Gramme sentence example

gramme
  • The volume of a gramme of water also depends on temperature and pressure.
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  • Kopp, begun in 1842, on the molecular volumes, the volume occupied by one gramme molecular weight of a substance, of liquids measured at their boiling-point under atmospheric pressure, brought to light a series of additive relations which, in the case of carbon compounds, render it possible to predict, in some measure, the cornposition of the substance.
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  • Now this ratio is the same as that which gives the relative chemical equivalents of hydrogen and copper, for r gramme of hydrogen and 31.8 grammes of copper unite chemically with the same weight of any acid radicle such as chlorine or the sulphuric group, SO 4.
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  • The mean result of the best determinations shows that when a current of one ampere is passed for one second, a mass of silver is deposited equal to o ooi i 18 gramme.
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  • When one gramme of zinc is dissolved in dilute sulphuric acid, 1670 thermal units or calories are evolved.
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  • Hence for the electrochemical unit of zinc or 0.003388 gramme, the thermal evolution is 5.66 calories.
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  • Thus a strip of zinc plunged into a solution of silver sulphate, containing not more than 0.03 gramme of silver in the litre, becomes covered with a flocculent precipitate which is a true alloy of silver and zinc, and in the same way, when copper is precipitated from its sulphate by zinc, the alloy formed is brass.
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  • The unit of mechanical force in the " centimetre, gramme, second " (C.G.S.) system of units is the dyne, which is approximately equal to 1/981 part of the weight of one gramme.
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  • The monetary unit is the gold colon weighing 778 gramme, 900 fine, and thus worth about 23d.
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  • It is clear that the effect of this "plongeur," when placed in the lower pan, is exactly the same as that of the 5 gramme weight in the upper pan.
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  • The permanent committee of the Paris International Congress of 1900, which was held for the purpose of unification of the numerotage of counts, unanimously decided - (a) With reference to cotton, silk and other textiles spun from fibres, that they should be based on a fixed weight and variable length, the unit being one metre to one gramme.
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  • This latter differs very little in actual practice from the previous method of determination by the number of deniers per 476 metres, the denier being calculated on the equivalent of 0.0531 gramme, the English equivalent showing 333 deniers per one dram avoirdupois.
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  • Thus if in one gramme of a mixture of water, alcohol and salt we are told the amount of water and salt, we can tell the amount of alcohol.
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  • Curie obtained only a fraction of a gramme of the chloride and Giesel 2 to 3 gramme of the bromide from a ton of uranium residues.
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  • We thus see that radium is continually losing matter and energy as electricity; it is also losing energy as heat, for, as was observed by Curie and Laborde, the temperature of a radium salt is always a degree or two above that of the atmosphere, and they estimated that a gramme of pure radium would emit about 100 gramme-calories per hour.
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  • The contraction corresponding to the melting of i gramme of ice was assumed to be.
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  • In order to be independent of the accuracy of the thermometer employed for observing the initial temperature of the water introduced, it has been usual to employ water at ioo° C., adopting as unit of heat the " mean calorie," which is one-hundredth part of the heat given up by one gramme of water in cooling from ioo° to o° C. The weight of mercury corresponding to the mean calorie has been determined with considerable care by a number of observers well skilled in the use of the instrument.
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  • The Duration Of An Experiment Was About Ten Minutes, And The Product Of The Mean Current And The Time, Namely Ct, Was Measured By The Weight Of Silver Deposited In A Voltameter, Which Amounted To About 0.56 Gramme.
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  • The Ideal Atomic Heat Is The Thermal Capacity Of A Gramme Atom In The Ideal State Of Monatomic Gas At Constant Volume.
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  • Gramme (1826-1901) inaugurated a departure from which we may date modern electrical engineering.
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  • In 1860 Dr Antonio Pacinotti invented what is now called the toothed ring winding for armatures and described it in an Italian journal, but it attracted little notice until reinvented in 1870 by Gramme.
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  • Gramme dynamos were then soon made on the self-exciting principle.
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  • In 1873 at Vienna the fact was discovered that a dynamo machine of the Gramme type could also act as an electric motor and jwas set in rotation when a current was passed into it from another similar machine.
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  • Thus in twenty years from the invention of the Gramme dynamo, electrical engineering had developed from small beginnings into a vast industry.
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  • The molybdate solution should be of such a strength that i cc. will precipitate o oi gramme of lead.
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  • The ore (0 5 gramme) is digested with a mixture of potassium nitrate and nitric acid.
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  • The ferrocyanide solution is standardized by dissolving i gramme of pure zinc in 6 cc. of hydrochloric acid, adding ammonium chloride, and titrating as before.
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  • One gramme of the ore is treated in a flask with a mixture of nitric and sulphuric acids and evaporated until all the nitric acid is expelled.
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  • The potassium cyanide solution is standardized by dissolving 0.5 gramme o£ pure copper in 5 cc. of nitric acid, diluting, adding io cc. of ammonia, and titrating exactly as described above.
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  • The ore is treated as described in the cyanide method until the copper precipitated by the aluminium foil has been washed and dissolved in 5 cc. of nitric acid; then 0.25 gramme of potassium chlorate is added, and the solution boiled nearly dry to oxidize any arsenic present to arsenic acid.
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  • A few drops of starch solution are then added, and when the blue colour has nearly vanished a drop or two of methyl orange makes the end reaction very sharp. The thiosulphate solution is standardized by dissolving o 3 to o 5 gramme of pure copper in 3 cc. of nitric acid, adding 50 cc. of water and 5 cc. of ammonia, and titrating as above after the addition of 5 cc. of glacial acetic acid and 5 cc. of the potassium iodide solution.
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  • One gramme of ore is usually taken for assay and treated in a small flask or beaker with 10 cc. of hydrochloric acid.
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  • It is the most malleable and ductile of all metals with the exception of gold: one gramme can be drawn out into a wire 180 metres long, and the leaf can be beaten out to a thickness of 0.0002 5 mm.; traces of arsenic, antimony, bismuth and lead, however, make it brittle.
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  • The principal units of length, weight and volume are the metre, gramme (or gram) and litre.
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  • The metre and the gramme are defined by standard measures preserved at Paris.
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  • The gramme was intended to be equal to the weight of a cubic centimetre of pure water at a certain temperature, but the equality is only approximate.
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  • The theory of the system is that the metre is a 1000-1000Y Part of a quandrant of the earth through Paris; the litre or unit of volume is a cube ofmetre side; the gramme or unit of weight is (nominally) 10 water at 4° C. The idea of adopting scientific measurements had been suggested as early as the 17th century, particularly by the astronomer Jean Picard (1620-1682), who proposed to take as a unit the length of a pendulum beating one second at sealevel, at a latitude of 45°.
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  • The saponification value (saponification number) denotes the number of milligrams which one gramme of an oil or fat requires for saponification, or, in other words, for the neutralization of the total fatty acids contained in an oil or fat.
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  • In the latitude of Paris the dyne is equal to the weight of about of a gramme, and the erg is the amount of work required to raise Ti lerof a gramme vertically through one centimetre.
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  • The following are those which have been in most general use: Small calorie or gramme calorie.
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  • A gas, therefore, has two specific heats, generally denoted by C p and C„, when the quantity of gas taken as a unit is one gramme molecular weight, the range of temperature being I° C. It may be shown that Cp C„ = R, where R is the gas- constant, i.e.
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  • Thus the statement that the migration constant or transport number for a decinormal solution of copper sulphate is o 632 implies that of every gramme of copper sulphate lost by a solution containing originally one-tenth of a gramme equivalent per litre when a current is passed through it between platinum electrodes, o 632 gramme is taken from the cathode vessel and o 368 gramme from the anode vessel.
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  • In order to be independent of the accuracy of the thermometer employed for observing the initial temperature of the water introduced, it has been usual to employ water at ioo° C., adopting as unit of heat the " mean calorie," which is one-hundredth part of the heat given up by one gramme of water in cooling from ioo° to o° C. The weight of mercury corresponding to the mean calorie has been determined with considerable care by a number of observers well skilled in the use of the instrument.
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  • The mass of the electron or corpuscle is 7 0 X1028 gramme and its diameter is 3 X I 013 centimetre.
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  • The theory of the system is that the metre is a 1000-1000Y Part of a quandrant of the earth through Paris; the litre or unit of volume is a cube ofmetre side; the gramme or unit of weight is (nominally) 10 water at 4° C. The idea of adopting scientific measurements had been suggested as early as the 17th century, particularly by the astronomer Jean Picard (1620-1682), who proposed to take as a unit the length of a pendulum beating one second at sealevel, at a latitude of 45°.
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  • Taking the centimetre, gramme and second as our fundamental units, the most convenient unit of force is that which, acting on a gramme for a second, produces in it a velocity of a centimetre per second; this is called a Dyne.
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  • A continuous electric current of one ampere is defined to be one which deposits electrolytically 0.001118 of a gramme of silver per second from a neutral solution of silver nitrate.'
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  • Thus number loo would be 100 metres per gramme calculated on the single strand.
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