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grant

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grant

grant Sentence Examples

  • Then I will grant you a favor.

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  • They will grant you safe passage.

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  • I cannot grant you that.

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  • With a grant from the National Foundation for Infant Paralysis, he went to work on a polio vaccine.

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  • If you are pleased enough about your victory, you will grant me leave to show you.

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  • Oh, Mamma, how is it you don't understand that the Holy Father, who has the right to grant dispensations...

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  • I've never known mercy, and I'll grant it to no one.

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  • I will grant them permission to kill you if needed.

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  • God grant that the one that will result from it will be as victorious!

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  • If this does as you say, I will grant you your boon.

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  • The life force would be welcomed and the Exemplars would grant permission easily.

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  • In 1619 he received by bequest, ratified in 1620 by royal grant, the duchy of Angouleme.

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  • The site of Troy was part of the Van Rensselaer manor grant of 1629.

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  • You will grant me anything.

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  • However, God grant that everything turns out well!

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  • I'll grant you, it is confusing and there's a whole lot more about their relationship we don't know and probably never will know.

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  • He owns a large Spanish land grant – oil wells and such.

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  • In 1672 she received a yearly grant from Charles II.

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  • In 1894 a more serious rebellion in the mountainous region of Sassun was ruthlessly stamped out; the Powers insistently demanded reforms, the eventual grant of which in the autumn of 1895 was the signal for a series of massacres, brought on in part by the injudicious and threatening acts of the victims, and extending over many months and throughout Asia Minor, as well as in the capital itself.

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  • God grant it! said Anna Pavlovna.

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  • I broke Immortal Code to grant your favor of not killing Rhyn.

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  • I grant it you.

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  • The faculties of law confer the same degrees in law and also grant certificates of capacity, which enable the holder to practise as an avou; a licence is necessary for the profession of barrister.

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  • "Then you will grant me my boon when I choose it," he said in a hard tone.

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  • Jerome told her if she had the baby and gave it to him, he'd grant her a divorce and leave her alone.

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  • At last, when he was reduced to actual destitution, it was arranged that the East India Company should grant him an annuity of 4000 for a term of years, with 90,000 paid down in advance.

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  • Unfortunately she could not grant my request, but I hope, Count, I shall be more fortunate with you, he said with a smile.

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  • In a fine Alfred Hitchcock movie called Notorious, the troubled character played by Ingrid Bergman gets very drunk at a party and asks Cary Grant to come for a drive.

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  • It was one of the ancient manors of the Butlers, who received for it the grant of a fair from Henry VIII.

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  • a grant (asiento) of two hundred leagues of the coast from the boundary of the Portuguese possessions southward towards the Straits of Magellan, and the inland country which lay behind it.

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  • holder and had voted a large grant of supplies.

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  • Earl Cholmondeley received a grant of two fairs in 1723.

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  • "Ah, my love," answered Anna Mikhaylovna, "God grant you never know what it is to be left a widow without means and with a son you love to distraction!

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  • God grant that the Corsican monster who is destroying the peace of Europe may be overthrown by the angel whom it has pleased the Almighty, in His goodness, to give us as sovereign!

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  • The church of St Mary and St German belonged to a Benedictine abbey founded under a grant from William the Conqueror in 1069 and raised to the dignity of a mitred abbey by Pope Alexander II.

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  • Woolwich (Wulewich) is mentioned in a grant of land by King Edward in 964 to the abbey of St Peter at Ghent.

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  • By it the northern provinces bound themselves together " as if they were one province " to maintain their rights and liberties " with life-blood and goods " against foreign tyranny, and to grant complete freedom of worship and of religious opinion throughout the confederacy.

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  • For these and other services Bonner had been rewarded by the grant of several livings, and in 1535 he was made archdeacon of Leicester.

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  • See a paper by Madison Grant, entitled "The Rocky Mountain Goat," published in the ninth annual report of the New York Zoological Society (1905).

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  • Dr Phillimore's patent had a grant of the "place or office of judge official and commissary of the court of admiralty of the Cinque Ports, and their members and appurtenances, and to be assistant to my lieutenant of Dover castle in all such affairs and business concerning the said court of admiralty wherein yourself and assistance shall be requisite and necessary."

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  • A weekly market on Wednesdays was granted to John, earl of Richmond, in 1308 together with an eight days' fair beginning on the vigil of St Margaret's day, and in 1445 John de la Pole, earl of Suffolk, one of his successors as lord of the manor, received a further grant of the same market and also two yearly fairs, one on the feast of St Philip and St James and the other at Michaelmas.

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  • The restaurants in this area grant a sumptuous respite for weary tourists and travelers.

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  • I will grant it, Memon responded with a bow of his own.

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  • Rupert, who from 1353 to 1390 was sole ruler, gained the electoral dignity for the Palatinate of the Rhine in 1356 by a grant of some lands in upper Bavaria to the emperor Charles IV.

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  • This grant was confirmed in 1378 when its extent and jurisdiction were defined.

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  • Exceptions were made permitting the states to grant bounties on mining and (with the consent of the parliament) on exports of produce or manufactures - Western Australia being for a time partially exempted from the prohibition to impose import duties.

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  • The Mahrattas at this time had got possession of the person of the Mogul emperor, Shah Alam, from whom Clive obtained the grant of Bengal in 1765, and to whom he assigned in return the districts of Allahabad and Kora and a tribute of 30o,000.

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  • The pope had already authorized the extensive grant of indulgences in order to secure funds for the crusade and more particularly for the rebuilding of St Peter's at Rome.

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  • Fernandez obtained from the Spanish government a grant of the islands, where he resided for some time, stocking them with goats and pigs.

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  • With a view to an ampler site for his college, Waynflete obtained on the 5th of July 1456 a grant of the Hospital of St John the Baptist outside the east gate at Oxford and on the 15th of July licence to found a college there.

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  • New York protested against the Bennington grant in 1749, but the question did not become serious until the chief obstacle to settlement was removed by the conquest of Canada in 1760-61.

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  • A favor of your choosing, so long as it pleases me to grant it.

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  • was induced to grant him, and he took this as a crime of Hume's.

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  • Grant Duff, Sir Henry Maine: a brief Memoir of his Life, &c. (1892); Notes from a Diary, passim; L.

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  • For this, the king granted Berford's Hall, formerly Charleston's Inn, which Chicheley's trustees had granted to him so as to obtain a royal grant and indefeasible title.

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  • General Grant had served two terms (1869-1877), and the unwritten law of custom condemned his being given another.

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  • The grant finally came into the possession of Thomas, Lord Fairfax, and in 1746 a stone was erected at the source of the north branch of the Potomac to mark the western limit of the grant.

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  • Crete indeed profited by the grant of extended privileges, but these did not satisfy its turbulent population, and early in 1897 a Greek expedition sailed to unite the island to Greece.

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  • It was beyond his imagination that she would grant him that which he wanted!

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  • Though votes were often cast for ten names, there were but two real candidates before the convention, Grant and Blaine.

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  • Within two years uniform customs duties were to be imposed; thereafter the parliament of the Commonwealth had exclusive power to impose customs and excise duties, or to grant bounties; and trade within the Commonwealth was to be absolutely free.

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  • Spare me this, and I swear, whatever it is you ask, I will grant you!

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  • The same year he was named one of the justices of the peace for his borough; and on the grant of a new charter showed great zeal in defending the rights of the commoners, and succeeded in procuring an alteration in the charter in their favour, exhibiting much warmth of temper during the dispute and being committed to custody by the privy council for angry words spoken against the mayor, for which he afterwards apologized.

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  • GEORGE MONRO GRANT (1835-1902), principal of Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, was born in Nova Scotia in 183 5.

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  • Grant threw the whole weight of his great influence in favour of confederation, and his oratory played an important part in securing the success of the movement.

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  • When the consolidation of the Dominion by means of railway construction was under discussion in 1872, Grant travelled from the Atlantic to the Pacific with the engineers who surveyed the route of the Canadian Pacific railway, and his book Ocean to Ocean (1873) was one of the first things that opened the eyes of Canadians to the value of the immense heritage they enjoyed.

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  • On the outbreak of the South African War in 1899 Grant was at first disposed to be hostile to the policy of Lord Salisbury and Mr Chamberlain; but his eyes were soon opened to the real nature of President Kruger's government, and he enthusiastically welcomed and supported the national feeling which sent men from the outlying portions of the Empire to assist in upholding British supremacy in South Africa.

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  • Grant married in 1872 Jessie, daughter of William Lawson of Halifax.

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  • James Grant >>

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  • Castle Grant, immediately to the north, is the principal mansion of the earl of Seafield, the head of the Clan Grant.

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  • The Post Office reserved the right to compete either directly or by granting other licences, and it was under no obligation to grant wayleaves.

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  • The corporation of Glasgow having persisted in its efforts to obtain a licence, the Treasury appointed Sheriff Andrew Jameson (afterwards Lord Ardwall) a special commissioner to hold a local inquiry in Glasgow to report whether the telephone service in that city was adequate and efficient and whether it was expedient to grant the corporation a licence.

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  • Grant that the distinctive mark of our Order may be never to possess anything as its own under the sun for the glory of Thy name, and to have no other patrimony than begging" (in the Legenda 3 Soc.).

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  • The demands of the Commission were only partly complied with, but a large special grant was voted amounting to at least 1/2I,ooo,000 per annum for the next seven years.

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  • ratified this grant, and confirmed the title of count.

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  • and compelled the pope to grant his claims on the investitures.

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  • For some time past the relations between Napoleon and the pope, Pius VII., had been Napoleon severely strained, chiefly because the emperor insisted ~pacj~ on controlling the church, both in France and in the kingdom of Italy, in a way inconsistent with the traditions of the Vatican, but also because the pontiff refused to grant the divorce between Jerome Bonaparte and the former Miss Patterson on which Napoleon early in the year 1806 laid so much stress.

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  • In February 1831 these provinces rose, raised the red, white and green tricolor (which henceforth took the place of the Carbonarist colors as the Italian flag), and shook off the papal yoke with surprising ease.1 At Parma too there was an outbreak and a demand for the constitution; Marie Louise could not grant it because of her engagements with Austria, and, therefore, abandoned her dominions.

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  • In Rome, after the restoration of the temporal power by the French troops, the pope paid no attention to Louis Napoleons advice to maintain some form of constitution, to grant a general amnesty, and to secularize the administration.

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  • The Sardinian government had formally invited that of Tuscany to participate in Unionist the war of liberation, and on the grand-dtike rejecting movethe proposal, moderates and democrats combined to ments in present an ultimatum to Leopold demanding that he ~~-~ should abdicate in favor of his son, grant a constitu- ~~ tion and take part in the campaign.

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  • In May 1859 Ferdinand of Naples was succeeded by his son Francis II., who gave no signs of any intention to change his fathers policy, and, in spite of Napoleons advice, refused to grant a constitution or to enter into an alliance with Sardinia.

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  • In 1681, reinforced by 10,000 Transylvanians and a Turkish army under the pasha of Nagyvarad, he compelled the emperor to grant an armistice.

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  • They refused therefore to grant him either subsidies or a levee en masse, and he bad to take what he wanted by force.

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  • Any one introspectively apprehending the facts must grant, he thought, that benevolence was an integral part of human nature and that conscience was rightfully supreme.

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  • The causes which led to the grant of Magna Carta are described in the article on English History.

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  • On the present occasion it was evidently regarded as quite a formal and introductory matter, and the same remark applies to the general grant of liberties to all freemen and their heirs, with which the chapter concludes.

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  • As he rose in the morning he prayed: " O God, grant that throughout this coming day I may be able to love my neighbour as myself."

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  • indultusn, from indulgere, grant, concede, allow), a, papal licence which authorizes the doing of something not sanctioned by the common law of the church; thus by an indult the pope authorizes a bishop to grant certain relaxations during the Lenten fast according to the necessities of the situation, climate, &c., of his diocese.

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  • A market, formerly held on Thursdays by a grant of 1309, is now held on Fridays.

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  • The first settlement here was made about 1659 in a part of Marlboro called Chauncy (because of a grant of Soo acres here to Charles Chauncy, president of Harvard College, made in 1659 and revoked in 1660 by the General Court of Massachusetts).

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  • Grant, Rutherford B.

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  • In 1853, after the grant of a constitution to New Zealand, he took up his residence in the colony, and immediately began to act a leading part in colonial politics.

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  • Finally a clause said that "no person born out of the kingdoms of England, Scotland or Ireland, or the dominions thereunto belonging (although he be naturalized or made a denizen) except such as are born of English parents, shall be capable to be of the Privy Council, or a member of either House of Parliament, or enjoy any office or place of trust, either civil or military, or to have any grant of lands, tenements or hereditaments from the Crown to himself, or to any other or others in trust for him."

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  • Thus charged on the silver bend, it makes bad armory and it is worthy of note that, although the grant of it is clearly to the duke and his heirs in fee simple, Howards of all branches descending from the duke bear it in their shields, even though all right to it has long passed from the house to the duke's heirs general, the Stourtons and Petres.

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  • A grant of the precedence enjoyed by the bride's father being held illegal, her husband was in the same year created Viscount Stafford.

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  • Grant, Hist.

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  • Grant's Hist.

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  • They started with no such claim as Duke William put forth to justify his invasion of England; their only show of legal right was the papal grant of conquests that were already made.

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  • It is possible that Minehead had a corporate existence during the 15th century, as certain documents executed by the portreeve and burgesses at that date are preserved, but no record of the grant of a charter has been found.

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  • 2) were held by the lord of the manor from the 15th century, but the date of the grant has not been found.

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  • Those who possessed the right of coatarmour by immemorial use, or by grant in regular form, formed the class of nobility or gentry, words which, it must again be remembered, are strictly of the same meaning.

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  • No "grant" was necessary; it was assumed by all and sundry who had occasion to use it, though a reasonable convention forbade one man to assume the device of another.

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  • This again was not at the outset an exclusive right of the crown; it was common for a leader in battle to grant to some one not of his family, who had specially distinguished himself, the right to bear the whole or part of his coat of arms, differenced or undifferenced.

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  • The claim of the heralds to make "gentry" depend on the bearing of coat-armour, and the right to this depend on grant or recognition by themselves as officers of the crown, is of comparatively late growth.

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  • In this way the fundamental laws were suspended not only in Poland but in St Petersburg and other parts of the empire during the greater part of the four years succeeding the grant of the constitution.

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  • The opportunity thus given for debate naturally stimulated the movement in favour of constitutional government, which received new impulses from the sympathetic attitude of the emperor Alexander II., his grant in 1879 of a constitution to the liberated principality of Bulgaria, and the multiplication of Nihilist outrages which pointed to the necessity of conciliating Liberal opinion in order to present a united front against revolutionary agitation.

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  • In the zemstvo congress of November the " Cadets " protested against the " grant " of a constitution already elaborated, and demanded the convocation of a Constituent Assembly.

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  • The right to send a ship to trade with China was one for which large sums were paid, and Pereira, as commander of the expedition, would enjoy commercial privileges which Ataide had, ex officio, the power to grant or withhold.

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  • Lafone, a wealthy cattle and hide merchant on the river Plate, obtained from government a grant of the southern portion of the island, a peninsula 600,000 acres in extent, and possession of all the wild cattle on the island for a period of six years, for a payment of £10,000 down, and £20,000 in ten years from January 1, 1852.

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  • A "campaign" biography was published by Lew Wallace (Philadelphia, 1888), and a sketch of his life may be found in Presidents of the United States (New York, 1894), edited by James Grant Wilson.

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  • m.) of public land and an additional grant, under the Morrill Act of 1862, of 90,000 acres for the support of a college for agriculture and mechanic arts.

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  • The public schools are supported by the income from a Federal grant of 2,000,000 acres of public land (given in lieu of the usual sixteenth and thirty-sixth sections) supplemented by state and local taxation.

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  • He served as judge of the Superior Court (1865-72), as secretary of war (1876) and as attorneygeneral of the United States (1876-77) in President Grant's cabinet; and as minister to Austria-Hungary (1882-84) and to Russia (1884-85) .

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  • He was also made a privy councillor in Ireland, and received a grant of lands within the Pale.

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  • But Baldwin of Flanders was elected emperor over his head; and his irritation was not wholly allayed by the grant of Macedonia, the north of Thessaly, and Crete (which he afterwards sold to Venice).

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  • A favourite form of tolerance was to grant a permit to the Jews to remain in the state for a limited term of years; their continuance beyond the specified time was illegal and they were therefore subject to sudden banishment.

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  • In 1830 the first Jewish emancipation bill was brought in by Robert Grant, but it was not till the legislation of 1858-1860 that Jews obtained full parliamentary rights.

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  • In 1320 a grant occurs of a Tuesday market, but no fair is mentioned.

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  • The missionaries, finding their position secure, presently began to take action in political affairs, and persuaded the king to grant a constitution to the Tongans, who welcomed it with a kind of childish enthusiasm, but were far from fitted to receive it.

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  • - Cretan constitutional history may be said to date from 1868, when, after the suppression of an insurrection which had extended over three years, the Turkish government consented to grant a certain measure of autonomy to the island.

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  • Lymington dates its importance from the grant of the town to Richard de Redvers, earl of Devon, in the reign of Henry I.

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  • In 1221 Falkes de Breaute, then custodian of the borough, rendered a palfrey for holding a three days' fair at the feast of All Saints, transferred in 1247 to the feast of St Margaret, and still held under that grant.

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  • His speculations in gold, during which he attempted through President Grant's brother-in-law, A.

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  • The governor is empowered to call extraordinary sessions of the legislature, to grant pardons and reprieves, and to exercise a power of veto which extends to items in appropriation bills; a two-thirds majority of the legislature is necessary to pass a bill over his veto.

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  • To this end John Locke drafted for them in 1669 the famous Fundamental Constitutions providing for the division of the province into eight counties and each county into seigniories, baronies, precincts and colonies, and the division of the land among hereditary nobles who were to grant three-fifths of it to their freemen and govern through an elaborate system of feudal courts.

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  • No such significance could attach to the grant of the usus mitrae (under somewhat narrow restrictions as to where and when) to cathedral dignitaries.

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  • While in prison he wrote the "Fort Warren letter" (August 11th), in which he urged the people of Texas to recognize their defeat, grant civil rights to the freedmen, and try to conciliate the North.

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  • Knaresborough (Canardesburg, Cnarreburc, Cknareburg), which belonged to the Crown before the Conquest, formed part of William the Conqueror's grant to his follower Serlo de Burgh.

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  • Grant, History of Physical Astronomy.

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  • No early grant of a market can be found, but in 1792 the market-day was Wednesday.

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  • Grant Duff, History of the Mahrattas (3 vols., 1826); T.

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  • General Lee that General Grant had broken through the lines at Petersburg and that Richmond must be evacuated.

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  • In June Grant's army crossed the James and attacked Lee in Petersburg.

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  • An Act passed in 1770, which relaxed the rigour of strict entails and afforded power to landlords to grant leases and otherwise improve their estates, had a beneficial effect on Scottish agriculture.

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  • Galway); while lectures are given at farmers' meetings by 1 This sum was furnished out of a total of £693,851, forming the residue grant allocated for the purposes of education to the various county councils of England and Wales under the Local Taxation (customs and Excise) Act 1890.

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  • would grant their request (prompted by his agents) of incorporating the Genoese (or Ligurian) republic in the French empire.

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  • He refused even to grant her tearful request for Magdeburg.

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  • West Ham received the grant of a market and annual fair in 1253.

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  • was conferred on him at Doctors' Commons in 1691, and the Royal Society made him, in 1696, a grant to enable him to complete his philosophical inventions.

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  • In 1607 David Waterhouse, lord of the manor of Halifax, obtained a grant of two markets there every week on Friday and Saturday and two fairs every year, each lasting three days, one beginning on the 24th of June, the other on the 11th of November.

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  • In 1701, New York, seeking another claim, obtained from the Iroquois a grant to the king of England of this territory which they claimed to have conquered but from which they had subsequently been expelled, and this grant was confirmed in 1726 and again in 1744 About 1730 English traders from Pennsylvania and Virginia began to visit the eastern and southern parts of the territory and the crisis approached as a French Canadian expedition under Celeron de Bienville took formal possession of the upper Ohio Valley by planting leaden plates at the mouths of the principal streams. This was in 1749 and in the same year George II.

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  • An association of New Jerseymen, organized by John Cleves Symmes, secured a grant from Congress in1788-1792to a strip of 248,540 acres on the Ohio between the Great Miami and the Little Miami, which came to be known as the Symmes Purchase.

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  • Grant to the presidency.

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  • The powers of the old township were much more extensive than those of the present city of Boston, including as they did the determination of the residence of strangers, the allotment of land, the grant of citizenship, the fixing of wages and prices, of the conditions of lawsuits and even a voice in matters of peace and war.

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  • The Benefices Act 1898, however, now prohibits the grant of a lease of an advowson.

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  • Generally speaking, any person may grant or take a lease.

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  • A person of unsound mind can grant or take a lease if he is capable of contracting.

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  • He may also grant either a lease of the surface of settled land, reserving the mines and minerals, or a lease of the minerals without the surface.

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  • A grant or reservation of mines in general terms confers, or reserves, a right to work the mines, subject to the obligation of leaving a reasonable support to the surface as it exists at the time of the grant or reservation.

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  • Under these acts a right of reentry or forfeiture is not to be enforceable unless and until the lessor has served on the lessee a written notice specifying the breach of covenant or condition complained of, and requiring him to remedy it or make compensation, and this demand has not within a reasonable time been complied with; and when a lessor is proceeding to enforce such a right the court may, if it think fit, grant relief to the lessee.

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  • - The original lease in Scots law took the form of a grant by the proprietor or lessor.

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  • A life-renter can only grant a lease that is effectual during the subsistence of the life-rent.

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  • His name, and that of his wife Geloria (Elvira), are associated with the grant of the first franchises of Leon.

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  • The drilling of petroleum wells is carried on by individuals or companies, either on lands owned by them, or on properties whose owners grant leases, usually on condition that a certain number of wells shall be sunk within a stated period, and that a portion of the oil obtained (usually from one-tenth to one-fourth) shall be appropriated as royalty to the lessor.

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  • Unhappily, clinging to the conviction that all the lands which the crusaders would traverse were the "lost provinces" of his empire, he induced the crusaders to do him homage, so that, whatever they conquered, they would conquer in his name, and whatever they held, they would hold by his grant and as his vassals.

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  • c. vii.), by which the Genoese promised their assistance, in return for a third of all booty, a quarter in each town captured, and a grant of freedom from tolls.

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  • A government grant is made towards the cost of upkeep. A government industrial school (opened in 1906) is maintained at Maseru, and the Paris Society has an industrial school at Leloaleng.

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  • e o 6 naveral Grant, t?'

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  • In 1513 Juan Ponce de Leon (c. 1 4 60-1521), who had been with Christopher Columbus on his second voyage and had later been governor of Porto Rico, obtained a royal grant authorizing him to discover and settle " Bimini," - a fabulous island believed to contain a marvellous fountain or spring whose waters would restore to old men their youth or at least had wonderful curative powers.

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  • He returned to Spain in 1514, and obtained from the king a grant to colonize " the island of Bimini and the island of Florida," of which he was appointed adelantado, and in 1521 he made another expedition, this one for colonization as well as for discovery.

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  • The charter of incorporation granted in 1614 states that by the invasion of the Spaniards it had been treacherously spoiled and burnt but that its strength, prosperity and usefulness for navigation, and the acceptable and laudable services of the inhabitants in rebuilding and fortifying it, and their enterprise in erecting a pier, have moved the king to grant the petition for its incorporation.

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  • It also ratified Henry's grant of anchorage, keelage and busselage.

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  • John made a further grant of a three days' fair from the 10th of May.

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  • The governor and Executive Council have the exclusive right to grant all other franchises of a public or quasi-public nature and Congress reserves the right to annul or modify any such grant.

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  • In 1877 the provincial deputation was re-established, but it was not until 1895 that the home government attempted, far too late, to enact a series of adequate reform measures, and in November 1897 followed this by a grant of autonomy.

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    0
  • The principal parks are: the Piedmont (189 acres), the site of the Piedmont Exposition of 1887 and of the Cotton States and International Exposition of 1895; the Grant, given to the city by L.

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  • P. Grant, an Atlanta railroad builder, in 1882, and subsequently enlarged by the city (in its south-east corner is Fort Walker); the Lake wood, 6 m.

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    0
  • In 1216 John confirmed toRobertBruce the market on Wednesday granted to his father and the fair on the feast of St Lawrence; this fair was extended to fifteen days by the grant of 1230, while the charter of 1595 also granted a fair and market.

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    0
  • The king gave him an annual grant of 1200 gulden (120), considerably enlarging it before the end of the year, and placing a comfortable house in the outskirts of the city at his disposal.

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    0
  • Their importance will never be comparable to that of his music; but, just as the reaction against Ruskin's ascendancy as an art-critic has coincided with an increased respect for his ethical and sociological thought, so the rebellious forces that are compelling Wagnerism to grant music a constitution coincide with a growing admiration of his general mental powers.

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  • In this festival Pales was invoked to grant protection and increase to flocks and herds; the shepherds entreated forgiveness for any unintentional profanation of holy places of which their flocks might have been guilty, and leaped three times across bonfires of hay and straw (Ovid, Fasti, iv.

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  • The dress was of crimson (7ropcbupa); this and the badges were the king's gift, and except by royal grant neither crimson nor gold might, apparently, be worn at court (1 Macc. ro, 20; 62; 89; 11, 58; Athen.

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    0
  • The king of Navarre, who defended this deed, had, however, many friends in France and was in communication with Edward III.; and consequently John was forced to make a treaty at Mantes and to compensate him for the loss of Angouleme by a large grant of lands, chiefly in Normandy.

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    0
  • (1189) he received a grant of lands from John as lord of Ireland.

    0
    0
  • Dying in 1243, he was succeeded as lord of Connaught by his son Richard, and then (1248) by his younger son Walter, who carried on the family warfare against the native chieftains, and added greatly to his vast domains by obtaining (c. 1255) from Prince Edward a grant of "the county of Ulster," in consequence of which he was styled later earl of Ulster.

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    0
  • Being ordered to co-operate with Grant, who was then before Vicksburg, he invested the defences of Port Hudson, Louisiana, in May 1863, and after three attempts to carry the works by storm he began a regular siege.

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    0
  • A personal quarrel with President Grant led in 1872, however, to his joining the Liberal-Republican revolt in supportof Horace Greeley, and as the Liberal-Republican and Democratic candidate he was defeated for re-election.

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    0
  • `Amr told him that it was not in his power to grant such a request, but promised to write to the caliph for his consent.

    0
    0
  • The first grant of a market and fair is dated 1227, when the prior of Wenlock obtained licence to hold a fair on the vigil, day and morrow of the Nativity of St John the Baptist, and a market every Monday.

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    0
  • The "residue" grant is expended on navigation and swimming classes.

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    0
  • Wilberforce, Charles Grant, John Thornton and his son Henry, were among the philanthropists who contributed to his funds; in 1798 the Sunday School Society (established 1785) extended its operations to Wales, making him its agent, and Sunday Schools grew rapidly in number and favour.

    0
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  • senior, elder), in English law, the lordship remaining to a grantor after the grant of an estate in fee-simple.

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    0
  • A seignory appendant passes with the grant of the manor; a seignory in gross - that is, a seignory which has been severed from the demesne lands of the manor to which it was originally appendant - must be specially conveyed by deed of grant.

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  • The state and the national government co-operate in the construction and maintenance of this system, but the Federal government did not give material aid (the only exception being the grant of swamp lands in 1850) until the exceptionally disastrous flood in 1882.

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    0
  • From 1712 to 1717 " Louisiana," or the French possessions of the Mississippi valley, was held by Antoine Crozat (1655-1738) as a private grant from the king.

    0
    0
  • The company retained its grant of the colony until 1731, when it reverted to the crown.

    0
    0
  • The separatists, headed by Carlos Manuel de Cespedes (1819-1874), a wealthy planter who proclaimed the revolution at Yara on the 10th of October, demanded the same reforms, including gradual emancipation of the slaves with indemnity to owners, and the grant of free and universal suffrage.

    0
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  • made a grant of the islands to Christopher, duke of Albemarle, and others.

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    0
  • Grant's advance on this centre, then defended by General A.

    0
    0
  • These receive a grant from the government, which nevertheless encourages all parents to send their children to its own schools.

    0
    0
  • Hoping to gain active support from the Vatican, Ostojic renounced Bogomilism, and persecuted his former co-religionists, until the menace of an insurrection forced him to grant an amnesty.

    0
    0
  • The reforms in Turkey certainly encouraged the Serb and Moslem inhabitants of the occupied territory to petition the emperor for the grant of a constitution similar to that in force in the provinces of Austria proper.

    0
    0
  • The culture of cotton is making rapid progress, immigrants who receive a grant of land being obliged to devote one-fourth of it to cotton culture.

    0
    0
  • It is obliged also to form entrepots for the storage of the crops at reasonable distances from each other, and, on certain conditions, to grant advances to cultivators to aid them in raising the leaf.

    0
    0
  • It was stated in the preface to the budget of 1910 that the government would grant no more railway concessions carrying guarantees.

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    0
  • The state may grant land of this category to private persons on payment by the latter of the value of the proprietary right - the tithes, ground-rent (should there be private buildings upon it), and the land-tax.

    0
    0
  • Fiefs with a revenue of from 3000 to 20,000 aspres were timars, furnishing one armed warrior for every 3000 aspres' revenue; the grant of a fief was conditional on obligatory residence.

    0
    0
  • An important event not to be passed over without mention is the grant on the 10th of March 1870 of the firman instituting the Bulgarian exarchate, thus severing the Bulgarian Church from Text in Holland, p. 212.

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    0
  • The diplomacy of Europe had been searching in vain since the autumn Accession of 1875 for the means of inducing Turkey to institute of Abd-u1- effective administrative reforms and to grant to Hamid 11., its European provinces that autonomy which now 1876.

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    0
  • In the account roll above mentioned reference is made to a fair and a market, but no early grant of either is to be found.

    0
    0
  • A grant of a market was obtained in 1247, and this is still of importance as regards both cattle and corn.

    0
    0
  • The Danish mission in Greenland has a yearly grant of £ 2000 from the trading revenue of the colony, besides a contribution of £880 from the state.

    0
    0
  • The town received its earliest known grant of municipal privileges sometime before 1147 from Fitz Hamon's successor and son-in-law Robert, earl of Gloucester.

    0
    0
  • granted a number of exemptions to Cardiff and other towns in South Wales, and this grant was confirmed by Edward III.

    0
    0
  • Alexander annulled his grant in 1258, but still pressed Henry for the discharge of unpaid arrears of subsidies.

    0
    0
  • gave a grant for founding a hospital in the burgh, which yet supplies the council with funds for charity.

    0
    0
  • Before taking his seat he served also as a member of the state constitutional convention, where he opposed the grant of universal suffrage.

    0
    0
  • The second part of the act provides that if any person or persons, bodies politic and corporate, for any sum of money, reward, gift, profit or benefit, directly or indirectly, or for or by reason of any promise, agreement, grant, bond, covenant or other assurances.

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    0
  • In early Saxon times the river was called Thamis, as may be seen in a grant before A.D.

    0
    0
  • The date of the grant of the town at an annual fee-farm of 8 marks is uncertain, but in the reign of Henry VI.

    0
    0
  • The earliest record of a grant of market rights is in 1219, when Roger la Zouch obtained a grant of a weekly market and a two days' fair at the feast of St Helen, in consideration of a fine of one palfrey.

    0
    0
  • He was lodged in `the Louvre, received the grant of an income equal to that he had hitherto enjoyed, and, with the title of "veteran pensioner" in lieu of that of "foreign associate" (conferred in 1772), the right of voting at the deliberations of the Academy.

    0
    0
  • 3 Grant, History of Physical Astronomy, p. 117.

    0
    0
  • Grant, History of Physical Astronomy, &c.; Pietro Cossali, Eloge (Padua, 1813); L.

    0
    0
  • To encourage the investment of private capital in the construction of railways, the general railway law of 1853 authorized the national government to grant guarantees of interest on the capital invested.

    0
    0
  • Martim Affonso de Sousa, having obtained a grant, fitted out a considerable armament and proceeded to explore the country in person.

    0
    0
  • Pero Lopes de Sousa received the grant of a captaincy, and set sail from Portugal at the same time as his brother, the founder of Sao Vicente.

    0
    0
  • Pedro de Campo Tourinho, a nobleman and excellent navigator, received a grant of the adjoining captaincy of Porto Seguro.

    0
    0
  • The coast from the Rio Sao Francisco to Bahia was granted to Francisco Pereira Coutinho; the bay itself, with all its creeks, was afterwards added to the grant.

    0
    0
  • Pedro de Goes obtained a grant of the captaincy of Parahyba between those of Sao Vicente and Espirito Santo; but his means were too feeble to enable him to make head against the aborigines, and the colony was broken up after a painful struggle of seven years.

    0
    0
  • For the sake of increasing his capital, he divided his grant with Fernao, Alvares de Andrade and Aires da Cunha.

    0
    0
  • In Dean cemetery, partly laid out on the banks of the Water of Leith, and considered the most beautiful in the city (opened 1845), were interred Lords Cockburn, Jeffrey and Rutherford; " Christopher North," Professor Aytoun, Edward Forbes the naturalist, John Goodsir the anatomist; Sir William Allan, L Sam Bough, George Paul Chalmers, the painters; George Combe, the phrenologist; Playfair, the architect; Alexander Russel, editor of the Scotsman; Sir Archibald Alison, the historian; Captain John Grant, the last survivor of the old Peninsular Gordon Highlanders; Captain Charles Gray, of the Royal Marines, writer of Scottish songs; Lieutenant John Irving, of the Franklin expedition, whose remains were sent home many years after his death by Lieut.

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  • cases of extreme poverty, a money grant towards maintenance.

    0
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  • The Romans occupied the country for more than three hundred years, as is evidenced by various remains; `but James Grant (1822-1887), in Old and New Edinburgh, doubts whether they ever built on the castle rock.

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  • - James Grant, Old and New Edinburgh (London, 1880 et seq.); W.

    0
    0
  • Thereupon, to spite the rival republic, the Sienese took the Ghibelline side, and the German emperors, beginning with Frederick Barbarossa, rewarded their fidelity by the grant of various privileges.

    0
    0
  • We may grant the pope's contention that the Edwardine church had no belief in priests who offered in sacrifice the body and blood of Christ or in bishops capable of ordaining such priests.

    0
    0
  • We may grant further that the medieval offices have been deliberately altered to exclude this view.

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    0
  • The king soon after presented him with the title of Professor, and with the Rosenkrantz grant of loo dollars for four years, the holder of which was expected to travel.

    0
    0
  • The commission declared that the chasm between the native and white races had been broadening for years and that the efforts of the administration - especially since the grant of responsible government - to reconcile the Kaffirs to the changed conditions of rule and policy and to convert them into an element of strength had been ineffective.

    0
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  • The principal facilities granted by the state are, exemption of taxation for a determined period of years, reduced railway fares for the goods manufactured, placing of government contracts, the grant of subsidies and loans and the foundation of industrial schools for the training of engineers and of skilled workmen.

    0
    0
  • But attendance at the diet was regarded by the bulk of the poorer deputies as an intolerable burden, and they frequently agreed to grant the taxes for two or three years in advance, so as to be saved the expense 1 Some of these were of gigantic size, e.g.

    0
    0
  • 1860) which proposed to prop up the crazy common state with the shadow of a constitution and to grant some measure of local autonomy to Hungary, subject always to the supervision of the imperial council (Reichsrath).

    0
    0
  • His successor, Kalman Szell, obtained an immense but artificial Szell, majority by a fresh fusion of parties, and the minority pledged itself to grant an indemnity for the extra parliamentary financial decrees rendered necessary by Hungary's understanding with Austria, as well as to cease from obstruction.

    0
    0
  • A grant of 40,000 francs having been obtained from the chamber, a national edition was issued in seven 4to vols., bearing the title Ouvres de Laplace (1843-1847).

    0
    0
  • During President Grant's administration he was a member of the senatorial coterie that influenced most of the president's policies, and in 1873 Grant urged him to accept an appointment as chief justice of the Supreme Court, but he declined.

    0
    0
  • In 1880 he was one of the leaders of the unsuccessful movement to nominate Grant for a third presidential term.

    0
    0
  • With Grant's successors, Hayes and Garfield, his relations were not cordial; an opponent of civil service reform, he came into conflict with President Hayes over the removal of Chester A.

    0
    0
  • The accession of the Emperor Charles, and the ferment aroused by the Russian Revolution, led to considerable political changes in both halves of the Dual Monarchy, the most notable being the dismissal of Count Tisza from the Hungarian premiership (May 23 1917), the grant of a general political amnesty, and the summons of the Austrian Reichsrat, which had not been allowed to meet since March 1914.

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    0
  • The Scyths had a method of divination with sticks, and the Enarees, who claimed to be soothsayers by grant of the goddess who had afflicted them, used another method by splitting bast fibres.

    0
    0
  • Sir Michael, however, in a despatch dated September the 16th 1878, reiterated the intention of the British cabinet to grant the state " to the utmost practicable extent, its individuality and powers of self-government under the sovereignty of the queen."

    0
    0
  • Meantime Frere's proposals to fulfil the promises made to grant the Boers a liberal constitution were shelved.

    0
    0
  • In later years, when the Boers desired to regard the whole of this convention (and not merely the articles) as cancelled by the London Convention of 1884, and with it the suzerainty, which was only mentioned in the preamble, Mr Chamberlain, a member of the cabinet of 1880-1885, pointed out that if the preamble to this instrument were considered cancelled, so also would be the grant of self-government.

    0
    0
  • The expedition cost Great Britain a million and a half, but the attempt at farther extension westwards was foiled, and a little later treaties with Lobenguela and the grant to Cecil Rhodes and his co-directors of a charter for the British South.

    0
    0
  • It no sooner opened than it was evident that Kruger had come to obtain, not to grant, concessions.

    0
    0
  • The British government was also of opinion that the time was near for the setting up of such institutions, and the pending grant of a constitution to the Transvaal was announced in parliament in July 1904.

    0
    0
  • In accordance with the promise made in 1904 a constitution for the Transvaal on representative lines was promulgated by letters patent on the 31st of March 1905; but there self-G,„„ was already an agitation for the immediate grant ment - the of full self-government, and on the accession to Botha office of the Campbell-Bannerman administration Ministry.

    0
    0
  • Praagh, The 1 The government expended over f r,000,000 on a land and agriculture bank and in 1910 made a grant of f roo,000 towards the establishment of a college of agriculture at Pretoria.

    0
    0
  • Even if, by a bold assumption, we grant the unity of authorship, it is plain upon the face of it that the chapters in question cannot have been composed at the same time or under the same circumstances; literary and artistic unity is wholly wanting.

    0
    0
  • Grant and Sir H.

    0
    0
  • They had endowed it with the manor and hundred of Faversham; this grant caused many disputes between the abbot and men of Faversham concerning the abbot's jurisdiction.

    0
    0
  • Once grant the above definition of disease, and even the most trivial aberrations from the normal must be regarded as diseased conditions, quite irrespective of whether, when structural, they interfere with the function of the part or not.

    0
    0
  • The despatch of this expedition seems to prove an almost blind confidence in Nicias, whose request to be superseded the Athenian people refused to grant.

    0
    0
  • The church of Austin Friars, origin- ally belonging to a friary founded in 1253, became a Dutch church under a grant of Edward VI., and still remains so; its style is principally Decorated, but through various vicissitudes little of the original work is left.

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    0
  • confirmed a grant to Florentine merchants in 1318, while the Lombards maintained their position until Tudor times.

    0
    0
  • The wealthier metropolitan parishes became discontented with the form of local government to which they remained subject, and in 1897 Kensington and Westminster petitioned to be created boroughs by the grant of charters under the Municipal Corporation Acts.

    0
    0
  • This grant is in lieu of the grants formerly made out of the exchequer grant in aid of local rates, and amounted in1906-1907to £619,489.

    0
    0
  • There is no evidence of any grant, but after 1540 the title had become general.

    0
    0
  • Fearnside (1838); George Grant, A Comprehensive History of London (Dublin, 1849); John Timbs, Curiosities of London (1855, later editions 1855, 1868, 1875, 1876); Old London Papers, Archaeological Institute (1867); W.

    0
    0
  • Arrival Farewell and a few companions, and to them he made of the a grant of the district of Port Natal.

    0
    0
  • Bishop Colenso visited him in 1857 and obtained a grant of land for a mission station, which was opened in 1860, by the Rev. R.

    0
    0
  • The mining laws of most civilized states grant the right of free prospecting over the public lands, protect the rights of the discoverer of the mineral deposit during the period of exploration, and provide for the acquisition of mineral property on favourable terms. Striking examples of the far-reaching effect of such laws is shown in the history of the Rocky Mountain region and western coast of the United States, the colonization and development of Australia, and the development of Alaska.

    0
    0
  • The grant was named Rensselaerwyck in his honour, became a "manor" in 1685, and remained in the family until 1853.

    0
    0
  • The colonists whom he settled upon his grant (1630) were industrious, and "Beverwyck" became increasingly prosperous.

    0
    0
  • There are in addition some pearling grounds in the Mergui Archipelago, which have a very recent history; they were practically unknown before 1890; in the early 'nineties they were worked by Australian adventurers, most of whom have since departed; and now they are leased in blocks to a syndicate of Chinamen, who grant sub-leases to individual adventurers at the rate of £25 a pump for the pearling year.

    0
    0
  • In some deeds relating to the parish of Chiddingfold, in Surrey, of a date not later than 1230, a grant is recorded of twenty acres of land to Lawrence " vitrearius," and in another deed, of about 1280, the " ovenhusveld " is mentioned as a boundary.

    0
    0
  • Re-elected to the Convention, he opposed the pretensions of the Commune and the proposed grant of money to the municipality of Paris by the state.

    0
    0
  • Another step in decentralization was taken in 1912 by the subdivision of the former unwieldy territorial division and by the grant of wider initiative to the commissioners of the divisions.

    0
    0
  • Folk-right could, however, be broken or modified by special law or special grant, and the fountain of such privileges was the royal power.

    0
    0
  • A fair on the 31st of October and the two following days was held under grant of Henry III.

    0
    0
  • Eight years later, on the 1st of August 1896, the bounties offered by the governments of Germany and Austria-Hungary were approximately doubled, and France had a bill in preparation to increase hers correspondingly, although it was computed that they were even then equivalent to a grant of 3, 5s.

    0
    0
  • Its chief function was to regulate the trade monopoly conveyed to the borough by the royal grant of gilda mercatoria.

    0
    0
  • A grant of this sort implied that the gildsmen had the right to trade freely in the town, and to impose payments and restrictions upon others who desired to exercise that privilege.

    0
    0
  • By the grant of an immunity to a proprietor the royal officers, the count and his representatives, were forbidden to enter his lands to exercise any public function there.

    0
    0
  • Nor was the king's aid lacking to this method of dividing up the royal authority, any more than to the immunity, for it became a frequent practice to make the administrative office into a fief, and to grant it to be held in that form of property by the count.

    0
    0
  • In the autumn of 1863 a war of manoeuvre was fought between the two commanders, on the whole favourably to the Union arms. Grant, commanding all the armies of the United States, joined the Army of the Potomac in the spring of 1864, and remained with it until the end of the war; but he continued Meade in his command, and successfully urged his appointment as major-general in the regular army (Aug.

    0
    0
  • Two years later, a compromise having been effected with Lord Marlborough, a grant of the island was obtained by the earl of Carlisle, whose claim was based on a grant, from the king, of all the Caribbean islands in 1624; and in 1628 Charles Wolferstone, a native of Bermuda, was appointed governor.

    0
    0
  • and entrusted with various military reforms. On the outbreak of the troubles of 1848 Filangieri advised the king to grant the constitution, which he did in February 1848, but when the Sicilians formally seceded from the Neapolitan kingdom Filangieri was given the command of an armed force with which to reduce the island to obedience.

    0
    0
  • The pardon transmitted by the secretary of state is applied by the supreme court, who grant the necessary orders to the magistrates in whose custody the convict is.

    0
    0
  • Thus by the New York Code of Criminal Procedure the governor of the state of New York has power to grant reprieves, commutations and pardons, except in the case of treason, where he can only suspend the execution of the sentence until the case can be reported to the legislature, with whom the power of pardon in this case rests.

    0
    0
  • Henry also gave him a grant of the island of Anglesey, with the castle of Beaumaris.

    0
    0
  • Ottawa University (Baptist) was established here in 1865, as the outgrowth of Roger Williams University, which had been chartered in 1860 for the education of Indians on the Ottawa Reservation, and had received a grant of 20,000 acres from the Federal government in 1862.

    0
    0
  • During the administrations of President Grant his leadership in shaping financial policy became generally recognized.

    0
    0
  • The university of San Marcos at Lima is the oldest collegiate institution in the New World, originating in a grant from Charles V.

    0
    0
  • Society, p. 302; Grant, Hist.

    0
    0
  • Both factions appealed to the governor of New York, that province having claimed jurisdiction over the islands under the grant to the duke of York in 1664, and, becoming increasingly dissatisfied with that government, sought a union with Massachusetts until the islands were annexed to that province by its new charter of 1691.

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    0
  • GRANT, ULYSSES SIMPSON (1822-1885), American soldier, and eighteenth president of the United States, was born at Point Pleasant, Ohio, on the 27th of April 1822.

    0
    0
  • He was a descendant of Matthew Grant, a Scotchman, who settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 1630.

    0
    0
  • Grant, upon his farm in Ohio.

    0
    0
  • Grant was the best horseman of his class, and took a respectable place in mathematics, but at his graduation in 1843 he only ranked twenty-first in a class of thirty-nine.

    0
    0
  • [For the history of the Civil War, and of Grant's battles and campaigns, the reader is referred to the article American Civil War.

    0
    0
  • To the " call to arms " of 1861 Grant promptly responded.

    0
    0
  • Grant and his division commanders were promoted to the rank of major-general U.S.V.

    0
    0
  • soon afterwards, but Grant's own fortunes suffered a temporary eclipse owing to a disagreement with Halleck.

    0
    0
  • On the 6th of April 1862 a furious assault on Grant's camps brought on the battle of Shiloh (q.

    0
    0
  • the Tennessee under Grant and the Army of the Ohio under Buell.

    0
    0
  • But the Army of the Tennessee had been on the verge of annihilation on the evening of the first day, and Grant's leadership throughout was by no means equal to the emergency, though he displayed his usual personal bravery and resolution.

    0
    0
  • In the grand advance of Halleck's armies which followed Shiloh, Grant was relieved of all important duties by his assignment as second in command of the whole force, and was thought by the army at large to 'be in disgrace.

    0
    0
  • But Halleck soon went to Washington as general-in-chief, and Grant took command of his old army and of Rosecrans' Army of the Mississippi.

    0
    0
  • It is fair to assume that Grant would have followed other unsuccessful generals into retirement, had he not shown that, whatever his mistakes or failures, and whether he was or was not sober and temperate in his habits, he possessed the iron determination and energy which in the eyes of Lincoln and Stanton,' and of the whole Northern people, was the first requisite of their generals.

    0
    0
  • He remained then with his army near Vicks 1 President Lincoln was Grant's most unwavering supporter.

    0
    0
  • Many amusing stories are told of his replies to various deputations which waited upon him to ask for Grant's removal.

    0
    0
  • On one occasion he asked the critics to ascertain the brand of whisky favoured by Grant, so that he could send kegs of it to the other generals.

    0
    0
  • The question of Grant's abstemiousness was and is of little importance.

    0
    0
  • Grant was at once made a major-general in the regular army.

    0
    0
  • A few months later the great reverse of Chickamauga created an alarm in the North commensurate with the elation that had been felt at the double victory of Vicksburg and Gettysburg, and Grant was at once ordered to Chattanooga, to decide the fate of the Army of the Cumberland in a second battle.

    0
    0
  • After this, in preparation for a grand combined effort of all the Union forces, Grant was placed in supreme command, and the rank of lieutenant-general revived for him (March 1864).

    0
    0
  • Grant's headquarters henceforth accompanied the Army of the Potomac, and the lieutenant-general directed the campaign in Virginia.

    0
    0
  • This, with Grant's driving energy infused into the best army that the Union possessed, resolved itself into a series, almost uninterrupted, of terrible battles.

    0
    0
  • But Grant was unshaken in his determination.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile all the other campaigns had been closely supervised by Grant, preoccupied though he was with the operations against his own adversary.

    0
    0
  • of armies of a total strength of over one million men, operating many thousands of miles apart from each other, while at the same time he watched and manoeuvred against a great captain and a veteran army in one field of the war, must be the greatest proof of Grant's powers as a general.

    0
    0
  • In the end complete success rewarded the sacrifices and efforts of the Federals on every theatre of war; in Virginia, where Grant was in personal control, the merciless policy of attrition wore down Lee's army until a mere remnant was left for the final surrender.

    0
    0
  • Grant had thus brought the great struggle to an end, and was universally regarded as the saviour of the Union.

    0
    0
  • any others in the service, could have accomplished the task which Grant brought to complete success.

    0
    0
  • Nor must it be supposed that Grant learned little from three years' campaigning Civil War career.

    0
    0
  • Shiloh revealed to Grant the intensity of the struggle, and after that battle, appreciating to the full the material and moral factors with which he had to deal, he gradually trained his military character on those lines which alone could conduce to ultimate success.

    0
    0
  • Grant possessed or acquired both to such a degree that he proved fully equal to the emergency.

    0
    0
  • Grant, however, insisted that the United States government was bound by the terms accorded to Lee and his army at Appomattox.

    0
    0
  • This energetic action on Grant's part saved the United States from a foul stain upon its escutcheon.

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  • In July 1866 the grade of general was created, for the first time since the organization of the government, and Grant was promoted to that position.

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  • To tie the president's hands Congress had passed the Tenure of Office Act, forbidding the president to remove any cabinet officer without the consent of the Senate; but in August 1867 President Johnson suspended Secretary Stanton and appointed Grant secretary of war ad interim until the pleasure of the Senate should be ascertained.

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  • Grant accepted the appointment under protest, and held it until the following January, when the Senate refused to confirm the president's action, and Secretary Stanton resumed his office.

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  • President Johnson was much disgusted at the readiness with which Grant turned over the office to Stanton, and a bitter controversy ensued between Johnson and Grant.

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  • Hitherto Grant had taken little part in politics.

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  • The only vote which he had ever cast for a presidential candidate was in 1856 for James .Buchanan; and leading Democrats, so late as by Grant, but a treaty negotiated with this end in view failed to obtain the requisite two-thirds vote in the Senate.

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  • As early as 1870 President Grant recommended measures of civil service reform, and succeeded in obtaining an act authorizing him to appoint a Civil Service commission.

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  • The evil rose to alarming proportions during Grant's presidency, partly because of the immense extension of the civil service, partly because of the growing tendency to alliance between spoilsmen and the persons benefited by protective tariffs, and partly because the public attention was still so much absorbed in Southern affairs that little energy was left for curbing rascality in the North.

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  • Grant was ill-fitted for coping with the difficulties of such a situation.

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  • The feeling was widely prevalent in the spring of 1872 that the interests of pure government in the United States demanded that President Grant should not be elected to a second term.

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  • As a natural result Grant was re-elected by an overwhelming majority.

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  • It was promptly vetoed by President Grant, and two months later he wrote a very sensible letter to Senator J.

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  • Presi- the beginning of 1868, hoped to make him their can 1868y' didate in the election of that year; but the effect of the controversy with President Johnson was to bring Grant forward as the candidate of the Republican party.

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  • The result of the contest was at no time in doubt; Grant received 214 electoral votes and Seymour 80.

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  • The most important domestic event of Grant's first term as president was the adoption of the fifteenth amendment to the Constitution on the 30th of March 1870, providing that suffrage throughout the United States should not be restricted on account of race, colour or previous condition of servitude.

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  • In some cases the culprits were so near to President Grant that many persons found it difficult to avoid the suspicion that he was himself implicated, and never perhaps was his hold upon popular favour so slight as in the summer and autumn of 1876.

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  • After the close of his presidency in the spring of 1877 Grant started on a journey round the world, accompanied by his wife and one son.

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  • In August 1881 General Grant bought a house in the city of New York.

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  • The name of the firm was Grant and Ward.

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  • This severe blow left General Grant penniless, just at the time when he was beginning to suffer acutely from the disease which finally caused his death.

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  • The circumstances in which it was written made it an act of heroism comparable with any that Grant ever showed as a soldier.

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  • Grant showed many admirable and lovable traits.

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  • The cornerstone was laid by President Harrison in 1892, and the tomb was dedicated on the 27th of April 1897 with a splendid parade and addresses by President McKinley and General Horace Porter, president of the Grant Monument Association, which from 90,000 contributions raised the funds for the tomb.

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  • Grant (3 vols., New York, 1867-1881), and Grant in Peace (Hartford, 1887), are appreciative but lacking in discrimination.

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  • Grant and the Period of National Preservation and Reconstruction (New York, 1897) is a good succinct account.

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  • See also Grant's Personal Memoirs (2 vols., New York, 1885-1886); J.

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  • Grant (New York, 1886); J.

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  • Young's Around the World with General Grant (New York, 1880); Horace Porter's Campaigning with Grant (New York, 1897); James Ford Rhodes's History of the United States (vols.

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  • Hosmer's Appeal to Arms and Outcome of the Civil War (New York, 1907); John Eaton's Grant, Lincoln, and the Freedmen (New York, 1907), and various works mentioned in the articles American Civil War, Wilderness Campaign, &C.

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  • Grant >>

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  • The prophetic thought is that the daughter (population) of Zion shall not be saved by her present rulers or defensive strength; she must come down from her bulwarks and dwell in the open field; there, and not within her proud ramparts, Yahweh will grant deliverance from her enemies.

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  • sanctioned a grant to the company of 500,000 acres generally N.W.

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  • of the Ohio, and to the eastward, between the Monongahela and the Kanawha rivers, but the grant was never actually issued.

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  • In 1752 the company had a pathway blazed between the small fortified posts at Will's Creek (Cumberland), Maryland, and at Redstone Creek (Brownsville), Pennsylvania, which it had established in 1750; but it was finally merged in the Walpole Company (an organization in which Benjamin Franklin was interested), which in 1772 had received from the British government a grant of a large tract lying along the southern bank of the Ohio as far west as the mouth of the Scioto river.

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  • Cutler's original intention was to buy for the Ohio Company only about 1,500,000 acres, but on the 27th of July Congress authorized a grant of about 5,000,000 acres of land for $3,500,000; a reduction of one-third was allowed for bad tracts, and it was also provided that the lands could be paid for in United States securities.

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  • His policy was to crush all tendencies to independence in Germany, and this led him to grant the stem-duchies to his relatives, and afterwards to ally himself with the church.

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  • At the opening of the session of 1845 the government, in pursuance of a promise made to Irish members that they would deal with the question of academical education in Ireland, proposed to establish non-sectarian colleges in that country and to make a large addition to the grant to the Roman Catholic College of Maynooth.

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  • His subsequent defence of the proposed grant, on the ground that it would be improper and unjust to exclude the Roman Catholic Church in Ireland from a " more indiscriminating support " which the state might give to various religious beliefs, was regarded by men of less sensitive conscience as only proving that there had been no adequate cause for his resignation.

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  • Ifut it reserved the power of suppressing or suspending a newspaper, and against that reservation a majority of the lower house voted, session after session, only to see the bill rejected by the peers, who shared the governments opinion that to grant a larger measure of liberty would certainly encourage licence.

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  • In March 1863, still troubled by his wound, he was assigned to the command of the south-west, and in May was ordered to take immediate command of all the Confederate forces in Mississippi, then threatened by Grant's movement on Vicksburg.

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  • When Pemberton's army was besieged in Vicksburg by Grant, Johnston used every effort to relieve it, but his force was inadequate.

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  • There are also an ancient church crowning the eastern hill, and a curious fortified warehouse (called the New Works), dating probably from the 14th century, when a trading company was established here under a grant from Henry IV.

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  • General Grant had now taken Porter's part, and wrote an article in vol.

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  • See, besides General Grant's article, Cox, The SecondBattle of Bull Run as connected with the Porter Case (Cincinnati, 1882); Lord, A Summary of the Case of F.

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  • Bhagalpur passed to the East India Company by the grant of the emperor Shah Alam in 1765.

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  • Grant, The Great Metropolis, ii.

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  • Grant, an eccentric genius, the Monthly Review (1888-1890), the New Zealand Illustrated Magazine (1899-1905), chiefly devoted to the light literature of New Zealand subjects, the Maori Record (1905-1907), and the Red Funnel, published since 1905.

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  • He also persuaded his colleagues to grant some rather scandalous pensions, and Fox's acquiescence in this abuse after his recent agitation against Lord North's waste did him injury.

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  • The magnitude of the sum, and his acquiescence in the grant of pensions by the Shelburne ministry, convinced the country that his zeal for economy was hypocritical.

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  • are the westernmost of the counties created from the "Western Reserve," and comprise the "Fire Lands" grant made in 1792 by the state of Connecticut to the people of Greenwich, Fairfield, Danbury, Ridgefield, Norwalk, New Haven, East Haven and New London to indemnify them for their fire losses during the British expeditions in Connecticut under Governor Tryon in 1779 and Benedict Arnold in 1781.

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  • Leighton was elected an Academician in 1868, and succeeded Sir Francis Grant as President in 1878, when he was knighted.

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  • In 1870 he was nominated by President Grant, and confirmed by the senate, as United States minister to England to succeed John Lothrop Motley, but declined the mission.

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  • The refusal of the Whigs to grant terms in 1706, and again in 1709 when Louis XIV.

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  • The town, which is very ancient, being mentioned in Domesday, obtained a grant for a market and fair in 1251, and received its charter of incorporation in 1887.

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  • This measure, applied by Russian officials, was designed against the Poles and the Lithuanian Nationalists alike, for not even the Progressives who favoured autonomy for Poland contemplated its grant to Lithuania.

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  • He was soon re-employed in a minor position, and, at the head of a division of new troops, accompanied Grant's army to Pittsburg Landing.

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  • His appreciation of Grant, and his sympathy with the chagrin he suffered after this battle, cemented the friendship between the two.

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  • In Grant's final Vicksburg campaign Sherman commanded the XV.

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  • When, after Rosecrans's defeat at Chickamauga, Grant was placed in supreme command in the west, Sherman succeeded to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, with which he took part in the great battle of Chattanooga.

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  • He had already prepared for a further advance by making an expedition into the heart of Mississippi as far as Meridian, destroying railways and making impracticable, for a season, the transfer of military operations to that region; and on Grant becoming general-in-chief (March 1864) he was made commander of the military division of the Mississippi, including his Army of the Tennessee, now under McPherson, the Army of the Cumberland, under Thomas, and the Army of the Ohio, under Schofield.

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  • In January 1865 Sherman marched northwards again, once more abandoning his base, towards Petersburg, where Grant and Lee were waging a war of giants.

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  • With 90,000 men Sherman drove Johnston before him, and when Lee surrendered to Grant Johnston also gave up the struggle.

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  • When Grant became full general in 1866 Sherman was promoted lieutenant-general, and in 1869, when Grant became president, hesucceeded to the full rank.

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  • SHILOH This, the second great battle in the American Civil War, also called the battle of Pittsburg Landing, was fought on the 6th-7th of April 1862 between the Union forces under Grant and Buell and the Confederates under A.

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  • In view of operations against Corinth, Mississippi, Grant's army had ascended the Tennessee to Pittsburg Landing and there disembarked, while the co-operating army under Buell moved across country from Nashville to join it.

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  • The Confederates concentrated above 40,000 men at Corinth and advanced on Pittsburg Landing with a view to beating Grant before Buell's arrival, but their concentration had left them only a narrow margin of time, and the advance was further delayed by the wretched condition of the roads.

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  • Grant meantime had disposed his divisions in camps around the Landing rather with a view to their comfort than in accordance with any tactical scheme.

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  • Even so, more by chance than intentionally, Buell's leading division was opposite the Landing, awaiting only a ferry, on the evening before the battle; Grant, however, declined to allow it to cross, as he thought that there would be no fighting for some days.

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  • Grant had formed a last (and now a connected) line of defence with Buell's leading division (Nelson's) and all of his own infantry that he could rally.

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  • During the night Grant's detached division (Lew Wallace's) and Buell's army came up, totalling 25,000 fresh troops, and at 5 A.M.

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  • on the 7th Grant took the offensive.

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  • About Shiloh Church, a strong rearguard under Bragg repulsed the attacks of Grant and Buell for six hours before withdrawing, and all that Grant and Buell achieved was the reoccupation of the abandoned camps.

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  • Under this statute the archbishop continues to grant special licences to marry, which are valid in both provinces; he appoints notaries public, who may practise in both provinces; and he grants dispensations to clerks to hold more than one benefice, subject to certain restrictions which have been imposed by later statutes.

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  • The archbishop also continues to grant degrees in the faculties of theology, music and law, which are known as Lambeth degrees.

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  • The liberality of William the Lion had bestowed upon the corporation an extensive grant of lands; while in addition to the well-endowed church of St John, it had two monasteries, each possessed of a fair revenue.

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  • and later on says Prous fu et de mult grant mesure, D'orgoil et de forfait n'ot qure Plus vaut faire qu'il ne dist Et plus doner qu'il ne pramist (Io.

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  • com grant domages, car onques puis ne chevaucha que cele foiz," compose a most striking overture.

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  • In the Roman camp the rabbi was courteously received, and Vespasian (whose future elevation to the imperial dignity Johanan, like Josephus, is said to have foretold) agreed to grant him any boon he desired.

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  • When the secret treaty with France became known, thus confirming Sacheverell's insight, the latter called for the disbandment of the forces and advocated the refusal of further supplies for military purposes; and in June 1678 he resolutely opposed Lord Danby's proposal to grant £300,000 per annum to Charles II.

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  • It dates from the time of Cortes, who built for himself a residence there, and had the town included in the royal grant to himself in 1529.

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  • could hardly do otherwise than ignore Errington's nomination, as he also ignored the nomination of Clifford, bishop of Clifton, and of Grant, bishop of Southwark; and, by what he humorously described as "the Lord's own coup d'etat," he appointed Manning to, the archiepiscopal see.

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  • He accepted, however, the Republican nomination as vice-president on a ticket headed by General Grant, and was elected; but he failed in 1872 to secure renomination.

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  • This charter was confirmed to Thomas, Lord Berkeley, in 1330, and in 1395-1396 Lord Berkeley received a grant of another fair on the vigil and day of Holyrood.

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  • The turbulent successors of O'Neill having been routed by the English, the town and fortress were obtained by grant dated the 16th of November 1571 by Sir Thomas Smith, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth, but were afterwards forfeited by him to the lord deputy Sir Arthur Chichester, who, in 1612, was created Baron Chichester of Belfast.

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  • The knights of St John having been driven from Rhodes by the Turks, obtained the grant of Malta, Gozo and Tripoli in 1530 from the emperor Charles V., subject to a reversion in favour of the emperor's successor in the kingdom of Aragon should the knights leave Malta, and to the annual tribute of a falcon in acknowledgment that Malta was under the suzerainty of Spain.

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  • The Maltese, at first, challenged the grant as a breach of the charter of King Alfonso, but eventually welcomed the knights.

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  • Dispensations, however, could be easily obtained from Rome, before the reformation of the Church of England, to enable a clerk to hold several ecclesiastical dignities or benefices at the same time, and by the Peterpence, Dispensations, &c. Act 1534, the power to grant such dispensations, which had been exercised previously by the court of Rome, was transferred to the archbishop of Canterbury, certain ecclesiastical persons having been declared by a previous statute (1529) to be entitled to such dispensations.

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  • Parliament would grant the king no supplies, and he could find the means of fitting out a fleet only by defrauding his creditors.

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  • Heathcoat Grant), another 3rd Fleet ship (with 4 12-in.

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  • On the 14th of May 1863 Johnston who then held the city, was attacked on both sides by Sherman and McPherson with two corps of Grant's army, which, after a sharp engagement, drove the Confederates from the town.

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  • His formal grant from Charles II.

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  • - In the first year of his reign Cyrus was inspired to grant a decree permitting the Jews to return to build the temple in Jerusalem (i.); a list of families is given (ii.).

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  • 3 (Darius), and between the grant by Cyrus in iii.

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  • The area of the grant may have been enlarged by later interpolations; or it may have dealt with property rather than with sovereignty, and have only referred to estates claimed by the pope in the territories named; or it is possible that Charles may have actually intended to establish an extensive papal kingdom in Italy, but was released from his promise by Adrian when the pope saw no chance of its fulfilment.

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  • Grant said of him, "Hancock stands the most conspicuous figure of all the general officers who did not exercise a separate command.

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  • The attempt to reduce the brigand-soldiery, and especially the ordinances passed by the estates of Languedoil at Orleans in 1439, which not only gave the king an aid of ioo,000 francs (an act which was later used by the king as though it were a perpetual grant and so freed him from that parliamentary control of the purse so important in England), but demanded as well royal nominations to officerships in the army, marked a gain in the royal prerogative which the nobility resolved to challenge.

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  • The land belonged from early times to the see of London, a grant being recorded in 1220.

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  • This is the only instance in Great Britain of the custom of free coal-mining under a government grant or concession, which is the rule in almost every country on the continent of Europe.

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  • The state legislature approved this grant in 1858, added to the endowment one section (640 acres) out of every ten appropriated co encourage the building of railways, and provided that there should be one university instead of two.

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  • The state also supports, wholly or in part: the Agricultural and Mechanical College at College Station (opened in 1876; a land grant college under the Morrill Act of 1862), near Bryan, which has a course in textile engineering besides the courses usually given in state agricultural and mechanical For a full discussion of this question see E.

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  • Mutesa had received Speke and Grant in a most friendly manner.

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  • Grant, some so Sudanese soldiers, and about 250 porters, armed with Snider carbines.

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  • Cunningham, Captain Seymour Vandeleur, William Grant and others, he overran Unyoro and broke down all resistance.

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  • The struggle continued with great bitterness on both sides, but gradually the Danish government was forced to grant many important reforms. High schools were established at Reykjavik, and efforts made to better the trade and farming of the country.

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  • Courts of justice, however, do not grant reprieves by way of dispensation from the penalties of the law, which is not for the judicial department, but for temporary purposes, e.g.

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  • North-west of the lake and along the Molo river the 3rd Lord Delamere obtained a grant of 155 sq.

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  • in 1189 freed the burgesses from tolls and all secular customs. In 1199 John repeated the grant and gave them the farm of the customs of their own port and those of Portsmouth at a yearly rent of X200.

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  • was induced reluctantly to grant the dispensation necessary on account of the relationship, which, according to the canon law and the current interpretation of Leviticus xviii.

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  • The territorial extent of each town was determined by its grant or grants from the general court, which the towns served as agents in the management of land.

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  • When it had become known that the colony was within the territory of the New England Council, John Pierce, in 1621, procured from that body a grant which made the colonists its tenants.

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  • In 1629 Governor Bradford procured from the same council a definite grant of the tract which corresponds to the south-eastern portion of the present state.

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  • King James having by patent in 1620 created a Council for New England to whom he made a large grant of territory, the council in 1628 made a sub-grant, confirmed by a royal charter that passed the seals on the 4th of March 1629, to the "Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in Newe England."

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  • The charter gave the company control over the admission of " freemen " (co-partners in the enterprise, and voters), " full and absolute power and authority to correct, punish and rule " subjects settling in the territory comprised in their grant, and power to " resist.

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  • From the freedom of the United States came the revolt of Spanish America, and the grant by Great Britain to Canada of the amplest rights of self-government.

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  • Others, who hold