Grant sentence example

grant
  • Then I will grant you a favor.
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  • They will grant you safe passage.
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  • I cannot grant you that.
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  • If you are pleased enough about your victory, you will grant me leave to show you.
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  • With a grant from the National Foundation for Infant Paralysis, he went to work on a polio vaccine.
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  • I've never known mercy, and I'll grant it to no one.
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  • A favor of your choosing, so long as it pleases me to grant it.
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  • Grant threw the whole weight of his great influence in favour of confederation, and his oratory played an important part in securing the success of the movement.
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  • Oh, Mamma, how is it you don't understand that the Holy Father, who has the right to grant dispensations...
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  • As he rose in the morning he prayed: " O God, grant that throughout this coming day I may be able to love my neighbour as myself."
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  • Finally a clause said that "no person born out of the kingdoms of England, Scotland or Ireland, or the dominions thereunto belonging (although he be naturalized or made a denizen) except such as are born of English parents, shall be capable to be of the Privy Council, or a member of either House of Parliament, or enjoy any office or place of trust, either civil or military, or to have any grant of lands, tenements or hereditaments from the Crown to himself, or to any other or others in trust for him."
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  • Thus charged on the silver bend, it makes bad armory and it is worthy of note that, although the grant of it is clearly to the duke and his heirs in fee simple, Howards of all branches descending from the duke bear it in their shields, even though all right to it has long passed from the house to the duke's heirs general, the Stourtons and Petres.
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  • They started with no such claim as Duke William put forth to justify his invasion of England; their only show of legal right was the papal grant of conquests that were already made.
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  • It is possible that Minehead had a corporate existence during the 15th century, as certain documents executed by the portreeve and burgesses at that date are preserved, but no record of the grant of a charter has been found.
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  • Those who possessed the right of coatarmour by immemorial use, or by grant in regular form, formed the class of nobility or gentry, words which, it must again be remembered, are strictly of the same meaning.
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  • No "grant" was necessary; it was assumed by all and sundry who had occasion to use it, though a reasonable convention forbade one man to assume the device of another.
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  • This again was not at the outset an exclusive right of the crown; it was common for a leader in battle to grant to some one not of his family, who had specially distinguished himself, the right to bear the whole or part of his coat of arms, differenced or undifferenced.
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  • The claim of the heralds to make "gentry" depend on the bearing of coat-armour, and the right to this depend on grant or recognition by themselves as officers of the crown, is of comparatively late growth.
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  • In this way the fundamental laws were suspended not only in Poland but in St Petersburg and other parts of the empire during the greater part of the four years succeeding the grant of the constitution.
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  • The opportunity thus given for debate naturally stimulated the movement in favour of constitutional government, which received new impulses from the sympathetic attitude of the emperor Alexander II., his grant in 1879 of a constitution to the liberated principality of Bulgaria, and the multiplication of Nihilist outrages which pointed to the necessity of conciliating Liberal opinion in order to present a united front against revolutionary agitation.
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  • In the zemstvo congress of November the " Cadets " protested against the " grant " of a constitution already elaborated, and demanded the convocation of a Constituent Assembly.
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  • The right to send a ship to trade with China was one for which large sums were paid, and Pereira, as commander of the expedition, would enjoy commercial privileges which Ataide had, ex officio, the power to grant or withhold.
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  • Lafone, a wealthy cattle and hide merchant on the river Plate, obtained from government a grant of the southern portion of the island, a peninsula 600,000 acres in extent, and possession of all the wild cattle on the island for a period of six years, for a payment of £10,000 down, and £20,000 in ten years from January 1, 1852.
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  • A "campaign" biography was published by Lew Wallace (Philadelphia, 1888), and a sketch of his life may be found in Presidents of the United States (New York, 1894), edited by James Grant Wilson.
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  • The public schools are supported by the income from a Federal grant of 2,000,000 acres of public land (given in lieu of the usual sixteenth and thirty-sixth sections) supplemented by state and local taxation.
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  • He served as judge of the Superior Court (1865-72), as secretary of war (1876) and as attorneygeneral of the United States (1876-77) in President Grant's cabinet; and as minister to Austria-Hungary (1882-84) and to Russia (1884-85) .
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  • He was also made a privy councillor in Ireland, and received a grant of lands within the Pale.
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  • But Baldwin of Flanders was elected emperor over his head; and his irritation was not wholly allayed by the grant of Macedonia, the north of Thessaly, and Crete (which he afterwards sold to Venice).
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  • A favourite form of tolerance was to grant a permit to the Jews to remain in the state for a limited term of years; their continuance beyond the specified time was illegal and they were therefore subject to sudden banishment.
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  • In 1830 the first Jewish emancipation bill was brought in by Robert Grant, but it was not till the legislation of 1858-1860 that Jews obtained full parliamentary rights.
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  • In 1320 a grant occurs of a Tuesday market, but no fair is mentioned.
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  • The missionaries, finding their position secure, presently began to take action in political affairs, and persuaded the king to grant a constitution to the Tongans, who welcomed it with a kind of childish enthusiasm, but were far from fitted to receive it.
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  • Lymington dates its importance from the grant of the town to Richard de Redvers, earl of Devon, in the reign of Henry I.
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  • In 1221 Falkes de Breaute, then custodian of the borough, rendered a palfrey for holding a three days' fair at the feast of All Saints, transferred in 1247 to the feast of St Margaret, and still held under that grant.
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  • The governor is empowered to call extraordinary sessions of the legislature, to grant pardons and reprieves, and to exercise a power of veto which extends to items in appropriation bills; a two-thirds majority of the legislature is necessary to pass a bill over his veto.
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  • To this end John Locke drafted for them in 1669 the famous Fundamental Constitutions providing for the division of the province into eight counties and each county into seigniories, baronies, precincts and colonies, and the division of the land among hereditary nobles who were to grant three-fifths of it to their freemen and govern through an elaborate system of feudal courts.
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  • No such significance could attach to the grant of the usus mitrae (under somewhat narrow restrictions as to where and when) to cathedral dignitaries.
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  • While in prison he wrote the "Fort Warren letter" (August 11th), in which he urged the people of Texas to recognize their defeat, grant civil rights to the freedmen, and try to conciliate the North.
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  • Knaresborough (Canardesburg, Cnarreburc, Cknareburg), which belonged to the Crown before the Conquest, formed part of William the Conqueror's grant to his follower Serlo de Burgh.
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  • No early grant of a market can be found, but in 1792 the market-day was Wednesday.
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  • General Lee that General Grant had broken through the lines at Petersburg and that Richmond must be evacuated.
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  • In June Grant's army crossed the James and attacked Lee in Petersburg.
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  • He refused even to grant her tearful request for Magdeburg.
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  • West Ham received the grant of a market and annual fair in 1253.
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  • In 1607 David Waterhouse, lord of the manor of Halifax, obtained a grant of two markets there every week on Friday and Saturday and two fairs every year, each lasting three days, one beginning on the 24th of June, the other on the 11th of November.
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  • In 1701, New York, seeking another claim, obtained from the Iroquois a grant to the king of England of this territory which they claimed to have conquered but from which they had subsequently been expelled, and this grant was confirmed in 1726 and again in 1744 About 1730 English traders from Pennsylvania and Virginia began to visit the eastern and southern parts of the territory and the crisis approached as a French Canadian expedition under Celeron de Bienville took formal possession of the upper Ohio Valley by planting leaden plates at the mouths of the principal streams. This was in 1749 and in the same year George II.
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  • An association of New Jerseymen, organized by John Cleves Symmes, secured a grant from Congress in1788-1792to a strip of 248,540 acres on the Ohio between the Great Miami and the Little Miami, which came to be known as the Symmes Purchase.
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  • The powers of the old township were much more extensive than those of the present city of Boston, including as they did the determination of the residence of strangers, the allotment of land, the grant of citizenship, the fixing of wages and prices, of the conditions of lawsuits and even a voice in matters of peace and war.
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  • The Benefices Act 1898, however, now prohibits the grant of a lease of an advowson.
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  • Generally speaking, any person may grant or take a lease.
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  • A person of unsound mind can grant or take a lease if he is capable of contracting.
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  • He may also grant either a lease of the surface of settled land, reserving the mines and minerals, or a lease of the minerals without the surface.
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  • A grant or reservation of mines in general terms confers, or reserves, a right to work the mines, subject to the obligation of leaving a reasonable support to the surface as it exists at the time of the grant or reservation.
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  • Under these acts a right of reentry or forfeiture is not to be enforceable unless and until the lessor has served on the lessee a written notice specifying the breach of covenant or condition complained of, and requiring him to remedy it or make compensation, and this demand has not within a reasonable time been complied with; and when a lessor is proceeding to enforce such a right the court may, if it think fit, grant relief to the lessee.
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  • A life-renter can only grant a lease that is effectual during the subsistence of the life-rent.
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  • His name, and that of his wife Geloria (Elvira), are associated with the grant of the first franchises of Leon.
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  • The drilling of petroleum wells is carried on by individuals or companies, either on lands owned by them, or on properties whose owners grant leases, usually on condition that a certain number of wells shall be sunk within a stated period, and that a portion of the oil obtained (usually from one-tenth to one-fourth) shall be appropriated as royalty to the lessor.
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  • Unhappily, clinging to the conviction that all the lands which the crusaders would traverse were the "lost provinces" of his empire, he induced the crusaders to do him homage, so that, whatever they conquered, they would conquer in his name, and whatever they held, they would hold by his grant and as his vassals.
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  • A government grant is made towards the cost of upkeep. A government industrial school (opened in 1906) is maintained at Maseru, and the Paris Society has an industrial school at Leloaleng.
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  • In 1513 Juan Ponce de Leon (c. 1 4 60-1521), who had been with Christopher Columbus on his second voyage and had later been governor of Porto Rico, obtained a royal grant authorizing him to discover and settle " Bimini," - a fabulous island believed to contain a marvellous fountain or spring whose waters would restore to old men their youth or at least had wonderful curative powers.
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  • He returned to Spain in 1514, and obtained from the king a grant to colonize " the island of Bimini and the island of Florida," of which he was appointed adelantado, and in 1521 he made another expedition, this one for colonization as well as for discovery.
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  • The charter of incorporation granted in 1614 states that by the invasion of the Spaniards it had been treacherously spoiled and burnt but that its strength, prosperity and usefulness for navigation, and the acceptable and laudable services of the inhabitants in rebuilding and fortifying it, and their enterprise in erecting a pier, have moved the king to grant the petition for its incorporation.
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  • It also ratified Henry's grant of anchorage, keelage and busselage.
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  • John made a further grant of a three days' fair from the 10th of May.
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  • The governor and Executive Council have the exclusive right to grant all other franchises of a public or quasi-public nature and Congress reserves the right to annul or modify any such grant.
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  • In 1877 the provincial deputation was re-established, but it was not until 1895 that the home government attempted, far too late, to enact a series of adequate reform measures, and in November 1897 followed this by a grant of autonomy.
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  • P. Grant, an Atlanta railroad builder, in 1882, and subsequently enlarged by the city (in its south-east corner is Fort Walker); the Lake wood, 6 m.
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  • In 1216 John confirmed toRobertBruce the market on Wednesday granted to his father and the fair on the feast of St Lawrence; this fair was extended to fifteen days by the grant of 1230, while the charter of 1595 also granted a fair and market.
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  • The king gave him an annual grant of 1200 gulden (120), considerably enlarging it before the end of the year, and placing a comfortable house in the outskirts of the city at his disposal.
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  • Their importance will never be comparable to that of his music; but, just as the reaction against Ruskin's ascendancy as an art-critic has coincided with an increased respect for his ethical and sociological thought, so the rebellious forces that are compelling Wagnerism to grant music a constitution coincide with a growing admiration of his general mental powers.
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  • The king of Navarre, who defended this deed, had, however, many friends in France and was in communication with Edward III.; and consequently John was forced to make a treaty at Mantes and to compensate him for the loss of Angouleme by a large grant of lands, chiefly in Normandy.
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  • Dying in 1243, he was succeeded as lord of Connaught by his son Richard, and then (1248) by his younger son Walter, who carried on the family warfare against the native chieftains, and added greatly to his vast domains by obtaining (c. 1255) from Prince Edward a grant of "the county of Ulster," in consequence of which he was styled later earl of Ulster.
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  • Being ordered to co-operate with Grant, who was then before Vicksburg, he invested the defences of Port Hudson, Louisiana, in May 1863, and after three attempts to carry the works by storm he began a regular siege.
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  • A personal quarrel with President Grant led in 1872, however, to his joining the Liberal-Republican revolt in supportof Horace Greeley, and as the Liberal-Republican and Democratic candidate he was defeated for re-election.
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  • The first grant of a market and fair is dated 1227, when the prior of Wenlock obtained licence to hold a fair on the vigil, day and morrow of the Nativity of St John the Baptist, and a market every Monday.
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  • The "residue" grant is expended on navigation and swimming classes.
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  • Wilberforce, Charles Grant, John Thornton and his son Henry, were among the philanthropists who contributed to his funds; in 1798 the Sunday School Society (established 1785) extended its operations to Wales, making him its agent, and Sunday Schools grew rapidly in number and favour.
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  • A seignory appendant passes with the grant of the manor; a seignory in gross - that is, a seignory which has been severed from the demesne lands of the manor to which it was originally appendant - must be specially conveyed by deed of grant.
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  • The state and the national government co-operate in the construction and maintenance of this system, but the Federal government did not give material aid (the only exception being the grant of swamp lands in 1850) until the exceptionally disastrous flood in 1882.
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  • From 1712 to 1717 " Louisiana," or the French possessions of the Mississippi valley, was held by Antoine Crozat (1655-1738) as a private grant from the king.
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  • The company retained its grant of the colony until 1731, when it reverted to the crown.
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  • The separatists, headed by Carlos Manuel de Cespedes (1819-1874), a wealthy planter who proclaimed the revolution at Yara on the 10th of October, demanded the same reforms, including gradual emancipation of the slaves with indemnity to owners, and the grant of free and universal suffrage.
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  • These receive a grant from the government, which nevertheless encourages all parents to send their children to its own schools.
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  • Hoping to gain active support from the Vatican, Ostojic renounced Bogomilism, and persecuted his former co-religionists, until the menace of an insurrection forced him to grant an amnesty.
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  • The reforms in Turkey certainly encouraged the Serb and Moslem inhabitants of the occupied territory to petition the emperor for the grant of a constitution similar to that in force in the provinces of Austria proper.
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  • The culture of cotton is making rapid progress, immigrants who receive a grant of land being obliged to devote one-fourth of it to cotton culture.
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  • It is obliged also to form entrepots for the storage of the crops at reasonable distances from each other, and, on certain conditions, to grant advances to cultivators to aid them in raising the leaf.
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  • It was stated in the preface to the budget of 1910 that the government would grant no more railway concessions carrying guarantees.
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  • The state may grant land of this category to private persons on payment by the latter of the value of the proprietary right - the tithes, ground-rent (should there be private buildings upon it), and the land-tax.
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  • Fiefs with a revenue of from 3000 to 20,000 aspres were timars, furnishing one armed warrior for every 3000 aspres' revenue; the grant of a fief was conditional on obligatory residence.
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  • An important event not to be passed over without mention is the grant on the 10th of March 1870 of the firman instituting the Bulgarian exarchate, thus severing the Bulgarian Church from Text in Holland, p. 212.
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  • The diplomacy of Europe had been searching in vain since the autumn Accession of 1875 for the means of inducing Turkey to institute of Abd-u1- effective administrative reforms and to grant to Hamid 11., its European provinces that autonomy which now 1876.
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  • In the account roll above mentioned reference is made to a fair and a market, but no early grant of either is to be found.
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  • A grant of a market was obtained in 1247, and this is still of importance as regards both cattle and corn.
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  • The Danish mission in Greenland has a yearly grant of £ 2000 from the trading revenue of the colony, besides a contribution of £880 from the state.
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  • The town received its earliest known grant of municipal privileges sometime before 1147 from Fitz Hamon's successor and son-in-law Robert, earl of Gloucester.
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  • Alexander annulled his grant in 1258, but still pressed Henry for the discharge of unpaid arrears of subsidies.
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  • Before taking his seat he served also as a member of the state constitutional convention, where he opposed the grant of universal suffrage.
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  • The second part of the act provides that if any person or persons, bodies politic and corporate, for any sum of money, reward, gift, profit or benefit, directly or indirectly, or for or by reason of any promise, agreement, grant, bond, covenant or other assurances.
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  • In early Saxon times the river was called Thamis, as may be seen in a grant before A.D.
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  • The date of the grant of the town at an annual fee-farm of 8 marks is uncertain, but in the reign of Henry VI.
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  • The earliest record of a grant of market rights is in 1219, when Roger la Zouch obtained a grant of a weekly market and a two days' fair at the feast of St Helen, in consideration of a fine of one palfrey.
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  • He was lodged in `the Louvre, received the grant of an income equal to that he had hitherto enjoyed, and, with the title of "veteran pensioner" in lieu of that of "foreign associate" (conferred in 1772), the right of voting at the deliberations of the Academy.
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  • To encourage the investment of private capital in the construction of railways, the general railway law of 1853 authorized the national government to grant guarantees of interest on the capital invested.
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  • Martim Affonso de Sousa, having obtained a grant, fitted out a considerable armament and proceeded to explore the country in person.
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  • Pero Lopes de Sousa received the grant of a captaincy, and set sail from Portugal at the same time as his brother, the founder of Sao Vicente.
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  • Pedro de Campo Tourinho, a nobleman and excellent navigator, received a grant of the adjoining captaincy of Porto Seguro.
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  • The coast from the Rio Sao Francisco to Bahia was granted to Francisco Pereira Coutinho; the bay itself, with all its creeks, was afterwards added to the grant.
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  • Pedro de Goes obtained a grant of the captaincy of Parahyba between those of Sao Vicente and Espirito Santo; but his means were too feeble to enable him to make head against the aborigines, and the colony was broken up after a painful struggle of seven years.
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  • For the sake of increasing his capital, he divided his grant with Fernao, Alvares de Andrade and Aires da Cunha.
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  • In Dean cemetery, partly laid out on the banks of the Water of Leith, and considered the most beautiful in the city (opened 1845), were interred Lords Cockburn, Jeffrey and Rutherford; " Christopher North," Professor Aytoun, Edward Forbes the naturalist, John Goodsir the anatomist; Sir William Allan, L Sam Bough, George Paul Chalmers, the painters; George Combe, the phrenologist; Playfair, the architect; Alexander Russel, editor of the Scotsman; Sir Archibald Alison, the historian; Captain John Grant, the last survivor of the old Peninsular Gordon Highlanders; Captain Charles Gray, of the Royal Marines, writer of Scottish songs; Lieutenant John Irving, of the Franklin expedition, whose remains were sent home many years after his death by Lieut.
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  • The Romans occupied the country for more than three hundred years, as is evidenced by various remains; `but James Grant (1822-1887), in Old and New Edinburgh, doubts whether they ever built on the castle rock.
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  • Thereupon, to spite the rival republic, the Sienese took the Ghibelline side, and the German emperors, beginning with Frederick Barbarossa, rewarded their fidelity by the grant of various privileges.
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  • We may grant the pope's contention that the Edwardine church had no belief in priests who offered in sacrifice the body and blood of Christ or in bishops capable of ordaining such priests.
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  • We may grant further that the medieval offices have been deliberately altered to exclude this view.
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  • The king soon after presented him with the title of Professor, and with the Rosenkrantz grant of loo dollars for four years, the holder of which was expected to travel.
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  • The commission declared that the chasm between the native and white races had been broadening for years and that the efforts of the administration - especially since the grant of responsible government - to reconcile the Kaffirs to the changed conditions of rule and policy and to convert them into an element of strength had been ineffective.
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  • The principal facilities granted by the state are, exemption of taxation for a determined period of years, reduced railway fares for the goods manufactured, placing of government contracts, the grant of subsidies and loans and the foundation of industrial schools for the training of engineers and of skilled workmen.
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  • But attendance at the diet was regarded by the bulk of the poorer deputies as an intolerable burden, and they frequently agreed to grant the taxes for two or three years in advance, so as to be saved the expense 1 Some of these were of gigantic size, e.g.
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  • His successor, Kalman Szell, obtained an immense but artificial Szell, majority by a fresh fusion of parties, and the minority pledged itself to grant an indemnity for the extra parliamentary financial decrees rendered necessary by Hungary's understanding with Austria, as well as to cease from obstruction.
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  • A grant of 40,000 francs having been obtained from the chamber, a national edition was issued in seven 4to vols., bearing the title Ouvres de Laplace (1843-1847).
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  • During President Grant's administration he was a member of the senatorial coterie that influenced most of the president's policies, and in 1873 Grant urged him to accept an appointment as chief justice of the Supreme Court, but he declined.
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  • In 1880 he was one of the leaders of the unsuccessful movement to nominate Grant for a third presidential term.
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  • The accession of the Emperor Charles, and the ferment aroused by the Russian Revolution, led to considerable political changes in both halves of the Dual Monarchy, the most notable being the dismissal of Count Tisza from the Hungarian premiership (May 23 1917), the grant of a general political amnesty, and the summons of the Austrian Reichsrat, which had not been allowed to meet since March 1914.
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  • The Scyths had a method of divination with sticks, and the Enarees, who claimed to be soothsayers by grant of the goddess who had afflicted them, used another method by splitting bast fibres.
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  • Sir Michael, however, in a despatch dated September the 16th 1878, reiterated the intention of the British cabinet to grant the state " to the utmost practicable extent, its individuality and powers of self-government under the sovereignty of the queen."
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  • Meantime Frere's proposals to fulfil the promises made to grant the Boers a liberal constitution were shelved.
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  • In later years, when the Boers desired to regard the whole of this convention (and not merely the articles) as cancelled by the London Convention of 1884, and with it the suzerainty, which was only mentioned in the preamble, Mr Chamberlain, a member of the cabinet of 1880-1885, pointed out that if the preamble to this instrument were considered cancelled, so also would be the grant of self-government.
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  • The expedition cost Great Britain a million and a half, but the attempt at farther extension westwards was foiled, and a little later treaties with Lobenguela and the grant to Cecil Rhodes and his co-directors of a charter for the British South.
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  • It no sooner opened than it was evident that Kruger had come to obtain, not to grant, concessions.
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  • The British government was also of opinion that the time was near for the setting up of such institutions, and the pending grant of a constitution to the Transvaal was announced in parliament in July 1904.
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  • In accordance with the promise made in 1904 a constitution for the Transvaal on representative lines was promulgated by letters patent on the 31st of March 1905; but there self-G,„„ was already an agitation for the immediate grant ment - the of full self-government, and on the accession to Botha office of the Campbell-Bannerman administration Ministry.
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  • Praagh, The 1 The government expended over f r,000,000 on a land and agriculture bank and in 1910 made a grant of f roo,000 towards the establishment of a college of agriculture at Pretoria.
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  • Even if, by a bold assumption, we grant the unity of authorship, it is plain upon the face of it that the chapters in question cannot have been composed at the same time or under the same circumstances; literary and artistic unity is wholly wanting.
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  • They had endowed it with the manor and hundred of Faversham; this grant caused many disputes between the abbot and men of Faversham concerning the abbot's jurisdiction.
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  • Once grant the above definition of disease, and even the most trivial aberrations from the normal must be regarded as diseased conditions, quite irrespective of whether, when structural, they interfere with the function of the part or not.
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  • The despatch of this expedition seems to prove an almost blind confidence in Nicias, whose request to be superseded the Athenian people refused to grant.
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  • The church of Austin Friars, origin- ally belonging to a friary founded in 1253, became a Dutch church under a grant of Edward VI., and still remains so; its style is principally Decorated, but through various vicissitudes little of the original work is left.
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  • The wealthier metropolitan parishes became discontented with the form of local government to which they remained subject, and in 1897 Kensington and Westminster petitioned to be created boroughs by the grant of charters under the Municipal Corporation Acts.
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  • This grant is in lieu of the grants formerly made out of the exchequer grant in aid of local rates, and amounted in1906-1907to £619,489.
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  • There is no evidence of any grant, but after 1540 the title had become general.
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  • Arrival Farewell and a few companions, and to them he made of the a grant of the district of Port Natal.
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  • The mining laws of most civilized states grant the right of free prospecting over the public lands, protect the rights of the discoverer of the mineral deposit during the period of exploration, and provide for the acquisition of mineral property on favourable terms. Striking examples of the far-reaching effect of such laws is shown in the history of the Rocky Mountain region and western coast of the United States, the colonization and development of Australia, and the development of Alaska.
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  • The grant was named Rensselaerwyck in his honour, became a "manor" in 1685, and remained in the family until 1853.
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  • The colonists whom he settled upon his grant (1630) were industrious, and "Beverwyck" became increasingly prosperous.
    0
    0
  • There are in addition some pearling grounds in the Mergui Archipelago, which have a very recent history; they were practically unknown before 1890; in the early 'nineties they were worked by Australian adventurers, most of whom have since departed; and now they are leased in blocks to a syndicate of Chinamen, who grant sub-leases to individual adventurers at the rate of £25 a pump for the pearling year.
    0
    0
  • Two years later, a compromise having been effected with Lord Marlborough, a grant of the island was obtained by the earl of Carlisle, whose claim was based on a grant, from the king, of all the Caribbean islands in 1624; and in 1628 Charles Wolferstone, a native of Bermuda, was appointed governor.
    0
    0
  • The pardon transmitted by the secretary of state is applied by the supreme court, who grant the necessary orders to the magistrates in whose custody the convict is.
    0
    0
  • Thus by the New York Code of Criminal Procedure the governor of the state of New York has power to grant reprieves, commutations and pardons, except in the case of treason, where he can only suspend the execution of the sentence until the case can be reported to the legislature, with whom the power of pardon in this case rests.
    0
    0
  • Henry also gave him a grant of the island of Anglesey, with the castle of Beaumaris.
    0
    0
  • Ottawa University (Baptist) was established here in 1865, as the outgrowth of Roger Williams University, which had been chartered in 1860 for the education of Indians on the Ottawa Reservation, and had received a grant of 20,000 acres from the Federal government in 1862.
    0
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  • During the administrations of President Grant his leadership in shaping financial policy became generally recognized.
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  • Society, p. 302; Grant, Hist.
    0
    0
  • Both factions appealed to the governor of New York, that province having claimed jurisdiction over the islands under the grant to the duke of York in 1664, and, becoming increasingly dissatisfied with that government, sought a union with Massachusetts until the islands were annexed to that province by its new charter of 1691.
    0
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  • He was a descendant of Matthew Grant, a Scotchman, who settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts, in 1630.
    0
    0
  • Grant was the best horseman of his class, and took a respectable place in mathematics, but at his graduation in 1843 he only ranked twenty-first in a class of thirty-nine.
    0
    0
  • To the " call to arms " of 1861 Grant promptly responded.
    0
    0
  • Grant and his division commanders were promoted to the rank of major-general U.S.V.
    0
    0
  • But the Army of the Tennessee had been on the verge of annihilation on the evening of the first day, and Grant's leadership throughout was by no means equal to the emergency, though he displayed his usual personal bravery and resolution.
    0
    0
  • In the grand advance of Halleck's armies which followed Shiloh, Grant was relieved of all important duties by his assignment as second in command of the whole force, and was thought by the army at large to 'be in disgrace.
    0
    0
  • But Halleck soon went to Washington as general-in-chief, and Grant took command of his old army and of Rosecrans' Army of the Mississippi.
    0
    0
  • It is fair to assume that Grant would have followed other unsuccessful generals into retirement, had he not shown that, whatever his mistakes or failures, and whether he was or was not sober and temperate in his habits, he possessed the iron determination and energy which in the eyes of Lincoln and Stanton,' and of the whole Northern people, was the first requisite of their generals.
    0
    0
  • He remained then with his army near Vicks 1 President Lincoln was Grant's most unwavering supporter.
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    0
  • Many amusing stories are told of his replies to various deputations which waited upon him to ask for Grant's removal.
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    0
  • On one occasion he asked the critics to ascertain the brand of whisky favoured by Grant, so that he could send kegs of it to the other generals.
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    0
  • The question of Grant's abstemiousness was and is of little importance.
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    0
  • Grant was at once made a major-general in the regular army.
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    0
  • A few months later the great reverse of Chickamauga created an alarm in the North commensurate with the elation that had been felt at the double victory of Vicksburg and Gettysburg, and Grant was at once ordered to Chattanooga, to decide the fate of the Army of the Cumberland in a second battle.
    0
    0
  • After this, in preparation for a grand combined effort of all the Union forces, Grant was placed in supreme command, and the rank of lieutenant-general revived for him (March 1864).
    0
    0
  • Grant's headquarters henceforth accompanied the Army of the Potomac, and the lieutenant-general directed the campaign in Virginia.
    0
    0
  • This, with Grant's driving energy infused into the best army that the Union possessed, resolved itself into a series, almost uninterrupted, of terrible battles.
    0
    0
  • But Grant was unshaken in his determination.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile all the other campaigns had been closely supervised by Grant, preoccupied though he was with the operations against his own adversary.
    0
    0
  • In the end complete success rewarded the sacrifices and efforts of the Federals on every theatre of war; in Virginia, where Grant was in personal control, the merciless policy of attrition wore down Lee's army until a mere remnant was left for the final surrender.
    0
    0
  • Grant had thus brought the great struggle to an end, and was universally regarded as the saviour of the Union.
    0
    0
  • Nor must it be supposed that Grant learned little from three years' campaigning Civil War career.
    0
    0
  • Shiloh revealed to Grant the intensity of the struggle, and after that battle, appreciating to the full the material and moral factors with which he had to deal, he gradually trained his military character on those lines which alone could conduce to ultimate success.
    0
    0
  • Grant possessed or acquired both to such a degree that he proved fully equal to the emergency.
    0
    0
  • Grant, however, insisted that the United States government was bound by the terms accorded to Lee and his army at Appomattox.
    0
    0
  • This energetic action on Grant's part saved the United States from a foul stain upon its escutcheon.
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    0
  • In July 1866 the grade of general was created, for the first time since the organization of the government, and Grant was promoted to that position.
    0
    0
  • To tie the president's hands Congress had passed the Tenure of Office Act, forbidding the president to remove any cabinet officer without the consent of the Senate; but in August 1867 President Johnson suspended Secretary Stanton and appointed Grant secretary of war ad interim until the pleasure of the Senate should be ascertained.
    0
    0
  • Grant accepted the appointment under protest, and held it until the following January, when the Senate refused to confirm the president's action, and Secretary Stanton resumed his office.
    0
    0
  • President Johnson was much disgusted at the readiness with which Grant turned over the office to Stanton, and a bitter controversy ensued between Johnson and Grant.
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    0
  • Hitherto Grant had taken little part in politics.
    0
    0
  • The only vote which he had ever cast for a presidential candidate was in 1856 for James .Buchanan; and leading Democrats, so late as by Grant, but a treaty negotiated with this end in view failed to obtain the requisite two-thirds vote in the Senate.
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    0
  • Presi- the beginning of 1868, hoped to make him their can 1868y' didate in the election of that year; but the effect of the controversy with President Johnson was to bring Grant forward as the candidate of the Republican party.
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    0
  • The result of the contest was at no time in doubt; Grant received 214 electoral votes and Seymour 80.
    0
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  • The most important domestic event of Grant's first term as president was the adoption of the fifteenth amendment to the Constitution on the 30th of March 1870, providing that suffrage throughout the United States should not be restricted on account of race, colour or previous condition of servitude.
    0
    0
  • In some cases the culprits were so near to President Grant that many persons found it difficult to avoid the suspicion that he was himself implicated, and never perhaps was his hold upon popular favour so slight as in the summer and autumn of 1876.
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    0
  • After the close of his presidency in the spring of 1877 Grant started on a journey round the world, accompanied by his wife and one son.
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    0
  • The name of the firm was Grant and Ward.
    0
    0
  • This severe blow left General Grant penniless, just at the time when he was beginning to suffer acutely from the disease which finally caused his death.
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    0
  • The circumstances in which it was written made it an act of heroism comparable with any that Grant ever showed as a soldier.
    0
    0
  • Grant showed many admirable and lovable traits.
    0
    0
  • The cornerstone was laid by President Harrison in 1892, and the tomb was dedicated on the 27th of April 1897 with a splendid parade and addresses by President McKinley and General Horace Porter, president of the Grant Monument Association, which from 90,000 contributions raised the funds for the tomb.
    0
    0
  • Grant (3 vols., New York, 1867-1881), and Grant in Peace (Hartford, 1887), are appreciative but lacking in discrimination.
    0
    0
  • Grant and the Period of National Preservation and Reconstruction (New York, 1897) is a good succinct account.
    0
    0
  • Hosmer's Appeal to Arms and Outcome of the Civil War (New York, 1907); John Eaton's Grant, Lincoln, and the Freedmen (New York, 1907), and various works mentioned in the articles American Civil War, Wilderness Campaign, &C.
    0
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  • The prophetic thought is that the daughter (population) of Zion shall not be saved by her present rulers or defensive strength; she must come down from her bulwarks and dwell in the open field; there, and not within her proud ramparts, Yahweh will grant deliverance from her enemies.
    0
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  • In 1752 the company had a pathway blazed between the small fortified posts at Will's Creek (Cumberland), Maryland, and at Redstone Creek (Brownsville), Pennsylvania, which it had established in 1750; but it was finally merged in the Walpole Company (an organization in which Benjamin Franklin was interested), which in 1772 had received from the British government a grant of a large tract lying along the southern bank of the Ohio as far west as the mouth of the Scioto river.
    0
    0
  • Cutler's original intention was to buy for the Ohio Company only about 1,500,000 acres, but on the 27th of July Congress authorized a grant of about 5,000,000 acres of land for $3,500,000; a reduction of one-third was allowed for bad tracts, and it was also provided that the lands could be paid for in United States securities.
    0
    0
  • His policy was to crush all tendencies to independence in Germany, and this led him to grant the stem-duchies to his relatives, and afterwards to ally himself with the church.
    0
    0
  • At the opening of the session of 1845 the government, in pursuance of a promise made to Irish members that they would deal with the question of academical education in Ireland, proposed to establish non-sectarian colleges in that country and to make a large addition to the grant to the Roman Catholic College of Maynooth.
    0
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  • Ifut it reserved the power of suppressing or suspending a newspaper, and against that reservation a majority of the lower house voted, session after session, only to see the bill rejected by the peers, who shared the governments opinion that to grant a larger measure of liberty would certainly encourage licence.
    0
    0
  • In March 1863, still troubled by his wound, he was assigned to the command of the south-west, and in May was ordered to take immediate command of all the Confederate forces in Mississippi, then threatened by Grant's movement on Vicksburg.
    0
    0
  • When Pemberton's army was besieged in Vicksburg by Grant, Johnston used every effort to relieve it, but his force was inadequate.
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  • There are also an ancient church crowning the eastern hill, and a curious fortified warehouse (called the New Works), dating probably from the 14th century, when a trading company was established here under a grant from Henry IV.
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    0
  • General Grant had now taken Porter's part, and wrote an article in vol.
    0
    0
  • Bhagalpur passed to the East India Company by the grant of the emperor Shah Alam in 1765.
    0
    0
  • Grant, an eccentric genius, the Monthly Review (1888-1890), the New Zealand Illustrated Magazine (1899-1905), chiefly devoted to the light literature of New Zealand subjects, the Maori Record (1905-1907), and the Red Funnel, published since 1905.
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  • The town, which is very ancient, being mentioned in Domesday, obtained a grant for a market and fair in 1251, and received its charter of incorporation in 1887.
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    0
  • He was soon re-employed in a minor position, and, at the head of a division of new troops, accompanied Grant's army to Pittsburg Landing.
    0
    0
  • His appreciation of Grant, and his sympathy with the chagrin he suffered after this battle, cemented the friendship between the two.
    0
    0
  • In Grant's final Vicksburg campaign Sherman commanded the XV.
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    0
  • When, after Rosecrans's defeat at Chickamauga, Grant was placed in supreme command in the west, Sherman succeeded to the command of the Army of the Tennessee, with which he took part in the great battle of Chattanooga.
    0
    0
  • He had already prepared for a further advance by making an expedition into the heart of Mississippi as far as Meridian, destroying railways and making impracticable, for a season, the transfer of military operations to that region; and on Grant becoming general-in-chief (March 1864) he was made commander of the military division of the Mississippi, including his Army of the Tennessee, now under McPherson, the Army of the Cumberland, under Thomas, and the Army of the Ohio, under Schofield.
    0
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  • In January 1865 Sherman marched northwards again, once more abandoning his base, towards Petersburg, where Grant and Lee were waging a war of giants.
    0
    0
  • With 90,000 men Sherman drove Johnston before him, and when Lee surrendered to Grant Johnston also gave up the struggle.
    0
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  • When Grant became full general in 1866 Sherman was promoted lieutenant-general, and in 1869, when Grant became president, hesucceeded to the full rank.
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    0
  • In view of operations against Corinth, Mississippi, Grant's army had ascended the Tennessee to Pittsburg Landing and there disembarked, while the co-operating army under Buell moved across country from Nashville to join it.
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  • The Confederates concentrated above 40,000 men at Corinth and advanced on Pittsburg Landing with a view to beating Grant before Buell's arrival, but their concentration had left them only a narrow margin of time, and the advance was further delayed by the wretched condition of the roads.
    0
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  • Grant meantime had disposed his divisions in camps around the Landing rather with a view to their comfort than in accordance with any tactical scheme.
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  • Even so, more by chance than intentionally, Buell's leading division was opposite the Landing, awaiting only a ferry, on the evening before the battle; Grant, however, declined to allow it to cross, as he thought that there would be no fighting for some days.
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  • Grant had formed a last (and now a connected) line of defence with Buell's leading division (Nelson's) and all of his own infantry that he could rally.
    0
    0
  • During the night Grant's detached division (Lew Wallace's) and Buell's army came up, totalling 25,000 fresh troops, and at 5 A.M.
    0
    0
  • About Shiloh Church, a strong rearguard under Bragg repulsed the attacks of Grant and Buell for six hours before withdrawing, and all that Grant and Buell achieved was the reoccupation of the abandoned camps.
    0
    0
  • Under this statute the archbishop continues to grant special licences to marry, which are valid in both provinces; he appoints notaries public, who may practise in both provinces; and he grants dispensations to clerks to hold more than one benefice, subject to certain restrictions which have been imposed by later statutes.
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    0
  • The archbishop also continues to grant degrees in the faculties of theology, music and law, which are known as Lambeth degrees.
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    0
  • The liberality of William the Lion had bestowed upon the corporation an extensive grant of lands; while in addition to the well-endowed church of St John, it had two monasteries, each possessed of a fair revenue.
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    0
  • In the Roman camp the rabbi was courteously received, and Vespasian (whose future elevation to the imperial dignity Johanan, like Josephus, is said to have foretold) agreed to grant him any boon he desired.
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    0
  • When the secret treaty with France became known, thus confirming Sacheverell's insight, the latter called for the disbandment of the forces and advocated the refusal of further supplies for military purposes; and in June 1678 he resolutely opposed Lord Danby's proposal to grant £300,000 per annum to Charles II.
    0
    0
  • It dates from the time of Cortes, who built for himself a residence there, and had the town included in the royal grant to himself in 1529.
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  • He accepted, however, the Republican nomination as vice-president on a ticket headed by General Grant, and was elected; but he failed in 1872 to secure renomination.
    0
    0
  • This charter was confirmed to Thomas, Lord Berkeley, in 1330, and in 1395-1396 Lord Berkeley received a grant of another fair on the vigil and day of Holyrood.
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    0
  • The turbulent successors of O'Neill having been routed by the English, the town and fortress were obtained by grant dated the 16th of November 1571 by Sir Thomas Smith, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth, but were afterwards forfeited by him to the lord deputy Sir Arthur Chichester, who, in 1612, was created Baron Chichester of Belfast.
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    0
  • The knights of St John having been driven from Rhodes by the Turks, obtained the grant of Malta, Gozo and Tripoli in 1530 from the emperor Charles V., subject to a reversion in favour of the emperor's successor in the kingdom of Aragon should the knights leave Malta, and to the annual tribute of a falcon in acknowledgment that Malta was under the suzerainty of Spain.
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    0
  • The Maltese, at first, challenged the grant as a breach of the charter of King Alfonso, but eventually welcomed the knights.
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  • Dispensations, however, could be easily obtained from Rome, before the reformation of the Church of England, to enable a clerk to hold several ecclesiastical dignities or benefices at the same time, and by the Peterpence, Dispensations, &c. Act 1534, the power to grant such dispensations, which had been exercised previously by the court of Rome, was transferred to the archbishop of Canterbury, certain ecclesiastical persons having been declared by a previous statute (1529) to be entitled to such dispensations.
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  • Parliament would grant the king no supplies, and he could find the means of fitting out a fleet only by defrauding his creditors.
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  • On the 14th of May 1863 Johnston who then held the city, was attacked on both sides by Sherman and McPherson with two corps of Grant's army, which, after a sharp engagement, drove the Confederates from the town.
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    0
  • The area of the grant may have been enlarged by later interpolations; or it may have dealt with property rather than with sovereignty, and have only referred to estates claimed by the pope in the territories named; or it is possible that Charles may have actually intended to establish an extensive papal kingdom in Italy, but was released from his promise by Adrian when the pope saw no chance of its fulfilment.
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  • Grant said of him, "Hancock stands the most conspicuous figure of all the general officers who did not exercise a separate command.
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  • The attempt to reduce the brigand-soldiery, and especially the ordinances passed by the estates of Languedoil at Orleans in 1439, which not only gave the king an aid of ioo,000 francs (an act which was later used by the king as though it were a perpetual grant and so freed him from that parliamentary control of the purse so important in England), but demanded as well royal nominations to officerships in the army, marked a gain in the royal prerogative which the nobility resolved to challenge.
    0
    0
  • The land belonged from early times to the see of London, a grant being recorded in 1220.
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    0
  • This is the only instance in Great Britain of the custom of free coal-mining under a government grant or concession, which is the rule in almost every country on the continent of Europe.
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    0
  • The state legislature approved this grant in 1858, added to the endowment one section (640 acres) out of every ten appropriated co encourage the building of railways, and provided that there should be one university instead of two.
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  • Mutesa had received Speke and Grant in a most friendly manner.
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  • Grant, some so Sudanese soldiers, and about 250 porters, armed with Snider carbines.
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  • Cunningham, Captain Seymour Vandeleur, William Grant and others, he overran Unyoro and broke down all resistance.
    0
    0
  • The struggle continued with great bitterness on both sides, but gradually the Danish government was forced to grant many important reforms. High schools were established at Reykjavik, and efforts made to better the trade and farming of the country.
    0
    0
  • Courts of justice, however, do not grant reprieves by way of dispensation from the penalties of the law, which is not for the judicial department, but for temporary purposes, e.g.
    0
    0
  • North-west of the lake and along the Molo river the 3rd Lord Delamere obtained a grant of 155 sq.
    0
    0
  • The territorial extent of each town was determined by its grant or grants from the general court, which the towns served as agents in the management of land.
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    0
  • When it had become known that the colony was within the territory of the New England Council, John Pierce, in 1621, procured from that body a grant which made the colonists its tenants.
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    0
  • In 1629 Governor Bradford procured from the same council a definite grant of the tract which corresponds to the south-eastern portion of the present state.
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    0
  • King James having by patent in 1620 created a Council for New England to whom he made a large grant of territory, the council in 1628 made a sub-grant, confirmed by a royal charter that passed the seals on the 4th of March 1629, to the "Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in Newe England."
    0
    0
  • The charter gave the company control over the admission of " freemen " (co-partners in the enterprise, and voters), " full and absolute power and authority to correct, punish and rule " subjects settling in the territory comprised in their grant, and power to " resist.
    0
    0
  • From the freedom of the United States came the revolt of Spanish America, and the grant by Great Britain to Canada of the amplest rights of self-government.
    0
    0
  • Others, who hold no less strongly to theological progress by evolution, not revolution, will hesitate to grant that the line of advance passes through the symbolical books.
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    0
  • A forged grant of Ceadwalla speaks of the fall of Kent before Sigehere as a well-known event; and in a Kentish charter dated 676 a king of Kent called Swebhard grants land with the consent of his father King Sebbe.
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    0
  • His trusted intelligence officer, Colonel Colquhoun Grant, was at this time in France, and it had been arranged that his reports.
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    0
  • On June 15 Grant wrote to Wellington stating that the French were advancing, and that French officers spoke freely about a decisive action being fought within three days.
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    0
  • Owing to this officer's presumptuous folly Grant's information only reached the duke on June 18, too late to be of use.
    0
    0
  • Even though the supreme court should decide such legislation to be within the grant of powers to the general government, the distrust and opposition, on constitutional grounds, of so large a portion of the people, could not but go far to defeat the object sought."
    0
    0
  • The governor's power to grant reprieves, commutations or pardons is unrestricted by any board of pardons, but he is required to report to the legislature each case in which he exercises such power.
    0
    0
  • On the expiration of the charter of the New Netherland Company (1618) the StatesGeneral refused to grant a renewal, and only private ventures were authorized until 1621, when the West India Company was chartered for a term of twenty-four years; to this company was given a monopoly of Dutch trade with the whole American coast from Newfoundland to the Straits of Magellan.
    0
    0
  • The revised charter also provided that any one who brought over five colonists and established them in a new settlement should receive 200 acres, and if such a settlement grew to be a town or village it should receive a grant of municipal government.
    0
    0
  • That body suggested a representative government, but this the Company refused to grant.
    0
    0
  • As Johnson thought it unsafe to pursue the routed army his victory had no other effect than the erection here of the useless defences of Fort William Henry, but as it was the only success in a year of gloom parliament rewarded him with a grant of X 5000 and the title of a baronet.
    0
    0
  • The town was evidently governed by bailiffs in 1401, when the "bailiffs and good men" received a grant of pontage for the repair of the bridge called "Assheconbrigge," but the town was never incorporated and never sent members to parliament.
    0
    0
  • Ferries over the Redewynd were subjects of royal grant in 1340 and 1399; the abbot built a new bridge over the Bourne in 1333, and wholly maintained the bridge over the Thames when it replaced the 14th century ferry.
    0
    0
  • A capitation grant is given for every child in average daily attendance at the schools.
    0
    0
  • The Old Age Pensions law, enacted in 1898, provided for the free grant of pensions, not exceeding £18 a year, to persons of sixty-five years and upwards who had lived for twentyfive years in the colony.
    0
    0
  • The British government was ready to grant land for an autonomous settlement in East Africa.
    0
    0
  • A further grant of privileges was bestowed in 1292 by the earl of Devon, but no charter of incorporation was granted until that from James I.
    0
    0
  • The Janissaries rose once more in revolt, induced the Sheikhul-Islam to grant a fetva against the reforms, dethroned and imprisoned Selim (1807), and placed his nephew Mustafa on the throne.
    0
    0
  • It is of considerable antiquity, and received a grant for a market and fair in the 7th year of Edward III.
    0
    0
  • In some parts, especially (in Douglas and Grant counties) within the Big Bend of the Columbia, the plain is frequently cut by coulees, or abandoned river channels, some of them 500 to 600 ft.
    0
    0
  • A congress of ex-burghers was held at Brandfort in December 1904, when among other resolutions passed was one demanding the grant of self-government to the colony.
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    0
  • He was dissatisfied with General Grant's administration, and became its sharp critic. The discontent which he did much to develop ended in the organization of the Liberal Republican party, which held its National Convention at Cincinnati in 1872, and nominated Greeley for the presidency.
    0
    0
  • He expected their support, on account of his attitude toward the South and hostility to Grant, but he thought it a mistake to give him their formal nomination.
    0
    0
  • General Grant received in the election 3,597,070 votes, Greeley 2,834,079.
    0
    0
  • Nogi and Oyama were equally impressed with the strength of the new (west) Russian front, and like Grant at Petersburg in 1864, extended farther and farther to the outer flank, the Russians following suit.
    0
    0
  • The first source of its power is under charters which the Crown of Great Britain was authorized by act of parliament to grant, the other is from several charters derived from the emperor of the Moguls ....
    0
    0
  • A new form of condenser was tested on the small engine employed, and the results it yielded formed the starting-point of a series of investigations which were aided by a special grant from the Royal Society, and were described in an elaborate memoir presented to it on the 13th of December 1860.
    0
    0
  • Since the Northern and Southern Sla y s had absented themselves and the Poles were in opposition, the Reichsrat was adjourned (May 3), and the Germans now again demanded the grant of a revised constitution, with German as the language of State, a special status for Galicia and Dalmatia, access for the Germans to the Adriatic, and the partition of Bohemia.
    0
    0
  • Yahweh appeared to Solomon in a dream and offered to grant whatever he might ask.
    0
    0
  • Wheat grows chiefly in the east and north-east parts of the state, especially in Brown, Spink, Roberts, Day and Grant counties, the largest crop in 1899 being that of Brown county, 3,3 20, 57 0 bush., or about one-twelfth of the state's product.
    0
    0
  • The governor may remit fines and forfeitures, and grant reprieves, commutations and pardons, but in the more serious cases only on the recommendation of a board of pardons, composed of the presiding judge, the secretary of state, and the attorney-general.
    0
    0
  • The first sejm to legislate for the whole of Poland was the diet of Piotrkow (1493), summoned by John Albert to grant him subsidies; but the mandates of its deputies were limited to twelve months, and its decrees were to have force for only three years.
    0
    0
  • She received from parliament a grant of 30,000 a year in compensation for the loss of her dower-lands, and the king added a similar sum as a pension from himself.
    0
    0
  • The authority to grant such discharge was conceived to be included in the power of binding and loosing committed by Christ to His Church; and when in the course of time the vaguer theological conceptions of the first ages of Christianity assumed scientific form and shape at the hands of the Schoolmen, the doctrine came to prevail that this discharge of the sinner's debt was made through an application to the offender of what was called the " Treasure of the Church " (Thurston, p. 315).
    0
    0
  • A daily market was obtained in 1784 by grant from George III.
    0
    0
  • In November 1903 a syndicate was of Grant (1575) was succeeded by that of Camden (1 595), founded mainly on a Paduan text-book, and apparently adopted in 1596 by Sir Henry Savile at Eton, where it long remained in use as the Eton Greek Grammar, while at Westminster itself it was superseded by that of Busby (1663).
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  • He had opposed the grant of the Maryland charter, had established a trading post on Kent Island in Chesapeake Bay in 1631, and when commanded to submit to the new government he and his followers offered armed resistance.
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  • On the 6th of February Fort Henry fell to Foote's gunboat flotilla, and Grant then moved overland to Donelson.
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  • Had Halleck reinforced Mitchel, that officer might perhaps have forestalled the later victories of Grant and Sherman.
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  • Johnston and Beauregard completely surprised the camps of Grant's divisions.
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  • Some weeks afterwards, Halleck with the combined armies of Grant, Buell and Pope began the siege of Corinth, which Beauregard ultimately evacuated a month later.
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  • Halleck went to Washington as general-in-chief, Pope was transferred to Virginia, Grant, with his own Army of the Tennessee and Rosecrans's (lately Pope's) Army of the Mississippi, was entrusted with operations on the latter river, while Buell's Army of the Ohio was ordered to east Tennessee to relieve the inhabitants of that district, who, as Unionist sympathizers, were receiving harsh treatment from the Confederate and state authorities.
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  • Sterling Price in the meanwhile had been ordered forward against Grant and Rosecrans, and Van Dorn promised his assistance.
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  • Grant's other forces were split up into detachments, and when Van Dorn, boldly marching right round Rosecrans, descended upon Corinth from the north, Grant could hardly stir to help his subordinate.
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  • The Confederates fell back to the southward, escaping Grant once more, and thus ended the Confederate advance in the West.
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  • Sherman from Memphis, and a force from Helena on the Arkansas side, failed, owing to Pemberton's prompt retirement to Oxford, Mississippi, and complications brought about by the intrigues of an able but intractable subordinate, McClernand, induced Grant to make a complete change of plan.
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  • Sherman was to proceed down the great river, and join the ships from the Gulf before Vicksburg, while Grant himself drove Pemberton southwards along the Mississippi Central railway.
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  • Grant, with the other three under Sherman, McClernand and McPherson, moved by water to the neighbourhood of the fortress.
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  • As Sherman in 1862, so now Grant was unable to obtain any foothold on the high ground, and no effective attack was possible until this had been gained.
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  • At last, after many trials and failures, Grant took a daring step. The troops with their supplies marched round through a network of lakes and streams to a point south of Vicksburg; Admiral Porter's gunboats and the transports along with them "ran" the batteries.
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  • At Bruinsburg, beyond Pemberton's reach, a landing was made on the eastern bank and, without any base of supplies or line of retreat, Grant embarked upon a campaign which made him in the end master of the prize.
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  • Grant's endurance and daring had won what was perhaps the greatest success of the war.
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  • Grant was now given supreme command in the west, and the Army of the Tennessee (now under Sherman) and two corps from Virginia under Hooker were hurried by rail to Tennessee.
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  • But Thomas, his successor, was one of the greatest soldiers of the war, and Grant's three generals, all men of great ability, set to work promptly.
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  • Grant's triumph was decisive of the war in the west, and with Burnside's victory over Longstreet at Knoxville, the struggle for Tennessee was over.
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  • Sherman was to command in the west, Grant's headquarters accompanied Meade and the Army of the Potomac. The general plan was simple and comprehensive.
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  • Grant and Meade, reinforced by Burnside's IX.
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  • With a bare 70,000 men the Confederate general struck at the flank of Grant's marching columns in that same Wilderness where Jackson had won his last battle twelve months before.
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  • On his part Grant had lost 18,000 men.
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  • Grant, astonished perhaps, but here as always resolute, tried again to reach Lee's right wing, and on the 8th another desperate battle began at Spottsylvania Court House.
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  • The fighting on this field lasted ten days, at the end of which Grant had doubled his losses and was as far as ever from success.
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  • On the 16th of May Butler fought the indecisive battle of Drury's Bluff against Beauregard, in consequence of which he had to retire to Bermuda Hundred, whence most of his troops were sent to join Grant.
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  • On the 3rd of June at Cold Harbor (q.v.) took place the last of Grant's "hammering" battles in the open fields.
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  • But Grant was as resolute as ever.
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  • Two sharp combats followed on the 22nd of June and the 2nd of July, as Grant once more began to feel Lee's right.
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  • A vast network of fortifications covered the front of both armies, whose flank extended far to the south-west, Grant seeking to capture, Lee to defend, the Danville railway by which the Confederates received their supplies.
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  • The policy of "attrition" upon which Grant had embarked, and which he was carrying through regardless of his losses, was having its effect.
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  • Early had been nearer to the immediate success than Lee had been in 1862 and 1863, but he had failed utterly to relax Grant's hold on Petersburg, which was becoming daily more crushing.
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  • But Grant was tireless, and five days later another battle was fought, at Peebles Farm, in which the lost ground was regained.
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  • One more attempt to outflank Lee to the westward was made by Grant without success, before winter came on, and the campaign closed with an expedition, under the direction of General Warren, which destroyed the Weldon line.
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  • Grant had not reached Lee's flank at any point,.
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  • In the closing months of the year Grant's brilliant cavalry commander Sheridan had been put in command of an army to operate against Early in the Valley.
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  • The victory was decisive, and, the country being now bare of supplies, the Army of the Shenandoah was sent to reinforce Grant, while the remnant of Early's forces also went to Petersburg.
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  • Whilst Grant, with his avowed object of crushing Lee's army, lost no opportunity of fighting a battle coute que coute, Sherman, intent rather on the conquest of territory, acted on different lines.
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  • With the provisos that if Lee turned upon Sherman, Grant must follow him up sharply,'and that Thomas could be left to deal with Hood (both of which could be, and were, done), the scheme might well be decisive of the war.
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  • Grant lay in front of the Army of northern Virginia with 125,000 men, and when active operations began Lee had no resource but to try and escape to the southwest in order to join Johnston.
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  • Grant felt that this was a mere feint to screen some other move.
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  • The remnant of Ewell's corps was cut off at Sailor's Creek, and when Sheridan got ahead of the Confederates while Grant furiously pressed them in the rear, surrender was inevitable (April 8).
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  • But Lee, the Johnstons, McClellan, Grant and Sherman had all served in the old army.
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  • Stuart was twenty-eight, Sheridan thirty, Grant and Jackson under forty, while some of the subordinate generals were actually fresh from West Point.
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  • The use of masses was never put in practice more sternly than by Grant in 1864.
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  • Its early importance is shown by the grant of privileges made to it by the German King Henry I., and by the diet held here in 1135.
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  • But any such result would be difficult to reconcile with the results yielded by other lines of investigation in this article; among alternative views the choice seems to lie between the following: - (i.) The years of Tiberius are here reckoned from some earlier starting-point than the death of his predecessor - probably from the grant to him of co-ordinate authority with Augustus over the provinces made in A.D.
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  • A fuller grant in 1206 gave the burgesses a gild merchant, the husting court to be held once a week only, and general liberties according to the customs of Oxford, saving the rights of the bishop and the earl of Arundel, whose ancestor William D'Albini had received from William the moiety of the tolbooth.
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  • A fair held on the festival of St Margaret (July 20) was included in the grant to the monks of Norwich about 110o.
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  • The governor is commander-in-chief of the militia when it is not called into the service of the United States; he may remit fines and forfeitures, commute sentences, and grant reprieves and pardons, except in cases of impeachment; and he calls extraordinary sessions of the legislature.
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  • The Virginia authorities expressed a willingness to grant the demand provided Congress would admit the new district into the Union as a state.
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  • Supported by representative Christian leaders, such as Granville Sharp, Zachary Macaulay, William Wilberforce, Charles Grant and Henry Thornton, with Lord Teignmouth, ex-governorgeneral of India, as its first president, and Dr Porteus, bishop of London, as its friendly counsellor, the new society made rapid progress.
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  • He returned to Rome in 60 B.C. to find that the senate had sacrificed the support of the capitalists (which Cicero had worked so hard to secure), and had finally alienated Pompey by refusing to ratify his acts and grant lands to his soldiers.
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  • Priests of the Society are given the option of either joining other orders or remaining as secular clergy, under obedience to the ordinaries, who are empowered to grant or withhold from them licences to hear confessions.
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  • Under a grant made by Edward IV.
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