Grammar sentence examples

grammar
  • There are a grammar school, a free school and a number of charities.

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  • Of grammar she knew nothing and she cared nothing for it.

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  • The grammar school was founded in 1618.

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  • He taught me Latin grammar principally; but he often helped me in arithmetic, which I found as troublesome as it was uninteresting.

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  • I really believe he knows more Latin and Greek Grammar than Cicero or Homer ever dreamed of!

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  • The grammar school dates from 1499, but occupies modern buildings.

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  • There are also numerous grammar schools and other private schools.

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  • There are only two genders and two numbers: the neuter gender is entirely wanting, and the dual number is not recognized in Syriac grammar, though there are plain traces of it in the language.

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  • He was the third and youngest son of Thomas Chicheley, who appears in 1368 in still extant town records of Higham Ferrers as a suitor in the mayor's court, and in 1381-1382, and again in 1384-1385, was mayor: in fact, for a dozen years he and Henry Barton, school master of Higham Ferrers grammar school, and one Richard Brabazon, filled the mayoralty in turns.

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  • On the 18th of July 1542 it was surrendered to Henry VIII., and its possessions granted to Robert Dacres on condition of maintaining the grammar school and paying the master £10 a year, the same salary as the headmasters of Winchester and Eton, and maintaining the almshouse.

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  • According to Shafi`ite law, such a cadi must be a male, free, adult Moslem, intelligent, of unassailed character, able to see, hear and write, learned in the Koran, the traditions, the Agreement, the differences of the legal schools, acquainted with Arabic grammar and the exegesis of the Koran.

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  • The Port Royalists, Pierre Nicole (1625-1695) and Antoine Arnauld (1612-1694), had applied it to grammar and logic; Jean Domat or Daumat (1625-1696) and Henri Francois Daugesseau (1668-1751) to jurisprudence; Fontenelle, Charles Perrault (1628-1703) and Jean Terrasson (1670-1750) to literary criticism, and a worthier estimate of modern literature.

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  • The unknown author, as may be inferred from the treatise itself, did not write to make money, but to oblige his relative and friend Herennius, for whose instruction he promises to supply other works on grammar, military matters and political administration.

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  • The public buildings include the town-hall (dating from 1762 and altered in 1876), the tolbooth (1590), and the grammar school.

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  • I had a French grammar in raised print, and as I already knew some French, I often amused myself by composing in my head short exercises, using the new words as I came across them, and ignoring rules and other technicalities as much as possible.

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  • Portions of the abbey buildings, including the Lady chapel of the church, now converted into a dwelling-house, are incoporated in those of Sherborne grammar school, founded (although a school existed previously) by Edward VI.

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  • What many children think of with dread, as a painful plodding through grammar, hard sums and harder definitions, is to-day one of my most precious memories.

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  • He wrote numerous translations, of Galen, Aristotle, Ilariri, IIunain ben Isaac and Maimonides, as well as several original works, a Sepher Anaq in imitation of Moses ben Ezra, and treatises on grammar and medicine (Rephuath geviyyah), but he is best known for his Talzkemoni, a diwan in the style of Ilariri's Magimat.

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  • From 1834 to 1862 he was headmaster of Clapham grammar school.

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  • He wrote on grammar (Sepher ha-galui and Sepher Zikkaron), commentaries on Proverbs and the Song of Solomon, an apologetic work, Sepher ha-berith, and a translation of Balhya's Ilobhoth ha-lebhabhoth.

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  • To the north of the village, which has extended greatly as a residential suburb of the metropolis, is Mill Hill, with a Roman Catholic Missionary College, opened in 1871, with branches at Rosendaal, Holland and Brixen, Austria, and a preparatory school at Freshfield near Liverpool; and a large grammar school founded by Nonconformists in 1807.

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  • Chesterfield grammar school was founded in 1574.

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  • Allhallows Grammar School, founded in 1614, was enlarged in 1893; St Margaret's hospital, founded as a lazar-house in the 14th century, is converted into almshouses.

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  • His great work, the Mikhlol, consists of a grammar and lexicon; his commentaries on various parts of the Bible are admirably luminous, and, in spite of his anti-Christian remarks, have been widely used by Christian theologians and largely influenced the English authorized version of the Bible.

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  • Miller, Pali Grammar (London, 1884); R O.

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  • Of Kirkby, from whom he learned the rudiments of English and Latin grammar, he speaks gratefully, and doubtless truly, so far as he could trust the impressions of childhood.

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  • The groundwork, so far as it can be ascertained, and the grammar are Indo-European, but a large number of words have been borrowed from the Latin or Italian and Greek, and it is not always easy to decide whether the mutilated and curtailed forms now in use represent adopted words or belong to the original vocabulary.

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  • Their literature, with which alone we are here concerned, is largely polemical and to a great extent deals with grammar and exegesis.

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  • He compiled a Russian grammar, which long enjoyed popularity, and did much to improve the rhythm of Russian verse.

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  • To the west of the town is the grammar school of Giggleswick, one of the principal public schools in the north of England, founded in 15.12.

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  • He studied at the Polytechnic institute of Brooklyn, graduated at Rutgers College in 1870, and was admitted to the bar in 1875 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, where he taught in the Rutgers College grammar school from 1876 to 1879.

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  • It is the seat of Miami University (co-educational; chartered in 1809, opened as a grammar school in 1818, and organized as a college in 1824), which had 40 instructors and 1076 students in 1909.

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  • Yet he contrived to write his great commentary on the Pentateuch and other books of the Bible, treatises on philosophy (as the Yesodh mora), astronomy, mathematics, grammar (translation of Ilayyu j), besides a Diwan.

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  • There may be mentioned further the old buildings of the grammar school, founded in 1563, and of the charity called Christ's Hospital (1583); while the town-hall in the marketplace, dating from 1677, is attributed to Inigo Jones.

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  • Lever's grammar school, founded in 1641, had Robert Ainsworth, the Latin lexicographer, and John Lempriere, author of the classical dictionary, among its masters.

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  • 1340), wrote a large number of treatises on grammar and philosophy (mystical), besides commentaries and piyyutim.

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  • At the grammar school, founded in 1528, Dr Samuel Johnson was a master about 17 3 2, but found the work unbearable.

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  • Other buildings include the grammar school, founded in 1532 and rebuilt in 1893, a town hall and corn exchange, erected in 1866 in Italian style, with an assembly room.

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  • William Murray was educated at Perth grammar school and Westminster School, of which he was a king's scholar.

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  • There are an opera-house and an academy of music. The Auckland University College and the grammar school are the principal educational establishments.

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  • Shakespeare may have attended the grammar school attached to the old guildhall in Church Street.

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  • about 1190) also wrote on grammar and some commentaries, wrongly attributed to Ibn Ezra.

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  • The grammar school was founded by Dr Roger Lupton, provost of Eton College, in 1528, but as it was connected with a chantry it was suppressed by Henry VIII., to be refounded in 1551 by Edward VI.; it now takes rank among the important public schools.

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  • The almshouses, known as St John's hospital, were founded in 1602; and in 1637 a free grammar school was endowed by Lady Grace Manners.

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  • 7; Pearson, Grammar of Science; Romanes, Darwin and after Darwin; Sedgwick, Presidential Address to Section Zoology, Brit.

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  • Magdalen College School was established at the gates and as a part of the college, to be, like Eton, a free grammar school, free of tuition fees for all corners, under a master and usher, the first master being John Ankywyll, a married man, with a salary of CIO a year, the same as at Winchester and Eton.

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  • The free grammar school was founded in 1525.

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  • George Airy was educated first at elementary schools in Hereford, and afterwards at Colchester Grammar School.

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  • The grammar school now occupies modern buildings, and ranks among the lesser public schools of England, having scholarships at Pembroke College, Oxford.

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  • He was a great Hebrew teacher: his Grammar of the Hebrew Language (1861, revised 1888) was a distinct improvement in method on Gesenius, Roediger, Ewald and Nordheimer.

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  • At the end of the century Isaac ben Moses, called Profiat Duran (Efodi), is chiefly known as an antiChristian controversialist (letter to Me'ir Alguadez), but also wrote on grammar (Ma`aseh Efod) and a commentary on the Moreh.

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  • A former Jesuit monastery is now used for a grammar school and seminary.

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  • The spoken languages of northern India are very various, differing one from another in the sort of degree that English differs from German, though all are thoroughly Sanskritic in their vocables, but with an absence of Sanskrit grammar that has given rise to considerable discussion.

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  • The foundation was closely modelled on Winchester College, with its warden and fellows, its grammar and song schoolmasters, but a step in advance was made by the masters being made fellows and so members of the governing body.

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  • He retained this position until 1517, wrote a Latin grammar, and other manuals for the use of his pupils, and in 1515 travelled in Italy with Ernest.

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  • Among these was Judah IJayyuj of Cordova, the father of modern Hebrew grammar, who first established the principle of tri-literal roots.

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  • In grammar he followed Hayyuj, whose pupil he was.

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  • That he was at Oxford, and probably a scholar at one of the grammar schools there, before passing on to the higher faculties, is shown by a letter of the chancellor addressed to him when provost of Eton (Ep. Acad.

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  • Schoppe, as the long list -of his writings shows, knew also something of grammar and philosophy, and had an excellent acquaintance with Latin.

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  • The grammar school was founded in 1614; it occupies modern buildings, but the original house remains, a picturesque half-timbered building, raised upon pillars of wood.

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  • It has its own grammar and structure.

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  • Bleek, Comparative Grammar of the South African Languages (1862-1869); J.

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  • Torrend, A Comparative Grammar of the South African Bantu Languages (1891); A.

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  • C. Madan, An Outline Dictionary intended as an Aid to the Study of the Languages of the Bantu and other Uncivilized Races (1905); C. Meinhof, Die Sprache der Herero, a grammar and vocabulary (Berlin, 1909); G.

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  • Elffers, Practische hollandsche Spraakkunst (Cape Town, 1894), and Elementary Grammar of the Dutch Language (Cape Town, 1898).

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  • The boy was placed under the care of the Rev. Philip Barton, master of the grammar school at Wantage, and remained there for some years.

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  • There are grammar, model and industrial schools, the first with exhibitions to Trinity College, Dublin; but the principal educational establishment is University College, a quadrangular building in Tudor Gothic style, of grey limestone.

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  • He received an excellent education, especially in grammar and rhetoric, but confesses that his progress in Greek was unsatisfactory.

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  • the Skinners have the Tonbridge Grammar School; the Mercers, St Paul's School; the Merchant Taylors, the school bearing their name, &c. The constitution of the livery companies usually embraces (a) the court, which includes the master and wardens, and is the executive and administrative body; (2) the livery or middle class, being the body from which the court is recruited; and (3) the general body of freemen, from which the livery is recruited.

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  • A brief tract on comic metres (De comicis dimensionibus) and a work De causis linguae Latinae - the earliest Latin grammar on scientific principles and following a scientific method - were his only other purely literary works published in his lifetime.

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  • He read Homer in twenty-one days, and then went through all the other Greek poets, orators and historians, forming a grammar for himself as he went along.

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  • John Scott was educated at the grammar school of his native town.

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  • When he had finished his education at the grammar school, his father thought of apprenticing him to his own business, to which an elder brother Henry had already devoted himself; and it was only through the interference of his elder brother William (afterwards Lord Stowell, q.v.), who had already obtained a fellowship at University College, Oxford, that it was ultimately resolved that he should continue the prosecution of his studies.

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  • mathematics, grammar, &c.) to be of no use.

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  • With this exposition we have already invaded the province of logic. To this the Stoics assigned a miscellany of studies - rhetoric, dialectic, including grammar, in addition to formal Logic. logic - to all of which their industry made contributions.

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  • It supplied them with an incentive to scientific research in archaeology and grammar; it penetrated jurisprudence until the belief in the ultimate identity of the jus gentium with the law of nature modified the praetor's edicts for centuries.

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  • Along with grammar, which had been a prominent branch of study under Chrysippus, philosophy, history, geography, chronology and kindred subjects came to be recognized as fields of activity no less than philology proper.

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  • In 1536 Fernao de Oliveira published the first Portuguese grammar, and three years later the historian Barros brought out his Cartinha Para aprender a ler, and in 1540 his Grammatica.

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  • C. Owen, Bari Grammar (1908).

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  • New buildings for the Free Grammar.

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  • His education at Winchester, no doubt in the Great Grammar school or High school in Minster Street, was paid for by some patron unnamed by the biographer, perhaps Sir Ralph Sutton, who is named first by Wykeham among his benefactors to be prayed for by his colleges.

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  • on the 1st of June 1378, enabling Wykeham to found "a certain college he proposed to establish for 70 poor scholars, clerks, who should live college-wise and study in grammaticals near the city of Winchester," and appropriate to it Downton rectory, one of the richest livings belonging to his bishopric. The bull says that the bishop "had, as he asserts, for several years administered the necessaries of life to scholars studying grammar in the same city."

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  • On the 6th of October 1382 the crown licence in mortmain was issued, on the loth-13th of October the site was conveyed, and on the 20th of October 1382 "Sancte Marie collegium" or in vulgar tongue "Seinte Marie College of Wynchestre by Wynchestre" was founded for a warden and "70 pore and needy scholars studying and becoming proficient in grammaticals or the art and science of grammar."

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  • The foundation was on the model of Merton and Queen's colleges at Oxford, to which grammar schools were attached by their founders, while fellows of Merton were the first wardens of both of Wykeham's colleges.

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  • The grammar school founded in 1682 by Hugh Gore (1613-1691), bishop of Waterford, is now carried on by the town council under the Welsh Intermediate Education Act of 1889, and there is a similar school for girls.

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  • The complete catalogue may be roughly arranged under three heads - (1) belles lettres, (2) history and antiquities, (3) technical treatises on philosophy, law, grammar, mathematics, philology and other subjects.

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  • Philosophy, grammar, the history and theory of language, rhetoric, law, arithmetic, astronomy, geometry, mensuration, agriculture, naval tactics, were all represented.

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  • He also wrote a Hebrew and an Aramaic grammar.

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  • He was educated at Midhurst grammar school and at the Royal College of Science, where he was trained in physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology and biology.

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  • He composed, it is said, nearly 500 treatises on various subjects, including logic, ethics and grammar.

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  • His works, which include a grammar of the Bohemian language and a history of Bohemian literature, were mostly written in German or Latin, and his only Bohemian works are some essays which he contributed to the early numbers of the Casopis Musea Krdlovstvi Ceskeho (Journal of the Bohemian Museum) and a collection of letters.

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  • political economist, born on the 26th of May 1623, was the son of a clothier at Romsey in Hampshire, and received his early education at the grammar school there.

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  • William was educated at Oakham and Newark grammar schools, and in 1714 he was articled to Mr Kirke, attorney at East Markham, in Nottinghamshire.

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  • After attending King Edward VI.'s grammar school, Birmingham, he studied at Birmingham hospital, and afterwards at King's College, London, with the intention of making medicine his profession; but after taking his degree at Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1843 he changed his mind.

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  • At the grammar school, which formerly occupied a building in those gardens, Dr John Wolcot, otherwise known as Peter Pindar, was educated.

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  • During his school days at the grammar schools of Penzance and Truro he showed few signs of a taste for scientific pursuits or indeed of any special zeal for knowledge or of ability beyond a certain skill in making verse translations from the classics and in story-telling.

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  • Other buildings are the town hall, and the modern buildings of the grammar school founded in 1561.

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  • All children between the ages of 7 and 15 are required to attend school for the full school year, and those who at 15 years of age have not completed the grammar school course must continue to attend until they either complete it or arrive at the age of 17.

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  • Furthermore, children past 15 years of age who have completed the grammar school .course but are not regularly and lawfully employed at some useful occupation must attend a high school or a manual training school until 17 years of age.

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  • There are, besides, the Edward Latymer foundation school for boys (1624), part of the income of which is devoted to general charitable purposes; the Godolphin school, founded in the 16th century and remodelled as a grammar school in 1861; Nazareth House of Little Sisters of the Poor, the Convent of the Sacred Heart, and other convents.

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  • He was educated at Oakham grammar school, and Emmanuel College, Cambridge, taking the degree of M.A., and entering holy orders in 1835.

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  • In 1856 he became master of King Edward's grammar school at Lichfield, in 1858 warden and professor of classical literature and geology in Queen's College, Birmingham, in 1862 rector of Mellis, in Suffolk, and in 1867 vicar of St John's, Bethnal Green, London.

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  • By his editio princeps of the Samaritan Pentateuch and Targum, in the Paris Polyglott, he gave the first impulse in Europe to the study of this dialect, which he acquired without a teacher (framing a grammar for himself) by the study of MSS.

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  • WILLIAM ALEXANDER HUNTER (1844-1898), Scottish jurist and politician, was born in Aberdeen on the 8th of May 5844, and educated at Aberdeen grammar school and university.

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  • especially in the conclusion of the present final peace with our dearest father the king of France," granted for 300 marks (too) licence to found, on three acres at Higham Ferrers, a perpetual college of eight chaplains and four clerks, of whom one was to teach grammar and the other song.

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  • The college was to consist of a provost, io priests, 6 choristers, 25 poor and needy scholars, 25 almsmen and a magister infor mator "to teach gratis the scholars and all others coming from any part of England to learn grammar."

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  • for a free grammar school at his name-place, Wainfleet, sufficient to produce for the chantry-priest-schoolmaster Lro a year, the same salary as the headmaster of Magdalen School, and built the school which still exists almost untouched, a fine brick building with two towers, 76 ft.

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  • Buck's Oscan and Umbrian Grammar.

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  • Grammar and prosody were studied in India with a marvellous accuracy and minuteness several centuries before Christ.

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  • And in regard to Reid's favourite proof of the principles in question by reference to "the consent of ages and nations, of the learned and unlearned," it is only fair to observe that this argument assumes a much more scientific form in the Essays, where it is almost identified with an appeal to "the structure and grammar of all languages."

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  • Robert was sent to Liskeard grammar school, and when he was about sixteen was apprenticed to a solicitor.

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  • He was soon removed to Cheltenham grammar school, and in April 1823 matriculated at Pembroke College, Oxford.

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  • The Knaresborough free grammar school was founded in 1616.

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  • There are a grammar school (1712), and boys' school and free school on the foundation of Sir John Leman (1631).

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  • The chief buildings are that containing the town hall and the grammar school (a foundation of 1547), the exchange, a theatre, and the customs house and dock offices.

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  • His father, Nathaniel, though a barber, was a man of some education, for Jeremy was "solely grounded in grammar and mathematics" by him.

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  • Jeremy Taylor was a pupil of Thomas Lovering, at the newly founded Perse grammar school.

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  • SIR DAVID BREWSTER (1781-1868), Scottish natural philosopher, was born on the 11th of December 1781 at Jedburgh, where his father, a teacher of high reputation, was rector of the grammar school.

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  • He wrote also Elements de metaphysique (1724), a "French Grammar on a new plan," and a number of historical essays.

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  • Of his numerous publications the following are of special importance: - Assyrian Grammar for Comparative Purposes (1872); Principles of Comparative Philology (1874); Babylonian Literature (1877); Introduction to the Science of Language (1879); Monuments of the Hittites (1881); Herodotus i.-iii.

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  • Occasionally grammar schools have agricultural sides, and in evening continuation schools agricultural classes are sometimes held.

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  • A free grammar school, founded in 1591, was refounded by James I.

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  • His education was undertaken by his uncle, John de Willoughby, and after leaving the grammar school of his native place he was sent to Oxford, where he is said to have distinguished himself in philosophy and theology.

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  • A 14th-century grammar school was refounded by Queen Elizabeth; and there are two mansions dating from the same reign, which have been converted into inns.

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  • The Heath grammar school was founded in 1585 under royal charter for instruction in classical languages.

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  • Bacon and a Fragment of his Hebrew Grammar, edited with introduction and notes by E.

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  • Charles, however, has given good grounds for supposing that it is merely a preface, and that the work went on to discuss grammar, logic (which Bacon thought of little service, as reasoning was innate), mathematics, general physics, metaphysics and moral philosophy.

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  • First appears to have come the treatise now called Compendium Studii Philosophiae (Brewer pp. 393-519), containing an account of the causes of error, and then entering at length upon grammar.

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  • Educated at Marylebone grammar school and at Eton College, he proceeded to King's College, Cambridge, and was elected a fellow of this society in 1768.

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  • Three years after the death of Mrs Priestley in 1739, Joseph's father's sister, Mrs Keighley, took him to live with her, and sent him at the age of twelve to a neighbouring grammar school.

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  • The grammar school founded in 1418 by Sir William Sevenoke was reconstituted as a first-grade modern school in 1877.

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  • SIR JOSEPH PAXTON (1801-1865), English architect and ornamental gardener, was born of humble parents at Milton Bryant, near Woburn, Bedfordshire, on the 3rd of August 1801, and was educated at the grammar school of that town.

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  • Taiping (Perak, 1894-1898); John Crawfurd, History of the Indian Archipelago (3 vols., Edinburgh, 1820); Grammar and Dictionary of the Malay Language (2 vols., London, 1852); A Descriptive Dictionary of the Indian Islands and Adjacent Countries (London, 1856); Journal of the Indian Archipelago (12 vols., Singapore, 1847-1862); Journal of the Straits Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, 33 Nos.

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  • While still young he became a monk, and studied grammar and theology first at Exeter, then at Nutcell near Winchester, under the abbot Winberht.

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  • Besides these there are a grammar (De octo partibus orationibus, ed.

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  • Here he consulted Isabella Roser, a lady of high rank and piety, and also the master of a grammar school.

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  • Bartole, the official biographer of Ignatius, says that he would not permit any innovation in the studies; and that, were he to live five hundred years, he would always repeat "no novelties" in theology, in philosophy or in logic - not even in grammar.

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  • He was educated at the free grammar school of his native town, and in 1631 was nominated to the Lynn scholarship in Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A.

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  • The principal other buildings are the court house, government buildings (formerly a Jesuit monastery), episcopal palace, grammar school (once attended by Erasmus), a prison, hospitals, arsenal and barracks.

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  • He was educated at Dedham grammar school and at Cambridge, and in 1868 became professor of engineering at Owens College, Manchester, holding that post for nearly 40 years.

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  • A grammar school of ancient foundation, renewed by Elizabeth and George III., occupies modern buildings.

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  • Hunter, Grammar of the Somal Language (Bombay, 1880); E.

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  • de Larajasse and C. de Sampont, A Practical Grammar of the Somali Language (London, 1897); E.

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  • In private service superior posts were often filled by freedmen; the higher arts - as medicine, grammar, painting - were partly in the hands of freedmen and even of ingenui; the more successful actors and gladiators were often freedmen.

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  • The first class comprises works on grammar, one on natural phenomena, and two on chronology and the calendar.

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  • Here the young Marsilio received his elementary education in grammar and Latin literature at the high school or studio pubblico.

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  • Born on the 18th of February 1718 he was educated at the parish school of St Ninians, and at the grammar school of Stirling, and, after completing his course at Edinburgh University, became master of the grammar school at Annan.

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  • The "Cleveland plan," in force in the public schools, minimizes school routine, red tape and frequent examinations, puts great stress on domestic and manual training courses, and makes promotion in the grammar schools depend on the general knowledge and development of the pupil, as estimated by a teacher who is supposed to make a careful study of the individual.

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  • In 1909 there were 8 high schools and 90 grammar schools in the city; more than $2,500,000 is annually expended by Cleveland on its public schools.

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  • He was educated at the grammar school of his native town, and at the university of Edinburgh, where he graduated M.A.

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  • He was educated at the Wigton grammar school, and about 1754 went to Virginia, where he became a private tutor in the families of Virginia planters.

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  • A grammar school, founded 1554, occupied part of the Priory, but was removed in 1874 to new buildings.

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  • The grammar school was founded by Sir Norton Knatchbull in the reign of Charles I.

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  • The grammar school was founded in 1553 and reorganized in 1862.

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  • Demetrius Chalcondyles published the editio princeps of Homer, Isocrates, and Suidas, and a Greek grammar (Erotemata) in the form of question and answer.

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  • Since then, says their regretful pupil, " less time and less care have been bestowed on grammar, and persons who profess all arts, liberal and mechanical, are ignorant of the primary art, without which a man proceeds in vain to the rest.

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  • The first Hungarian grammar known is the Grammatica HungaroLatina of John Erdosi alias Sylvester Pannonius, printed at SarvarUjsziget in 1539.

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  • Wekey in his grammar (1852) and E.

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  • Besides theology he was interested in the study of grammar and natural history, but his name is chiefly associated with nautical science.

    1
    1
  • Among institutions may be mentioned the grammar school, founded in 1674, the public library and museum, and a number of hospitals and sanatoria.

    1
    1
  • He wrote various philosophical works, also a treatise on grammar which is quoted by the later grammarian, John bar Zo`bi.

    1
    1
  • Grammar and Lexicography.

    1
    1
  • His Latin Grammar and Glossary 2 were written for his pupils after the two books of homilies.

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    1
  • and grammar on the ground that they are not due to himself but to earlier and ignorant copyists.

    1
    1
  • WILLIAM STUBBS (1825-1901), English historian and bishop of Oxford, son of William Morley Stubbs, solicitor, of Knaresborough, Yorkshire, was born on the 21st of June 1825, and was educated at the Ripon grammar school and Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated in 1848, obtaining a first-class in classics and a third in mathematics.

    1
    1
  • At a somewhat earlier period the grammar school, now extinct, was of such repute as to be chosen as the model for the constitution of the school of St Paul's.

    1
    1
  • Other institutions include a grammar school founded in the middle of the 16th century and provided for by a charter of Edward VI., the Cambridgeshire hospital, a custom-house, a cattle-market, and an important corn-exchange, for Wisbech has a large trade in grain.

    1
    1
  • He also introduced innovations in orthography and grammar.

    1
    1
  • A free grammar school was founded about 1614.

    1
    1
  • In early times the priories and other religious houses had generally grammar schools attached to them.

    1
    1
  • No Polish grammar worthy of the name appeared till that of Kopczynski at the close of the 18th century, but the reproach has been taken away in modern times by the excellent works by Malecki and Malinowski.

    1
    1
  • An elaborate history of Polish literature has been written by Anton Malecki, who is the author of the best Polish grammar (Gramatyka historyczno-porownawcza jezyka polskiego, 2 vols., Lemberg, 1879).

    1
    1
  • He was an active visitor of Eton and Winchester, and endowed the grammar school at Reading, where he was himself educated.

    1
    1
  • The Hartford grammar school, founded in 1638, long managed by the town and in 1847 merged with the classical department of the Hartford public high school, is the oldest educational institution in the state.

    1
    1
  • (I) Priscian avowedly treats Greek writers on (Greek) grammar as his supreme authorities; and bears too little in mind that each has a history of its own and is a law to itself.

    1
    1
  • Two critical editions of the Iliad and Odyssey were produced by his successor, Aristarchus, who was librarian until 1 4 6 B.C. and was the founder of scientific scholarship. His distinguished pupil, Dionysius Thrax (born c. 166 B.C.), drew up a Greek grammar which continued in use for more than thirteen centuries.

    1
    1
  • From about 168 B.C. the head of the Pergamene school was Crates of Mallus, who (like the Stoics) was an adherent of the principle of " anomaly " in grammar, and was thus opposed to Aristarchus of Alexandria, the champion of " analogy."

    1
    1
  • Early in the 4th century the study of grammar was represented in northern Africa by the Numidian tiro, Nonius Marcellus (fl.

    1
    1
  • The educational institutions include the free grammar school (founded by James Leigh in 1619 and rebuilt in 1876), the Wigan and District Mining and Technical College (built by public subscription and opened in 1903) and the mechanics' institution, also the convent of Notre Dame (1854), with a college for pupil teachers and a high school for girls, and several Roman Catholic schools.

    1
    1
  • From his early years he displayed an extraordinary talent and appetite for knowledge, and as soon as he had completed his own education he began to teach with distinguished success grammar, rhetoric, divinity and philosophy.

    1
    1
  • Pughe, Grammar and Dictionary 2 (1832), vitiated by absurd etymological theories; J.

    1
    1
  • Rowland, Grammar of the Welsh Language 4 (1876), containing a large collection of facts about the modern language, badly arranged and wholly undigested; Rhys, Lectures on Welsh Philology 2 (1879); J.

    1
    1
  • Anwyl, Welsh Grammar for Schools, i.

    1
    1
  • Morris Jones, Historical Welsh Grammar, i.

    1
    1
  • He was intended for the church from his youth; and when seven years old was sent for five years to the grammar school which Colet had founded near the Carthusian monastery at Sheen.

    1
    1
  • The high school, formerly the grammar school, was founded in the time of Elizabeth.

    1
    1
  • There are a Nonconformist grammar school, a diocesan training college for mistresses, and other educational establishments.

    1
    1
  • He was ignorant of the rules of grammar, confused genders and cases, and wrote in the vernacular Latin of his time, apart from certain passages which are especially elaborated and filled with poetical and elegant expressions.

    1
    1
  • In addition to these works Camden compiled a Greek grammar, Institutio Graecae Grammatices Compendiaria, which became very popular, and he published an edition of the writings of Asser, Giraldus Cambrensis, Thomas Walsingham and others, under the title, Anglica, Hibernica, Normannica, Cambrica, a veteribus scripta, published at Frankfort in 1602, and again in 1603.

    1
    1
  • A grammar school was founded in 1611.

    1
    1
  • - The contents of the Opera posthuma included the Ethics, the Tractatus politicos and the De intellectus emendatione (the last two unfinished), a selection from Spinoza's correspondence, and a Compendium of Hebrew Grammar.

    1
    1
  • Having studied theology at Lingen and Halle, he became successively rector of the grammar school at Mors (1793), professor of theology at Duisburg (1800), preacher at Crefeld, and afterwards at Kettwig, Consistorialrath and superintendent in Bernburg, and, after declining an invitation to the university of Bonn, pastor of the Ansgariuskirche in Bremen (1824).

    1
    1
  • But he sent his son John to school (no doubt the well-known grammar school of Haddington), and thereafter to the university, where, like his contemporary George Buchanan, he sat "at the feet" of John Major.

    1
    1
  • rector of the Perth grammar school and then (appointed by Cromwell) principal of King's College, Aberdeen, who, with his father and grandfather was a famour Hebraist, but left the Church of Scotland to become an Independent minister.

    1
    1
  • Abbott, Johannine Grammar, pp. 530-532).

    1
    1
  • npler is the grammar, the more lax the use of the cases.

    1
    1
  • The ancient ~sian inscriptions have been collected in a Latin translation;h grammar and glossaries by F.

    1
    1
  • He was known for his great scholarship, simplicity of character, and affectionate interest in the pupils of the grammar school, of which he was appointed master a few months before becoming vicar of the parish (1760), reigning in both capacities till his death.

    1
    1
  • All those texts in which the grammar is handled, now with laxness and want of skill, and again with absolute barbarism, may probably be placed to the account of the Sassanian redactors.

    1
    1
  • The grammar school was founded in 1611.

    1
    1
  • The grammar school, occupying a Gothic building (1858) at Woodhouse Moor, dates its foundation from 1552.

    1
    1
  • from grammar on one side and from psychology on another), and cannot claim the unity of an independent science.

    1
    1
  • He translated and edited Gesenius's Hebrew Grammar (1839; 1877), and published revised versions with notes of Job (1856), Genesis (1868), Psalms (1871), Proverbs (1872), Isaiah i.

    1
    1
  • In 1857 he was appointed professor of Sanscrit in the school of languages connected with the National Library in Paris, and in this capacity he produced a Sanscrit grammar; but his attention was chiefly given to Assyrian and cognate subjects, and he was especially prominent in establishing the Turanian character of the language originally spoken in Assyria.

    1
    1
  • His writings have not one literary fault except their occasional looseness of grammar and their frequent indecency.

    1
    1
  • He was educated at the Sydney grammar school and the university of Sydney, where he won many distinctions, and was called to the N.S.W bar in 1871, becoming Q.C. in 1889.

    1
    1
  • He was educated at Rotherham grammar school and at Lincoln College, Oxford, took orders in 1611, and was promoted successively to several benefices.

    1
    1
  • His works embraced politics, astronomy, medicine, music, theology, jurisprudence, physics, grammar and history.

    1
    1
  • JOSE ECHEGARAY Y EIZAGUIRRE (1833-), Spanish mathematician, statesman and dramatist, was born at Madrid in March 1833, and was educated at the grammar school of Murcia, whence he proceeded to the Escuela de Caminos at the capital.

    1
    1
  • There are gymnasia, or grammar schools of four classes, roughly corresponding with the German sub-gymnasia; and lyceums of eight classes, which answer to the German gymnasia.

    1
    1
  • Ianache Vacarescu, author of the first native Rumanian grammar on independent lines, was also the first who tried his hand at poetry, following Greek examples.

    1
    1
  • There was a grammar school at Midhurst, which at one time had enjoyed considerable reputation, but which had fallen into decay.

    0
    0
  • Faversham has a free grammar school founded in 1527 and removed to its present site in 1877.

    0
    0
  • The founding of new teaching universities, in which England, and even France, had been at some disadvantage as compared with Scotland and Germany, strengthened the movement in favour of enlarging and liberalizing technical training, and of anticipating technical instruction by some broader scientific discipline; though, as in all times of transition, something was lost temporarily by a departure from the old discipline of the grammar school before a new scheme of training the mind in scientific habits and conceptions was established or fully apprehended.

    0
    0
  • St Olave's and St Saviour's grammar school, Southwark, received its charter in 1571.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at the Malmesbury grammar school under Robert Latimer, who had numbered Thomas Hobbes among his earlier pupils, and at his schoolmaster's house Aubrey first met the philosopher about whom he was to leave so many curious and interesting details.

    0
    0
  • The free grammar school, refounded bý Edward IV., was rebuilt in 1677, and again in 1867.

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    0
  • He was educated at Perth grammar school and the university of St Andrews.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Kinclaven and the grammar school, Perth, graduated A.M.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Bath Grammar School, matriculated at Oriel College, Oxford, in 1618, obtained his B.A.

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    0
  • It is known as the Mass Tower and contains a niche in which is a small effigy believed to represent the founder, who also endowed the grammar school which is still in existence.

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  • Kitzingen is still surrounded by its old walls and towers, and has an Evangelical and two Roman Catholic churches, two municipal museums, a town-hall, a grammar school, a richly endowed hospital and two old convents.

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  • Schmeller in 1830; the second volume, containing the glossary and grammar, appeared in 1840.

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    0
  • - As supplemental to the account of poetry may be mentioned here some of the chief collections of ancient verse, sometimes made for the sake of the poems themselves, sometimes to give a locus classicus for usages of grammar or lexicography, sometimes to illustrate ancient manners and customs. The earliest of these is the Mo'allakat.

    0
    0
  • The Khizanat ul-Adab of Abdulgadir, written in the 17th century in the form of a commentary on verses cited in a grammar, contains much old verse (ed.

    0
    0
  • Such books were written by Bakri and Yaqut (q.v.)' Grammar and aexicography.

    0
    0
  • - Arab tradition ascribes the first grammatical treatment of the language to Abu-l-Aswad ud-Du'ali (latter half of the 7th century), but the certain beginnings of Arabic grammar are found a hundred years later.

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    0
  • His pupil Sibawaihi, a Persian, wrote the grammar known simply as The Book, which is generally regarded in the East as authoritative and almost above criticism.

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    0
  • The school of Kufa claimed to pay more attention to the living language (spoken among the Bedouins) than to written laws of grammar.

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    0
  • The education which he provided consisted of rhetoric, grammar, style and the interpretation of the poets.

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    0
  • Protagoras was the first to systematize grammar, distinguishing the parts of speech, the tenses and the moods.

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    0
  • His Hebrew Grammar inaugurated a new era in biblical philology.

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    0
  • The following have been translated into English: - Hebrew Grammar, by John Nicholson (from 2nd German edition) (London 1836); Introductory Hebrew Grammar (from 3rd German edition) (London, 1870); History of Israel, 5 vols.

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    0
  • The objections to Paul's authorship on the score of style and grammar are finally set aside by the philologist Ngeli in Der Wortschatz des Apostels Paulus 1905), pp. 80-82.

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    0
  • He was the author of a Greek translation of a Latin grammar, intended to assist the Greekspeaking inhabitants of the empire in learning Latin.

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    0
  • The Latin grammar used was based on the same authorities as those of Charisius and Diomedes, which accounts for the many points of similarity.

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    0
  • Some Greek-Latin exercises by an unknown writer of the 3rd century, to be learnt by heart and translated, were added to the grammar.

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  • Many critics ascribe it to an unknown Lucius Caecilius; there are certainly serious differences of grammar, style and temper between it and the writings already mentioned.

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    0
  • His TEXvrt rypaµµanKii, which we possess (though probably not in its original form), begins with the definition of grammar and its functions.

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  • At the age of twelve he was sent to a grammar school in Belfast, whence he removed in 1746 to study medicine in Glasgow.

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  • The principal are the governor's residence and government offices, the barracks, the cathedral, the missionary institutions, the fruit market, Wilberforce Hall, courts of justice, the railway station and the grammar school.

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  • These two tractates, with which `Ilayyuj had laid the foundations of scientific Hebrew grammar, were recognized by Abulwalid as the basis of his own grammatical investigations, and Abraham Ibn Daud, when enumerating the great Spanish Jews in his history, sums up the significance of R.

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  • Derenbourg, Paris, 1886) contains the grammar, the latter (ed.

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    0
  • At Christmas 1815 he was sent to the grammar school at Louth, his mother having kept up a connexion with this typical Lincolnshire borough, of which her father, the Rev. Stephen Fytche, had been vicar.

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    0
  • After receiving some rudimentary instruction from his father, the boy was sent to the grammar school of his native town.

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    0
  • A grammar school was founded in 1713, the operations of which have been extended so as to embrace a trade school (1871) for boys, and a grammar school for girls.

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    0
  • James was educated at Norwich Grammar School under Edward Valpy, as good a scholar as his better-known brother Richard.

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    0
  • A grammar school was founded in 1606, and reorganized and moved to new buildings in modern times.

    0
    0
  • -The grammar school, founded in the reign of Henry IV., occupies modern buildings.

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    0
  • Lord Ashburton was educated at the grammar school, which was founded as a chantry in 1314.

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    0
  • The market-hall, museum, school of art, and a free grammar school, founded under Edward VI., may be noted among buildings and institutions.

    0
    0
  • Other noteworthy buildings are the town-hall, 16th century grammar school and Marlborough College.

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  • Sacheverell, the politician and divine, was born here in 1674, and educated at the grammar school.

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  • high, contain assembly and reading rooms. Of the schools the most notable is the Academy (rebuilt in 1880), which in 1764 superseded the grammar school of the burgh, which existed in the 13th century.

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    0
  • The mosque known as Raja Bhoj's school was built out of Hindu remains in the 4 th or 15th century: its name is derived from the slabs, covered with inscriptions giving rules of Sanskrit grammar, with which it is paved.

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  • The town has a handsome church (Early English and Decorated), a grammar school, and some trade in coal, timber, malt and cheese.

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  • Donatus taught him grammar and explained the Latin poets.

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    0
  • The grammar school was founded in 1696, and here among its students were John Philpot Curran and Isaac Butt.

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    0
  • He attended lectures on grammar, and his favourite work was St Augustine's De civitate Dei, He caused Frankish sagas to be collected, began a grammar of his native tongue, and spent some of his last hours in correcting a text of the Vulgate.

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  • Benjamin could not remember when he did not know how to read, and when eight years old he was sent to the Boston grammar school, being destined by his father for the church as a tithe of his sons.

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  • On his father's return from Gibraltar, David, who had previously been educated at the grammar school of Lichfield, was, largely by the advice of Gilbert Walmley, registrar of the ecclesiastical court, sent with his brother George to the " academy " at Edial, just opened in June or July 1736 by Samuel Johnson, the senior by seven years of David, who was then nineteen.

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  • treats of grammar, iv.

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  • There is a grammar school, founded in 1558.

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  • Government Avenue contains, on the east side, the Houses of Parliament, government house, a modernized Dutch building, and the Jewish synagogue; on the west side are the Anglican cathedral and grammar schools, the public library, botanic gardens, the museum and South African college.

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  • They studied criticism, grammar, prosody and metre, antiquities and mythology.

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    0
  • To perform their task adequately required from the critics a wide circle of knowledge; and from this requirement sprang the sciences of grammar, prosody, lexicography, mythology and archaeology.

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  • Dionysius Thrax, the author of the first scientific Greek grammar, may also be mentioned.

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    0
  • He succeeded not only in raising the standard of education generally in the north of Scotland, but also in forming a school of philosophy and in widely influencing the teaching of English grammar and composition.

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  • His efforts were first directed to the preparation of English textbooks: Higher English Grammar (1863), followed in 1866 by the Manual of Rhetoric, in 1872 by A First English Grammar, and in 1874 by the Companion io the Higher Grammar.

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    0
  • All these works, from the Higher English Grammar downwards, were written by Bain during his twenty years' professoriate at Aberdeen.

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  • grammar school was founded in 1550 and reorganized in 1875, and occupies modern buildings.

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  • Secundus devoted much attention to the niceties of grammar and style, on which he was recognized as an.

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  • of the De mensura (Dicuil's tract on grammar is lost); of these the earliest and best are (I) Paris, National Library, Lat.

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  • Alleyne's grammar school is a foundation of 1558.

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    0
  • Of the education of Herodotus no more can be said than that it was thoroughly Greek, and embraced no doubt the three subjects essential to a Greek liberal education - grammar, gymnastic training and music. His studies would be regarded as completed when he attained the age of eighteen, and took rank among the eplzebi or eirenes of his native city.

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  • He attended the grammar school of Bishop Auckland for a short time, but a large portion of his boyhood was spent in Westmorland.

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    0
  • He tried to find his own way in Greek literature, to which German schools then gave little attention; but, as he had not mastered the grammar, he soon found this a sore task and took up Arabic. He was very poor, having almost nothing beyond his allowance, which for the five years was only two hundred thalers.

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  • Wright, Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages, p. 16).

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    0
  • In 1846 a grammar and dictionary of it were made with difficulty from the mouths of old people.

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    0
  • Sorn's Der Sprachgebrauch des Historikers Eutropius (1892) contains a systematic account of the grammar and style of the author.

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    0
  • Tregelles wrote Heads of Hebrew Grammar (1852), translated Gesenius's Hebrew Lexicon, and was the author of a little work on the Jansenists (1851) and of various works in exposition of his special eschatological views (Remarks on the Prophetic Visions of Daniel, 1852,1852, new ed., 1864).

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  • After a brief stay in the grammar school of Colmar he went to Strassburg in 1651, where he devoted himself to the study of philology, history and philosophy, and won his degree of master (1653) by a disputation against the philosophy of Hobbes.

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  • Other buildings of interest are the guildhall, a 15th-century structure of brick; Shodfriars Hall, a half-timbered house adjacent to slight remains of a Dominican priory; the free grammar school, founded in 1554, with a fine gateway of wrought iron of the 17th century brought from St Botolph's church; and the Hussey Tower of brick, part of a mansion of the 16th century.

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  • The College of New Jersey, now Princeton University, was situated here from 1747 to 1756, for all but the first few months under the presidency of the Rev. Aaron Burr, who published in 1752 the well-known Newark Grammar, long used in Princeton and originally prepared for Burr's very successful boys' school in Newark.

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  • The grammar school dates from 1687.

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  • 1863), who headed the Cambridge classical tripos in 1886, became head master of Manchester grammar school in 1903.

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  • In the dull round of instruction in "grammar" he did not distinguish himself, and was surpassed by his early friend and companion, William Herman, who was Winckel's favourite pupil.

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    0
  • About the middle of the same century grammar had a far abler exponent at Rome in the person of Aelius Donatus, the preceptor of St Jerome, as well as the author of a text-book that remained in use throughout the middle ages.

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  • 512), a transcript of whose great work on Latin grammar was completed at Constantinople by one of that grammarian's pupils in 527, to be reproduced in a thousand MSS.

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    0
  • It was there that he began his Latin Grammar, his Glossary (the earliest Latin-English dictionary in existence), and his Colloquium, in which Latin is taught in a conversational manner.

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    0
  • In Italy, where the study of Latin literature seems never to have entirely died out, young nobles and students preparing for the priesthood were not infrequently learning Latin together, in private grammar schools under liberal clerics, such as Anselm of Bisate (fl.

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    0
  • His knowledge of Greek, as shown in his Greek Grammar (first published in 1902), was clearly derived from the Greeks of his own day.

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    0
  • At Ferrara he spent the last thirty years of his long life (1370-1460), producing textbooks of Greek and Latin grammar, and translations from Strabo and Plutarch.

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    0
  • The printing of Greek began at Milan with the Greek grammar of Constantine Lascaris (1476).

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    0
  • Grammar and kindred subjects have been represented by P. Buttmann, A.

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    0
  • At the grammar school of Stratford-on-Avon, about 1671-1677, Shakespeare presumably studied Terence, Horace, Ovid and the Bucolics of Baptista Mantuanus (1502).

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  • 2) he says, of Integer vitae: 'Tis a verse in Horace; I know it well: I read it in the grammar long ago."

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  • The Westminster Greek Grammar presented Latin verses to Queen Elizabeth.

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  • When Latin grammar has been mastered, he bids the teacher lead his pupil " into the sweet fountain and spring of all Arts and Science," that is, Greek learning which is " as profitable for the understanding as the Latin tongue for speaking."

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  • Latin was, above all, to be learned through use, with as little grammar as possible, but with the reading of easy Latin texts, and with no repetition, no composition.

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    0
  • In November 1903 a syndicate was of Grant (1575) was succeeded by that of Camden (1 595), founded mainly on a Paduan text-book, and apparently adopted in 1596 by Sir Henry Savile at Eton, where it long remained in use as the Eton Greek Grammar, while at Westminster itself it was superseded by that of Busby (1663).

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  • C. Jebb, " Humanism in Education," Romanes Lecture of 1899, reprinted with other lectures on cognate subjects in Essays and Addresses (1907); Foster Watson, The Curriculum and Practice of the English Grammar Schools up to 1660 (1908); " Greek at Oxford," by a Resident, in The Times (December 27, 1904); Cambridge University Reporter (November i i and December 17, 1904); British Association Report on Curricula of Secondary Schools (with an independent paper by Professor Armstrong on " The Teaching of Classics "), (December 1907); W.

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  • In the second half of the 17th century the rules of grammar and rhetoric were simplified, and the time withdrawn from the practice of composition (especially verse composition) transferred to the explanation and the study of authors.

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  • A greater originality in the method of teaching the ancient languages was exemplified by Fenelon, whose views were partially reflected by the Abbe Fleury, who also desired the simplification of grammar, the diminution of composition, and even the suppression of Latin verse.

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  • not only the above-mentioned Latin grammar 16 Y g (44) but also the Methode grecque of 1655 and the Jardin des racines grecques (1657), which remained in use for two centuries and largely superseded the grammar of Clenardus (1636) and the Tirocinium of Pere Labbe (1648).

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  • Daunou (October 1795), which divided the pupils of the " central schools " into three groups, according to age, with corresponding subjects of study: (r) twelve to fourteen, = drawing, natural history, Greek and Latin, and a choice of modern languages; (2) fourteen to sixteen, - mathematics, physics, chemistry; (3) over sixteen, - general grammar, literature, history and constitutional law.

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    0
  • During more than forty years of academic activity he not only provided manuals of Latin and Greek grammar and many other text-books that long remained in use, but he also formed for Germany a welltrained class of learned teachers, who extended his influence throughout the land.

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    0
  • The Latin grammar in use was that of the Jesuit rector of the school at Lisbon, Alvarez (1572).

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    0
  • Agnes, Cambs., but the greater part of his life was given up to teaching, as headmaster of Helston grammar school from 18J5 to 1859 and of King Edward VI.

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    0
  • Jewish teacher about 1492, published a work entitled De Rudimentis Hebraicis containing a Hebrew lexicon and a Hebrew grammar.

    0
    0
  • He was educated at Norwich grammar school.

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  • At the grammar school, founded in the reign of Henry VIII., but occupying modern buildings, Eugene Aram was usher.

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  • A chapel, dedicated to St Thomas of Canterbury, is used as a grammar school.

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    0
  • There are also many connexions with Dr Johnson, a frequent visitor here to his friend Dr Taylor, who occupied a house opposite the grammar school.

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    0
  • In 1839 he brought out his Greek Grammar, which had a great success.

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  • Bernard Gilpin, "the Apostle of the North," was rector of this parish from 1556 to 1583, and the founder of the grammar school.

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  • It has one of the finest race-courses in Australia, and in the King's School, founded in 1832, the oldest grammar school in the colony.

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    0
  • The first college in Mexico was founded', during the administration of Viceroy Mendoza (1535-1550), but it taught very little beyond Latin, rhetoric, grammar and theology.

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    0
  • Kay's free grammar school was founded in 1726; there are also municipal technical schools.

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    0
  • In 1520 he published his Greek Grammar.

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    0
  • New Hampshire formed a part of Massachusetts when, in 1647, the General Court of that province passed the famous act requiring every town in which there were fifty householders to maintain a school for teaching reading and writing, and every town in which there were one hundred householders to maintain a grammar school with an instructor capable of preparing young men for college.

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  • master of Tonbridge Grammar School, begging to be received into his family, that he might enjoy the benefit of his learning and.

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    0
  • Among educational institutions, the grammar school existed in the 16th century, and in 1663 received a charter of incorporation from Charles II.

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    0
  • He took much interest in the educational affairs of the province, and in 1807 was instrumental in having provision made for the establishment of the first grammar schools.

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    0
  • The town has a grammar school, founded before the reign of Henry VIII., but reorganized in 1885.

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  • JOHN BRADFORD (1510?- 1 555), English Protestant martyr, was born at Manchester in the early part of the reign of Henry VIII., and educated at the local grammar school.

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  • In all races there has been since 1890, throughout the country, a large increase in the proportion of girls among the pupils of each age-group; and this is particularly true of the group of 15 years and upwardthat is of the grammar school and high school age, in which girls were in 1900 decidedly preponderant.

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  • Farnham has a town hall and exchange in Italian style (1866), a grammar school of early foundation, and a school of science and art.

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  • It was certainly by Aristotle, because it contained the triple grammatical division of words into noun, verb and conjunction, which the history of grammar recognized as his discovery.

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  • Its point is to separate the enunciative sentence, or that in which there is truth or falsity, from other sentences; and then, dismissing the rest to rhetoric or poetry (where we should say grammar), to discuss the enunciative sentence(it r04avTLKOs X6yos), or enunciation (air04avvts), or what we should call the proposition (De Int.

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  • Here Aristotle, starting from the previous grammar of sentences in general, proceeded, for the first time in philosophical literature, to disengage the logic of the proposition, or that sentence which can alone be true or false, whereby it alone enters into reasoning.

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  • He gradually became a logician out of his previous studies: out of metaphysics, for with him being is always the basis of thinking, and common principles, such as that of contradiction, are axioms of things before axioms of thought, while categories are primarily things signified by names; out of the mathematics of the Pythagoreans and the Platonists, which taught him the nature of demonstration; out of the physics, of which he imbibed the first draughts from his father, which taught him induction from sense and the modification of strict demonstration to suit facts; out of the dialectic between man and man which provided him with beautiful examples of inference in the Socratic dialogues of Xenophon and Plato; out of the rhetoric addressed to large audiences, which with dialectic called his attention to probable inferences; out of the grammar taught with rhetoric and poetics which led him to the logic of the proposition.

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  • Aristotle, who made this great discovery, must have had great difficulty in developing the new investigation of reasoning processes out of dialectic, rhetoric, poetics, grammar, metaphysics, mathematics, physics and ethics; and in disengaging it from other kinds of learning.

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  • The neighbouring building of the grammar school preserves a Norman door from another church, which formerly stood in the same churchyard with St Peter's.

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  • The institutions include a museum of local antiquities, a grammar school, the Siemens Convalescent Home and the Ilkley Bath Charitable Institution.

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  • Shepton possesses a grammar school of the 17th century, and a science and art school.

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  • Besides the Virgilian commentary, other works of Servius are extant: a collection of notes on the grammar (Ars) of Aelius Donatus; a treatise on metrical endings (De finalibus); and a tract on the different metres (De centum snetris).

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  • Grammar >>

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  • The grammar school was founded in 1486.

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  • In addition to the usual high and grammar schools, the city itself supports a city training school for teachers, and a system of night schools and kindergartens.

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  • It possesses a town hall, a grammar school (1576), and a Martyr's Memorial HallThe most noteworthy building, however, is the parish church, restored in 1863, which contains a curious old fresco and several interesting brasses, and has a Norman tower.

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  • He published a Latin Grammar (1867; revised with the co-operation of Gonzalez B.

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  • His views on the function of grammar were summarized in a paper on The Spiritual Rights of Minute Research delivered at Bryn Mawr on the 16th of June 1895.

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  • They furnish a good manual and technical training to Hawaiian boys and girls, in addition to a primary and grammar school course of study, and exert a strong religious influence.

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  • A free grammar school was founded in the reign of Edward VI., and an English free school for the instruction of forty boys and thirty girls by Richard Smith in 1712.

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  • We have here, in this sceptical idealism, the source of the characteristically English form of idealism still to be read in the writings of Mill and Spencer, and still the starting-point of more recent works, such as Pearson's Grammar of Science and James's Principles of Psychology.

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  • Karl Pearson (The Grammar of Science, 1892, 2nd enlarged ed., 1900), starting from Hume's phenomenal idealism, has developed views closely allied to Mach's universal physical phenomenology.

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  • The rudiments of Latin he obtained at the grammar school of Montrose, after leaving which he learned Greek for two years under Pierre de Marsilliers, a Frenchman whom John Erskine of Dun had induced to settle at Montrose; and such was Melville's proficiency that on going to the university of St Andrews he excited the astonishment of the professors by using the Greek text of Aristotle, which no one else there understood.

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  • The town has long been an important military centre with a large permanent camp. There are a free grammar school (founded 1 539), a technical and university extension college, a literary institute and medical and other societies.

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  • Pearson, The Grammar of Science (1892); A.

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  • He studied grammar and rhetoric at Rome and philosophy at Athens, after which he returned to Rome, where he held a judicial office.

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  • It is compiled out of an Adversaria, or commonplace book, in which he had jotted down everything of unusual interest that he heard in conversation or read in books, and it comprises notes on grammar, geometry, philosophy, history and almost every other branch of knowledge.

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  • His Tibetan-English Dictionary, and pioneer Tibetan Grammar, both published in 1834, opened to Europeans the way to acquire a knowledge of the Tibetan language as found in the ancient classics.

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  • Hodgson, and grammatical notices of Tibetan (according to Csoma's grammar).

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  • investigations to the language as a whole, and provided Europeans for the first time with the means of making a practical study of modern Tibetan and the speech of the people His Tibetan-English Dictionary and Tibetan Grammar are models of scientific precision and important sources of our knowledge of the structure and development of the language, and the former is not superseded by Chandra Das's Dictionary.3 The language was first reduced to writing with the assistance of Indian Buddhist monks in the middle of the 7th century A.

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  • In 1868 at Kyelang he published by lithography A Short Practical Grammar of the Tibetan Language, with special reference to the spoken dialects, and the following year a Romanized Tibetan and English Dictionary.

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  • Wenzel, one of his pupils, edited in 1883 from his MS. a Simplified Tibetan Grammar.

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  • As regards native philology, the most ancient work extant is a grammar of the Tibetan tongue preserved in the Bstan-hgyur (mdo cxxiv.).

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  • A good deal of new research on the grammar is to be found in Grierson's Linguistic Survey of India, part III., 1908.

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  • Foucaux, in his Grammaire (1858), quoted a fragment from a native work on grammar several centuries old, in which the pronunciation of the supposed silent letters is carefully described.

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  • Subsequently he held the mastership of the grammar school at Southampton, and in 1582 was professor of divinity and minister of the reformed church at Leiden.

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  • At the age of fourteen he went into his father's printing office, but continued to attend the grammar school in the afternoons.

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  • Besides the regular elementary schools there are the Perth Academy (1807) with which was subsequently amalgamated the Burgh Grammar.

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  • Cavan has no buildings of antiquarian interest, but the principal county institutions are here, and the most conspicuous building is the grammar school, founded by Charles I.

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  • The grammar school was founded in 1487 by Sir Edmund Shaa or Shaw, lord mayor of London.

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  • His commentaries on the Scriptures were the first application on an extensive scale of the principle affirmed by Scaliger, that, namely, of interpretation by the rules of grammar without dogmatic assumptions.

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  • He also devoted much of his time to writing on the comparatively safe subjects of grammar and rhetoric. A detailed work on rhetoric, entitled Studiosus, was followed by eight books, Dubii sermons (A.D.

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  • Hottinger (Syriac) in Germany, with advantage to the Hebrew grammar and lexicon.

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  • In the 19th century the greatest name among Hebraists is that of Gesenius, at Halle, whose shorter grammar (of Biblical Hebrew) first published in 1813, is still the standard work, thanks to the ability with which his pupil E.

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  • Comparative Grammar.

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  • - Wright, Lectures on the Comp. Grammar of the Sem.

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  • It has three Protestant churches, a grammar school and court of law.

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  • Another work by him, Elements of English Grammar, was published in 1801.

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  • He was educated at the grammar school of Irvine, the university of Glasgow, and the East India Company's College at Haileybury.

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  • Among several educational institutions, the free grammar school dates from 1665; and a philosophical society was founded in 1828.

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  • There are a picturesque town hall (1641), raised on stone columns, and a free grammar school.

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  • He received the best education to be had at the time, and was noted for his proficiency in the arts of grammar, rhetoric and dialectic. Entering on a public career he held, about 573, the high office of prefect of the city of Rome; but about 574, feeling irresistibly attracted to the "religious" life, he resigned his post, founded six monasteries in Sicily and one in Rome, and in the last - the famous monastery of St Andrew - became himself a monk.

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  • 1898); Grammar of Greek Art (1905); Exploratio Evangelica (1899), on the origin of Christian belief; A Historic View of the New Testament (1901); Growth of Christianity (1907).

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  • See especially his Sumerian grammar in this latter work, pp. 133-147.

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  • His father, Daniel Doddridge, was a London merchant, and his mother the orphan daughter of the Rev. John Bauman, a Lutheran clergyman who had fled from Prague to escape religious persecution, and had held for some time the mastership of the grammar school at Kingston-upon-Thames.

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  • He afterwards went to a private school in London, and in 1712 to the grammar school at Kingston-upon-Thames.

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  • Educational establishments include an Elizabethan grammar school, a training college for schoolmistresses (British and Foreign School Society), and a technical school.

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  • Before his time four Italian towns had won the honours of Greek publications: Milan, with the grammar of Lascaris, Aesop, Theocritus, a Greek Psalter, and Isocrates, between 1476 and 1493; Venice, with the Erotemata of Chrysoloras in 1484; Vicenza, with reprints of Lascaris's grammar and the Erotemata, in 1488 and 1490; Florence, with Alopa's Homer, in 1488.

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  • He was acquainted moreover with Latin grammar, under the influence of which he resorted to the innovation of dividing the Hebrew vowels into five long vowels and five short, previous grammarians having simply spoken of seven vowels without distinction of quantity.

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  • Moses Kimhi was the author of a Hebrew grammar, known - after the first three words - as Mahalak Shebile Ha-daat, or briefly as Mahalak.

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  • This falls into two divisions: the grammar, to which the title of the whole, Miklol, is usually applied (first printed in Constantinople, 1532-1534, then, with the notes of Elias Levita, at Venice, 1545), and the lexicon, Sefer Hashorashim, "Book of Roots," which was first printed in Italy before 1480, then at Naples in 1490, and at Venice in 1546 with the annotations of Elias.

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  • In the grammar he combined the paradigmatic method of his brother Moses with the procedure of the older scholars who devoted a close attention to details.

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  • The free grammar school occupies modern buildings in the Elizabethan style.

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  • The grammar school was enlarged and endowed in 1686 by Sarah, dowager duchess of Somerset.

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  • The free grammar school, originally founded in 1502 by Sir John Percival, was refounded in 1552 by Edward VI., and a commercial school was erected in 1840 out of its funds.

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  • There is a free grammar school founded in 1637.

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  • Only two of his works have been printed, his Erotemata (published at Venice in 1484), which was the first Greek grammar in use in the West, and Epistolae III.

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  • Besides numerous board schools, the educational establishments include the John Neilson Endowed Institute (1852) on Oakshaw Hill, the grammar school (founded, 1576; rebuilt, 1864), and the academy for secondary education, and the technical college, in George Street.

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  • David Hughes, of Jesus College, Oxford, founded the free grammar school in 1603.

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  • In 1638 he was nominated to the mastership of the free grammar school, Dudley, in which place he commenced his ministry, having been ordained and licensed by John Thornborough, bishop of Worcester.

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  • From the grammar school of Norwich he passed to Trinity College, Cambridge; and in 1572 he entered Lincoln's Inn.

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  • The conversation ranges from the dishes before the guests to literary matters of every description, including points of grammar and criticism; and they are expected to bring with them extracts from the poets, which are read aloud and discussed at table.

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  • In 1541 he was appointed professor of Latin grammar at Wittenberg, and in 1557 professor of the Old Testament.

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  • From Suetonius (De grammaticis, 23) we learn that he was originally a slave who obtained his freedom and taught grammar at Rome.

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  • 215), a system of grammar much used in his own time and largely drawn upon by later grammarians, contained rules for correct diction, illustrative quotations and treated of barbarisms and solecisms (Juvenal vi.

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  • See C. Marschall, De Remmii Palaemonis libris grammaticis (1887); "Latin Grammar in the First Century" by H.

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  • About the same time he also wrote his Anaq, a poem on grammar, of which only 97 lines out of 400 are preserved.

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  • His Shakespearian Grammar (1870) is a permanent contribution to English philology.

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  • More weighty contributions are the anonymous theological discussion The Kernel and the Husk (1886), Philomythus (1891), his book on Cardinal Newman as an Anglican (1892), and his article "The Gospels" in the ninth edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, embodying a critical view which caused considerable stir in the English theological world; he also wrote St Thomas of Canterbury, his Death and Miracles (1898), Johannine V ocabulary (1905), Johannine Grammar (1906).

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  • Phillips Academy, opened in 1778 (incorporated in 1780), was the first incorporated academy of the state; it was founded through the efforts of Samuel Phillips (1752-1802, president of the Massachusetts senate in 1785-1787 and in 1788-1801, and lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts in 1801-1802), by his father, Samuel Phillips (1715-1790), and his uncle, John Phillips (1719-1795), "for the purpose of instructing youth, not only in English and Latin grammar, writing, arithmetic and those sciences wherein they are commonly taught, but more especially to learn them the great end and real business of living."

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  • He was also author of a once popular Hebrew grammar in two volumes (1862-1863).

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  • There are a grammar school, founded in 1554, and a technical school.

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  • He became usher of a grammar school in Leicestershire; he resided as a.

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  • The name was soon discovered; and Pope, with great kindness, exerted himself to obtain an academical degree and the mastership of a grammar school for the poor young poet.

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  • He borrowed a grammar and other books,.

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  • He was educated at Durham grammar school and at Merton College, Oxford, where he was elected to a postmastership in 1862.

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  • He was sent to New College school in 1641, and at the age of twelve was removed to the free grammar school at Thame, where his studies were interrupted by civil war skirmishes.

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  • The Lady Mary Ramsay grammar school dates from 1594.

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  • grammar, music, painting, sculpture, medicine, geometry, mathematics and optics; c. 2 is on the general principles of architectural design; c. 3 on the considerations which determine a design, such as strength, utility, beauty; c. 4 on the nature of different sorts of ground for sites; c. 5 on walls of fortification; c. 6 on aspects towards the north, south and other points; c. 7 on the proper situations of temples dedicated to the various deities.

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  • Education is provided by a grammar school, a large day school for girls, and technical and art schools.

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  • In 1880 Ludwig Stern (Koptische Grammatik) admirably classified the grammatical forms of Coptic. The much more difficult task of recovering the grammar of Egyptian has occupied thirty years of special study by Adolf Erman and his school at Berlin, and has now reached an advanced stage.

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  • The very archaic pyramid texts enabled him to sketch the grammar of the earliest known form of Egyptian (Zeitschrift d.

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  • Owing to the very imperfect notation of sound in the writing, the highly important subject, of the verbal roots and verbal forms was perhaps the obscurest branch of Egyptian grammar when Sethe first attacked it in 1895.

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  • The Berlin school, having settled the main lines of the grammar, next turned its attention to lexicography.

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  • It is only by the most careful scrutiny, or the exercise of the most piercing insight, that the imperfectly spelled Egyptian has been made to yield up one grammatical secret after another in the light brought to bear upon it from Coptic. Demotic grammar ought soon to be thoroughly comprehensible in its forms, and the study of Late Egyptian should not stand far behind that of demotic. On the other hand, Middle Egyptian, and still mote Old Egyptian, which is separated from Middle Egyptian by a wide gap, will perhaps always be to us little more than consonantal skeletons, the flesh and blood of their vocalization being for the most part irretrievably lost.

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  • It will serve to contrast with Coptic grammar on the one hand and Semitic grammar on the other.

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  • The beginner takes first a course in the grammar of classical Arabic, for he has hitherto learned only to read, write and count.

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  • The rules of grammar are read out in the memorial verses of the Ajrumiya, and the teacher adds an exposition, generally read from a printed commentary.

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  • The grammar school, founded in the reign of John, was incorporated by Edward I.

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  • There is an Elizabethan grammar school.

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  • The grammar school was in existence as early as 1553.

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  • Educational institutions include an Elizabethan grammar school and a blue-coat school; and there is a local museum.

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  • The chief buildings are the Carmelite Priory (ruins dating perhaps from the 13th century); a Bluecoat school (1514); a free grammar school (1527); an orphan girl school (funds left by Thomas Howel to the Drapers' Co., in Henry VII.'s reign); the town hall (built in 1572 by Robert Dudley, earl of Leicester, enlarged and restored in 1780); an unfinished church (begun by Leicester); a market hall (with arcades or "rows," such as those of Chester or Yarmouth); and the old parish church of St Marcella.

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  • For an attempt to treat the whole problem of differential fertility and assortative mating numerically, see Pearson, The Grammar of Science, 2nd edition, London, 1900.

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  • grammar school, occupying modern buildings.

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  • At Lafayette he introduced the first carefully scientific study of English in any American college, and in 1870 published A Comparative Grammar of the AngloSaxon Language, in which its Forms are Illustrated by Those of the Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, Gothic, Old Saxon, Old Friesic, Old Norse and Old High German, and An Anglo-Saxon Reader; he was editor of the "Douglass Series of Christian Greek and Latin Classics," to which he contributed Latin Hymns (1874); he was chairman of the Commission of the State of Pennsylvania on Amended Orthography; and was consulting editor of the Standard Dictionary, and in 1879-1882 was director of the American readers for the Philological Society's (New Oxford) Dictionary.

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  • The principal buildings are the church of St Hilda, with a picturesque old tower; the town hall in the market-place, exchange, customhouse, mercantile marine offices, public library and museum, grammar school, marine school, master-mariners' asylum and seamen's institute.

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  • Other noteworthy buildings are a grammar school, founded by John Bentley in 1660, and the town-hall.

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  • After attending the grammar schools of Melton and Oakham, he entered St John's College, Cambridge, and while still an undergraduate he addressed in February 1712, under the pseudonym of Peter de Quir, a letter to the Spectator displaying no small wit and humour.

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  • After graduating B.A., he became assistant and then headmaster of the grammar school of his native town, uniting to these duties those of assistant curate.

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  • His abundant energy found still further expression in a poem entitled Esther, Queen of Persia (1714), and in the compilation of a grammar of ten languages entitled The Complete Linguist (2 vols., London, 1719-1721).

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  • He had no teacher and no grammar; but Paulus Scriptoris carried him a huge codex of the prophets on his own shoulders all the way from Mainz.

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  • He learned the letters from the transcription of a few verses in the Star of the Messiah of Petrus Niger, and, with a subsequent hint or two from Reuchlin, who also lent him the grammar of Moses Kimhi, made his way through the Bible for himself with the help of Jerome's Latin.

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  • He got on so well that he was not only a useful helper to Reuchlin but anticipated the manuals of the great Hebraist by composing in 1501 the first Hebrew grammar in the European tongue.

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