How to use Government in a sentence

government
  • We have no control over what the government does.

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  • Government is a great achievement of civilization.

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  • He must keep order, keep the law, that's what the government is there for.

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  • It was a government business agency.

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  • It is unprecedented for so many nations to change their form of government so quickly and peacefully.

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  • Not only are we eliminating historically warlike forms of government, we are replacing them with peaceful ones, namely democracy.

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  • It is part of government's commitment to support families.

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  • People can come together and choose a form of government suitable to them.

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  • Why were bundles of useless papers from the government offices, and Leppich's balloon and other articles removed?

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  • Chance forms the characters of the rulers of France, who submit to him; chance forms the character of Paul I of Russia who recognizes his government; chance contrives a plot against him which not only fails to harm him but confirms his power.

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  • Government is the servant of the people, not the master.

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  • His words are wisdom to those legislators who contemplate no essential reform in the existing government; but for thinkers, and those who legislate for all time, he never once glances at the subject.

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  • She rubbed her face and considered ignoring her instinct, wanting to give the high-level government members the benefit of the doubt.

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  • It was government's proposal to introduce a formalized resettlement program.

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  • There will be no peace talks between the PMF and the government now.

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  • Others say poor nations need to develop free markets in agriculture and strongly discourage government intervention.

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  • If this happens, the government becomes an agent that works against the very ideals it purports to protect.

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  • The government of the world I live in was not framed, like that of Britain, in after-dinner conversations over the wine.

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  • Guard dogs trotted forward to sniff him and his men while a doctor in a blue government jumpsuit approached them, eyes pinned to the injured man carried between two others.

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  • It had been addressed to the Peace Command Center—the site where peace had been declared and the new government created after the East-West Civil War—in Colorado.

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  • The government itself, which is only the mode which the people have chosen to execute their will, is equally liable to be abused and perverted before the people can act through it.

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  • Though this news was being concealed from the inhabitants, the officials--the heads of the various government departments--knew that Moscow would soon be in the enemy's hands, just as Count Rostopchin himself knew it, and to escape personal responsibility they had all come to the governor to ask how they were to deal with their various departments.

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  • That is all the government needs to tax to bring in the $300 per person per year.

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  • Now that there was no government, she was nothing!

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  • In the end, the federal government had to change its approach and send another question to the Supreme Court.

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  • It is not many moments that I live under a government, even in this world.

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  • The area beyond the gates and inspections was quiet, with men and women dressed in government uniforms touring the compound like it was any other day and not possibly the last day of the world.

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  • Sometimes countries simply nationalize industries, so that an enterprise once owned by a private company, often a foreign-based one, is taken over by the government or "the people."

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  • No government is involved in these organizations, which are instead driven by a combination of religious and civic motives.

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  • How is this need filled without government involvement?

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  • Electronic transfers mean the money of a government, business, or individual might be anywhere at any time.

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  • How does it become a man to behave toward this American government to-day?

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  • After the death of Gracchus, a conservative government under Sulla withdrew the subsidy, but shortly afterward, in a period of great unrest, restored it, and two hundred thousand persons stood in line.

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  • Two interesting government programs are under way in the United States, according to a June 2011 article in The New York Times.

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  • Anyone who loves civilization necessarily appreciates the role of government in protecting liberties.

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  • He distrusted government and said 'that government governs best which governs least.'

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  • For these reasons and a hundred more, government should be the smallest unit that is economically and politically viable.

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  • I realize in these pages I must seem very distrustful of government, but it is not really true.

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  • The government operating in its correct role is instrumental to civilization.

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  • Is the government involved, or backing her in some way?

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  • If he knew something was about to happen, then others within the government did as well.

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  • Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe,--"That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.

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  • Let every man make known what kind of government would command his respect, and that will be one step toward obtaining it.

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  • You could finance the entire government and its (hopefully) noble agenda, by this method alone.

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  • There were bazaars, shops, warehouses, market stalls, granaries--for the most part still stocked with goods-- and there were factories and workshops, palaces and wealthy houses filled with luxuries, hospitals, prisons, government offices, churches, and cathedrals.

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  • Tim, his government contact and the highest-ranking individual in the PMF, was already on screen when Brady entered the comms center.

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  • I worry we won't be enough to maintain government ops for much longer.

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  • After all, that's the government taking more than half of what you make.

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  • In other words, civil government steps in to take over roles traditionally provided by private charity only when charities no longer provide the service.

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  • As a government grows in size, even if the growth is in social programs, it inevitably grows in its intrusion on civil liberty.

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  • I don't want to end up working for the government.

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  • Brady glanced up at Elise's hard tone, sensing she'd not yet absorbed the fact the government she served had splintered.

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  • Today I would like to highlight how a conservative government will support farmers.

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  • Now let's look at the role of government, both philosophically and historically, which also changes over time.

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  • Barely a decade earlier, Cleveland, also a Democrat, had said essentially, "Look, the government shouldn't be helping the poor Texans; that's the role of charity."

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  • To elevate food to the status of a human right does not require government to administer it—far from it.

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  • Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison.

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  • When I meet a government which says to me, "Your money or your life," why should I be in haste to give it my money?

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  • That's what the government is for.

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  • What would then have become of the activity of all those who opposed the tendency that then prevailed in the government--an activity that in the opinion of the historians was good and beneficent?

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  • In the republics, as we begin to know them after the war of investitures, government was carried on by officers called consuls, varying in number according to custom and according to the division of the town into districts.

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  • Aid workers accuse the government of mistreating refugees as part of an effort to get them to resettle in camps in Albania.

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  • In fact, we don't simply buy more government, but we give it a disproportionate amount of our increased income.

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  • After this came the Great Depression, which so overwhelmed the social support structures that Americans turned to the government for help and have never turned back.

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  • Rarely in history has a government wrested away a functioning, privately funded solution in favor of a government entitlement.

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  • Although there was cultural opposition in India to Borlaug's methods and seeds, the famine was so bad by 1965 that the government stepped in and urged the project forward.

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  • Government buildings were converted into silos to hold the abundance, as other countries in the region placed orders for massive amounts of these seeds.

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  • O'Neill observed that scrutiny of government had become so intense that officials never could have gotten away with that—and he was writing in the late 1980s.

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  • Free and peaceful societies function best when government is transparent and open.

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  • He was ruthless, beyond loyal to the few he trusted, and quick to use his influence to get Brady access to any of the government's supplies, technology, intelligence, and anything else Brady requested it.

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  • Lana, you know enough about the PMF to know they're the only force—perhaps in the world—with the ability to survive the government tearing itself apart.

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  • We've all but taken over the military and have people in all levels of government.

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  • I see them once a year at most, but you had access to me and the government's secrets that would've put you in danger had anyone found out.

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  • As much as she didn't want to admit it, there was no way of knowing who the bad guys were, not with Mr. Tim's information about the shadow government.

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  • These rules were borrowed almost word for word from the project drawn up at the Brussels international conference of 1874, which, though never ratified, was practically incorporated in the army regulations issued by the Russian government in connexion with the war of 18 77-7 8.

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  • Under the Restoration he became a peer of France, but protested against the reactionary spirit of the government, and remained in opposition.

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  • On the 25th of lvIarch the Remonstrance, now termed the Petition and Advice, and including a new scheme of government, was passed by a majority of 123 to 62 in spite of the opposition of the officers; and on the 31st it was presented to Cromwell in the Banqueting House at Whitehall whence Charles I.

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  • Instead, however, of proceeding with the work of practical legislation, accepting the Instrument of Government without challenge as the basis of its authority, the parliament immediately began to discuss and find fault with the constitution and to debate about "Fundamentals."

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  • On the outbreak of the South African War in 1899 Grant was at first disposed to be hostile to the policy of Lord Salisbury and Mr Chamberlain; but his eyes were soon opened to the real nature of President Kruger's government, and he enthusiastically welcomed and supported the national feeling which sent men from the outlying portions of the Empire to assist in upholding British supremacy in South Africa.

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  • This road was practically abandoned when the Indian government telegraph line, which ran along it, was removed to a road farther east in 1906.

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  • In the hill country are the government stations of Misahohe and Bismarckburg.

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  • Government, eec. - The colony is administered by a governor who is advised by a nominated council of unofficial members.

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  • The government maintains schools at all the coast towns.

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  • At stated intervals the native chiefs are summoned to Lome to discuss administrative matters with the government.

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  • Phocaea continued to exist under the Persian government, but greatly reduced in population and commerce.

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  • A college, founded by government in 1853, was made over in 1888 to a local committee, being mainly supported by the munificence of the rani Svarnamayi.

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  • He immediately brought forward a scheme for improving the condi - tion of the poorer clergy by equalizing the incomes of the bishops, the reception of which at the time may be imagined, though it was substantially the same as that carried into effect by Lord Melbourne's government fifty years later.

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  • His advice to the government in 1787 is said to have saved the country £ioo,000 a year in gunpowder.

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  • He was estranged from many old friends who accused him, probably with injustice, of making his peace with the government.

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  • On the outbreak of the Pindari War in 1817 the British government offered its protection.

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  • Hughes's form was taken up by the French government in 1860, and is very largely in use not only in France but in all European countries, including Great Britain.

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  • In 1856 the Edinburgh Chamber of Commerce began an agitation for the purchase by the government of the telegraphs, and other chambers of commerce in Great Britain joined the agitation, which was strongly supported by the Press.

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  • The Belgian government endeavoured by reducing rates and increasing facilities to stimulate inland telegraphy in the hope of thereby increasing the profits of the department.

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  • In that year the Swiss government reduced the rate for inland telegrams by one-half, and the traffic immediately doubled, but the cost of carrying on the service increased in a larger ratio.

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  • It cannot justly be said that the companies made large profits while neglecting to develop the services adequately, but it is true that they were not able commercially to comply with many of the demands made upon them by the public. Until speculation took place in anticipation of government purchase, the market prices of the telegraph securities were mostly below par.

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  • After much negotiation the basis finally agreed upon between the government and the companies was 20 years' purchase of the profits of the year ended 30th June 1868.

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  • The two cables to Holland and one of the cables to Germany were already the property of Great Britain, and the German Union Company's cable to Germany was purchased by the German government.

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  • The offices of the Submarine Company in London, Dover, Ramsgate, East Dean and Jersey were purchased by the Post Office, as well as the cable ship; and the staff, 370 in number, was taken over by the government.

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  • Government messages were accorded a rate of 2S.

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  • The government policy would, they alleged, create an absolute and objectionable monopoly.

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  • In the case of inland telegraphs and of cable communication with the continent of Europe government control has entirely superseded private companies.

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  • The service which the government and the colonies desire is one which neither the Eastern Telegraph Company nor any other private enterprise is prepared to undertake on terms which can be considered in comparison with the terms upon which it can be provided by the associated governments."

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  • Since the early days of international telegraphy, conferences of representatives of government telegraph departments and companies have been held from time to time (Paris 1865, Vienna 1868, Rome 1871 and 1878, St Petersburg 1875, London 1879, Berlin 1885,1885, Paris 1891, Buda Pesth 1896, London 1903).

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  • In the same year numerous experiments were tried with the assistance of an Italian battleship, the " Carlo Alberto," lent by the Italian government, and messages were transmitted from Poldhu to Kronstadt, to Spezia, and also to Sydney in Nova Scotia.

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  • The decisions of the Conference were ratified for Great Britain by the British government on July 1, 1908.

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  • On the 23rd of August 1873 it was bombarded by the Spanish fleet under Admiral Lobos; on the 11th of October a battle took place off the town, between the ships of the government and the rebels, and on the 12th of January 1874 Cartagena was occupied by the government troops.

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  • Both the Bell and the Edison Companies opened negotiations with the Post Office for the sale of their patents to the government, but without success.

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  • The new licences were to terminate in 1911 without any provision for purchase or compensation in that year, but with the option to the government to purchase the plant of the licensees in 1890, 1897, or 1904 at a price to be determined by arbitration.

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  • The government again changed its policy.

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  • The draft agreement between the government and the National Telephone Company to carry out the policy of 1892 was submitted to parliament and led to much discussion.

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  • The trunk wires were transferred to the Post Office in pursuance of the policy of 1892, but for all practical purposes the local authorities had vetoed the permission of the government to the company to lay wires underground.

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  • The government had an option to purchase the plant of the company under the licences of 1884, but did not exercise it.

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  • The government policy of 1899 was abandoned in London, the Post Office making an agreement with the company in regard to the London business.

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  • The government had option to purchase the company's provincial plant under the licence of 1884.

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  • The government contracted to buy the company's plant in 1911, thus in effect annulling the act of 1899 which had failed to accomplish its object of establishing all-round competition.

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  • The province is divided for administration into 42 circles (Kreise), 24 in the government of Cassel and 18 in that of Wiesbaden.

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  • He was a leader of those who contended for reform in municipal government, was conspicuous for his public spirit, and exerted a great influence for good not only in New York City but in the state and nation.

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  • Since tobacco is a government monopoly, its cultivation is subject to official concessions and prescriptions.

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  • This has been encouraged by government prizes since 1904.

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  • In 1902 there were 23,098 boats, manned by 101,720 men, and the total catch was valued at just over half a million sterlingaccording to the government figures, which are certainly below the truth.

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  • A government weaving school was established in Naples in r9o6.

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  • Milan and Genoa are the principal centres, and also the government military pharmaceutical factory at Turin.

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  • The societies require government recognition if they wish to enjoy legal rights.

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  • Technical institutes Government 5,555 9,654 54

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  • The schools which do not obtain equality with government schools are either some of those conducted by religious orders, or else those in which a sufficient standard is not reached.

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  • The female secondary schools in 1881-1882 numbered 77, of which 7 were government institutions, with 3569 pupils; in 1901f 902 there were 233 schools (9 governmental) with 9347 pupils.

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  • Each of the chambers has the right of introducing new bills, as has also the government; but all money bills must originate in the Chamber of Deputies.

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  • Land is not so heavily burdened by the government quota as by the additional centimes imposed by the provincial and communal authorities.

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  • On an average Italian landowners pay nearly 25% of their revenues from land in government and local land tax.

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  • Thus, that of 1907-1908 was devoted mainly to raising the salaries of government officials and university professors; even then the maximum for both (in the former class, for an under-secretary of state) was only 500 per annum.

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  • Local government was modified by the law of the 10th of February 1889 and by posterior enactments.

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  • The syndics (or mayors) are now elected by a secret ballot of the communal council, though they are still government officials.

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  • Each provincial administrative junta is composed, in part, of government nominees, and in larger part of elective elements, elected by the provincial council for four years, half of whom require to be elected every two years.

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  • Both communal councils and prefects may appeal to the government against the decision of the provincial administrative juntas, the government being guided by the opinion of the Council of State.

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  • Besides possessing competence in regard to local government elections, which previously came within the jurisdiction of the provincial deputations, the provincial administrative juntas discharge magisterial functions in administrative affairs, and deal with appeals presented by private persons against acts of the communal and provincial administrations.

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  • The former qualifications for electorship in local government elections have been modified, and it is now sufficient to pay five lire annually in, direct taxes, five lire of certain communal taxes, or a certain rental (which varies according to the population of a commune), instead of being obliged to pay, as previously, at least five lire annually of direct taxes to the state.

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  • Thus began that system of mixed government, Teutonic and Roman, which, in the absence of a national monarch, impressed the institutions of new Italy from the earliest date with dualism.

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  • In the third place it was marked by a decline of good government in Rome.

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  • The cities, exposed to pillage by Huns in the north and Saracens in the south, and ravaged on the coast by Norse pirates, asserted their right to enclose themselves with walls, and taught their burghers the use of arms. Within the circuit of their ramparts, the bishops already began to exercise authority in rivalry with the counts, to whom, since the days of Theodoric, had been entrusted the government of the Italian burghs.

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  • The mass of the people remained unrepresented in the government; and even if the consuls existed in the days of Heribert, they were but humble legal officers, transacting business for their constituents in the courts of the bishop and his viscount.

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  • But the main issue of the struggle was not in these details of ecclesiastical government; principles had been at stake far deeper and more widely reaching.

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  • Massive walls, substantial edifices, commodious seaports, good roads, were the benefits conferred by this new government on Italy.

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  • The war against the castles became a war against the palaces; and the system of government by consuls proved inefficient to control the clashing elements within the state.

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  • The podest marks an essentially transitional state in civic government, and his intervention paved the way for despotism.

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  • Burghers of all denominations are enrolled in one or other of the arts or gilds, and these trading companies furnish the material from which the government or signoria bf the city is composed.

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  • This body tends to stitution become a little state within the state, and, by conof the free trolling the victorious majority, disposes of the cities, government as it thinks best.

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  • The several steps whereby the members of the grand council succeeded in eliminating the people from a share in the government, and reducing the doge to the position of their ornamental representative, cannot here be described.

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  • But the government of Milan remaned in the hands of this youths uncle, Lodovico, surnamed II Moro.

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  • This decline of vigour was felt, with the customary effects of discord and bad government, in Lower Italy.

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  • At Palermo the Sicilians struggled hard to establish a republic in place of the odious government of an alien dynasty.

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  • The constitution was modelled on that of the French directory, and, lest there should be a majority of clerical or Jacobinical deputies, the French Republic through its general, Bonaparte, nominated and appointed the first deputies and administrators of the new government.

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  • The British government, which awarded a large annual subsidy to the king and queen at Palermo, claimed to have some control over the administration.

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  • Not only did she govern Lombardy and Venetia directly, but Austrian princes ruled in Modena, Parma and Tuscany; Piacenza, Ferrara and Comacchio had Austrian garrisons; Prince Metternich, the Austrian chancellor, believed that he could always secure the election of an Austrophil pope, and Ferdinand of Naples, reinstated by an Austrian army, had bound himself, by a secret article of the treaty of June 12, 1815, not to introduce methods of government incompatible with those adopted in Austrias Italian possessions.

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  • Lucca too enjoyed good government, and the peasantry were well cared for and prosperous.

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  • In Naples King Ferdinand retained some of the laws and institutions of Murats rgime, and many of the functionaries of the former government entered Naples his service; but he revived the Bourbon tradition, the odious police system and the censorship; and a degrading religious bigotry, to which the masses were all too much inclined, became the basis of government and social iife.

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  • Romagna had continued a prey to anarchy ever since 1831; the government organized armed bands called the Centurioni (descended from the earlier Sanfedisti), to terrorize the Liberals, while the secret societies continued their propaganda by deeds.

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  • He extolled Charles Albert and appealed to his patriotism; he believed that the church was necessary and the secret societies harmful; rqpresentative government was undesirable, but he advocated a consultative assembly.

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  • All these forces were equally necessarythe revolutionists to keep up agitation and make government by bayonets impossible; the moderates to curb the impetuosity of the revolutionists and to present a scheme of society that was neither reactionary nor anarchical; the volunteers abroad to gain military experience; and the more peaceful exiles to spread the name of Italy among foreign peoples.

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  • At Milan, where there was a division of opinion between tha monarchists under Casati and the republicans under Cattaneo, a provisional administration was formed and the question of the form of government postponed for the moment.

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  • Tuscany the government drifted from the moderates to the extreme democrats; the Ridolfi ministry was succeeded after Custozza by that of Ricasoli, and the latter by that of Capponi.

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  • Venice alone still held out; after Novara the Piedmontcse commissioners withdrew and Manin again took charge of the government.

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  • All reasonable men were now convinced that the question of the ultimate form of the Italian government was secondary, and that the national efforts should be concentrated on the task of expelling the Austrians; the form of government could be decided afterwards.

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  • His government, however, was not characterized by cruelty like those of his brother despots, and Guerrazzi and the other Liberals of 1849, although tried and sentenced to long terms of imprisonment, were merely exiled.

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  • By Article 15 the government relinquished its rights to apostolic legation in Sicily, and to theap. pointment of its own nominees to the chief benefices throughout the kingdom.

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  • In many districts the government was obliged to open mills on its own account.

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  • Fear of the advent of a Radical administration under Rattazzi alone prevented the Minghettian Right from revolting against the government.

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  • At this juncture the emperor of Austria invited Victor Emmanuel to visit the Vienna Exhibition, and the Italian government received a confidential intimation that acceptance of the invitation to Vienna would be followed by a further invitation from Berlin.

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  • The railway redemption contracts were in fact immediately voted by parliament, with a clause pledging the government to legislate in favor of farming out the railways to private companies.

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  • Besides, the Left stood for anticlericalism and for the retention by the State of means of coercing the Church, in opposition to the men of the Right, who, with the exception of Sella, favored Cavours ideal of a free Church in a free State, and the consequent abandonment of state control over ecclesiastical government.

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  • Depretis recalled Nigra from Paris and replaced him by General Cialdini, whose ardent plea for Italian intervention in favor of France in 1870, and whose comradeship with Marshal Macmahon in 1859, would, it was supposed, render him persona gratissima to the French government.

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  • As a precaution against an eventual French attempt to restore the temporal power, orders were hurriedly given to complete the defences of Rome, but in other respects the Italian government maintained its subservient attitude.

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  • Formerly a friend and disciple of Mazzini, with whom he had broken on the question of the monarchical form of government which Crispi believed indispensable to the unification of Italy, he had afterwards been one of Garibaldis most efficient coadjutors and an active member of the party of action.

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  • Crispi, whose strong anti-clerical convictions did not prevent him from regarding the papacy as preeminently an Italian institution, was determined both to prove to the Catholic world the practical independence of the government of the Church and to retain for Rome so potent a centre of universal attraction as the presence of the future pope.

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  • The Sacred College having decided to hold the conclave abroad, Crispi assured them of absolute freedom if they remained in Rome, or of protection to the frontier should they migrate, but warned them that, once evacuated, the Vatican would be occupied in the name of the Italian government and be lost to the Church as headquarters of the papacy.

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  • For twelve years these committees had remained comparatively inactive, but in 1878 the presence of the ex-Garibaldian Cairoli at the head of the government, and popular dissatisfaction at the spread of Austrian sway on the Adriatic, encouraged them to begin a series of noisy demonstrations.

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  • The Italian government attached little importance to the occurrence, and believed that a diplomatic expression of regret would suffice to allay Austrian irritation.

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  • The fall of Cairoli, and the formation of a second Depretis cabinet in 1878, brought no substantial change in the attitude of the government towards Irredentism, nor was the position improved by the return of Cairoli to power in the following July.

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  • Almost up to the moment of the French occupation of Tunisia the Italian government believed that Great Britain, if only out of gratitude for the bearing of Italy in connection with the Dulcigno demonstration.

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  • The rivalry between these two officials in Tunisia contributed not a little to strain FrancoItalian relations, but it is doubtful whether France would have precipitated her action had not General Menabrea, Italian ambassador in London, urged his government to purchase the Tunis-Goletta railway from the English company by which it had been constructed.

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  • Roustan therefore hastened to extort from the bey concessions calculated to neutralize the advantages which Italy had hoped to secure by the possession of the Tunis- Goletta line, and at the same time the French government prepared at Toulon an expeditionary corps for the occupation of the Regency.

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  • Seeing the hesitation of the Italian government, the Austrian and German semi-official press redoubled their efforts to bring about the visit.

    1
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  • Though he considered such precipitation impolitic, Robilant, finding that confidential information of Italian intentions had already been conveyed to the Austrian government, sought an interview with King Humbert, and on the 17th of October started for Vienna to settle the conditions of the visit.

    1
    0
  • The Austrian government, for its part, desired that the king should be accompanied by Depretis, though not by Mancini, lest the presence of the Italian foreign minister should lend to the occasion too marked a political character.

    1
    0
  • A revival of Irredentism in connection with the execution of an Austrian deserter named Oberdank, who after escaping into Italy endeavoured to return to Austria with explosive bombs in his possession, and the cordial references to France made by Depretis at Stradella (8th October 1882), prevented the French government from suspecting the existence of the alliance, or from ceasing to strive after a Franco-Italian understanding.

    1
    0
  • Though kept in the dark as to the Skierniewice arrangement, the Italian government soon discovered from the course of events that the triple alliance had practically lost its object, European peace having been assured without Italian co-operation.

    1
    0
  • The railways redeemed in 1875-1876 had been worked in the interval by the government at a heavy loss.

    1
    0
  • Depretis and his colleague Genala, minister of public works, experienced great difficulty in securing parliamentary sanction for the conventions, not so much on account of their defective character, as from the opposition of local interests anxious tc extort new lines from the government.

    1
    0
  • In fact, the conventionf were only voted by a majority of twenty-three votes after the government had undertaken to increase the length of new statebuilt lines from 1500 to 2500 kilometres.

    2
    1
  • Gradually the increase of traffic consequent upon the industrial development of Italy decreased the annual losses of the state, but the position of the government in regard to the railways still remained so unsatisfactory as to render the resumption of the whole system by the state on the expiration of the first period of twenty years in 1905 inevitable.

    2
    1
  • Numerically insufficient to reject such measures, and lacking the fibre and the cohesion necessary for the pursuance of a far-sighted policy, the Right thought prudent not to employ its strength in uncompromising opposition, but rather, by supporting the government, to endeavour to modify Radical legislation in a Conservative sense.

    1
    0
  • The Egyptian government being unwilling to recognize the sovereignty of Beheran over Assab or his right to sell territory to a foreign power, sTisconti-Venosta thought it opportune not then to occupy Assab.

    1
    0
  • This convention was never recognized by the Porte nor by the Egyptian government.

    1
    0
  • A month later (10th March I 882) Rubattino made over his establishment to the Italian government, and on the 12th of June the Chamber adopted a bill constituting Assab an Italian crown colony.

    2
    1
  • Partly to satisfy public opinion, partly in order to profit by the favorable disposition of the British government, and partly in the hope of remedying the error committed in 1882 by refusal to co-operate with Great Britain in Egypt, the Italian government in January 1885 despatched an expedition under Admiral Caimi and Colonel Saletta to occupy Massawa and Beilul.

    1
    0
  • The British government, desirous of preventing an Italo-Abyssinian conflict, which could but strengthen the position of the Mahdists, despatched Mr (afterwards Sir) Gerald Portal from Massawa on the 29th of October to mediate with the negus.

    1
    0
  • The entry of Crispi into the Depretis cabinet as minister of the interior (4th April 1887) introduced into the government an element of vigour which had Cabinet, long been lacking.

    1
    0
  • Tostis pamphlet was known to represent papal ideas, and Tosti himself was persona grata to the Italian government.

    1
    0
  • The chief advantage derived by Italy from Crispis foreign policy was the increase of confidence in her government on the part of her allies and of Great Britain.

    1
    0
  • With the instinct of a true statesman, he felt the pulse of the people, divined their need for prestige, and their preference for a government heavy-handed rather than lax.

    1
    0
  • On the 16th of June an attempt by an anarchist named Lega was made on Crispis life; on the 24th of June President Carnot was assassinated by the anarchist Caserio; and on the 3oth of June an Italian journalist was murdered at Leghorn for a newspaper attack upon anarchism a series of outrages which led the government to frame and parliament to adopt (11th July) a Public Safety Bill for the prevention of anarchist propaganda and crime.

    1
    0
  • These attacks were, however, unavailing to shake Crispis position, and in the general election of May 1895 his government obtained a majority of nearly 200 votes.

    1
    0
  • The protocol concluded with Great Britain on the 15th of April 1891, already referred to, contained a clause to the effect that, were Kassala occupied by the Italians, the place should be transferred to the Egyptian government as soon as the latter should be In a position.

    1
    0
  • The Italian government, however, neglected this opening, and Mangash came to terms with Menelek.

    1
    0
  • He threw all the influence of the government against Crispi, who was charged with complicity in embezzlements perpetrated by Favilla, managing director of the Bologna branch of the Bank of Naples.

    1
    0
  • Pressed by Cavallotti, Rudini in March 1897 dissolved the Chamber and conducted the general election in such a way as to crush by government pressure the partisans of Crispi, and greatly to strengthen the (Socialist, Republican and Radical) revolutionary parties.

    1
    0
  • By the beginning of February the agitation had spread all over Italy, and the government was faced by the possibility of a strike which would paralyse the whole economic life of the country.

    1
    0
  • The government called out all the railwaymen who were army reservists, but continued to keep them at their railway work, exercising military discipline over them and thus ensuring the continuance of the service.

    1
    0
  • The Monza labor exchange then took the initiative of proclaiming a general strike throughout Italy (September 15th) as a protest against the government for daring to maintain order.

    1
    0
  • The mayor of Venice sent a firm and dignified protest to the government for its inaction, and the people of Liguria raised a large subscription in favor of the troops, in recognition of their gallantry and admirable discipline during the troubles.

    1
    0
  • The extreme parties now began to direct especial attention to propaganda in the army, with a view to destroying its cohesion and thus paralysing the action of the government.

    1
    0
  • In October 1907 there was again a general strike at Milan, which was rendered more serious on account of the action of the railway servants, and extended to other cities; traffic was disorganized over a large part of northern Italy, until the government, being now owner of the railways, dismissed the ringleaders from the service.

    1
    0
  • The agitation ceased in June with the defeat of the strikers, but not until a vast amount of damage had been done to the crops and all had suffered heavy losses, including the government, whose expenses for the maintenance of public order ran into tens of millions of lire.

    1
    0
  • Fortunately, however, the government, by dismissing the ringleader, Dr Campanozzi, in time nipped the agitation in the bud, and it did attempt to redress some of the genuine grievances.

    1
    0
  • Public opinion upheld the government in its attitude, for all persons of common sense realized that the suspension of the public services could not be permitted for a moment in a civilized country.

    1
    0
  • In parliamentary politics the most notable event in 1902 was the presentation of a divorce bill by Signor Zanardellis government; this was done not because there was any real demand for it, but to please the doctrinaire 1902.

    1
    0
  • The weakness of the government in dealing with the strike riots caused a feeling of profound dissatisfaction, and the so-called experiment of liberty, conducted with the object of conciliating the extreme parties, proved a dismal failure.

    1
    0
  • French government, in view of the rupture between Church and State in France, formally asked to be placed under Italian protection, which was granted in January 1907.

    1
    0
  • One of the causes of ill-feeling was the university question; the Austrian government had persistently refused to create an Italian university for its Italian subjects, fearing lest it should become a hotbed of irredentism, the Italianspeaking students being thus obliged to attend the GermanAustrian universities.

    1
    0
  • Danby therefore ordered a return from every diocese of the numbers of dissenters, both Romanist and Protestant, in order by a proof of their insignificance to remove the royal scruples.3 In December 1676 he issued a proclamation for the suppression of coffee-houses because of the "defamation of His Majesty's Government" which took place in them, but this was soon withdrawn.

    1
    0
  • This is what the government wanted.

    1
    0
  • Among the public buildings are the capitol, the United States government building, a United States mint, and a state orphans' home; in the vicinity are the state prison and a United States government school for Indians.

    1
    0
  • Yet it is a very grave question whether the idea of God's moral government admits of being argued as pure matter of fact.

    1
    0
  • Artaxata and Tigranocerta were captured, and Tigranes, who had been brought up in Rome and was the obedient servant of the government, was installed king of Armenia.

    1
    0
  • By declaring, as it does, what were the laws and customs of a past age wherein justice prevailed, it shows what was the ideal of good government formed by John's prelates and barons.

    1
    0
  • The plan was unsuccessful, and soon after his return to Paris Brissot was lodged in the Bastille on the charge of having published a work against the government.

    1
    0
  • There is no idea of government, but in each sept there is a head, who has attained that position by degrees on account of some tacitly admitted superiority and commands a limited respect and some obedience.

    1
    0
  • The policy of the government is to leave the Andamanese alone, while doing what is possible to ameliorate their condition.

    1
    0
  • The net annual cost of the settlement to the government is about £6 per convict.

    1
    0
  • In 1788-1789 the government of Bengal sought to establish in the Andamans a penal colony, associated with a harbour of refuge.

    1
    0
  • There was much sickness, and after two years, urged by Admiral Cornwallis, the government transferred the colony to the N.E.

    1
    0
  • The scheme did ill; and in 1796 the government put an end to it, owing to the great mortality and the embarrassments of maintenance.

    1
    0
  • In 1839, Dr Helfer, a German savant employed by the Indian government, having landed in the islands, was attacked and killed.

    1
    0
  • In the same year the two groups, Andaman and Nicobar, the occupation of the latter also having been forced on the British government (in 1869) by the continuance of outrage upon vessels, were united under a chief commissioner residing at Port Blair.

    1
    0
  • He became principal of the government college at Lahore in 1864, and there originated the term "Dardistan" for a portion of the mountains on the north-west frontier, which was subsequently recognized to be a purely artificial distinction.

    1
    0
  • The government of Germany during his minority was in the hands of Theophano, and after her death in June 99 1 passed to a council in which the chief influence was exercised by Adelaide and Willigis, archbishop of Mainz.

    1
    0
  • The government in some cases recognized these tribunals as capable of judging ecclesiastical causes (Migne, ubi sup.).

    1
    0
  • The metropolitan of Athens is president, and there are four other members appointed by the government in annual rotation from the senior bishops.

    1
    0
  • The government continued to struggle against this spirit of defiance; proclamations of James I.

    1
    0
  • Any poisonous substance that is not included in the schedules can be sold by anyone, as, for instance, red lead, sulphate of copper, &c. The duty of the Pharmaceutical Society is a purely legal one, and relates only to the schedules of poisons framed by the government to protect the public by rendering it a difficult matter to obtain the poisons most frequently used for criminal purposes.

    1
    0
  • The fact that a voluntary society with limited funds must contest the illegal decisions of local councils, without government support, seems likely to render this portion of the act of 1908 a dead letter.

    1
    0
  • The price of the drugs and the tariff for dispensing prescriptions is fixed by government authority.

    1
    0
  • There is a small government house, standing in beautiful grounds, adjoining Albert Park, with plantations of oaks and pines.

    1
    0
  • The government offices, art gallery and exchange, with St Mary's cathedral (Anglican), a building in a combination of native timbers, St Paul's and St Patrick's cathedral (Roman Catholic), are noteworthy buildings.

    1
    0
  • There is communication both south and north by rail, and regular steamers serve the ports of the colony, the principal Pacific Islands, Australia, &c. From 1853 to 1876 Auckland was the seat of the provincial government, and until 1865 that of the central government, which was then transferred to Wellington.

    1
    0
  • Within a twelvemonth he became more widely known by his Castigo y Perdon, and by a more humorous effort, Los dos Guzmanes; and shortly afterwards he was appointed by the Moderado government to a post in the home office, which he lost in 1854 on the accession to power of the Liberal party.

    1
    0
  • But Persis lies too far off from the centre of the Asiatic world to be the seat of government.

    1
    0
  • Again, the practical engineers who are building aeroplanes, and those who are making practical tests by actual flight in those machines, cannot be called "researchers"; that term should be confined to the members, for example, of the scientific committee appointed by the British Government in 1909 to make investigations regarding aerial construction and navigation.

    1
    0
  • In 1508 Alonso de Ojeda obtained the government of the coast of South America from Cabo de la Vela to the Gulf of Darien; Ojeda landed at Cartagena in 1510, and sustained a defeat from the natives, in which his lieutenant, Juan de la Cosa, was killed.

    1
    0
  • The great desire of the Spanish government at that time was to find a westward route to the Moluccas.

    1
    0
  • The eighth voyage, led by Captain Saris, extended the operations of the company to Japan; and in 1613 the Japanese government granted privileges to the company; but the British retired in 1623, giving up their factory.

    1
    0
  • Five years later he accepted an offer from the government to command an expedition into the interior of Africa, the plan being to cross from the Gambia to the Niger and descend the latter river to the sea.

    1
    0
  • In 1785 the French government carefully fitted out an expedition of discovery at Brest, which was placed under the command of Francois La Perouse, an accomplished and experienced officer.

    1
    0
  • The Spaniards under Quadra had begun a survey of north-western America and occupied Nootka Sound, which their government eventually agreed to surrender.

    1
    0
  • Amongst nomads the tribe is the unit of government, the political bond is personal, and there is no definite territorial association of the people, who may be loyal but cannot be patriotic. The idea of a country arises only when a nation, either homogeneous or composed of several races, establishes itself in a region the boundaries of which may be defined and defended against aggression from without.

    1
    0
  • Republics, although represented in Europe, are the peculiar form of government of America and are unknown in Asia.

    1
    0
  • The forms of government of colonies present a series of transitional types from the autocratic administration of a governor appointed by the home government to complete democratic selfgovernment.

    1
    0
  • This is a vaguer form of control than a protectorate, and frequently amounts merely to an agreement amongst civilized powers to respect the right of one of their number to exercise government within a certain area, if it should decide to do so at any future time.

    1
    0
  • The ultimate cause of the predominant form of federal government may be the geographical diversity of the country.

    1
    0
  • In February 1679, when the country was agitated by real or fancied dangers to the Protestant religion, the earl entered political life as secretary of state for the northern department and became at once a member of the small clique responsible for the government of the country.

    1
    0
  • The government of the university is vested in a board of trustees appointed by the governor of the state for a term of seven years.

    1
    0
  • Under the Khuen-Heclvary Government he became on June 18 1910 once more president of the House of Magnates.

    1
    0
  • Though a Protestant, he supported the government of Mary of Guise, showed himself violently anti-English, and led a raid into England, subsequently in 1559 meeting the English commissioners and signing articles for peace on the border.

    1
    0
  • He acted in the same spirit a few months later, when (about July 1839), understanding that the authorities intended to prevent the despatch of emigrants to New Zealand, he hurried them off on his own responsibility, thus compelling the government to annex the country just in time to anticipate a similar step on the part of France.

    1
    0
  • The management of the company had meanwhile passed into the hands of others, whose sole object was to settle accounts with the government, and wind up the undertaking.

    1
    0
  • One of these provided that all matters relating to the government shall be transacted in the Privy Council, and that all resolutions "shall be signed by such of the Privy Council as shall advise and consent to the same"; and another declared that all office-holders and pensioners under the Crown shall be incapable of sitting in the House of Commons.

    1
    0
  • In 1450 an insurrection led to the admission of the gilds to a share in the municipal government.

    1
    0
  • Having undertaken the government in person, the king received the submission of the powerful earl of Ross, and strengthened his authority in other ways.

    1
    0
  • The exact position of Anzan is still disputed, but it probably included originally the site of Susa and was distinguished from it only when Susa became the seat of a Semitic government.

    1
    0
  • Susa once more became a capital, and on the establishment of the Persian empire remained one of the three seats of government, its language, the Neo-Susian, ranking with the Persian of Persepolis and the Semitic of Babylon as an official tongue.

    1
    0
  • On the outbreak of Kosciuszko's insurrection he returned to Poland, and as member of the national government and minister of finance took a leading part in affairs.

    1
    0
  • At first, too, it seemed as if the government were incapable of coping with him.

    1
    0
  • In 1894 the Russian government enforced new customs regulations, by which a heavy duty is levied on Anglo-Indian manufactures and produce, excepting pepper, ginger and drugs, imported into Russian Asia by way of Persia; and the importation of green teas is altogether prohibited except by way of Batum, Baku, Uzunada and the Transcaspian railway.

    1
    0
  • The railways of the state are the Recife and Sao Francisco (77 m.), Central de Pernambuco (132 m.) and Sul de Pernambuco (120 m.) - all government properties leased to the Great Western of Brazil Railway Co., Ltd., since 1901.

    1
    0
  • The Ahoms retained the form of government in Assam peculiar to the Shan tribes, which may be briefly described as an organized system of personal service in lieu of taxation.

    1
    0
  • Since 1814 they have belonged entirely to the Austrian government.

    1
    0
  • The Turkish government also levies taxes on the inhabitants of the river valley, and for this purpose, and to maintain a caravan route from the Mediterranean coast to Bagdad, maintains stations of a few zaptiehs or gens d'armes, at intervals of about 8 hours (caravan time), occupying in general the stations of the old Persian post road.

    1
    0
  • At the present time the preservation of the embankments about the point of bifurcation demands the constant care of the Bagdad government.

    1
    0
  • All these schemes, however, fell through either on the financial question, or on the unwillingness of the Turkish government to sanction any line not connected directly with Constantinople.

    1
    0
  • Accordingly, it was henceforward governed by a proconsul (appointed by the senate) and freed from the burden of troops, while its local government was assimilated to that of Italy.

    1
    0
  • As befitted an unromanized region, the local government was unlike that of Italy or Narbonensis.

    1
    0
  • But all five leaders were romanized nobles, with Roman names and Roman citizenship, and their risings were directed rather against the Roman government than the Roman empire.

    1
    0
  • Public morality was in peril, and in May 183 2 the halls of the new sect were closed by the government, and the father, with some of his followers, appeared before the tribunals.

    1
    0
  • Serajevo is the seat of the provincial government, of a Roman Catholic bishop, an Orthodox metropolitan, the highest Moslem ecclesiastical authority or Reis-el-ulema, and the supreme court.

    1
    0
  • It was chosen as the seat of Turkish government in 1850, instead of Travnik.

    1
    0
  • Nearly half the ex- penditure goes to meet debt charges, while government, internal development and defence absorb most of the remainder.

    1
    0
  • In 1891, when the debt of the republic amounted to $87,789,973, or about £18,678,710, the government suspended payment of interest, and an arrangement was made with the bondholders.

    1
    0
  • From 1750 Montevideo enjoyed a provincial government independent of that of Buenos Aires.

    1
    0
  • A long struggle for dominion in Uruguay between Brazil and the revolutionary government of Buenos Aires was concluded in 1828, through the mediation of Great Britain, Uruguay being declared a free and independent state.

    1
    0
  • The Colorados have held the government for many years, and the attempts of the Blancos to oust them have caused a series of revolutions.

    1
    0
  • Tanneries exist in nearly every government, but it is especially at Warsaw and St Petersburg, and after these at Moscow, that the largest and best modern tanneries and shoe and glove factories are established.

    1
    0
  • For half a century the struggle between the two races went on with varying success, but on the whole the Polish government proved stronger than its insubordinate subjects, and about 1638 it seemed to have attained its object.

    1
    0
  • As national income increases in a given country, the size of government as a portion of gross national product (GNP) rises and the range of services people expect the government to offer rises.

    5
    4
  • It seems that we can afford to spend more on government as income rises.

    5
    4
  • He writes how in Europe when there is a problem, people turn to the government to solve it, but in America, they form what he calls "voluntary associations"—what we might term charities and nonprofits.

    6
    5
  • In the United States, you could do it via the tax code, with government only acting as an income redistribution agent but not as a food distributor.

    5
    4
  • I mention FactCheck and Snopes as two examples of the many enterprises on the Internet that subject every government utterance to scrutiny in something approximating real time.

    12
    11
  • All of this means examples of atrocities by the government or by the mob are increasingly likely to be documented and publicized.

    11
    10
  • Now, instead of just intellectually engaging with the news, we feel the government brutality, we experience the war, we are electrified by the demonstrations, and we are horrified at the suffering.

    14
    13
  • Having said all of that, government should certainly be watched with a suspicious eye, for it could conceivably delay or derail our ascent to the next golden age.

    11
    10
  • I heartily accept the motto,--"That government is best which governs least"; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.

    5
    4
  • I do not hesitate to say, that those who call themselves Abolitionists should at once effectually withdraw their support, both in person and property, from the government of Massachusetts, and not wait till they constitute a majority of one, before they suffer the right to prevail through them.

    6
    5
  • But instead of all that--here he was, the wealthy husband of an unfaithful wife, a retired gentleman-in-waiting, fond of eating and drinking and, as he unbuttoned his waistcoat, of abusing the government a bit, a member of the Moscow English Club, and a universal favorite in Moscow society.

    5
    4
  • Alpatych went to the shops, to government offices, to the post office, and to the Governor's.

    5
    4
  • These are the measures the government has adopted to re- establish order and relieve your condition.

    5
    4
  • When the conclusions thus reached by many independent investigators were at length reduced to a system by Calvin, in his famous Institutio, it became the definite ideal of church government for all the Reformed, in contradistinction to the Lutheran, churches.

    0
    0
  • Even, therefore, where people desired the Reformation there were powerful influences opposed to the setting up of church government and to the exercise of church discipline after the manner of the apostolic Church; and one ceases to wonder at the absence of complete Presbyterianism in the countries which were forward to embrace and adopt the Reformation.

    0
    0
  • By them he was to be ordained, after vowing to be true in office, faithful to the church system, obedient to the laws and to the civil government, and ready to exercise discipline without fear or favour.

    0
    0
  • During the first half of the 19th century civil war and despotic government seriously restricted the natural growth of the country, but since the definite organization of the republic in 1860 and the settlement of disturbing political controversies, the population had increased rapidly.

    0
    0
  • The postal and telegraph services are administered by the national government, and are under the immediate supervision of the minister of the interior.

    0
    0
  • Under the constitution, the provinces retain all the powers not delegated to the federal government.

    0
    0
  • Each elects its governor, legislators and provincial functionaries of all classes, without the intervention of the federal government.

    0
    0
  • The territories are under the direct control of the national government .

    0
    0
  • The government maintains a naval school at Flores, a school of mechanics in Buenos Aires, an artillery school on the cruiser " Patagonia," and a school for torpedo practice at La Plata.

    0
    0
  • It is under the control of the national government, which in 1902 maintained 19 colleges.

    0
    0
  • The national government has founded several scholarships (some in art) for study abroad.

    0
    0
  • The collection of a part of the import duties in gold has served to give the government the gold it requires for certain expenditures, but it has complicated returns and accounts and increased the burden of taxation.

    0
    0
  • In Argentina these burdens bear heavily upon the labouring classes, and in years of depression they send away by thousands immigrants unable to meet the high costs of living, For the year 1900 the total expenditures of the national government, 14 provincial governments, and 16 principal cities, were estimated to have been $208,811,925 paper, which is equivalent to $91,877,247 gold, or (at $5.04 per pound stg.) to £18,229,612, ios.

    0
    0
  • The population that year was estimated to be 4,794,149, from which it is seen that the annual costs of government were no less than £3,16s.

    0
    0
  • Under the provisions of this law the provinces were authorized to borrow specie abroad and deposit the same with the national government as security for their issues.

    0
    0
  • The national government has since assumed responsibility for all these provincial loans abroad.

    0
    0
  • In 1620 Buenos Aires was separated from the authority of the government established at Asuncion, and was made the seat of a government extending over Mendoza, Santa Fe, Entre Rios and Corrientes, but at the same time remained like the government of Paraguay at Asuncion, and that of the province of Tucuman, which had Cordoba as its capital, subject to the authority of the viceroyalty of Peru.

    0
    0
  • But the Spanish government was not content with the prohibition of sea-borne commerce.

    0
    0
  • The continual encroachments of the Portuguese at length led the Spanish government to take the important step of making Buenos Aires the seat of a viceroyalty with jurisdiction over the territories of the present republics of Bolivia, Paraguay, Uruguay and the Argentine Confederation (1776).

    0
    0
  • On the 25th of May 1810 a great armed assembly met at Buenos Aires and a provisional junta was formed to supersede the authority of the viceroy and carry on the government.

    0
    0
  • The combined forces of Buenos Aires and Chile defeated the Spaniards at Chacabuco in 1817, and at Maipu in 1818; and from Chile the victorious general Jose de San Martin led his troops into Peru, where on the 9th of July 1821, he made a triumphal entry into Lima, which had been the chief stronghold of the Spanish power, having from the time of its foundation by Pizarro been the seat of government of a viceroyalty which at one time extended to the river Plate.

    0
    0
  • The Spanish government did not, however, formally acknowledge the independence of the country until the year 1842.

    0
    0
  • In every department of administration and of government he was supreme.

    0
    0
  • A provisional government was formed under Urquiza, and the Brazilian and Uruguayan troops withdrew.

    0
    0
  • A constituent congress, in which each province had equal representation, was duly gress had (May 1, 1853) appointed Urquiza president of the confederation, and he established the seat of government at Parana.

    0
    0
  • Urquiza at this juncture resigned the presidency, and Doctor Santiago Derqui was elected president of the fourteen provinces with the seat of government at Parana; while Urquiza became once more governor of Entre Rios, and Mitre was appointed governor of Buenos Aires.

    0
    0
  • The government troops gained two decisive victories over the insurgents under Generals Mitre and Arredondo, and they were compelled to surrender at discretion.

    0
    0
  • On the 13th of February 1880, the minister of war, Dr Carlos Pellegrini, summoned the principal officers connected with the Tiro Nacional, General Bartolome Mitre, his brother Emilio, Colonel Julio Campos, Colonel Hilario Lagos and others, and warned them that as officers of the national army they owed obedience to the national government, and would be severely punished if concerned in any revolutionary outbreak against the constituted authorities.

    0
    0
  • Two days later, the national government occupied, with a strong force of infantry and artillery, the parade ground at Palermo used by the Buenos Aires volunteers for drill purposes.

    0
    0
  • Negotiations were now opened by the government with the provincial authorities for the disarmament of the city and province of Buenos Aires, but they led to nothing.

    0
    0