knolls, from which long trails of grey or purple debris descend till they are lost among the grass.
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  • The females lay a vast number of eggs upon grass stems near water.
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  • The highest temperature of nocturnal radiation on grass was 73.1°, recorded in May, and the lowest 67.2°, recorded in January.
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  • Mayflies and dragon-flies danced in the sunlight; lizards darted across the paths; and legions of spiders pervaded the grass, many very beautiful - frosted - silver backs, or curious, like the saltigrades, who took a few steps and then gave a leap. There were crickets in infinite numbers; and flies innumerable, from slim daddy-long-legs to ponderous, black, hairy fellows known to science as Dejeaniae; hymenopterous insects in profusion, including our old friend the bishop of Ambato (possibly Dielis), in company with another formidable stinger, with chrome antennae, called by the natives ` the Devil '; and occasional Phasmas (caballo de palo) crawling painfully about, like animated twigs."
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  • There" is enough grass on the surface to feed a few cattle, and the island contains a spring, but it is uninhabited.
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  • A columnar cave exists towards the northern side of the island, and on the eastern are the remains of a tower, with several vaulted rooms. Two springs occur and some scanty grass affords subsistence to rabbits, and, on the higher levels, to goats.
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  • Rice grows wild, and several kinds of Poa grass are used as food by the natives.
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  • The most important streams within the area are the Hudson, Black, Oswegatchie, Grass, Raquette, Saranac and Ausable rivers.
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  • Some hold the view that maize originated from a common Mexican fodder grass, Euchlaena mexicana, known as Teosinte, a closely allied plant which when crossed with maize yields a maize-like hybrid.
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  • In the hills shoes resembling sandals, called chaplis, made of wood, straw or grass are worn.
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  • Yecla has a thriving trade in the grain, wine, oil, fruit and esparto grass produced in the surrounding country.
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  • These were lands enclosed and held in severalty during the growing of corn and grass and thrown open to pasturage during the rest of the year for those who had common rights.
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  • These commoners might be the several owners, the inhabitants of a parish, freemen of a borough, tenants of a manor, &c. The opening of the fields by throwing down the fences took place on Lammas Day (12th of August) for corn-lands and on Old Midsummer Day (6th of July) for grass.
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  • The northern groups and the Diamond Mountain are heavily timbered, but the hills are covered mainly with coarse, sour grass, oak and chestnut scrub.
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  • Crescent (1848-1849); afterwards he passed his time carpentering, building and selling small houses in Brooklyn (1851-1854) in the meanwhile writing for the magazines and reviews and turning out several novels, and finally revolving in his mind the scheme of his Leaves of Grass.
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  • Finally, in the summer of 1855 the first edition of Leaves of Grass appeared - a small quarto of ninety-four pages.
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  • In 1856 a second and much enlarged edition of Leaves of Grass appeared.
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  • He left many notes that throw light upon his aims and methods in composing Leaves of Grass.
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  • In the arid portions of this and the tropic areas the indigenous plants are creosote, mesquite and alfileria bushes, desert acacias, paloverdes, alkali-heath, salt grass, agaves, yuccas (especially the Spanish-bayonet and Joshua tree) and cactuses.
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  • The essential character of California's economic life has been determined by the successive predominance of grass, gold, grain and fruits.
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  • In places the sands are fringed by long lines of Casuarina trees; in others, and more especially in the neighbourhood of some of the river mouths, there are deep banks of black mud covered with mangroves; in others the coast presents to the sea bold headlands, cliffs, mostly of a reddish hue, sparsely clad with greenery, or rolling hills covered by a growth of rank grass.
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  • They live entirely on the ground, or in burrows or holes among rocks, and feed on grass, roots and other vegetable substances.
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  • At the intersection of a street with an avenue there is usually the reservation of a small triangular grass plot at least.
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  • Blanford considers that it dwells among grass and bushes rather than in forests.
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  • Although its manufacturing importance is now small in comparison with that of several other Yorkshire towns, it possesses mills for spinning worsted and carpet yarns, coco-nut fibre and China grass.
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  • It was the Calamus aromaticus of the medieval druggists and perhaps of the ancients, though the latter has been referred by some to the Citron grass, Andropogon Nardus.
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  • The grass flora of the lowlands is not so rich in variety nor so abundant in quality as that of high altitudes.
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  • The Malwa plateau consists of great undulating plains, separated by flat-topped hills, whose sides are boldly terraced, with here and there a scarp rising above the general level; it is covered with long grass, stunted trees and scrub, which owing to the presence of deciduous plants is of a uniform straw colour, except in the rains.
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  • New Mexico has such a great range of elevations that all four of the zones of vegetation into which the South-West has been divided according to altitude are found within its limits; namely, the zone of cactus, yucca and agave (3000-3500 ft.), where grass is scanty; the zone of greasewood and sage-brush (3500-4900 ft.), where there is little grass, and the cactus species are less numerous; the zone of the cedar (4900-6800 ft.); and the zone of the pine and fir (6800 - 10,800 ft.), in which grass is more abundant.
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  • The hills and mesas covered with the nutritious grama grass form excellent grazing grounds, which are most extensive in Bernalillo, Guadalupe, Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Union and Valencia counties.
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  • By this method the operation of steeping is entirely dispensed with, and the flax is, immediately after pulling, spread on the grass where it is under the influence of air, sunlight, night-dews and rain.
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  • The Sky pours down rain and sunshine; the Earth produces corn and grass.
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  • All feed on the roots of grass; and when disturbed, like marmots, utter a whistling cry.
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  • Esparto grass, rice, olives, the sugar-cane, and tropical fruits and vegetables are largely produced.
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  • This is an enormous boa-constrictor of great length and weight, which drops upon his prey from the branch of a tree, or steals upon it in the thick grass.
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  • The export trade is chiefly in esparto grass, cereals, wines, olive oil, marbles, cattle and hides.
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  • A system of rotation (cereal, roots, grass) is commonly followed, each division of land lying fallow one year as a rule; not more than two ripe grain-crops are commonly taken consecutively.
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  • It is the chief outlet for the Spanish trade in esparto grass, and for the iron ore and other mineral products of the neighbourhood.
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  • In the centre is a grass mound, raised to the height of the hedges, and on this mound is a pagoda, approached by a curved grass path.
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  • On each side of the hedges throughout the labyrinth is a small strip of grass.
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  • Kangaroos are vegetable-feeders, browsing on grass and various kinds of herbage, but the smaller species also eat FIG.
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  • They were important sources of food-supply to the natives, and are hunted by the colonists, both for sport and on account of the damage they do in consuming grass required for cattle and sheep. A few species are found in New Guinea, and the adjacent islands, which belong, in the zoological sense, to the Australian province, beyond the bounds of which none occurs.
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  • Tail long, and sometimes partially prehensile when it is used for carrying bundles of grass with which these animals build their nests.
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  • Rain and snow are copious, and dense fogs enshroud the coast in summer; consequently the mountains are well clothed with timber and the meadows with grass, except in the tundras of the north.
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  • The division is thus as follows: Grass Counties.
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  • The counties in which the greatest proportion of the land is devoted to permanent pasture may be judged roughly from the list of " ` grass counties " already given.
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  • The valleys of the two streams last mentioned, and of others that flow in the same direction, are almost wholly destitute of trees, but where the bare rock does not prevail, the mountain slopes are carpeted with grass.
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  • In July grass fires are of common occurrence, and frequently sweep over a great expanse of country.
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  • The absence of any vegetation beyond grass or scrub is a striking feature common to both Pamir and Chang, but there the resemblance ceases, and the physical conformation of mountain and valley to the east and to the west of the upper sources of the Zarafshan is radically distinct.
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  • Logs and clumsy floats of bark and grass enabled them to cross water under favourable circumstances.
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  • No plant is correctly termed a grass which is not a member of this family, but the word is in common language also used, generally in combination, for many plants of widely different affinities which possess some resemblance (often slight) in foliage to true grasses; e.g.
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  • Indeed, formerly grass (also spelt gwrs, gres, gyrs in the old herbals) meant any green herbaceous plant of small size.
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  • The sheaths are much dilated in Alopecurus vaginatus and in a species of Potamochloa, in the latter, an East Indian aquatic grass, serving as floats.
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  • They also decrease the specific gravity, so that the grain is more readily carried by the wind, especially when, as in Briza, the glume has a large surface compared with the size of the grain, or when, as in H olcus, empty glumes also take part; in Canary grass (Phalaris) the large empty glumes bear a membranous wing on the keel.
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  • Vossia, an aquatic grass, often floating, is found in western India and tropical Africa.
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  • In the swampy lands of the upper Nile it forms, along with a species of Saccharum, huge floating grass barriers.
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  • Elionurus, a widespread savanna grass in tropical and subtropical America, and also in the tropics of the old world, is rejected by cattle probably on account of its aromatic character, the spikelets having a strong balsam-like smell.
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  • Themeda Forskalii, which occurs from the Mediterranean region to South Africa and Tasmania, is the kangaroo grass of Australia, where, as in South Africa, it often covers wide tracts.
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  • P. plicatum, with broad folded leaves, is an ornamental greenhouse grass.
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  • P. miliaceum is millet (q.v.), and P. altissimum, Guinea grass.
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  • Setaria italica, Hungarian grass, is extensively grown as a food-grain both in China and Japan, parts of India and western Asia, as well as in Europe, where its culture dates from prehistoric times; it is found in considerable quantity in the lake dwellings of the Stone age.
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  • Spinifex, a dioecious grass, is widespread on the coasts of Australia and eastern Asia, forming an important sand-binder.
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  • Zizania aquatica (Tuscarora or Indian rice) is a reed-like grass growing over large areas on banks of streams and lakes in North America and northeast Asia.
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  • P. canariensis (Canary grass, a native of southern Europe and the Mediterranean area) is grown for bird-food and sometimes as a cereal.
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  • Phleum has a cylindrical spike-like inflorescence; P. pratense (timothy) is a valuable fodder grass, as also is Alopecurus pratensis (foxtail).
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  • Ammophila arundinacea (or Psamma arenaria) (Marram grass) with its long creeping stems forms a useful sand-binder on the coasts of Europe, North Africa and the Atlantic states of America.
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  • Holcus lanatus (Yorkshire fog, soft grass) is a common meadow and wayside grass with woolly or downy leaves.
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  • Arrhenatherum avenaceum, a perennial field grass, native in Britain and central and southern Europe, is cultivated in North America.
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  • The only British representative is Cynodon Dactylon (dog's tooth, Bermuda grass) found on sandy shores in the south-west of England; it is a cosmopolitan, covering the ground in sandy soils, and forming an important forage grass in many dry climates (Bermuda grass of the southern United States, and known as durba, dub and other names in India).
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  • Gynerium argenteum (pampas grass) is a native of southern Brazil and Argentina.
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  • Briza media (quaking grass) is a useful mea'dowgrass.
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  • Dactylis glomerata (cock's-foot), a perennial grass with a dense panicle, common in pastures and waste places is a useful meadow-grass.
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  • It has become naturalized in North America, where it is known as orchard grass, as it will grow in shade.
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  • Nardus stricta (matweed), found on heaths and dry pastures, is a small perennial with slender rigid stem and leaves, it is a useless grass, crowding out better sorts.
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  • Elymus arenarius (lyme grass) occurs on sandy sea-shores in the north temperate zone and is a useful sand-binder.
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  • The only genus of flowering plants peculiar to the arctic regions is the beautiful and rare grass Pleuropogon Sabinii, of Melville Island.
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  • Stone and mortar are used in building, but the Abyssinian houses are of the roughest kind, being usually circular huts, ill made and thatched with grass.
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  • Bunch grass is abundant on the hillsides the year round, and affords valuable pasturage.
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  • The soil, though shallow, is fertile, and mutton fed on the grass has a peculiar rich flavour: Quarrying, fishing and agriculture are the chief industries.
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  • Peatbogs and grass lands cover the greater part of the surface; there are several considerable streams and a large number of small lakes.
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  • This envelope is also sharply defined, but its normal appearance is compared to the serrations which blades of grass show on the skyline of a hill, and it is disturbed by the outbursts, called prominences, of which details are given below.
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  • After the periodical rains, the Karroo and the great plains of Bushmanland are converted into vast fields of grass and flowering shrubs, but the summer sun reduces them again to a barren and burnt-up aspect.
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