Grain sentence example

grain
  • Then she used wild and long grain rice instead of stuffing.
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  • He always eats the grain I leave for him.
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  • He sowed grain and baked bread.
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  • In 58 BC, Clodius Pulcher ran on a "free grain for the poor" platform as he tried to become tribune.
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  • Sometimes when you look at a grain of sand in your hand, you forget that there couldn't be a beach without every one of them.
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  • Deposit, especially warehousing of grain, was charged for at one-sixtieth.
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  • She scooped some grain up and fed them too.
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  • Beetroot, molasses and grain are the chief sources of spirit.
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  • There is a large weekly market for grain, and annual horse and cattle fairs.
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  • Comparatively little grain is now produced, whereas under the republic Sardinia was one of the chief granaries of Rome.
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  • Tecuci has a large transit trade in grain, timber, cattle and horses, on their way from northern and eastern Moldavia to the Danubian ports.
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  • Though much land previously devoted to grain culture has been planted with vines, the area under wheat, barley, beans and maize is still considerable.
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  • The imports consist principally of coal, salt, grain and flour, groceries, textiles, wood, and mineral oils.
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  • During the period 1958 to 1961, an initiative called "The Great Leap Forward" was intended to increase the production of grain and other agricultural products.
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  • The chief grain crops are oats, rye and wheat, and the cultivation of potatoes is general.
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  • Schweidnitz is the chief grain market of the district.
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  • A very considerable trade is carried on at Parma in grain, cattle and the dairy produce of the district.
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  • The soil is not very productive, although agriculture flourishes in the valleys and on the level ground; grain has to be imported to meet the demand.
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  • It is one of the principal grain and flour markets in the world.
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  • I am giving you everything, my friends, and I beg you to take everything, all our grain, so that you may not suffer want!
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  • Organizing it like this would be easy, because it would be working with the grain of the encyclopedia itself, and usually, for instance, the county that any British or Irish town is in is listed very early in the article.
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  • The means of subsistence are mainly provided by the cultivation of grain and cattle-rearing.
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  • There is always enough grain within the boundaries of India for the needs of the people; the only difficulty is to transport it to the tract where it is required at a particular moment.
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  • The principal commerce is in fish and grain.
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  • The Grain coast, that part of the Guinea coast extending for Soo m.
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  • Reaching through the slot, she poured the cow some grain.
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  • In April and May the rivers have opened, the snow has disappeared, and the opportunity has been afforded the farmer of sowing his grain.
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  • The territories of the Gran Chaco, however, are covered with a characteristic tropical vegetation, in which the palm predominates, but intermingled south of the Bermejo with heavy growths of algarrobo, quebracho-colorado, urunday (Astronium fraxinifolium), lapacho (Tecoma curialis) and palosanto (Guayacum officinalis), all esteemed for hardness and fineness of grain.
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  • Imports are coal, textiles, salt, grain and flour.
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  • The ant was carrying a grain of wheat as large as itself.
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  • Carmen gave the horses some grain and went to feed and water the chickens.
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  • After she fed the rabbits, she came back to find the horses had finished their grain.
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  • Beetroot for sugar, grain and fruit are also grown.
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  • The valleys afford rich pastures, and the plains produce every species of grain.
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  • There is a trade in beer, cattle and grain, sold at eleven annual fairs, three of which last for ten days each.
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  • The male gametophyte is represented by one or few cells and, except in a few primitive forms where the male cell still retains the motile character as in the Pteridophyta, is carried passively to the macrospore in a development of the pollen grain, the pollen tube.
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  • The ANGIOSFERMS, which are much the larger class, derive their name from the fact that the carpel or carpels form a closed chamber, the ovary, in which the ovules are developedassociated with this is the development of a receptive or stigmatic surface on which the pollen grain is deposited.
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  • Pardubitz has a tolerably active trade in grain and timber, and the horse-fairs attract numerous customers.
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  • The soil, mainly alluvial, is naturally very fertile, and wherever cultivated yields abundant crops, durra being the principal grain grown.
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  • The river is navigable for 770 m.; grain and a variety of goods conveyed from the upper Kama are floated down, while furs, fish and other products of the sea are shipped up the river to be transported to Cherdyn on the Kama.
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  • But a long course of continuous cropping with these grain crops, without affording compensation to the soil in the form of manure or deep cultivation, has so ex.
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  • Many districts are fertile, but some, particularly those in the south-eastern part of the province, do not produce sufficient grain for the requirements of the sparse population.
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  • The principal types to be found in the United Kingdom and on the continent of Europe are open wagons (the lading often protected from the weather by tarpaulin sheets), mineral wagons, covered or box wagons for cotton, grain, &c., sheep and cattle trucks, &c. The principal types of American freight cars are box cars, gondola cars, coal cars, stock cars, tank cars and refrigerator cars, with, as in other countries, various special cars for special purposes.
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  • Besides the use of the straw when cut up and mixed with other food for fodder, the oat grain constitutes an important food for both man and beast.
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  • The oat grain (excepting the naked oat), like that of barley, is closely invested by the husk.
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  • Oatmeal is made from the kiln-dried grain from which the husks have been removed; and the form of the food is the well-known "porridge."
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  • With regard to the nutritive value of oatmeal, as compared with that of wheat flour, it contains a higher percentage of albuminoids than any other grain, viz.
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  • The place has an active trade, especially in grain and in the timber floated down from the Black Forest by the Rhine and the Ysel; the industries include tanning, weaving, and oil and paper manufactures.
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  • Grain is shipped to and from Jersey City in large quantities, and in general the city is an important shipping port; being included, however, in the port of New York, no separate statistics are available.
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  • In this region the sandstone rocks are generally overlaid with heavy black soil formed from the decaying trap, which is principally devoted to the cultivation of the spring crops, wheat and grain, while rice and hill millets are sown in the lighter and more sandy soils.
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  • Broadly speaking, the northern districts of the province produce principally cold weather crops, such as wheat and grain, and the eastern ones principally rice.
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  • The largest grain crops are rye and barley, and nearly 40,000 acres are under vines.
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  • It is the chief entrepot for grain from the basin of the lower Oka, and carries on an active trade with Moscow and Nizhniy-Novgorod.
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  • They also eschewed the luxuries and pursuits of settled life, and lived in tents, refusing to sow grain as well as to plant vineyards.
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  • On either side of the canal are the warehouses of wholesale dealers in cotton, wool, sugar, grain and other commodities.
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  • Manacor has a small trade in grain, fruit, wine, oil and live stock.
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  • About one-sixth of the total area is under cultivation, oats and barley being the chief grain, and potatoes (introduced in 1730) and turnips (1807) the chief green crops.
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  • It is the centre of a thriving agricultural district and has a considerahle trade in wool, grain, cattle and horses with Basutoland, Pondoland and the neighbouring regions of Natal.
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  • The principal products are millet, sesamum and sugar produced from toddy-palms in the riverain districts, which also grow rice, grain, peas and beans.
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  • The year 1884 may be taken as the initial date of the new period, and the grain is now harvested exactly as is wheat in the west-central states.
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  • Previously the grain had ordinarily been cut with sickles and harvested by hand.
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  • Grain and hemp are also cultivated, and live stock extensively reared in the neighbourhood.
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  • A large and remunerative export trade in salt to India is now established, whereas formerly not one grain found its way there; the first steps in this direction were taken in 1892 when works were begun to place the great rock-salt salines of Salif, on the coast of the Red Sea, on a commercial footing.
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  • Tobacco, soap, soda, beer and furniture are manufactured, and there is a considerable trade in timber and grain.
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  • The Zahran district lies four days west of Besha on the crest of the main range: the principal place is Makhwa, a large town and market, from which grain is exported in considerable quantities to Mecca.
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  • It is also the largest market for fresh-water fish in America, and handles large quantities of lumber and grain.
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  • What Cardiff lacks is a corresponding import trade, for its imports in 1906 amounted to only 2,108,133 tons, of which the chief items were iron ore (8 9 5,610 tons), pit-wood (303,407), grain and flour (298,197).
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  • There are also in the city several large grain mills and breweries, a biscuit factory, wire and hemp roperies, fuel works, general foundries and engineering works.
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  • Woollen fabrics are manufactured, and the sugar industry established in 1890 employs several thousand hands; but the majority of the inhabitants are occupied by the trade in grain, fruit, wine and oil.
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  • On the lower plateau, in Transbaikalia, grain is successfully raised in the Nerchinsk region, with serious risks, however, from early frosts in the valleys.
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  • In the Baraba district it is the practice to sow four different grain crops in five to seven years and then to let the land rest ten to twenty-five years.
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  • The southern parts of Tobolsk, nearly all the government of Tomsk (exclusive of the Narym region), southern Yeniseisk and southern Irkutsk, have in an average year a surplus of grain varying from 35 to 40% of the total crop, but in bad years the crop falls short of the actual needs of the population.
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  • There is considerable movement of grain in Siberia itself, the populations of vast portions of the territory, especially of the mining regions, having to rely upon imported corn.
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  • Granite and wood-pulp are exported, and coal and grain imported.
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  • Several flour-mills and other factories have recently sprung up. Much grain is exported; timber is brought from the upper Volga, and manufactured wares from Nizhniy Novgorod.
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  • Fourteen years later, when curule aedile, he distributed large quantities of grain among the citizens at a very low price.
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  • The soil is varied, much of it being good meadow land or well adapted to the growing of grain and fruit.
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  • Imports include coal, grain, flour and wine.
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  • Mulhausen carries on an active trade in grain, wine, colonial produce and timber, which is facilitated by its river harbour.
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  • Marble of very fine quality and grain is extensively quarried and exported for architectural ornamentation and for furniture-making.
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  • It is built by the banks of a tributary of the Vet affluent of the Vaal, and is a trading centre for a large grain and pastoral district.
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  • Flint has important manufacturing interests, its chief manufactures being automobiles, wagons, carriages - Flint is called "the vehicle city," - flour, woollen goods, iron goods, cigars, beer, and bricks and tiles; and its grain trade is of considerable importance.
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  • Slaughter-houses, cattle markets and grain markets have been erected at Gorgie, thus obviating the driving of clocks and herds through the streets, which was constantly objected to.
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  • There is a harbour on the Elbe here, and a brisk trade is carried on in coal, grain and timber.
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  • Pre-Cape Rocks principally the yellow wood (Podocarpus)., sneezewood (Pteroxylon utile), stinkwood (Oreodaphne bullata), black ironwood (Olea laurifolia), white ironwood (Vepris lanceolata), and umtomboti (Exoecaria africana); all are very useful woods, and the yellow wood, sneezewood, stinkwood and ironwood when polished have grain and colour equal to maple, walnut and ebony.
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  • Besides wine, fruit, grain and timber, the surrounding uplands yield petroleum and salt.
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  • Schweinfurt carries on an active trade in the grain, fruit and wine produced in its neighbourhood, and it is the seat of an important sheep and cattle market.
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  • The grain produce, consisting mainly of wheat, oats, rye and Indian corn, exceeds the consumption, and the vineyards yield an abundant supply of both white and red wines, those of Limoux and the Narbonnais being most highly esteemed.
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  • The manufacture of morocco leather goods and the quarrying of the lithographic stone of the vicinity are carried on, and there is trade in cattle, grain, wine, truffles and dressed pork.
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  • Tin which has been thus manipulated and proved incidentally to be very pure is sold as grain tin.
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  • Next comes English grain tin.
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  • Other institutions include a grammar school founded in the middle of the 16th century and provided for by a charter of Edward VI., the Cambridgeshire hospital, a custom-house, a cattle-market, and an important corn-exchange, for Wisbech has a large trade in grain.
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  • The British Pharmacopoeia contains a liquor trinitrini (I %), and tablets made up with chocolate, each containing one-hundredth of a grain.
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  • Temesvar is the most important centre of commerce and industry of south Hungary, and carries on a brisk trade in grain, flour, spirits and horses.
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  • Florence is the centre of a large and fertile agricultural district, and does considerable business in wine, oil and grain, and supplies the neighbouring peasantry with goods of all kinds.
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  • It is of course presupposed that the juice has been properly defecated, because without this no amount of skill and knowledge in cooking in the pan will avail; the sugar resulting must be bad, either in colour or grain, or both, and certainly in polarizing power.
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  • If a very large firm grain like sugar-candy is required the syrup when first brought into the pan must be of low density, say 20° to 21° Beaume, but if a smaller grain be wanted it can easily be obtained from syrup of 27° to 28° Beaume.
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  • The numerous enactments of councils to ensure the proper care of church property, prohibiting the use of churches for secular purposes, for the storing of grain or valuables, for dances and merry-making, do not technically come under the head of legislation against sacrilege.
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  • Considerable trade in wine, fruit, grain and timber is carried on by boats on the Main.
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  • By the peace of Copenhagen in 1441, after the unsuccessful war of the League with Holland, the attempted monopoly of the Baltic was broken, and, though the Hanseatic trade regulations were maintained on paper, the Dutch with their larger ships increased their hold on the herring fisheries, the French salt trade, and the Baltic grain trade.
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  • In 1903 the harbour was entered by 66 vessels of about 25,000 tons, engaged in the exportation of grain, rice and fruit, and the importation of guano.
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  • The province produces much grain and a fine quality of cotton with a very long staple.
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  • The American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) is larger than the former, and is not uncommon in European seaports trading with America, being conveyed in cargoes of grain and other food produce.
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  • The wood is generally reddish-brown, light and of a coarse grain and spongy texture, easy to work, but liable to shrink and warp. Mountain-grown wood is harder, stronger, less liable to warp and more durable.
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  • Ottawa has an important trade in grain and live-stock; soft coal and natural gas are found in the vicinity; the manufactures include flour, windmills, wire-fences, furniture, bricks, brooms and foundry products.
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  • The exports mainly consist of grain, cattle, fish, dairy produce and potatoes; the imports of coal and timber.
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  • It depends on what you hear; hammering and knocking--that's bad; but a sound of shifting grain is good and one sometimes hears that, too.
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  • More than likely the bear had been attracted by the molasses in the grain.
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  • I thought I saw the bear last night so I was checking to see if it got into the grain.
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  • They sprinted across the floor and leaped up to the elevated platforms, poking their soft muzzles into the stanchions to gobble the grain.
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  • Bees carry the spores of Scierotinia as they do the pollen of the bilberries, and flies convey the conidia of ergot from grain to grain.
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  • The separate layers of the starch-grain are deposited on it by the activity of the chrmatophore, and according to Meyer the grain is always surrounded by a thin layer of the chromatophore which completely separates it from the cytoplasm.
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  • The starch grain may thus be regarded as a crystalline structure of the nature of a spherecrystal, as has been suggested by many observers.
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  • Whether the formation of the starch grain is due to a secretion from the plastid (Meyer, 1895) or to a direct transformation of the proteid of the plastid (Timberlake, 1901) has not been definitely established.
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  • The principal exports are grain, livestock and fruit.
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  • The Grand Trunk Railroad Company has here two of the largest grain warehouses on the Atlantic Coast.
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  • This low tract, though producing large quantities of grain, was intensely hot in summer; the high regions, however, were cool and well watered.
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  • Colchicine is the active principle and may be given in full form in doses of to 1 1 8 grain.
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  • The British Pharmacopoeia contains (i) an extract of the fresh corm, having doses of 4 to i grain, and (2) the Vinum Colchici, made by treating the dried corm with sherry and given in doses of 10 to 30 minims. This latter is the preparation still most generally used, though the presence of veratrine both in the corm and the seeds renders the use of colchicine itself theoretically preferable.
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  • The salicylate of colchicine is stable in water and may be given in doses of about one-thirtieth of a grain.
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  • The long hauls in the United States make it specially important that the cars should carry a load in both directions, and so bcx cars which have carried grain or merchandise one way are filled with wool, coal, coke, ore, timber and other coarse articles for the return journey.
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  • In the United States mineral and grain trains, running at perhaps 12 m.
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  • Early-sown grain is often injured by flying sand and gravel.
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  • Gorinchem possesses a good harbour, and besides working in gold and silver, carries on a considerable trade in grain, hemp, cheese, potatoes, cattle and fish, the salmon fishery being noted.
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  • The principal imports are grain and agricultural produce, timber and coal, and the exports cement and fish.
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  • The city is situated in a rich agricultural region, and is a market for grain, neat cattle, horses and swine.
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  • Esna, one of the healthiest towns in Egypt, is noted for its manufactures of pottery and its large grain and live stock markets.
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  • It is a market for live-stock, and for dairy and farm products, and has slaughtering and packing establishments, flour mills, creameries and cheese factories, canning and preserving factories, carriage works, a flax fibre mill and grain elevators.
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  • The produce consists of some grain, cotton, tobacco, &c., but fruit is more abundant.
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  • Other genera of South American ants - A pterostigma and Cyphomyrmex - make similar fungal cultivations, but they use wood, grain or dung as the substratum instead of leaf fragments.
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  • The chief manufactures are silk, confectionery and earthenware; and there is besides a considerable trade in fruit, grain and cattle.
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  • Under such conditions of the soil, the land, nevertheless, produces crops of wheat and other grain from fifteen to forty fold.
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  • The land around Beauly is fertile and the town drives a brisk trade in coal, timber, lime, grain and fish.
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  • It is in a region especially devoted to the growing of cotton and grain and to poultry raising, and an annual county fair is held here.
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  • There are ship-yards for the construction of both steel and wooden vessels, and several grain elevators.
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  • There is a good harbour, and the city has a considerable lake commerce in grain, flour, and dairy products.
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  • Among the higher altitudes of north Derbyshire, where the soil is poor and the climate harsh, grain is unable to flourish, while even in the more sheltered parts of this region the harvest is usually belated.
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  • Winnowing was done by women, who tossed the grain into the air with small wooden boards, the chaff being blown away by the winds.
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  • The latter, when ripe, was pulled up by the roots, and the grain was separated by means of an implement resembling a comb.
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  • The low price of grain, which was imported in huge quantities from Sicily and other Roman provinces, operated to crush the small holder, at the same time as it made arable farming unremunerative.
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  • In this he lays it down as a rule that it is bad husbandry to take two crops of grain successively, which marks a considerable progress in the knowledge of modern husbandry; though he adds that in Scotland the best husbandmen after a fallow take a crop of wheat; after the wheat, peas; then barley, and then oats; and after that they fallow again.
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  • Green crops, such as turnips, clover and rye grass, began to be alternated with grain crops, whence the name alternate husbandry.
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  • In 1795, under the joint operation of a deficient harvest and the diminution in foreign supplies of grain owing to outbreak of war, the price of wheat, which, for the twenty preceding years, had been under 50s.
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  • Much of the grain was never harvested, whilst owing mainly to the excessive floods there commenced an outbreak of liver-rot in sheep, due to the ravages of the fluke parasite.
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  • Between these two occurrences came the disastrous decline in the value of grain in the autumn of 1894, when the weekly average price of English wheat fell to the record minimum of 17s.
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  • Wheat was so great a glut in the market that various methods were devised for feeding it to stock, a purpose for which it is not specially suited; in thus utilizing the grain, however, a smaller loss was often incurred than in sending it to market.
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  • The import of the manufactured product from 1875 to 1900 increased at a much greater ratio than that of the raw grain, for whilst in 1875 the former represented less than one-ninth of the total, by 1900 the proportion had risen to nearly one-fourth.
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  • In the five subsequent years the proportion was fundamentally altered, so that with a greatly increased importation of grain, that of meal and flour was in the proportion of about one-ninth.
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  • The acreage of rye grown in the United Kingdom as a grain crop is small, the respective maximum and minimum areas during the period 1875-1905 having been 102,676 acres in 1894 and 47,937 acres in 1880.
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  • Although barley is appropriately grown on lighter soils than wheat, good crops, of fair quality, may be grown on the heavier soils after another grain crop by the aid of artificial manures, provided that the land is sufficiently clean.
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  • The fact that the growth of a leguminous crop, such as red clover, leaves the soil in a higher condition for the subsequent growth of a grain crop - that, indeed, the growth of such a leguminous crop is to a great extent equivalent to the application of a nitrogenous manure for the cereal crop - was in effect known ages ago.
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  • Whatever the specific rotation, there may in practice be deviations from the plan of retaining on the farm the whole of the root-crops, the straw of the grain crops and the leguminous fodder crops (clover, vetches, sainfoin, &c.) for the production of meat or milk, and, coincidently, for that of manure to be returned to the land.
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  • Such deviations from the practice of merely selling grain and meat off the farm have much extended in recent years, and will probably continue to do so under the altered conditions of British agriculture, determined by very large imports of grain, increasing imports of meat and of other products of stock-feeding, and very large imports of cattle-food and other agricultural produce.
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  • Of phosphoric acid, the cereal crops take up as much as, or more than, any other crops of the rotation, excepting clover; and the greater portion thus taken up is lost to the farm in the saleable product - the grain.
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  • In the most prevalent variety of the Norway spruce the wood is white, apt to be very knotty when the tree has grown in an open place, but, as produced in the close northern forests, often of fine and even grain.
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  • The small twigs, tied in bundles, are boiled for some time in water with broken biscuit or roasted grain; the resulting decoction is then poured into a cask with molasses or maple sugar and a little yeast, and left to ferment.
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  • The timber is very much twisted in grain, and liable to warp and split, but is used for making plasterers' laths and for fencing; "shingles" for roofing are sometimes made of it.
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  • It forms extensive forests in Vancouver Island, British Columbia and Oregon, whence the timber is exported, being highly prized for its strength, durability and even grain, though very heavy; it is of a deep yellow colour, abounding in resin, which oozes from the thick bark.
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  • This enactment applies to leases of agricultural subjects, houses, mills, fisheries and whatever is fundo annexum; provided that (a) the lease, when for more than one year, must be in writing, (b) it must be definite as to subject, rent (which may consist of money, grain or services, if the reddendum is not illusory) and term of duration, (c) possession must follow on the lease.
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  • Where the rent is in grain, or otherwise payable in produce, it is to be satisfied from the produce of the farm, if there be any.
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  • If there be none the tenant is bound and entitled to deliver fair marketable grain of the same kind."
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  • Under Elizabeth Margate was still an obscure fishing village employing about 20 small vessels ("boys") in the coasting and river trades, chiefly in the conveyance of grain, on which in 1791 it chiefly subsisted.
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  • Steamers ascend this river as far as Bilyutai, near the Mongolian frontier, and bring back tea, imported via Kiakhta, while grain, cedar nuts, salt, soda, wool and timber are shipped on rafts down the Khilok, Chikoi and Uda (tributaries of the Selenga), and manufactured goods are taken up the river for export to China.
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  • In 78 he was consul with Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, who after the death of Sulla proposed the overthrow of his constitution, the re-establishment of the distribution of grain, the recall of the banished, and other democratic measures.
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  • In other parts fine crops of millet and various kinds of grain are grown, and on it trees flourish abundantly.
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  • The town carries on trade in grain, and has flour mills.
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  • In planting rice three methods are in use: the cultivation of swamp-rice in irrigated fields; the planting of ploughed areas; and the planting of hill-rice by sowing each grain separately in holes bored for the purpose.
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  • Reaping is usually performed by the aid of a curious little knife which severs each ear of grain separately.
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  • It is a large railway centre, and the number and size of the grain elevators are noticeable.
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  • Holland is a grain and fruit shipping centre, and among its manufactures are furniture, leather, grist mill products, iron, beer, pickles, shoes, beet sugar, gelatine, biscuit (Holland rusk), electric and steam launches, and pianos.
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  • The principal imports are coal, grain, manufactured articles and articles of luxury.
    0
    0
  • Cedar Rapids has also a large grain trade and a large jobbing business, especially in dry goods, millinery, groceries, paper and drugs.
    0
    0
  • Buckman succeeded in raising "the potato-oat type" and "the white Tatarian oat" from grain of this species.
    0
    0
  • The grain is very small and worthless it the one, but larger and full in the other.
    0
    0
  • Central Europe appears to be the locality where it was cultivated, earliest, at least in Europe, for grains have been found among 1 Rarer Kinds of Grain, ii.
    0
    0
  • The chief method employed for their destruction is spraying the swarms with arsenic. The districts with the greatest area under cultivation are Heidelberg, Witwatersrand, Pretoria, Standerton and Krugersdorp. The chief crops grown for grain are wheat, maize (mealie) and kaffir corn, but the harvest is inadequate to meet local demands.
    0
    0
  • One grain of saffron rubbed to powder with sugar and a little water imparts a distinctly yellow tint to ten gallons of water.
    0
    0
  • The chief imports are coal, timber and iron, and the exports grain and other agricultural products and salt.
    0
    0
  • Local prosperity was greatly enhanced during the period 18 751905 by the improvement of communications, which enabled the grain, fruit and wine of the Guadiana valley, on the north, and of the upland known as the Tierra de Barros, on the south, to be readily exported by the Merida-Seville railway.
    0
    0
  • There is considerable traffic in grain and cattle brought from the surrounding districts; and twice a year there are large horse fairs.
    0
    0
  • It is a rich and well-watered country, producing abundance of grain and hops, and yielding excellent pasture for cattle.
    0
    0
  • The carving is done in teak wood when it is meant for fixtures, but teak has a coarse grain, and otherwise yamane dogwood, said to be a species of gmelina, is preferred.
    0
    0
  • The district is agricultural and pastoral, and wool and grain are exported, as well as meat and dairy produce, for which there are large refrigerating works.
    0
    0
  • The materials ordinarily employed are the following: sand, of good quality, uniform in grain and free from any notable quantity of iron oxide; carbonate of lime, generally in the form of a pure variety of powdered limestone; and sulphate of soda.
    0
    0
  • Its trade in grain and its cattle-markets are likewise important.
    0
    0
  • Large quantities of grain are shipped in lighters to Braila.
    0
    0
  • It lies in a rich grain district, and 3 m.
    0
    0
  • It has a large trade in wool, flax and grain, its markets for these commodities being very numerously attended.
    0
    0
  • Grain, vegetables and lumber are shipped along the coast.
    0
    0
  • Gis-ukh was made tributary, a certain amount of grain being levied upon each person in it, which had to be paid into the treasury of the goddess Nina and the god Ingurisa.
    0
    0
  • The principal exports are grain, eggs, cattle, linen cloth and flax, and the imports include timber, groceries and coal.
    0
    0
  • The city is situated in a rich farming region; is an important shipping point for livestock, grain and other farm products; and is especially known as a centre for the manufacture of wire-fences.
    0
    0
  • It is now, however, the chief emporium of the Rhenish wine traffic, and also carries on an extensive transit trade in grain, timber, flour, petroleum, paper and vegetables.
    0
    0
  • Its principal imports are cotton and woollen goods, yarn, metals, sugar, coffee, tea, spices, cashmere shawls, &c., and its principal exports opium, wool, carpets, horses, grain, dyes and gums, tobacco, rosewater, &c. The importance of Bushire has much increased since about 1862.
    0
    0
  • He happened to send his eldest son, John, to Liverpool to sell a cargo of grain there, and the energy and aptitude of the young man attracted the favourable notice of a leading corn-merchant of Liverpool, who recommended him to settle in that city.
    0
    0
  • A large trade is carried on in grain, flour, alcohol, cattle and wood.
    0
    0
  • Its industries include tanning and leather-currying, and there is trade in grain.
    0
    0
  • The wood used is generally that of the cherry-tree, sakura, which has a grain of peculiar evenness and hardness.
    0
    0
  • It is worked plankwise to a surface parallel with the grain, and not across it.
    0
    0
  • It has manufactures and a considerable trade, especially in grain.
    0
    0
  • The principal crops are oats and potatoes, but all grain crops are decreasing, and flax, formerly grown to a considerable extent, is now practically neglected.
    0
    0
  • The dock is specially designed and equipped for dealing with the coal, timber, grain and wool trades.
    0
    0
  • Albert Lea is a railway and manufacturing centre of considerable importance, has grain elevators and foundries and machine shops, and manufactures bricks, tiles, carriages, wagons, flour, corsets, refrigerators and woollen goods.
    0
    0
  • Granite is quarried in the neighbourhood and there is an extensive trade in grain.
    0
    0
  • A grain of sand is brought; out of it he makes an island (America?).
    0
    0
  • Grain of all kinds (chiefly rye), clover and potatoes are grown.
    0
    0
  • The dock is provided with railways and machinery for facilitating traffic, including a large grain elevator.
    0
    0
  • It is also extremely ductile; a single grain may be drawn into a wire 500 ft.
    0
    0
  • The other cereal crops consist of mandua (a grass-like plant producing a coarse grain resembling rice), wheat, barley, and china, a rice-like cereal.
    0
    0
  • There is some coast trade in grain, &c., and sea-fishery is prosecuted.
    0
    0
  • The district is famed for its stock, and the fine quality of its grain; also for the character of the English grasses laid down there, which flourish in a rich black loam on a limestone formation.
    0
    0
  • There is also a government opium depot for the payment of duty, the town being a considerable centre for the trade in opium as well as in grain.
    0
    0
  • In spite of the difficulties of communication with the interior, and the malarial marshes which surround the town, it has become important for the export of grain (chiefly maize).
    0
    0
  • The wheat and barley have a full round grain, and the climate is well adapted to the production of both European and Asiatic vegetables.
    0
    0
  • Estimates made at the arrival of the knights (1530) varied from 15,000 to 25,000: it was then necessary to import annually io,000 quarters of grain from Sicily.
    0
    0
  • In 1582, 20,000 quarters of imported grain were required to avert famine.
    0
    0
  • The grain crops are maize, wheat and barley; the two latter are frequently sown together.
    0
    0
  • The point is of no very great significance, however, since no one has pretended that the Western civilization compared with the Eastern in point of antiquity; and in any event, no amount of negative evidence weighs a grain in the balance against the positive evidence of the Cretan inscriptions.
    0
    0
  • Apparently this mound had been occupied largely by store houses, in which were stored not only grain, figs, &c., but also vessels, weapons, sculptures and every possible object connected with the use and administration of palace and temple.
    0
    0
  • There is an active export trade in grain.
    0
    0
  • Grain and fruit are grown in large quantities, and much coal is mined in the vicinity of Kirksville.
    0
    0
  • The town has trade in grain, iron, mined in the vicinity, and leather.
    0
    0
  • In imperial times we hear little of it, though its grain and grapes were famous.
    0
    0
  • It has manufactures of silk, cotton and hosiery and is a market for cheese and grain.
    0
    0
  • The leaders, one of whom was Captain David P. de Vries, wished " to plant a colony for the cultivation of grain and tobacco as well as to carry on the whale fishery in that region."
    0
    0
  • According to the words just quoted from the Apocalypse, there was to be a dearth of grain and a superfluity of wine; the price of the wheat was to be seven times the ordinary, according to Reinach's computation, and that of the barley four times.
    0
    0
  • Grain, wine, oil and fruit are produced in the district, and there is a municipal farm, founded in 1885, for experiments in viticulture.
    0
    0
  • Malaguti and Durocher 1 estimate the silver in sea-water as i part in ioo,000,000 or i grain in 1430 gallons.
    0
    0
  • Sonnstadt 2 detected gold by means of a colour test and roughly estimated the amount as i grain per ton of sea-water, and on this estimate all the projects for extracting gold from sea-water have been based.
    0
    0
  • Boat-building is also prosecuted, and a brisk transit trade is carried on in salt, grain and timber.
    0
    0
  • The industries of Arnstadt include iron and other metal founding, the manufacture of leather, cloth, tobacco, weighing-machines, paper, playing-cards, chairs, gloves, shoes, iron safes, and beer, and market-gardening and trade in grain and wood are carried on.
    0
    0
  • The manufacture of machinery, amber articles, tobacco and cigars, and bricks, with some iron-founding, linen-weaving, and salmon-fishing in the Stolpe, are the chief industrial occupations of the inhabitants, who also carry on trade in grain, cattle, spirits, timber, fish and geese.
    0
    0
  • Among the principal imports are cocoa, coffee, grain (including Indian corn), fruit, provisions (including butter, eggs and potatoes from France and the Channel Islands), wines and spirits, sugar, wool, and other foreign and colonial produce.
    0
    0
  • The old tithe on grain shall continue to be paid, since that is established by the Old Testament.
    0
    0
  • The chief manufactures of the town are linen goods, soap, malt, and agricultural implements, and a brisk trade is carried on in cattle, grain and geese.
    0
    0
  • The value of farms on which dairying was the chief source of income in 1900 was 46% of the total farm value of the state; the corresponding percentages for livestock, vegetables, hay and grain, flowers and plants, fruit and tobacco, being respectively 14.6, 10 2, 8 o, 4.2, 3.2, and 1 8%.
    0
    0
  • They describe it 2 as " a compact, massive rock, somewhat above medium grain, and of light colour.
    0
    0
  • The first grain elevator built in Boston, and one of the first in the world, was erected in 1843, when Massachusetts sent Indian corn to Ireland.
    0
    0
  • Trade, which is largely water-borne, is in grain and agricultural products, coal and building material.
    0
    0
  • There is a considerable trade in grain; but the commercial prosperity of Karshi is mainly due to its being a meeting-point for the roads from Samarkand, Bokhara, Hissar, Balkh and Maimana, and serves as the market where the Turkomans and Uzbegs dispose of their carpets, knives and firearms. Its coppersmiths turn out excellent work.
    0
    0
  • There is a considerable trade in cattle, grain and other agricultural produce, and in timber and spirits.
    0
    0
  • They carried coal, wood and grain, also iron-ore, Stinnes having begun to manufacture iron and steel.
    0
    0
  • Tilsit carries on trade in timber, grain, hemp, flax, herrings and coal; but its trade with Russia, at one time considerable, has fallen off since the construction of the railway from Konigsberg to Kovno.
    0
    0
  • In the sovereign it is 0.2 grain or about 1.62 per moo.
    0
    0
  • The balance turns to o oi grain.
    0
    0
  • Several types of horse-drawn hoe capable of working one or more rows at a time are used among root and grain crops.
    0
    0
  • In the lever-hoe, which is largely used in grain crops, the blades may be raised and lowered by means FIG.
    0
    0
  • Livonia carries on a large export trade, especially through Riga and Pernau, in petroleum, wool, oilcake, flax, linseed, hemp, grain, timber and wooden wares; the Dvina is the chief channel for this trade.
    0
    0
  • Each colonist not only paid him a fixed rent, usually in kind, but had to share with him the increase of the stock and to have the grain ground at his mill.
    0
    0
  • All the flowers of each triplet of spikelets on both sides of the rachis are fertile and produce ripe fruits; hence the ear produces six longitudinal rows of grain.
    0
    0
  • The ears are short, erect, and the grain thin and coarse; the straw is also short.
    0
    0
  • It is a hardy race, but owing to the poor quality of the grain is rarely met with in Great Britain.
    0
    0
  • In both the fruits fall out freely from the glume, and in the latter the awns are three-pronged and shorter than the grain.
    0
    0
  • When the attrition is carried further, so that the grain is reduced to small round pellets, it is termed " pearl barley."
    0
    0
  • The city has a large commerce,and trade by water and rail in coal and grain, which are produced in the vicinity, is of special importance.
    0
    0
  • Cotton, grain and rice are produced in the vicinity, and there are some manufactories, including cotton mills, a cotton-seed oil mill and planing mills.
    0
    0
  • Schiedam is famous as the seat of a great gin manufacture, which, carried on in more than three hundred distilleries, gives employment besides to malt-factories, cooperages and cork-cutting establishments, and supplies grain refuse enough to feed about 30,000 pigs, as well as sufficient yeast to form an important article of export.
    0
    0
  • The energy of this fork with a given amplitude of vibration could be calculated from its dimensions and elasticity, and the amplitude was observed by measuring with a microscope the line into which the image of a starch grain on the prong was drawn by the vibration.
    0
    0
  • Its industries include important hosiery manufactures, and it carries on trade in grain and coal.
    0
    0
  • But in 1834 a law was passed providing for the union of the scattered lands belonging to each proprietor, and that may be considered the dawn of modern Saxon agriculture., The richest grain districts are near Meissen, Grimma, Bautzen,.
    0
    0
  • A considerable trade is carried on in hops, which are extensively cultivated in the neighbourhood, and in cattle, wool, leather and grain.
    0
    0
  • It possesses manufactures of cloth, table-linen and earthenware, and has an active trade in wine, linen, cattle and grain.
    0
    0
  • In the 14th century it was imported into Europe from the Grain Coast, under the name of pepper, by merchants of Rouen and Lippe.
    0
    0
  • Early in 1915 an institution was established for regulating the traffic in grain during the war (Kriegsgetreide-Verhehrs-Anstalt); it had been preceded by a central maize board, established to control the distribution of the maize contributed by Hungary.
    0
    0
  • This institution, in the conduct of which officials and experts appointed by the Government took part, had complete control of all grain, flour, mills and bakeries.
    0
    0
  • This system of State control prevented industries which used grain as their raw material from buying in an open market, and in their case too it was found necessary to regulate supplies by means of an organization analogous to that of the economic associations already mentioned.
    0
    0
  • Milwaukee is an important grain slipping port - in 1908 it shipped 28,618,519 bushels of grain and 3,752,033 barrels of flour, and its 25 elevators have a capacity of over 12,500,000 bushels.
    0
    0
  • Market-gardening is also extensively carried on, and there is a large river traffic in grain and agricultural produce.
    0
    0
  • Sheerness lies at the mouth of the Medway, a narrow branch of which cuts off a tongue of land termed the Isle of Grain lying opposite Sheerness.
    0
    0
  • Some have given up all grain and pulse foods, and have declared that old age can be best resisted by living entirely upon fruits, salads, nuts, soft water and milk products.
    0
    0
  • On the ground that the assimilable nutriment from a given weight of selected fruit and grain and nut and vegetable foods will cost less than the same nutriment obtained from flesh foods.
    0
    0
  • Hay and grain formed the principal source of income of 88.4% of the farms, live-stock of 6.7% and dairy produce of 2.6%.
    0
    0
  • They have also adopted the policy of selecting favourable town-sites on the uninhabited prairie, erecting grain elevators at such points, and furnishing transportation facilities by means of branch roads tapping the main lines of travel.
    0
    0
  • The tang is used for measuring rice and the sat for paddi and other grain.
    0
    0
  • Imports, principally timber, grain, cotton and linseed, increased owing to these improvements from L116,179 in 1881 to £816,698 in 1899; and exports (coal, machinery and manufactured goods) from £83,000 in 1883 to £261,873 in 1899.
    0
    0
  • The trade is very active and increasing, Kishinev being a centre for the Bessarabian trade in grain, wine, tobacco, tallow, wool and skins, exported to Austria and to Odessa.
    0
    0
  • The chief trade is grain.
    0
    0
  • The district is fertile and produces much grain and some opium.
    0
    0
  • The first systematic Corn Laws imposing duties on grain had been passed in 1 773.
    0
    0
  • From 1861 onwards a series of measures were passed, all designed to maintain the high price of grain.
    0
    0
  • In 1828 the sliding scale was introduced, under which the duty went up and down as the price of grain went down and up; and it was against this form of the Corn Law that the great agitation led by Cobden and Bright was directed after 1830.
    0
    0
  • In view of the bad harvest of 1845-46, and the famine in Ireland in 1846, Peel surrendered, and proposed in 1846 the admission of Laws re- grain with only a fixed duty of is.
    0
    0
  • The four acts of 1842, 1846, 1853, 1860 - the first two In under Peel's leadership, the second two under Gladstone's guidance - thus carried out gradually the policy of free trade in regard to other articles than grain.
    0
    0
  • Such was the case not only with some metals, such as lead, zinc, copper, but still more strikingly with textile materials such as wool, flax, and the like, and most of all with agricultural products such as grain, meat and meat products, timber.
    0
    0
  • These new treaty arrangements expired in 1892: even before that date, duties had been raised on grain and meats; and finally, in 1892, a new and more highly protective general tariff was established on Tariff of 1892..
    0
    0
  • As a rule the minimum tariff has been applied, after negotiation, and thus is the tariff in practical effect; yet its rates are still high, and, most significant of all, agricultural products are granted no reductions whatever as compared with the maximum tariff, there being heavy and unrelaxed duties upon grain, animals, meats and the like.
    0
    0
  • Other advances of tion rein- duty were made in later years, especially on grain; stated, and thus the policy of Germany has become dis 1879.
    0
    0
  • In 205 B.C. it contributed grain and timber for the needs of Scipio's fleet.
    0
    0
  • It carries on a large trade in cattle, horses and grain, and has two annual fairs, held at Whitsuntide and in June.
    0
    0
  • It is in the Illinois coal region, and coal-mining is the most important industry; the city is also a shipping point for hay and grain grown in the vicinity.
    0
    0
  • Iannina had previously been one of the chief centres of the Thessalian grain trade; it now exports little except cheese, hides, bitumen and sheepskins to the annual value of about £120,000; the imports, which supply only the local demand for provisions, textile goods, hardware, &c., are worth about double that sum.
    0
    0
  • Fruit, grain, wine and oil are produced in the islands, and there is an active trade with Barcelona in fresh fish, including large quantities of lobsters.
    0
    0
  • Its chief industries are the manufacture of watch springs, gloves, lace, beer and machinery, and it has a trade in grain.
    0
    0
  • There are manufactures of cloth, machinery and tobacco, and an active trade in grain and horses.
    0
    0
  • The pollen grain bears numerous spines, the dark spots indicate thin places in the outer wall.
    0
    0
  • The experimental determination of the time of burning under the influence of the varying pressure and density, and the size of the grain, is thus of great practical importance, as thereby it is possible to estimate close limits to the maximum pressure that will be reached in the bore of a gun, and to design the chamber so that the G.D.
    0
    0
  • The trade is chiefly in timber, grain, wine, tobacco, fruit and other products of the neighbourhood.
    0
    0
  • During the winter these animals retire to their burrows, sleeping the greater part of the time, but awakening about February or March, when they feed on the garnered grain.
    0
    0
  • Although feeding chiefly on roots, fruits and grain, it is also to some extent carnivorous, attacking and eating small quadrupeds, lizards and birds.
    0
    0
  • Palma has a thriving trade in grain, wine, oil, almonds, fruit, vegetables, silk, foodstuffs and livestock.
    0
    0
  • Sissek has a considerable trade in grain and timber.
    0
    0
  • A force of 3800 British troops traversed their country, destroying their villages and grain, &c.
    0
    0
  • The district, which has a length of 50 and a breadth of 16 m., and contains about 40 villages, produces much grain.
    0
    0
  • Thus foot, digit, palm, cubit, stadium, mile, talent, mina, stater, drachm, obol, pound, ounce, grain, metretes, medimrius, modius, hin and many others mean nothing exact unless qualified by the name of their country or city.
    0
    0
  • All quantities stated in this article without distinguishing names are in British units of inch, cubic inch or grain.
    0
    0
  • The first grain grown in the colony was harvested at Parramatta, then called Rosehill.
    0
    0
  • It is the chief depot for grain raised in the Gezira, has oil and soap works, and is a thriving commercial centre, being on the main trade route between Khartum and Abyssinia.
    0
    0
  • The larger nuclear body, which corresponds to the trophonucleus of a Trypanosome, is usually round or oval; the smaller one, representing a kinetonucleus, has the form either of a little rod or of a round grain, and is generally separate from the larger nucleus.
    0
    0
  • The crops include grain of all kinds (not sufficient, however, for the needs of the province), peas and beans, buckwheat, potatoes, fruit and hemp. The cultivation of flax is very extensive, especially in the N.E.
    0
    0
  • It is a shipping and transfer point and has paper mills, machine shops, flour mills, sash, door and blind factories, a launch and pleasure-boat factory, and knitting works, cheese factories and dairies, brick yards and grain elevators.
    0
    0
  • Trade is in wool, iron, grain, sheep, lithographic stone and leather.
    0
    0
  • Bismarck is the headquarters for navigation of the upper Missouri river, is situated in a good agricultural region, and has a large wholesale trade, shipping grain, hides, furs, wool and coal.
    0
    0
  • In De fundamentis astrologiae certioribus (Prague, 1602) he declared his purpose of preserving and purifying the grain of truth which he believed the science to contain.
    0
    0
  • It has a small river-port, and carries on trade in wine, brandy, grain, fruit and timber.
    0
    0
  • From the great size of the trunk and the even grain of the red cedar-like wood it is a valuable tree to the farmer and carpenter: it splits readily and evenly, and planes and polishes well; cut radially, the medullary plates give the wood a fine satiny lustre; it is strong and durable, but not so elastic as many of the western pines and firs.
    0
    0
  • Manufacture of woollens, cottons, Russia leather and embroidery is carried on, and there is trade in cattle, wine, tobacco, hemp, hides and grain.
    0
    0
  • An extensive trade is carried on in peltry, silk goods, iron and wooden wares, salt fish, grain, cattle and horses.
    0
    0
  • Picumnus, a rustic deity (like Picus) and husband of Pomona, is specially concerned with the manuring of the soil and hence called Sterquilinus, while Pilumnus is the inventor of the pounding of grain, so named from the pestle (pi/um) used by bakers.
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    0
  • One smote the threshold with an axe, another with a pestle, the third swept it with a broom - three symbols of culture (for trees were hewn down with the axe, grain pounded with the pestle, and the fruits of the field swept up with the broom) which Silvanus could not endure.
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    0
  • In the sequel Irenaeus recites the Invocation read by Marcus before the communicants: " Grace that is before all things, that passeth understanding and words, replenish thy inner man, and make to abound in thee the knowledge of her, sowing in the good soil the grain of mustard seed."
    0
    0
  • It is by no means the most powerful poison known, for such an alkaloid as pseud-aconitine, which is lethal in dose of about 1/200 of a grain, is some hundreds of times more toxic, but prussic acid is by far the most rapid poison known, a single inhalation of it producing absolutely instantaneous death.
    0
    0
  • One-fiftieth of a grain must be immediately injected subcutaneously.
    0
    0
  • Fruits, grain and medicinal plants are obtained in great abundance, especially where the soil is largely of volcanic origin, as in the Altos and Sierra Madre.
    0
    0
  • Grain, sweet potatoes and beans are grown for home consumption.
    0
    0
  • Although of reduced strength in the summer, they still suffice to dominate weather changes; it is during the approach of a low pressure centre that hot southerly winds prevail; they sometimes reach so high a temperature as to wither and blight the grain crops; and it is almost exclusively in connection with the cloudy areas near and south-east of these cyclonic centres that violent thunderstorms, with their occasional destructive whirling tornadoes, are formed.
    0
    0
  • Coal, iron ore, building materials, lumber, livestock, cotton, fruits, vegetables, tobacco and grain are the great items in the domestic commerce of the country, upon its railways, inland waterways, and in the coasting trade.
    0
    0
  • The commerce on the lakes is largely in grain, coal, iron and lumber.
    0
    0
  • The principal articles of import in 1919-20 were: cotton piece-goods and yarn £ 2,180,000, hides and skins £1,291,000, coal £626,000, grain and flour £541,000, coffee, sugar, tobacco, hardware, petroleum and provisions.
    0
    0
  • The exports were: hides and skins £2,123,000, cotton goods £2,112,000, coffee £456,000, grain and pulse £329,000, tobacco £213,000 and salt £151,000.
    0
    0
  • In spring the chaffinch is destructive to early flowers, and to young radishes and turnips just as they appear above the surface; in summer, however, it feeds principally on insects and their larvae, while in autumn and winter its food consists of grain and other seeds.
    0
    0
  • The industries include shoe-making and watch-making, and there is some trade in grain and timber.
    0
    0
  • There is considerable local trade with the rich farming country of the Platte and Elkhorn valleys; and the wholesale grain interests are especially important.
    0
    0
  • Of the nine provinces of Canada only two have no coast line on salt water, the western prairie provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan; but Manitoba and Ontario have a seaboard only on Hudson Bay and its southern extension James Bay respectively, and there is no probability that the shallow harbours of the latter bay will ever be of much importance for shipping, though Churchill Harbour on the west side of Hudson Bay may become an important grain port.
    0
    0
  • Northwards chinooks become less frequent and the winter's cold increases, but the coming of spring is not much later, and the summer temperatures, with sunshine for twenty hours out of twenty-four in June, are almost the same as for hundreds of miles to the south, so that most kinds of grain and vegetables ripen far to the north in the Peace river valley.
    0
    0
  • So great, however, is the desire to shorten the time and distance necessary for the transportation of grain from Lake Superior to Montreal that an increasing quantity is taken by water as far as the Lake Huron and Georgian Bay ports, and thence by rail to Montreal.
    0
    0
  • Summer fallowing is, however, subject to one drawback: the strong growth which it induces is apt to retard the ripening of the grain.
    0
    0
  • As a rule the weather during the harvesting period permits the grain to be gathered safely without damage from sprouting.
    0
    0
  • Occasionally in certain localities in the north-west the grain is liable to injury from frost in late summer; but as the proportion of land under cultivation increases the climate becomes modified and the danger from frost is appreciably less.
    0
    0
  • The loss from this cause is also less than formerly, because any grain unfit for export is now readily purchased for the feeding of animals in Ontario and other parts of eastern Canada.
    0
    0
  • Suitable machinery for cleaning the grain is everywhere in general use, so that weed seeds are removed before the wheat is ground.
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  • The property of the Macdonald College at Ste Anne de Bellevue comprises 561 acres, of which 74 acres are devoted to campus and field-research plots, ioo acres to a petite culture farm and 387 acres to a live-stock and grain farm.
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  • The complexity of the conditions of life in the 20th century may be well illustrated from the grain trade of the world.
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  • It may be stated roundly that an average quartern loaf in Great Britain is made from wheat grown in the following countries in the proportions named: - For details connected with grain and its handling see Agriculture, Corn Laws, Granaries, Flour, Baking, Wheat, &C. Wheat occupies of all cereals the widest region of any foodstuff.
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  • Nevertheless it is the deficient quantity of the wheat raised in the British Islands, and not the quality of the grain, which has been the cause of so much anxiety to economists and statesmen.
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  • Coming to the rates on grain, we find (in Table 23) a record for the forty years 1858-1897 of the charge on wheat from Chicago to New York, via all rail from 1858, and via lake and rail since 1868, the authority being the secretary of the Chicago Board of Trade.
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  • This latter mode is the cheapest by which grain can be carried to the eastern seaboard from the American prairies, and it can now be done at a cost of 7s.
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  • So much improved is the position of the farmer in North America compared with what it was about 1870, that the transport companies in 1901 carried 174 bushels of his grain to the seaboard in exchange for the value of one bushel, whereas in 1867 he had to give up one bushel in every six in return for the service.
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  • The subject of the rates of ocean carriage at different periods requires consideration if a proper understanding of the working of the foreign grain trade is to be obtained.
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  • Practically the only grain crops that are cultivated are oats (which greatly predominate) and barley, while the favoured root crops are turnips (much the most extensively grown) and potatoes.
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  • It has post and telegraph offices, and a population of about 7000, mostly Kurds of the Mukri tribe, and exports dried fruit, grain and tobacco.
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  • The wood of large trees is compact in texture, in the best varieties of a deep reddish colour varying to brownish-yellow, but apt to be lighter in tint, and less hard in grain, when grown in rich soils or in low sheltered situations.
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  • The chief local industries are tanning and the manufacture of petroleum drums. The opening, in 1895, of the railway to Bucharest, which crosses the Danube by a bridge at Cerna Voda, brought Constantza a considerable transit trade in grain and petroleum, which are largely exported; coal and coke head the list of imports, followed by machinery, iron goods, and cotton and woollen fabrics.
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  • The imports consist principally of machinery, coal, grain, dried fish, tobacco and hides, and the exports of hemp, hides, olive oil, soap, coral, candied fruit, wine, straw hats, boracic acid, mercury, and marble and alabaster.
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  • In the market square a considerable trade in grain, flax and provisions is prosecuted.
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