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granada

granada

granada Sentence Examples

  • By a treaty signed at Granada, the French and Spanish kings were to divide the spoil.

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  • CHRISTINO MARTOS (1830-1893), Spanish politician, was born at Granada on the 13th of September 1830.

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  • He died suddenly in his tent at Jaen when preparing for a raid into the Moorish territory of Granada, on the 7th of September 1312.

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  • An important event of his pontificate was the capture of Granada (2nd of January 1492), which was celebrated at Rome with great rejoicing and for which Innocent gave to Ferdinand of Aragon the title of "Catholic Majesty."

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  • The place of meeting, Elvira, was not far from the modern Granada, if not, as Dale thinks, actually identical with it.

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  • MONTEFRIO, a town of southern Spain, in the province of Granada, on the river Bilano.

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  • There is more than one meaning of Granada discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.

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  • At the age of eighteen Moratin won the second prize of the Academy for a heroic poem on the conquest of Granada, and two years afterwards he attracted more general attention with his LecciOn poetica, a satire upon the popular poets of the day.

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  • New Granada >>

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  • He then hurried back to Andalusia where he joined the sovereigns, who were now besieging Granada, which he entered with the conquering army in January 1492 and built there a convent of his order.

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  • Unable to bear up against the Dominican's fiery denunciations, the sovereigns, three months after the fall of Granada, issued a decree ordering every Jew either to embrace Christianity or to leave the country, four months being given to make up their minds; and those who refused to become Christians to order had leave to sell their property and carry off their effects.

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  • As vizier to the Moorish king at Granada, he was not only a patron of learning, but himself a man of wide knowledge and a considerable author.

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  • He was a native of Granada, but migrated to Lunel, where he probably died about 1190.

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  • Valenzuela succeeded in getting the embassy exchanged for the governorship of Granada.

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  • He still continued his yearly experimental contributions to the North American Review, elaborating them with a view as much to ultimate historical proficiency as to immediate literary effect, the essays on Scottish Song (1826), Novel-Writing (1827), Moliere (1828), and Irving's Granada (1829)) belonging to this preparatory period.

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  • of Granada vainly besieged Baena, which was held for Sancho IV.

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  • MOTRIL, a town of southern Spain in the province of Granada, at the foot of an offshoot of the Sierra Nevada and on the edge of a rich alluvial plain, about i m.

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  • of Granada, with which it is connected by a good carriage road.

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  • It became a convention of diplomacy, designed to cover any particularly sharp piece of policy which needed some excuse; and the treaty of Granada, formed between Louis XII.

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  • Some time afterwards the Cid was sent on an embassy to collect tribute from Motamid, the king of Seville, whom he found engaged in a war with Abdallah, the king of Granada.

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  • He here continued to render great service to Abu Salem (Ibrahim III.), Abu Inan's successor, but, having offended the prime minister, he obtained permission to emigrate to Spain, where, at Granada, he was received with great cordiality by Ibn al Ahmar, who had been greatly indebted to his good offices when an exile at the court of Abu Salem.

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  • Tornberg (Upsala, 1840), and the parts treating of the Banu-1 Ahmar kings of Granada were translated into French by M.

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  • LUIS DE GRANADA (1504-1588), Spanish preacher and ascetic writer, born of poor parents named Sarria at Granada.

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  • He was sent to Valladolid to continue his studies and then was appointed procurator at Granada.

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  • But in 1576 the prohibition was removed and the works of Luis de Granada, so prized by St Francis de Sales, have never lost their value.

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  • Granada, Nicaragua >>

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  • 1007), whose fame rests on a dissertation on amicable numbers, and on the schools which were founded by his pupils at Cordova, Dania and Granada.

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  • Balsam of Tolu, produced by Myroxylon toluiferum, a native of Venezuela and New Granada; balsam of Peru, derived from Myroxylon Pereirae, a native of San Salvador in Central America; Mexican and Brazilian elemi, produced by various species of Icica or "incense trees," and the liquid exudation of an American species of Liquidambar, are all used as incense in America.

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  • 1185), Moslem philosopher, was born at Guadix near Granada.

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  • He became secretary to the governor of Granada, and later physician and vizier to the Mohad caliph, Abu Ya`qub Yusuf.

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  • This is a history of Spain from the earliest times down to 1456, and was printed at Granada in 1545, and also in the Rerum Hispanicarum Scriptores aliquot, by R.

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  • Traces of Christianity remained among the Kabyles till after the conquest of Granada (1492),(1492), when the influx of Andalusian Moors from Spain completed the conversion of those tribes.

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  • In architectural merits its monuments, though not so extensive, are worthy of comparison with those of Granada.

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  • Among the antiquities preserved in the museum are the epitaph of Boabdil, the last king of Granada, who died at Tlemcen in 1494, and the standard cubit measure - in marble - used in the Kissaria, bearing date A.H.

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  • Arouj and Khair-ed-Din joined the exiled Moors of Granada in raids on the Spanish coast.

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  • Other famous preachers on the same side were the Spaniards Luiz of Granada and Thomas of Villanova, the Italians Cornelio Musso, Egidio of Viterbo and Carlo Borromeo, and the German Peter Canisius.

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  • MELocACTus, the genus of melon-thistle or Turk's-cap cactuses, contains, according to a recent estimate, about 90 species, which inhabit chiefly the West Indies, Mexico and Brazil, a few extending into New Granada.

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  • The native country of the insect is Mexico, and it is there more or less cultivated; but the greater part of our supply comes from New Granada and the Canary Islands.

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  • Their number had been considerably diminished by the time of the conquest of Granada in 1492.

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  • The first Christian archbishop of Granada, Talavera, made some progress in converting the people peacefully.

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  • The result was a rebellion in Granada, which was put down with great difficulty.

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  • The Moriscos were expelled from Granada and scattered over other parts of Spain.

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  • He did not, however, remain long in retirement, but in September 1812, hearing of important movements in New Granada, repaired to Cartagena, where he received a commission to operate against the Spanish troops on the Magdalena river.

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  • From Cumana Bolivar repaired to Cartagena, and thence to Tunja, where the revolutionary congress of New Granada was sitting.

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  • Being, however, required to resume his power, and retain it until the independence of the country had been completely established, he reorganized his troops, and set out from Angostura, in order to cross the Cordilleras, effect a junction with General Santander, who commanded the republican force in New Granada, and bring their united forces into action against the common enemy.

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  • In July 1819 he entered Tunja, after a sharp action on the adjoining heights; and on the 7th of August he gained the victory of Boyaca, which gave him immediate possession of Bogota and all New Granada.

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  • Availing himself of the favourable moment, he obtained the enactment of the fundamental law of the 17th of December 1819, by which the republics of Venezuela and New Granada were henceforth to be united in a single state, under his presidency, by the title of the Republic of Colombia.

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  • ALPUJARRAS, or [[Alpuxarras, The]] (Moorish al Busherat, " the grass-land"), a mountainous district of southern Spain, in the province of Granada, consisting principally of valleys which descend at right angles from the crest of the Sierra Nevada on the north, to the Sierras Almijara, Contraviesa and Gador, which sever it from the Mediterranean Sea, on the south.

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  • The inhabitants are the descendants of the Moors, who, after the Spanish conquest of Granada in 1492, vainly sought to preserve the last relics of their independence in their mountain fastnesses.

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  • The country between Peru and Panama was subdued before 1537 by the conquest of Quito by Sebastian de Benalcazar 'and of New Granada by Jimenez de Quesada.

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  • New Granada (which included the present republics of Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador) was created a viceroyalty in 1718 (soon abolished, but re-created in 1740).

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  • of Castile in 1240, and entrusted to the Order of Calatrava; in 1331 it was recaptured by the Moorish king of Granada; but in the following century it was finally reunited to Christian Spain.

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  • Her last appearance was as Almahide to the Almanzor of Hart, in Dryden's The Conquest of Granada (1670), the production of which had been postponed some months for her return to the stage after the birth of her first son by the king.

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  • He studied law, and after holding some minor judicial offices, was minister to New Granada in 1853.

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  • BAZA, a town of southern Spain, in the province of Granada; in the Hoya de Baza, a fruitful valley of the Sierra Nevada, not far from the small river Gallego, and at the terminus of a railway from Lorca.

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  • Under Moorish rule (c. 713-1489) it was one of the three most important cities in the kingdom of Granada, with an extensive trade, and a population estimated at 50,000.

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  • New Spain was one of four great viceroyalties, the other three being New Granada, Buenos Aires and Peru.

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  • At last, in 1810, the events in Spain which brought about the Peninsular War had divided the authorities in Spanish America, some of whom declared for Joseph Bonaparte, others for Ferdinand VII., others for Charles IV., and Miranda again landed, and got a large party together who declared a republic both in Venezuela and New Granada or Colombia.

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  • It is stated by Darwin that the pigs which have run wild in Jamaica and New Granada have resumed this aboriginal character, and produce longitudinally striped young; these being the descendants of domestic animals introduced from Europe since the Spanish conquest, as before that time there were no true pigs in the New World.

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  • by Granada and Jaen.

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  • The northern part of Albacete belongs to the high plains of New Castile, the southern is generally mountainous, traversed by low ranges or isolated groups of hills, which culminate in the Sierra de Alcaraz on the borders of Granada, where several summits reach 5000 ft.

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  • In 1431 he endeavoured to employ the restless nobles in 'a war for the conquest of Granada.

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  • He had made his family the recognized leaders of the Mahommedans of Arab and native Spanish descent against the Berber element, whose chief was the king of Granada.

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  • His reign until his death on the 28th of February 1069 was mainly spent in extending his power at the expense of his smaller neighbours, and in conflicts with his chief rival the king of Granada.

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  • In 755 he was in hiding near Ceuta, and thence he sent an agent over to Spain to ask for the support of other clients of the family, descendants of the conquerors of Spain, who were numerous in the province of Elvira, the modern Granada.

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  • GRANADA, the capital of the department of Granada, Nicaragua; 32 m.

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  • Granada is built on the north-western shore of Lake Nicaragua, of which it is the principal port.

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  • Granada was founded in 1523 by Francisco Fernandez de Cordoba.

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  • Granada, Spain (Province) >>

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  • Andalusia was divided in 1833 into the eight provinces of Almeria, Cadiz, Cordova, Granada, Jaen, Huelva, Malaga and Seville, which are described in separate articles.

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  • Some districts, indeed, such as the Vega of Granada, are famous for the luxuriance of their vegetation.

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  • The chief towns are Seville (pop. 1900, 148,315), which may be regarded as the capital, Malaga (130,109), Granada (75,900), Cadiz (69,382), Jerez de la Frontera (6 3,473), Cordova (58,275) and Almeria (47,326).

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  • The Moors first entered the province in 711, and only in 1492 was their power finally broken by the capture of Granada.

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  • Their four Andalusian kingdoms, Seville, Jaen, Cordova and Granada,.

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  • the Mezquita or cathedral of Cordova and the Alhambra at Granada - are its chief monuments.

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  • ABENCERRAGES, a family or faction that is said to have held a prominent position in the Moorish kingdom of Granada in the 15th century.

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  • Nothing is known of the family with certainty; but the name is familiar from the interesting romance of Gines Perez de Hita, Guerras civiles de Granada, which celebrates the feuds of the Abencerrages and the rival family of the Zegris, and the cruel treatment to which the former were subjected.

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  • After the union of Castile and Leon in that year he began the series of campaigns which ended by reducing the Mahommedan dominions in Spain to Granada.

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  • The king of Granada did homage to Ferdinand, and undertook to attend the cortes when summoned.

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  • a town of southern Spain, in the province of Granada, 24 m.

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  • of Granada.

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  • In the 15th century Alhama, and the neighbouring fortress of Loja, were generally regarded as the keys of the kingdom of Granada, and their capture went far to insure the overthrow of the Moorish power.

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  • an ancient palace and fortress of the Moorish monarchs of Granada, in southern Spain, occupying a hilly terrace on the south-eastern border of the city of Granada.

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  • The river Darro, which foams through a deep ravine on the north, divides the plateau from the Albaicin district of Granada; the Assabica valley, containing the Alhambra Park, on the west and south, and beyond this valley the almost parallel ridge of Monte Mauror, separate it from the Antequeruela district.

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  • (For an account of the period to which the Alhambra belongs, see Granada (city).) The palace was built chiefly between 1248 and 1 354, in the reigns of Al Ahmar and his successors; but even the names of the principal artists employed are either unknown or doubtful.

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  • The situation of the Alhambra is one of rare natural beauty; the plateau commands a wide view of the city and plain of Granada, towards the west and north, and of the heights of the Sierra Nevada, towards the east and south.

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  • long, which is connected with the Darro at the monastery of Jesus del Valle, above Granada.

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  • high, the flag of Ferdinand and Isabella was first raised, in token of the Spanish conquest of Granada, on the 2nd of January 1492.

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  • The Sala de los Abencerrajes (Hall of the Abencerrages) derives its name from a legend according to which Boabdil, the last king of Granada, having invited the chiefs of that illustrious line to a banquet, massacred them here.

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  • Goury and Owen Jones; with a complete translation of the Arabic inscriptions and a historical notice of the Kings of Granada, by P. de Gayangos.

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  • Montalvo alleges that the first three books were arranged and corrected by him from "the ancient originals," and a reference in the prologue to the siege of Granada points to the conclusion that the Spanish recast was made shortly after 1492; it is possible, however, that the prologue alone was written after 1492, and that the text itself is older.

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  • A political union was at once effected with New Granada and Venezuela on the basis of the republican constitution instituted at Cucuta in July 1821 - the triple confederation taking the name of Colombia.

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  • Diego Noboa, elected in 1850 after a period of great confusion, recalled the Jesuits, produced a rupture with New Granada by receiving conservative refugees, and thus brought about his own deposition and exile.

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  • Distrust in his policy, however, was excited by the publication of some of his private correspondence, in which he spoke favourably of a French protectorate, and the army which he sent under Flores to resist the encroachments of Mosquera, the president of New Granada, was completely routed.

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  • Between these two extremes the chief cones, proceeding southwards, are: the Maribios chain, comprising El Viejo (5840 ft.), Santa Clara, Telica, Orota, Las Pilas,'Axosco, Momotombo (4127 ft.), all crowded close together between the Bay of Fonesca and Lake Managua; Masaya or Popocatepac (which was active in 1670, 1782, 1857 and 5902, and attains a height of 2972 ft.), and Mombacho (4593 ft.), near Granada; lastly, in Lake Nicaragua the two islands of Zapatera and Ometepe or Omotepec with its twin peaks Ometepe (5 6 43 ft.) and Madera.

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  • The capital is Managua (pop. 1905, about 30,000); other important towns are Leon (45,000), Granada (25,000), Masaya (20,000), Chinandega (12,000), and the seaports of Corinto (3000) and Greytown (2500).

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  • of state railways, running from Corinto to Leon, Managua, Granada and Diriamba, with branches to El Viejo and Momotombo.

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  • Granada was founded in 1524 on the isthmus between the two lakes as the capital of a separate government, which, however, was soon attached as a special province to the captaincy general of Guatemala, which comprised the whole of Central America and the present Mexican state of Chiapas.

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  • Then came the hopeless revolts of the Indians against intolerable oppression, the abortive rebellions of Hernandez de Contreras and John Bermejo (Bermudez) against the mother country (1550), the foundation of Leon, future rival of Granada, in 1610, its sack by the buccaneers under William Dampier in 1685, and, lastly, the declaration of independence (1821), not definitively acknowledged by Spain till 1850.

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  • While it lasted Nicaragua was the scene of continual bloodshed, caused partly by its attempts to secede from the confederacy, partly by its wars with Costa Rica for the possession of the disputed territory of Guanacaste between the great lake and the Gulf of Nicoya, partly also by the bitter rivalries of the cities of Leon and Granada, respective headquarters of the Liberal and Conservative parties.

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  • One outstanding incident was the filibustering expedition of William Walker, who was at first invited by the Liberals of Leon to assist them against the Conservatives of Granada, and who, after seizing the supreme power in 1856, was expelled by the combined forces of the neighbouring states, and on venturing to return was shot at Trujillo in Honduras on the 12th of September 1860.

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  • It was made the capital of the viceroyalty of Nueva Granada, and soon became one of the centres of Spanish colonial power and civilization on the South American continent.

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  • On the creation of the republic of Colombia, Bogota became its capital, and when that republic was dissolved into its three constituent parts it remained the capital of Nueva Granada.

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  • Algeciras stands at the head of a railway from Granada, but its only means of access to Gibraltar is by water.

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  • The Spaniards became one nation by the conquest of Granada and the union of the crowns of Castile and Aragon.

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  • With the exception of one such asylum in Granada, Spain, the Bethlehem Hospital was the first in Europe.

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  • brought a strong Portuguese army to aid the Castilians against the Moors of Granada and their African allies.

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  • The important part taken by Portuguese prelates and theologians at the Council of Trent stimulated religious writing, most of it in Latin, but Frei Bartholomeu dos Martyres, archbishop of Braga, wrote a Cathecismo da doutrina Christa, Frei Luiz de Granada a Compendio de Doutrina Christa and Sermoes, all in Portuguese, and other notable pulpit orators include Diogo de Paiva de Andrade, Padre Luiz Alvares, Dom Antonio Pinheiro and Frei Miguel dos Santos, who preached at the obsequies of King Sebastian.

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  • Alphonso the Battler won his great successes in the middle Ebro, where he expelled the Moors from Saragossa; in the great raid of 1125, when he carried away a large part of the subject Christians from Granada, and in the south-west of France, where he had rights as king of Navarre.

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  • GUADIX, a city of southern Spain, in the province of Granada; on the left bank of the river Guadix, a subtributary of the Guadiana Menor, and on the Madrid-Valdepenas-Almeria railway.

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  • Almeria, a maritime province of southern Spain, formed in 1833, and comprehending the eastern territories of the ancient kingdom of Granada.

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  • by Granada and Murcia, E.

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  • by Granada.

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  • The main line from Madrid to Almeria conveys much ore from Granada and Jaen to the sea; while the railway from Baza to Lorca skirts the Almanzora valley and transports the mineral products of eastern Almeria by a branch line from Huercal-Overa to the Murcian port of Aguilas.

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  • Under its ancient name of Urci, Almeria was one of the chief Spanish harbours after the final conquest of Spain by the Romans in 19 B.C. It reached the summit of its prosperity in the middle ages, as the foremost seaport of the Moorish kingdom of Granada.

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  • Its chief buildings are those erected after 1855, when it was chosen as the capital to put an end to the rivalry between the then more important cities of Leon and Granada.

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  • of Lake Nicaragua and the city of Granada, on the eastern shore of Lake Masaya, and on the Granada-Managua railway.

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  • In 1853 he passed out at the head of the list of engineers, and, after a brief practical experience at Almeria and Granada, was appointed professor of pure and applied mathematics in the school where he had lately been a pupil.

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  • Tobacco was cultivated in New Granada and Venezuela in colonial times, when its sale was a royal monopoly and its cultivation was restricted to specified localities.

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  • Quesada gave to the country the name of New Granada.

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  • For the better government of the colony the Spanish monarch erected a presidency of New Granada in 1564, which continued till 1718, when it was raised to the rank of a viceroyalty.

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  • The Republic of New Granada was founded on the 21st of November 1831; and in 1832 a constitution was promulgated, and the territory divided into eighteen provinces, each of which was to have control of its local affairs.

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  • One of his measures, by which New Granada became responsible for the half of the debts of the defunct republic of Colombia, gave serious offence to a large party, and he was consequently succeeded not, as he desired, by Jose Maria Obando, but by a member of the opposition, Jose Ignacio de Marquez.

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  • During the conquest of Granada he contributed largely to the maintenance of the army.

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  • In 1568 he was appointed lieutenant-general to Don John of Austria during the suppression of the Morisco revolt in Granada, and he also accompanied Don John during the Lepanto campaign, his function being to watch and control his nominal commanderin-chief, whose excitable temperament was distrusted by the king.

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  • BOABDIL (a corruption of the name Abu Abdullah), the last Moorish king of Granada, called el chico, the little, and also el zogoybi, the unfortunate.

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  • A son of Muley Abu'l Hassan, king of Granada, he was proclaimed king in 1482 in place of his father, who was driven from the land.

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  • He was taken prisoner at Lucena in 1483, and only obtained his freedom by consenting to hold Granada as a tributary kingdom under Ferdinand and Isabella, king and queen of Castile and Aragon.

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  • In 1491 Boabdil was summoned by Ferdinand and Isabella to surrender the city of Granada, and on his refusal it was besieged by the Castilians.

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  • Eventually, in January 1492, Granada was surrendered, and the king spent some time on the lands which he was allowed to hold in Andalusia.

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  • The spot from which Boabdil looked for the last time on Granada is still shown, and is known as "the last sigh of the Moor" (el ultimo suspiro del Moro).

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  • Panama was a part of the viceroyalty of New Granada created in 1718, and in 1819 became a part of the independent nation of Colombia and in 1831 of New Granada, from which in 1841 Panama and Veragua provinces seceded as the state (short-lived) of the Isthmus of Panama.

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  • The treaty of the United States in 1846 with New Granada, granting transportation facilities on the Isthmus to the United States, then preparing for war with Mexico, and guaranteeing on the part of the United States the sovereignty of New Granada in the Isthmus, has been considered the first step toward the establishment of an American protectorate over the Isthmus.

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  • He saw Cadiz, Seville, Granada, Athens, Constantinople, Jerusalem, Cairo, Thebes; played the corsair with James Clay on a yacht voyage from Malta to Corfu; visited the terrible Reschid, then with a Turkish army in the Albanian capital; landed in Cyprus, and left it with an expectation in his singularly prescient mind that the island would one day be English.

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  • Meantime, in 1418, Henry had gone in person to relieve Ceuta from an attack of Morocco and Granada Mussulmans; had accomplished his task, and had planned, though he did not carry out, a seizure of Gibraltar.

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  • proposed to this master of roguery that they should divide the kingdom according to the treaty of Granada (1500).

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  • The hottest part of the region is not the most southerly district but the bright-colored steppes of the coast of Granada, and the plains and hill terraces of the south-east coast from Almeria to Alicante, Snow and frost are here hardly known.

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  • In the maritime parts of Malaga and Granada the vegetation is of almost tropical richness and beauty, while in Murcia, Alicante and Almeria the aspect is truly African, fertile oases appearing in the midst of rocky deserts or barren steppes.

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  • Six considerable steppe regions are counted: (I) that of Old Castile, situated to the south of Valladolid, and composed chiefly of hills of gypsum; (2) that of New Castile, in the south-east (including parts of La Mancha); (3) the Aragonese, occupying the upper part of the basin of the Ebro; (4) the littoral, stretching along the south-east coast from Alicante to the neighborhood of Almeria; (5) the Granadine, in the east of Upper Andalusia (the former kingdom of Granada); and (6) the Baetic, in Lower Andalusia, on both sides of the valley of the Jenil or Genii.

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  • A different aspect is presented by the grass steppes of Murcia, La Mancha, the plateaus of Guadix and Huescar in the province of Granada, &c., all of which are covered chiefly with the valuable esparto grass (Macrochloa tenacissinla).

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  • The first Spanish census was made in 1594, Pontevedra but some of the provinces now included in the Andalusia (And kingdom were not embraced in the enumera- Almeria tion, so that the total population assigned to Granada -

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  • Cotton is now cultivated only here and there in the south; but sugar-cane is, with sugar-beet, becoming more and more of a staple Sugar in the provinces of Granada, Malaga and Almeria.

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  • Its cultivation was introduced by the Arabs in the 12th century or later, and was of great importance in the kingdom of Granada at the time of the expulsion of the Moors (1489), but has since undergone great vicissitudes, first in consequence of the introduction of the cane into America, and afterwards because of the great development of beet-sugar in central Europe.

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  • Goats are mostly bred in the mountainous districts all along the Spanish side of the Pyrenees froth Biscay to Catalonia, and in Badajoz, Cceres, Ciudad Real, Granada and Leon; swine in Badajoz, Lugo, Oviedo, Cceres and Corunna.

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  • Besides the cattle reared for field-labor and (in the northern provinces) for regular dairy farming, bulls for bull-fighting are specially reared in many parts of the country, particularly in the forests of Navarre, the mountains separating the two Castiles, the Sierra Morena, and the Serrania de Ronda in Granada, and also in separate enclosures on the islands of the Guadalquivir.

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  • The expulsion of the Moors from Granada was contemporaneous with the discovery of the New World.

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  • The chain of this order surrounds the royal arms, in which are included, besides the arms of Castile, Leon, Granada, and the lilies of the royal house of Bourbon, the arms of Austria, Sicily, Savoy, Brabant and others.

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  • There are ten archbishoprics (Toledo, Madrid, Burgos, Granada, Santiago, Saragossa, Seville, Tarragona, Valencia and Valladolid) and fortyfive bishoprics.

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  • Spain has nine universities: Madrid, the most numerotisly attended; Salamanca, the most ancient; Granada, Seville, Barcelona, Valencia, Santiago, Saragossa and Valladolid.

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  • They fought out the old tribal rivalries of Arabia on the banks of the Guadalquivir and on the Vega of Granada: They planted the Berber down on the bleak, illwatered, and wind-swept central plateau.

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  • In 1236 Cordova was conquered, and Seville fell in 1248 with the help of a fleet from the Basque coast and of the Moorish king of Granada, who was Fernandos vassal, paying tribute and attending Cortes when summoned.

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  • of Spain, Mahommedan Spain was reduced to Granada and except a line of ports round to Cadix.

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  • The Christian Oranada, population had disappeared in Granada and Moslem r;fugees had peopled it closely.

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  • He did indeed add the town of Cadiz to his possessions with the help of his vassal, the Moorish king of Granada, but his reign is filled with quarrels between himself and his nobles.

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  • Its merits as a police have perhaps been exaggerated, and in the war with Granada its bands were employed as soldiers.

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  • It was not even summoned during the whole of the war with Granada.

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  • Between 1481 and 1492 the Catholic sovereigns completed the work of the reconquest by subjugating the one surviving Conquest of Mahommedan state of Granada.

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  • The surrender of Granada on the 2nd of January 1492 was partly secured by promises of toleration, which were soon violated.

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  • In the following year the tyranny of the Inquisition, encouraged by the king who desired to purge his kingdom of all taint of heterodoxy, led to the revolt of the Moriscoes, which desolated Granada from 1568 to 1570, and ruined the province completely.

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  • On Christmas night, 1884, an earthquake caused much damage and loss of life in the provinces of Granada and Malaga.

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  • At Alhama, in Granada, more than 1000 persons were killed and injured, several churches and convents destroyed, and 30C houses laid in ruins.

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  • The epidemic spread rapidly over the Peninsula, causing great havoc in important cities like Granada, Saragossa and Valencia.

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  • The price of corn rose, owing to the reimposition by the government, before the elections, of the import duties on corn and flour; and in November there was serious rioting in Seville, Granada, Oviedo, Bilbao and Valencia, M

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  • Granada, Vocabular/o rioplalense razonado (Montevideo, 1890); J.

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  • The conquest of Granada in 1492 by the Catholic sovereigns of Spain drove many Moors into exile.

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  • The main authorities for the early history of the Barbary states are: - Luis del Marmol Carvajal, Description de Africa (Granada, 1573); Diego de Haedo, Topographia e Historia General de Argel (Valladolid, 1612); and Pere Pierre Dan, Histoire de Barbarie et de ses corsaires (Paris, 1637).

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  • alluring city of Granada where the Moors left their greatest mark.

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  • Unions seek urgent Granada talks ITV Unions are seeking urgent talks with Granada on a proposed wage freeze.

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  • In 1987, they made the life-size marionettes for Granada Television's adaptation of Angela Carter's The Magic Toyshop.

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  • perfect for beginners, and are just 30 minutes from the center of Granada.

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  • razerricane Ivan ripped through Granada, killing 29 and razing much of the small island.

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  • The suit sign of pomegranates probably alludes to the recently reclaimed kingdom of Granada.

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  • In 2002, Granada Television invited the cheerleading squad from Zoë Taylor School of Dance to perform for them.

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  • winor example, it wasn't enough for Carlton and Granada to have won the consolidation battle.

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  • All the Moorish dominions in Spain were lost in the next few years, partly by the Christian conquest of Andalusia, and partly by the revolt of the Mahommedans of Granada, who put themselves under the protection of the Christian kings and became their vassals.

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  • Until 1855 Leon was the capital of Nicaragua, although its great commercial rival Granada contested its claim to that position, and the jealousy between the two cities often resulted in bloodshed.

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  • Leon was identified with the interests of the democracy of Nicaragua, Granada with the clerical and aristocratic parties.

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  • It is formed by the confluence of three head-streams, one of which rises on the northern versant of La Sagra (7875 ft.), a mountain in Granada, while the other two spring from the Sierra de Segura, in Jaen.

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  • Moses ben Ezra, of Granada (d.

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  • In other subjects, Saadyah ibn Danan, of Granada (d.

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  • The friend of St Teresa, St Peter of Alcantara, and of all the noble minds of Spain of his day, no one among the three hundred Spanish mystics excels Luis de Granada in the beauty of a didactic style, variety of illustration and soberness of statement.

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  • Monoz, La Vida y virtudes de Luis de Granada (Madrid, 1639); a study of his system by P. Rousselot in Mystiques espagnoles (Paris, 1867); Ticknor, History of Spanish Literature (vol.

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  • Grant, as he pushed Pemberton before him to Granada, lengthened day by day his line of communication, and when Van Dorn, ever enterprising, raided the great Federal depot of Holly Springs the game was up. Grant retired hastily, for starvation was imminent, and Pemberton, thus freed, turned upon Sherman, and inflicted a severe defeat on that general at Chickasaw Bayou near Vicksburg (December 29).

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  • Among the fancy cloths made in cotton may be mentioned: matting, which includes various kinds with some similarity in appearance to a matting texture; matelasse, which is in some degree an imitation of French dress goods of that name; pique, also of French origin, woven in stripes in relief, which cross the width of the piece, and usually finished stiff; Bedford cord, a cheaper variety of pique in which the stripes run the length of the piece; oatmeal cloth, which has an irregular surface suggesting the grain of oatmeal, commonly dyed cream colour; crimp cloth, in which a puckered effect is obtained by uneven shrinkage; grenadine, said to be derived from Granada, a light dress material originally made of silk or silk and wool; brilliant, a dress material, usually with a small raised pattern; leno, possibly a corrupt form of the French linon or lawn, a kind of fancy gauze used for veils, curtains, &c.; lappet, a light material with a figure or pattern as lawn, batiste, serge, huckaback, galloon, and a large number of names are of obvious derivation and use, such as umbrella cloth, apron cloth, sail cloth, book-binding cloth, shroud cloth, 1 Including Federated Malay States.

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  • book 2, chap. 3) speaks of the "great rocks and falls" which prevented Cordova, the first circumnavigator of the lake, from descending the San Juan in 1522; and although the English traveller Gage states that in his time (17th century) vessels reached Granada direct from Spain, there can be little doubt that the rapids are natural obstructions.

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  • Hurricane Ivan ripped through Granada, killing 29 and razing much of the small island.

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  • Meanwhile, over on satellite, Granada Plus were beginning the first of many reruns of the color episodes.

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  • For example, it was n't enough for Carlton and Granada to have won the consolidation battle.

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  • The best is W. caracasana, from the mountainous regions of New Granada; but even this will only succeed in the warmest and best sheltered spots.

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  • Eva learned her dance skills beginning at the age of 12, in Granada Spain, and later traveling to Cuba for choreographic training from Johannes García.

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  • VIII.; the fall of Granada freed Spain from her embarrassments; Columbus discovered America, destroying the commercial supremacy of Venice; last, but not least, Roderigo Borgia assumed the tiara with the famous title of Alexander VI.

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  • Hernan Cortes overran and conquered Mexico from 1518 to 1521, and the discovery and conquest of Guatemala by Alvarado, the invasion of Florida by De Soto, and of Nueva Granada by Quesada, followed in rapid succession.

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  • Troops were summoned to Seville and the war began by the siege of Alhama, a town eight leagues from Granada, the Moorish capital.

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  • FRANCISCO SUAREZ (1548-1617), Spanish theologian and philosopher, was born at Granada on the 5th of January 1548, and educated at Salamanca.

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