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gottingen

gottingen

gottingen Sentence Examples

  • Appended to this volume is a complete list of Lotze's writings, compiled by Professor Rehnisch of Gottingen.

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  • He was educated at Gottingen and Leipzig.

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  • The want of books and scientific apparatus at Cassel induced him to resort frequently to Gottingen, where he became betrothed to Therese Heyne, the daughter of the illustrious philologist, a clever and cultivated woman, but illsuited to be Forster's wife.

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  • Matriculating at the university of Gottingen in 1811, he began by devoting himself to astronomy under Carl Friedrich Gauss; but he enlisted in the Hanseatic Legion for the campaign of 1813 - 14, and became lieutenant of artillery in the Prussian service in 1815.

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  • Having returned to Gottingen in 1816, he was at once appointed by Benhardt von Lindenau his assistant in the observatory of Seeberg near Gotha.

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  • (Gottingen, 1905); Zeit.

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  • He studied law at Gottingen and Leipzig, but ultimately devoted himself entirely to literary studies.

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  • Gilbert, Studien zur altspartanischen Geschichte, Gottingen, 1872, p. 34 foll.).

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  • Bennigsen, having studied at the university of Gottingen, entered the Hanoverian civil service.

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  • Wellhausen, De gentibus et familiis Judaeis (Gottingen, 1870); Prolegomena (Eng.

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  • After studying medicine at Jena, he graduated doctor at Gottingen in 1775, and was appointed extraordinary professor of medicine in 1776 and ordinary professor in 1778.

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  • He died at Gottingen on the 22nd of January 1840.

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  • His most important anthropological work was his description of sixty human crania published originally in fasciculi under the title Collectionis suae craniorum diversarum gentium illustratae decades (Gottingen, 1790-1828).

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  • In 1866 he received three years' leave of absence to collect fresh materials, and in 1869 succeeded Heinrich Ewald as professor of oriental languages at Gottingen.

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  • He died at Gottingen on the 22nd of December 1891.

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  • Brandt's Mandaische Schriften, with notes (Gottingen, 1893).

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  • He studied at Breslau, Gottingen and Berlin, first law, then theology; and in 1839 became professor ordinarius of theology at Halle (1839).

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  • This was Berthold, who devoted a long chapter of his Beitrdge zur Anatomie, published at Gottingen in 1831, to a consideration of the subject.

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  • JOHANN AUGUST WILHELM NEANDER (1789-1850), German theologian and church historian, was born at Gottingen on the 17th of January 1789.

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  • But before the year had closed the events of the Franco-Prussian War compelled his removal to Gottingen.

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  • He was educated at the Carolinum, an endowed school at Osnabruck, and studied at the universities of Gottingen and Heidelberg.

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  • Langenberg, Uber die Verheiltnisse Meister Eckharts zur niederdeutschen Mystik (Gottingen, 1896); W.

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  • Kastner of Gottingen.

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  • At Halle Michaelis felt himself out of place, and in 1745 he gladly accepted an invitation to Gottingen as privatdozent.

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  • and in Gottingen he remained till his death in 1791.

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  • The personal character of Michaelis can be read between the lines 1 By a strange fortune of war it was the occupation of Gottingen by the French in the Seven Years' War, and the friendly relations he formed with the officers, that procured him the Paris MS. from which he edited Abulfeda's description of Egypt.

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  • 2 (Gottingen, 1898), Nos.

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  • In 1759, after completing with his pupils a tour of two years' duration through Gottingen, Utrecht, Paris, Marseilles and Turin, he resigned his tutorship and settled at Augsburg.

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  • Having studied theology at the university of Gottingen under Heinrich Ewald, he established himself there in 1870 as privat-docent for Old Testament history.

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  • Resigning in 1882 owing to conscientious scruples, he became professor extraordinarius of oriental languages in the faculty of philology at Halle, was elected professor ordinarius at Marburg in 1885, and was transferred to Gottingen in 1892.

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  • The best known of his works are De gentibus et familiis Judaeis (Gottingen, 1870); Der Text der Bucher Samuelis untersucht (Gottingen, 1871); Die Phariseier and Sadducder (Greifswald, 1874); Prolegomena zur Geschichte Israels (Berlin, 1882; Eng.

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  • Haller occupied in the new university of Gottingen (founded 1737) a position corresponding to that of Boerhaave at Leiden, and in like manner influenced a very large circle of pupils, The appreciation of his work in physiology belongs to the history of that science; we are only concerned here with its influence on medicine.

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  • The enthusiasm of the younger Brunonians in Germany was as great as in Edinburgh or in Italy, and led to serious riots in the university of Gottingen.

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  • (Gottingen, 1862-1886); E.

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  • He was intended for the medical profession, and studied at the universities of Berlin, Halle, Gottingen and Leiden.

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  • Shortly after the foundation of the university of Gottingen appeared Zeitungen von gelehrten Sachsen (1739), still famous as the Gottingische gelehrte Anzeigen, which during its long and influential career has been conducted by professors of that university, and among others by Haller, Heyne and Eichhorn.

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  • Gersdorf's Repertorium, the Gelehrte Anzeigen of Gottingen and of Munich, Sand the Heidelbergische Jahrbucher were the sole survivors.

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  • JULIUS AUGUST LUDWIG WEGSCHEIDER (1771-1849), German theologian, was born at ktibelingen, Brunswick, on the 17th of September 1771, studied theology at Helmstedt, was tutor in a Hamburg family 1795-1805, Repetent at Gottingen, professor of theology at Rinteln in Hesse (1806-1815), and at Halle from 1815.

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  • His ardour for historical studies was further stimulated by Schlozer, when Muller went (1769) to the university of Gottingen, nominally to study theology.

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  • Passing to the university of Gottingen he took his degree in classical philology and ancient history, but the bent of his mind was definitely towards the philosophical side of theology.

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  • ONNO KLOPP (1822-1903), German historian, was born at Leer on the 9th of October 1822, and was educated at the universities of Bonn, Berlin and Gottingen.

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  • Alphonsi de Ligorio (6 vols., Paris, 1899); Gustav Anrich, Das antike Mysterienwesen (Gottingen, 1894); L.

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  • (Gottingen, 1862-1886).

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  • Mosheim was much consulted by the authorities when the new university of Gottingen was being formed; especially in the framing of the statutes of the theological faculty, and the provisions for making the theologians independent of the ecclesiastical courts.

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  • He died at Gottingen on the 9th of September.

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  • In 1792 Lang again betook himself to a university, this time to Gottingen.

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  • (Gottingen, 1885), which contains an analysis of the dialectic peculiarities of Mannyng's work; O.

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  • of Gottingen and at the junction of railways to Cassel and Nordhausen.

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  • See Grysar, Die Akademiker Philo and Antiochus (1849);; Hermann, De Philone Larissaeo (Gottingen, 1851' and 1855).

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  • His mathematical capacity was early noticed; he pursued his studies at Gottingen under Abraham Gotthelf Kastner (1719-1800), and in 1787 he went to Berlin and studied practical astronomy under E.

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  • JOHANN GOTTLIEB BUHLE (1763-1821), German scholar and philosopher, was born at Brunswick, and educated at Gottingen.

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  • He became professor of philosophy at Gottingen, Moscow (1840) and Brunswick.

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  • On his return he was in 1750 made professor extraordinarius of philosophy in Jena, but in 1753 he accepted an invitation to become professor ordinarius at Gottingen.

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  • The Scholia (from the Gottingen MS.) have been edited by G.

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  • Brandt, Schriften aus der Genza oder Sidva Rabba (Gottingen, 1893).

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  • After studying at Giessen, Heidelberg and Gottingen, he entered on the practice of the law.

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  • Here he introduced many improvements in map-making, and gained a scientific reputation which led (in 1751) to his election to the chair of economy and mathematics in the university of Gottingen.

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  • C. Lichtenberg and published in one volume (Opera inedita, Gottingen, 1775).

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  • It contains an easy and accurate method for calculating eclipses; an essay on colour, in which three primary colours are recognized; a catalogue of 998 zodiacal stars; and a memoir, the earliest of any real value, on the proper motion of eighty stars, originally communicated to the Gottingen Royal Society in 1760.

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  • Kastner, Elogium Tobiae Mayeri (Gottingen, 1762); Connaissance des temps, 1767, p. 187 (J.

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  • Putter, Geschichte von der Universiteit zu Gottingen, i.

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  • P. Woodward, a model of clear systematic exposition, and the exhaustive treatise on the Malacozoa or Weichthiere by Professor Keferstein of Gottingen, published as part of Bronn's Klassen and Ordnungen des Thier-Reichs.

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  • (Gottingen, 1878); and A.

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  • In 1829 he went to Germany, and after studying at Gottingen and Berlin (where he came under the influence of Heeren, Ottfried Muller, Schleiermacher, Neander and Bdckh) he accompanied Bunsen to Italy and Rome.

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  • He was educated at Stade and the university of Gottingen.

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  • In 1766 he was appointed extraordinary professor of philosophy at Gottingen.

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  • In 1772 Beckmann was elected a member of the Royal Society of Gottingen, and he contributed valuable scientific dissertations to its proceedings until 1783, when he withdrew from all further share in its work.

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  • (Leipzig, 1894); Ernst Bernheim, Zur Geschichte des Wormser Konkordates (Gottingen, 1878); Martin Rule, The Life and Times of St Anselm (2 vols., London, 1883); and Klemm, Der Investiturstreit unter Heinrich I.

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  • Schirrmacher, Die letzten Hohenstaufen (Gottingen, 1871); A.

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  • See Standlin, Geschichte des Rationalismus (Gottingen, 1826); Hase, Theologische Streitschriften in Gesammelte Werke, viii.

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  • Wiistenfeld (Gottingen, 1842-1847).

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  • Erbt, Die Purimsage (Berlin, 1900); Abrahams, Jewish Life in the Middle Ages; Lagarde, Purim, ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der Religion (Gottingen, 885); Steinschneider, Purim and Parodie (Berlin, 1902); P. Haupt, Purim (Leipzig, 1906); I.

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  • Lagarde (Gottingen, 1883), p. 89, 1.61.

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  • Munk, Mélanges (quoted above); Guttmann, Die Philosophie des Sal.-ibn Gabirol (Gottingen, 1889); D.

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  • After studying law at the universities of Berlin, Gottingen and Heidelberg (1813-1817), he settled as a Privatdocent, in 1821, at the university of Berlin, where he became ordinary professor of law in 1827.

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  • Wiistenfeld (Gottingen, 1858-1860).

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  • Noldeke, Geschichte des Qoran's (Gottingen, 1860; 2nd ed.

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  • He learnt law at the universities of Heidelberg and Gottingen.

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  • Further study of political economy soon enabled him to pass out of this phase, and in 1850 he settled down to practise as an advocate at Gottingen.

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  • He was educated at Edinburgh Academy and the universities of Edinburgh and Gottingen, where he studied philosophy under Lotze.

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  • Educated at the universities of Heidelberg and Gottingen, he showed an interest in art and visited Italy; but returning to Frankfort he turned his attention to the study of history, and became secretary of the Gesellschaft fib' dltere deutsche Geschichtskunde.

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  • He took first-class honours in classics at Aberdeen, subsequently studied at Gottingen (under Ritschl) and at New College, Hampstead, and entered the Congregational ministry.

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  • He received a careful education at home, afterwards (in 1803) going to the Bavarian national university of Landshut and to Gottingen.

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  • Eschatologie (Gottingen, 1905), pp. 250 sqq.

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  • In 1829 he entered the university of Leipzig, and one year later that of Gottingen, where, under the influence of Otfried Miller, he finally decided to devote himself to the archaeological side of philology.

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  • From Gottingen he proceeded to Berlin, where he graduated in 1833 as doctor with the thesis De tabulis Eugubinis.

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  • At Giessen he lectured as an extraordinary professor, and at Gottingen, in 1824, published his treatise, Ueber das Wesen der Geschichte.

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  • Wrede, Die Ein fuhrung der Reformation in Luneburg (Gottingen, 1887), and W.

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  • In less direct relation stands Lotze, who, although under other influences he developed a different view even in logic, certainly let no point in the doctrine of his great predecessor at Gottingen escape him.

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  • In 1817, after the publication of his first work, Aegineticorum liber, he received an appointment at the Magdaleneum in Breslau, and in 1819 he was made adjunct professor of ancient literature in the university of Gottingen, his subject being the archaeology and history of ancient art.

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  • Miller's position at Gottingen being rendered unpleasant by the political troubles which followed the accession of Ernest Augustus (duke of Cumberland) to the throne of Hanover in 1837, he applied for permission to travel; and in 1839 he left Germany.

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  • Muller (Gottingen, 1841); F.

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  • 1007-1028; C. Dilthey, Otfried Muller (Gottingen, 1898); E.

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  • Niese, Nachrichten von der wissenschaftlichen Gesellschaft zu GOttingen, Phil.-Hist.

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  • He died at Gottingen, on the 9th of September 1869.

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  • Returning to Germany in 1855 he was professor of history successively at the universities of Rostock, Tubingen (which he left in 1866 because of his political views), Marburg and Gottingen.

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  • He retained his chair at Gottingen until his death at Bremen on the 3rd of June 1882.

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  • Blumenbach at Gottingen.

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  • While at Frankfurt, on his way to examine the Neanderthal skull at Bonn, he was struck with paralysis, and died at Gottingen a few months later on the 13th of May 1864.

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  • In 1843, after his removal to Gottingen, he began his great Handworterbuch der Physiologie, mit Riicksicht auf physiologische Pathologie, and brought out the fifth (supplementary) volume in 1852; the only contributions of his own in it were on the sympathetic nerve, nerve-ganglia and nerve-endings, and he modestly disclaimed all merit except as being the organizer.

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  • While resident in Italy for his health from 1845 to 1847, he occupied himself with researches on the electrical organ of the torpedo and on nervous organization generally; these he published in1853-1854(Neurologische Untersuchungen, Gottingen), and therewith his physiological period may be said to end.

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  • His quarrel with the materialists began with his oration at the Gottingen meeting of the NaturforscherVersammlung in 1854, on "Menschenschopfung and Seelensubstanz."

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  • This was followed by a series of " Physiological Letters " in the Allgemeine Zeitung, by an essay on " Glauben and Wissen," and by the most important piece of this series, " Der Kampf urn die Seele by (Gottingen, 1857).

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  • In what may be called his fourth and last period, Wagner became anthropologist and archaeologist, occupied himself with the cabinet of skulls in the Gottingen museum collected by Blumenbach and with the excavation of prehistoric remains, corresponded actively with the anthropological societies of Paris and London, and organized, in co-operation with the veteran K.

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  • von Baer, a successful congress of anthropologists at Gottingen in 1861.

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  • P. de Lagarde, Armenische Studien (Gottingen, 1877) ~.

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  • See Willigerod, Geschichte von Minden (Gottingen, 1808); and Henze, Fiihrer durch Minden and Umgegend (Munden, 1900).

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  • He was educated at the state school in Weikersheim, where his father was superintendent, at the gymnasium at Heilbronn and at the university of Gottingen (1770-1774), studying under J.

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  • On the death of Michaelis in 1788 he was elected professor ordinarius at Gottingen, where he lectured not only on Oriental languages and on the exegesis of the Old and New Testaments, but also on political history.

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  • He continued to study history in London, and at Berlin and Gottingen, graduating as doctor of laws at Gottingen in 1816.

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  • Having studied law at Gottingen, he became chief magistrate at Lilienthal, near Bremen, in 1788.

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  • He then studied at Gottingen and Berlin, becoming a friend of Bismarck at Gottingen, and after a period of European travel returned in 1834 to America, where he continued his legal studies.

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  • Gottingen, 1871, vol.

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  • After having beedsuccessively Repetent in Gottingen and teacher in the public schools of Dortmund (Westphalia) and Altdorf (Bavaria), he was, in 1785, appointed second professor of theology in the university of Altdorf, whence he was translated to a chair in Jena in 1804, where he succeeded Griesbach in 1812.

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  • In 1832 he was called to Marburg as professor ordinarius of classical literature; and in 1842 he was transferred to Gottingen to the chair of philology and archaeology, vacant by the death of Otfried Muller.

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  • He died at Gottingen on the 31st of December 1855.

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  • Gottingen, 1893); W.

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  • griechischen Denker (Gottingen, 1840).

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  • GOTTINGEN, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, pleasantly situated at the west foot of the Hainberg (1200 ft.), in the broad and fertile valley of the Leine, 67 m.

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  • After being educated at Berlin, Gottingen and Jena, in the last of which places he formed a close and lifelong friendship with Schiller, he married Fraulein von Dacherode, a lady of birth and fortune, and in 1802 was appointed by the Prussian government first resident and then minister plenipotentiary at Rome.

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  • KARL DIETRICH EBERHARD KOENIG (1774-1851), German palaeontologist, was born at Brunswick in 1774, and was educated at Gottingen.

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  • He studied chemistry at Gottingen, graduating as Ph.D.

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  • He subsequently held several appointments at Gottingen, being privat docent (1860), and extraordinary professor (1870).

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  • After studying under Fichte at Jena he gave his first philosophical lectures at Gottingen in 1805, whence he removed in 1809 to occupy the chair formerly held by Kant at Konigsberg.

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  • Here he also established and conducted a seminary of pedagogy till 1833, when he returned once more to Gottingen, and remained there as professor of philosophy till his death on the 14th of August 1841.

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  • After studying at Giessen, Gottingen and Berlin, he spent a few years in Italy studying the fine arts, and established himself in 1842 at Giessen as a teacher of philosophy.

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  • At the age of seventeen he went to the university of Gottingen, where he spent a little over a year; he joined the corps of the Hannoverana and took a leading part in the social life of the students.

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  • So early as 1783 Johannes von Muller of Gottingen had called attention to the historical figures appearing in the Nibelungenlied, identifying Etzel as Attila, Dietrich of Bern as Theodoric of Verona, and the Burgundian kings Gunther, Giselher and Gernot as the Gundaharius, Gislaharius and Godomar of the Lex Burgundiorum; in 1820 Julius Leichtlen (Neuaufgefundenes Bruchstick des Nibelungenliedes, Freiburg-im-Breisgau) roundly declared that "the Nibelungenlied rests entirely on a historical foundation, and that any other attempt to explain it must fail."

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  • Schmid in Jena, Buhle in Gottingen, Tennemann in Marburg, and Snell in Giessen, with many others, made it the basis of their philosophical teaching, while theologians like Tieftrunk, Staudlin, and Ammon eagerly applied it to Christian doctrine and morality.

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  • He laid the foundation of his philosophical system very early in his Metaphysik (Leipzig, 1841) and his Logik (1843), short books published while he was still a junior lecturer at Leipzig, from which university he migrated to Gottingen, succeeding Herbart in the chair of philosophy.

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  • Appended to this volume is a complete list of Lotze's writings, compiled by Professor Rehnisch of Gottingen.

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  • See his essays Ueber den Begriff der Schonheit (Gottingen, 1845) and Ueber Bedingungen der Kunstschonheit, ibid.

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  • He was educated at Gottingen and Leipzig.

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  • Rettberg, Kirchengeschichte Deutschlands (GOttingen, 1845-1848) have also demonstrated its untrustworthiness, while the Bollandists, De Rivaz and Joh.

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  • Dialekts (Gottingen, 1877).

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  • The want of books and scientific apparatus at Cassel induced him to resort frequently to Gottingen, where he became betrothed to Therese Heyne, the daughter of the illustrious philologist, a clever and cultivated woman, but illsuited to be Forster's wife.

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  • Neukirch, Das Leben des Peter Damiani (Gottingen, 1875); L.

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  • Matriculating at the university of Gottingen in 1811, he began by devoting himself to astronomy under Carl Friedrich Gauss; but he enlisted in the Hanseatic Legion for the campaign of 1813 - 14, and became lieutenant of artillery in the Prussian service in 1815.

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  • Having returned to Gottingen in 1816, he was at once appointed by Benhardt von Lindenau his assistant in the observatory of Seeberg near Gotha.

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  • (Gottingen, 1905); Zeit.

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  • He studied law at Gottingen and Leipzig, but ultimately devoted himself entirely to literary studies.

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  • Gilbert, Studien zur altspartanischen Geschichte, Gottingen, 1872, p. 34 foll.).

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  • de Sacy (in the above-mentioned Memoires); Histoire des Sassanides (texte Persan), by Jaubert (Paris, 18 43); Historia priorum regum Persarum, Persian and Latin, by Jenish (Vienna, 1782); Mirchondi ltistoria Taheridarum, Persian and Latin, by Mitscherlik (Gottingen, 1814, 2nd ed., Berlin, 1819); Historia Samanidarum, Persian and Latin, by Wilken (Gottingen, 1808); Histoire des Samanides, translated by Defremery (Paris, 18 45); Historia Ghaznevidarum, Persian and Latin, by Wilken (Berlin, 1832); Geschichte der Sultane aus dem Geschlechte Bujeh, Persian and German, by Wilken (Berlin, 1835); followed by Erdmann's Erlauterung and Erganzung (Kazan, 1836); Historia Seldschuckidarum, ed.

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  • Bennigsen, having studied at the university of Gottingen, entered the Hanoverian civil service.

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  • Wellhausen, De gentibus et familiis Judaeis (Gottingen, 1870); Prolegomena (Eng.

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  • After studying medicine at Jena, he graduated doctor at Gottingen in 1775, and was appointed extraordinary professor of medicine in 1776 and ordinary professor in 1778.

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  • He died at Gottingen on the 22nd of January 1840.

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  • His most important anthropological work was his description of sixty human crania published originally in fasciculi under the title Collectionis suae craniorum diversarum gentium illustratae decades (Gottingen, 1790-1828).

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  • In 1866 he received three years' leave of absence to collect fresh materials, and in 1869 succeeded Heinrich Ewald as professor of oriental languages at Gottingen.

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  • He died at Gottingen on the 22nd of December 1891.

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  • Brandt's Mandaische Schriften, with notes (Gottingen, 1893).

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  • He studied at Breslau, Gottingen and Berlin, first law, then theology; and in 1839 became professor ordinarius of theology at Halle (1839).

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  • This was Berthold, who devoted a long chapter of his Beitrdge zur Anatomie, published at Gottingen in 1831, to a consideration of the subject.

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  • JOHANN AUGUST WILHELM NEANDER (1789-1850), German theologian and church historian, was born at Gottingen on the 17th of January 1789.

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  • But before the year had closed the events of the Franco-Prussian War compelled his removal to Gottingen.

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  • He was educated at the Carolinum, an endowed school at Osnabruck, and studied at the universities of Gottingen and Heidelberg.

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  • Langenberg, Uber die Verheiltnisse Meister Eckharts zur niederdeutschen Mystik (Gottingen, 1896); W.

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  • Kastner of Gottingen.

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  • At Halle Michaelis felt himself out of place, and in 1745 he gladly accepted an invitation to Gottingen as privatdozent.

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  • and in Gottingen he remained till his death in 1791.

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  • The personal character of Michaelis can be read between the lines 1 By a strange fortune of war it was the occupation of Gottingen by the French in the Seven Years' War, and the friendly relations he formed with the officers, that procured him the Paris MS. from which he edited Abulfeda's description of Egypt.

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  • 2 (Gottingen, 1898), Nos.

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  • In 1759, after completing with his pupils a tour of two years' duration through Gottingen, Utrecht, Paris, Marseilles and Turin, he resigned his tutorship and settled at Augsburg.

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  • Having studied theology at the university of Gottingen under Heinrich Ewald, he established himself there in 1870 as privat-docent for Old Testament history.

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  • Resigning in 1882 owing to conscientious scruples, he became professor extraordinarius of oriental languages in the faculty of philology at Halle, was elected professor ordinarius at Marburg in 1885, and was transferred to Gottingen in 1892.

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  • The best known of his works are De gentibus et familiis Judaeis (Gottingen, 1870); Der Text der Bucher Samuelis untersucht (Gottingen, 1871); Die Phariseier and Sadducder (Greifswald, 1874); Prolegomena zur Geschichte Israels (Berlin, 1882; Eng.

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  • Haller occupied in the new university of Gottingen (founded 1737) a position corresponding to that of Boerhaave at Leiden, and in like manner influenced a very large circle of pupils, The appreciation of his work in physiology belongs to the history of that science; we are only concerned here with its influence on medicine.

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  • The enthusiasm of the younger Brunonians in Germany was as great as in Edinburgh or in Italy, and led to serious riots in the university of Gottingen.

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  • Gottingen (1890), xxxvi.

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  • (Gottingen, 1862-1886); E.

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  • He was intended for the medical profession, and studied at the universities of Berlin, Halle, Gottingen and Leiden.

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  • Shortly after the foundation of the university of Gottingen appeared Zeitungen von gelehrten Sachsen (1739), still famous as the Gottingische gelehrte Anzeigen, which during its long and influential career has been conducted by professors of that university, and among others by Haller, Heyne and Eichhorn.

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  • Gersdorf's Repertorium, the Gelehrte Anzeigen of Gottingen and of Munich, Sand the Heidelbergische Jahrbucher were the sole survivors.

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  • JULIUS AUGUST LUDWIG WEGSCHEIDER (1771-1849), German theologian, was born at ktibelingen, Brunswick, on the 17th of September 1771, studied theology at Helmstedt, was tutor in a Hamburg family 1795-1805, Repetent at Gottingen, professor of theology at Rinteln in Hesse (1806-1815), and at Halle from 1815.

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  • His ardour for historical studies was further stimulated by Schlozer, when Muller went (1769) to the university of Gottingen, nominally to study theology.

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  • Passing to the university of Gottingen he took his degree in classical philology and ancient history, but the bent of his mind was definitely towards the philosophical side of theology.

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  • ONNO KLOPP (1822-1903), German historian, was born at Leer on the 9th of October 1822, and was educated at the universities of Bonn, Berlin and Gottingen.

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  • Strenge, Quaestiones philochoreae (Gottingen, 1868); C. Wachsmuth, Einleitung in das Studium der alten Geschichte (1895).

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  • Alphonsi de Ligorio (6 vols., Paris, 1899); Gustav Anrich, Das antike Mysterienwesen (Gottingen, 1894); L.

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  • (Gottingen, 1862-1886).

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  • Mosheim was much consulted by the authorities when the new university of Gottingen was being formed; especially in the framing of the statutes of the theological faculty, and the provisions for making the theologians independent of the ecclesiastical courts.

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  • He died at Gottingen on the 9th of September.

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  • In 1792 Lang again betook himself to a university, this time to Gottingen.

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  • (Gottingen, 1885), which contains an analysis of the dialectic peculiarities of Mannyng's work; O.

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  • of Gottingen and at the junction of railways to Cassel and Nordhausen.

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  • See Grysar, Die Akademiker Philo and Antiochus (1849);; Hermann, De Philone Larissaeo (Gottingen, 1851' and 1855).

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  • His mathematical capacity was early noticed; he pursued his studies at Gottingen under Abraham Gotthelf Kastner (1719-1800), and in 1787 he went to Berlin and studied practical astronomy under E.

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  • JOHANN GOTTLIEB BUHLE (1763-1821), German scholar and philosopher, was born at Brunswick, and educated at Gottingen.

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  • He became professor of philosophy at Gottingen, Moscow (1840) and Brunswick.

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  • On his return he was in 1750 made professor extraordinarius of philosophy in Jena, but in 1753 he accepted an invitation to become professor ordinarius at Gottingen.

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  • The Scholia (from the Gottingen MS.) have been edited by G.

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  • zu Gottingen, xxxviii.

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  • Brandt, Schriften aus der Genza oder Sidva Rabba (Gottingen, 1893).

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  • After studying at Giessen, Heidelberg and Gottingen, he entered on the practice of the law.

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  • Here he introduced many improvements in map-making, and gained a scientific reputation which led (in 1751) to his election to the chair of economy and mathematics in the university of Gottingen.

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  • But his fame rests chiefly on his lunar tables, communicated in 1752, with new solar tables, to the Royal Society of Gottingen, and published in their Transactions (vol.

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  • C. Lichtenberg and published in one volume (Opera inedita, Gottingen, 1775).

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  • It contains an easy and accurate method for calculating eclipses; an essay on colour, in which three primary colours are recognized; a catalogue of 998 zodiacal stars; and a memoir, the earliest of any real value, on the proper motion of eighty stars, originally communicated to the Gottingen Royal Society in 1760.

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  • Kastner, Elogium Tobiae Mayeri (Gottingen, 1762); Connaissance des temps, 1767, p. 187 (J.

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  • Putter, Geschichte von der Universiteit zu Gottingen, i.

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  • P. Woodward, a model of clear systematic exposition, and the exhaustive treatise on the Malacozoa or Weichthiere by Professor Keferstein of Gottingen, published as part of Bronn's Klassen and Ordnungen des Thier-Reichs.

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  • (Gottingen, 1878); and A.

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  • He lived for a time in Berlin and became a privatdozent, but was unable to obtain a professorship. He therefore proceeded to Gottingen and afterwards to Munich, where he died of apoplexy at the very moment when the influence of Franz von Baader had at last obtained a position for him.

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  • In 1829 he went to Germany, and after studying at Gottingen and Berlin (where he came under the influence of Heeren, Ottfried Muller, Schleiermacher, Neander and Bdckh) he accompanied Bunsen to Italy and Rome.

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  • He was educated at Stade and the university of Gottingen.

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  • In 1766 he was appointed extraordinary professor of philosophy at Gottingen.

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  • In 1772 Beckmann was elected a member of the Royal Society of Gottingen, and he contributed valuable scientific dissertations to its proceedings until 1783, when he withdrew from all further share in its work.

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  • (Leipzig, 1894); Ernst Bernheim, Zur Geschichte des Wormser Konkordates (Gottingen, 1878); Martin Rule, The Life and Times of St Anselm (2 vols., London, 1883); and Klemm, Der Investiturstreit unter Heinrich I.

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  • Schirrmacher, Die letzten Hohenstaufen (Gottingen, 1871); A.

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  • See Standlin, Geschichte des Rationalismus (Gottingen, 1826); Hase, Theologische Streitschriften in Gesammelte Werke, viii.

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  • Wiistenfeld (Gottingen, 1842-1847).

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  • Erbt, Die Purimsage (Berlin, 1900); Abrahams, Jewish Life in the Middle Ages; Lagarde, Purim, ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der Religion (Gottingen, 885); Steinschneider, Purim and Parodie (Berlin, 1902); P. Haupt, Purim (Leipzig, 1906); I.

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  • See Marx, Zur Wiirdigung des Theophrastus von Hohenheim (Gottingen, 1842); Mook, Theophrastus Paracelsus, eine kritische Studie (Warzburg, 1876); Hartman, Life of P. T.

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  • Lagarde (Gottingen, 1883), p. 89, 1.61.

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  • Munk, Mélanges (quoted above); Guttmann, Die Philosophie des Sal.-ibn Gabirol (Gottingen, 1889); D.

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  • After studying law at the universities of Berlin, Gottingen and Heidelberg (1813-1817), he settled as a Privatdocent, in 1821, at the university of Berlin, where he became ordinary professor of law in 1827.

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  • (See also Abhandlungen der koniglichen Gesellschaft der Wissenschaften zu Gottingen, philol.

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  • Wiistenfeld (Gottingen, 1858-1860).

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  • Noldeke, Geschichte des Qoran's (Gottingen, 1860; 2nd ed.

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  • He learnt law at the universities of Heidelberg and Gottingen.

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  • Further study of political economy soon enabled him to pass out of this phase, and in 1850 he settled down to practise as an advocate at Gottingen.

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  • He was educated at Edinburgh Academy and the universities of Edinburgh and Gottingen, where he studied philosophy under Lotze.

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  • Educated at the universities of Heidelberg and Gottingen, he showed an interest in art and visited Italy; but returning to Frankfort he turned his attention to the study of history, and became secretary of the Gesellschaft fib' dltere deutsche Geschichtskunde.

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  • He took first-class honours in classics at Aberdeen, subsequently studied at Gottingen (under Ritschl) and at New College, Hampstead, and entered the Congregational ministry.

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  • He received a careful education at home, afterwards (in 1803) going to the Bavarian national university of Landshut and to Gottingen.

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  • Eschatologie (Gottingen, 1905), pp. 250 sqq.

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  • In 1829 he entered the university of Leipzig, and one year later that of Gottingen, where, under the influence of Otfried Miller, he finally decided to devote himself to the archaeological side of philology.

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  • From Gottingen he proceeded to Berlin, where he graduated in 1833 as doctor with the thesis De tabulis Eugubinis.

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  • At Giessen he lectured as an extraordinary professor, and at Gottingen, in 1824, published his treatise, Ueber das Wesen der Geschichte.

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  • Wrede, Die Ein fuhrung der Reformation in Luneburg (Gottingen, 1887), and W.

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  • In less direct relation stands Lotze, who, although under other influences he developed a different view even in logic, certainly let no point in the doctrine of his great predecessor at Gottingen escape him.

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  • In 1817, after the publication of his first work, Aegineticorum liber, he received an appointment at the Magdaleneum in Breslau, and in 1819 he was made adjunct professor of ancient literature in the university of Gottingen, his subject being the archaeology and history of ancient art.

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  • Miller's position at Gottingen being rendered unpleasant by the political troubles which followed the accession of Ernest Augustus (duke of Cumberland) to the throne of Hanover in 1837, he applied for permission to travel; and in 1839 he left Germany.

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  • Muller (Gottingen, 1841); F.

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  • 1007-1028; C. Dilthey, Otfried Muller (Gottingen, 1898); E.

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  • Niese, Nachrichten von der wissenschaftlichen Gesellschaft zu GOttingen, Phil.-Hist.

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  • He died at Gottingen, on the 9th of September 1869.

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  • Returning to Germany in 1855 he was professor of history successively at the universities of Rostock, Tubingen (which he left in 1866 because of his political views), Marburg and Gottingen.

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  • He retained his chair at Gottingen until his death at Bremen on the 3rd of June 1882.

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  • Blumenbach at Gottingen.

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  • While at Frankfurt, on his way to examine the Neanderthal skull at Bonn, he was struck with paralysis, and died at Gottingen a few months later on the 13th of May 1864.

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  • In 1843, after his removal to Gottingen, he began his great Handworterbuch der Physiologie, mit Riicksicht auf physiologische Pathologie, and brought out the fifth (supplementary) volume in 1852; the only contributions of his own in it were on the sympathetic nerve, nerve-ganglia and nerve-endings, and he modestly disclaimed all merit except as being the organizer.

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  • While resident in Italy for his health from 1845 to 1847, he occupied himself with researches on the electrical organ of the torpedo and on nervous organization generally; these he published in1853-1854(Neurologische Untersuchungen, Gottingen), and therewith his physiological period may be said to end.

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  • His quarrel with the materialists began with his oration at the Gottingen meeting of the NaturforscherVersammlung in 1854, on "Menschenschopfung and Seelensubstanz."

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  • This was followed by a series of " Physiological Letters " in the Allgemeine Zeitung, by an essay on " Glauben and Wissen," and by the most important piece of this series, " Der Kampf urn die Seele by (Gottingen, 1857).

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  • In what may be called his fourth and last period, Wagner became anthropologist and archaeologist, occupied himself with the cabinet of skulls in the Gottingen museum collected by Blumenbach and with the excavation of prehistoric remains, corresponded actively with the anthropological societies of Paris and London, and organized, in co-operation with the veteran K.

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  • von Baer, a successful congress of anthropologists at Gottingen in 1861.

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  • P. de Lagarde, Armenische Studien (Gottingen, 1877) ~.

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  • See Willigerod, Geschichte von Minden (Gottingen, 1808); and Henze, Fiihrer durch Minden and Umgegend (Munden, 1900).

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  • He was educated at the state school in Weikersheim, where his father was superintendent, at the gymnasium at Heilbronn and at the university of Gottingen (1770-1774), studying under J.

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  • On the death of Michaelis in 1788 he was elected professor ordinarius at Gottingen, where he lectured not only on Oriental languages and on the exegesis of the Old and New Testaments, but also on political history.

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  • He continued to study history in London, and at Berlin and Gottingen, graduating as doctor of laws at Gottingen in 1816.

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  • Having studied law at Gottingen, he became chief magistrate at Lilienthal, near Bremen, in 1788.

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  • He then studied at Gottingen and Berlin, becoming a friend of Bismarck at Gottingen, and after a period of European travel returned in 1834 to America, where he continued his legal studies.

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  • Gottingen, 1871, vol.

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  • After having beedsuccessively Repetent in Gottingen and teacher in the public schools of Dortmund (Westphalia) and Altdorf (Bavaria), he was, in 1785, appointed second professor of theology in the university of Altdorf, whence he was translated to a chair in Jena in 1804, where he succeeded Griesbach in 1812.

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  • In 1832 he was called to Marburg as professor ordinarius of classical literature; and in 1842 he was transferred to Gottingen to the chair of philology and archaeology, vacant by the death of Otfried Muller.

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  • He died at Gottingen on the 31st of December 1855.

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  • Gottingen, 1893); W.

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  • griechischen Denker (Gottingen, 1840).

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  • GOTTINGEN, a town of Germany, in the Prussian province of Hanover, pleasantly situated at the west foot of the Hainberg (1200 ft.), in the broad and fertile valley of the Leine, 67 m.

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  • After being educated at Berlin, Gottingen and Jena, in the last of which places he formed a close and lifelong friendship with Schiller, he married Fraulein von Dacherode, a lady of birth and fortune, and in 1802 was appointed by the Prussian government first resident and then minister plenipotentiary at Rome.

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  • KARL DIETRICH EBERHARD KOENIG (1774-1851), German palaeontologist, was born at Brunswick in 1774, and was educated at Gottingen.

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  • He studied chemistry at Gottingen, graduating as Ph.D.

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  • He subsequently held several appointments at Gottingen, being privat docent (1860), and extraordinary professor (1870).

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  • After studying under Fichte at Jena he gave his first philosophical lectures at Gottingen in 1805, whence he removed in 1809 to occupy the chair formerly held by Kant at Konigsberg.

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  • Here he also established and conducted a seminary of pedagogy till 1833, when he returned once more to Gottingen, and remained there as professor of philosophy till his death on the 14th of August 1841.

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  • After studying at Giessen, Gottingen and Berlin, he spent a few years in Italy studying the fine arts, and established himself in 1842 at Giessen as a teacher of philosophy.

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  • At the age of seventeen he went to the university of Gottingen, where he spent a little over a year; he joined the corps of the Hannoverana and took a leading part in the social life of the students.

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  • So early as 1783 Johannes von Muller of Gottingen had called attention to the historical figures appearing in the Nibelungenlied, identifying Etzel as Attila, Dietrich of Bern as Theodoric of Verona, and the Burgundian kings Gunther, Giselher and Gernot as the Gundaharius, Gislaharius and Godomar of the Lex Burgundiorum; in 1820 Julius Leichtlen (Neuaufgefundenes Bruchstick des Nibelungenliedes, Freiburg-im-Breisgau) roundly declared that "the Nibelungenlied rests entirely on a historical foundation, and that any other attempt to explain it must fail."

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  • Schmid in Jena, Buhle in Gottingen, Tennemann in Marburg, and Snell in Giessen, with many others, made it the basis of their philosophical teaching, while theologians like Tieftrunk, Staudlin, and Ammon eagerly applied it to Christian doctrine and morality.

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