Glycerin sentence example

glycerin
  • Glycerin is also a product of certain kinds of fermentation, especially of the alcoholic fermentation of sugar; consequently it is a constituent of many wines and other fermented liquors.
    4
    1
  • It is obtainable from most natural fatty bodies by the action of alkalis and similar reagents, whereby the fats are decomposed, water being taken up, and glycerin being formed together with the alkaline salt of some particular acid (varying with the nature of the fat).
    0
    0
  • Owing to their possession of this common property, these natural fatty bodies and various artificial derivatives of glycerin, which behave in the same way when treated with alkalis, are known as glycerides.
    0
    0
  • In the ordinary process of soap-making the glycerin remains dissolved in the aqueous liquors from which the soap is separated.
    0
    0
  • Berthelot, and many other chemists, from whose researches it results that glycerin is a trihydric alcohol indicated by the formula C 3 H 5 (OH) 3j the natural fats and oils, and the glycerides generally, being substances of the nature of compound esters formed from glycerin by the replacement of the hydrogen of the OH groups by the radicals of certain acids, called for that reason "fatty acids."
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Some other glycerides isolated from natural sources are analogous in composition to tristearin, but with this difference, that the three radicals which replace hydrogen in glycerin are not all identical; thus kephalin, myelin and lecithin are glycerides in which two hydrogens are replaced by fatty acid radicals, and the third by a complex phosphoric acid derivative.
    0
    0
  • According to Louis Pasteur, about oth of the sugar transformed under ordinary conditions in the fermentation of grape juice and similar saccharine liquids into alcohol and other products becomes converted into glycerin.
    0
    0
  • The simplest modes of preparing pure glycerin are based on the saponification of fats, either by alkalis or by superheated steam, and on the circumstance that, although glycerin cannot be distilled by itself under the ordinary pressure without decomposition, it can be readily volatilized in a current of superheated steam.
    0
    0
  • Commercial glycerin is mostly obtained from the "spent lyes" of the soap-maker.
    0
    0
  • Evaporation and subsequent distillation under a high vacuum gives crude glycerin.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The impure glycerin obtained as above is purified by redistillation in steam and evaporation in vacuum pans.
    0
    0
  • Its solvent power is also utilized in the production of various colouring fluids, where the colouring matter would not dissolve in water alone; thus aniline violet, the tinctorial constituents of madder, and various allied colouring matters dissolve in glycerin, forming liquids which remain coloured even when diluted with water, the colouring matters being either retained in suspension or dissolved by the glycerin present in the diluted fluid.
    0
    0
  • Glycerin is also employed in the manufacture of formic acid.
    0
    0
  • In its medicinal use glycerin is an excellent solvent for such substances as iodine, alkaloids, alkalis, &c., and is therefore used for applying them to diseased surfaces, especially as it aids in their absorption.
    0
    0
  • Given by the mouth glycerin produces purging if large doses are administered, and has the same action if only a small quantity be introduced into the rectum.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Glycerin is useless as a food and is not in any sense a substitute for cod-liver oil.
    0
    0
  • Glycerin when treated with hydrochloric acid gives propenyl dichlorhydrin, which may be oxidized to s-dichloracetone.
    0
    0
  • In preparing lead plaster by boiling olive oil with oxide of lead and a little water - a process palpably analogous to that of the soap-boilerhe obtained a sweet substance which, called by himself " Olsiiss " (" principium dulce oleorum "), is now known as " glycerin."
    0
    0
  • These discoveries of Geoffroy and Scheele formed the basis of Chevreul's researches by which he established the constitution of oils and the true nature of soap. In the article Oils it is pointed out that all fatty oils and fats are mixtures of glycerides, that is, of bodies related to the alcohol glycerin C 3H5(OH)3 i and some fatty acid such as palmitic acid (C 16 H 31 0 2)H.
    0
    0
  • The corresponding decomposition of a glyceride into an acid and glycerin takes place when the glyceride is distilled in superheated steam, or by boiling in water mixed with a suitable proportion of caustic potash or soda.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The soap solution which results from the combination forms soap-size and is a mixture of soap with water, the excess alkali, and the glycerin liberated from the oil.
    0
    0
  • In curd soaps, however, which form the basis of most household soap, the uncombined alkali and the glycerin are separated by " salting out, " and the soap in this condition contains about 30% of water.
    0
    0
  • Soaps made by this process contain the glycerin originally present in the oil, but, in view of their liability to contain free alkali and unsaponified oil, the process has been largely given up.
    0
    0
  • Glycerin soap ordinarily consists of about equal parts of pure hard soap and glycerin (the latter valuable for its emollient properties).
    0
    0
  • The soap is melted by heat, the glycerin is stirred in, and the mixture strained and poured into forms, in which it hardens but slowly into a transparent mass.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • With excess of glycerin a fluid soap is formed, soap being soluble in that body, and such fluid soap has only feeble lathering properties.
    0
    0
  • Soap containing small proportions of glycerin, on the other hand, forms a very tenacious lather, and when soap bubbles of an enduring character are desired glycerin is added to the solution.
    0
    0
  • The complete analysis involves an examination of the fatty matter, of the various forms in which the alkalis are present - free and combined glycerin, &c.
    0
    0
  • A new and energetic spirit was introduced by Scheele; among other discoveries this gifted experimenter isolated and characterized many organic acids, and proved the general occurrence of glycerin (Olsiiss) in all oils and fats.
    0
    0
  • Owing to their want of adhesiveness, they are, however, usually mounted on glass as microscopic slides, either in glycerin jelly, Canada balsam or some other suitable medium.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Some fusel oil, glycerin and succinic acid appear to be formed simultaneously, but in small amount.
    0
    0
  • There is present in the seeds an enzyme which rapidly decomposes the oil if the seeds are crushed and kept, setting free a fatty acid and glycerin.
    0
    0
  • That quinine, chloroform, glycerin, alcohol, with others, had no attractive influence on them - negative chemiotaxis.
    0
    0
  • The neutral fats are composed of fatty acids and glycerin.
    0
    0
  • Some glycerin may be re-formed, but with very strong alkaline solutions little of the glycerin molecule escapes destruction, oxalic acid and several other products resulting.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Calcium or potassium sulphides and potassium hydrosulphides completely reduce nitroglycerin to glycerin, some of the sulphur being oxidized and some precipitated.
    0
    0
  • Hydriodic acid reduces it to glycerin and nitric oxide.
    0
    0
  • The trioses are the aldehyde and ketone mentioned above as oxidation products of glycerin.
    0
    0
  • Instances of its application are found in the separation of orthoand para-nitrophenol, the o-compound distilling and the p- remaining behind; in the separation of aniline from the mixture obtained by reducing nitrobenzene; of the naphthols from the melts produced by fusing the naphthalene monosulphonic acids with potash; and of quinoline from the reaction between aniline, nitrobenzene, glycerin, and sulphuric acid (the product being first steam distilled to remove any aniline, nitrobenzene, or glycerin, then treated with alkali, and again steam distilled when quinoline comes over).
    0
    0
  • When heated with glycerin to ioo C. it yields formic acid and carbon dioxide; above this temperature, allyl alcohol is formed.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A dilute potash readily emulsionizes fats, and on boiling saponifies them with formation of a soap and glycerin.
    0
    0
  • A lotion containing ten minims of the dilute acid to an ounce of water and glycerin will relieve itching due to any cause; and is useful in some forms of neuralgia.
    0
    0
  • It is a most perfect non-conductor of electricity, and in its dry state the fibres frequently get so electrically excited as to seriously interfere with their working, so that it becomes necessary to moisten them with glycerin or soapy solutions.
    0
    0
  • This occurs in combination with glycerin, constituting the greater part of the bulk of the oil.
    0
    0
  • The latter portion, about Io% of the weight of the nutmegs, consists chiefly of myristin, which is a compound of myristic acid, C 14 H 28 0 2, with glycerin.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • At the same time various subsidiary products such as glycerin, succinic acid, small quantities of higher alcohols, volatile acids and compound esters are produced.
    0
    0
  • The sugar, as we have seen, has disappeared, and alcohol, glycerin and other substances have been formed.
    0
    0
  • The normal proportion of glycerin varies between 7 and 14 parts for every 100 parts of alcohol in the wine, but even these limits are frequently not reached or exceeded.
    0
    0
  • These comprise gummy and albuminous matters, acid, salts, glycerin and other matters of which we have so far little knowledge.
    0
    0
  • Although these old wines may contain absolutely a very large quantity of acid, they may not appear acid to the palate inasmuch as the other constituents, particularly the glycerin and gummy matters, will have likewise increased in relative quantity to such an extent as to hide the acid flavour.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Frequently alcohol, tannin, glycerin, and similar wine constituents are also added.
    0
    0
  • Chemically the sweet sherry differs from the natural dry light wines in that it contains relatively high proportions of alcohol, extractives, sugar and sulphates, and small quantities of acid and glycerin.
    0
    0
  • Comparing the fine wines of the better vintages with, for instance, the red wines of the Gironde, the main features of interest are the relatively high proportions of acid and glycerin and the low proportion of tannin which they contain.
    0
    0
  • The glycerin is used in tonsillitis and the lozenges in pharyngitis.
    0
    0
  • In 1855, reviewing the various substances that had been obtained from glycerin, he reached the conclusion that glycerin is a body of alcoholic nature formed on the type of three molecules of water, as common alcohol is on that of one, and was thus led (1856) to the discovery of the glycols or diatomic alcohols, bodies similarly related to the double water type.
    0
    0
  • With potassium iodide, glycerin and water, it forms the preparation spirone, which has been used as a spray inhalation in paroxysmal sneezing and asthma.
    0
    0
  • The valerianic;ester of guaiacol is known as geosote, the benzoic as benzosol,' the salicylic as guaiacolsalol, while the glycerin ether appears as guaiamar.
    0
    0
  • To deaden the vibration of the springs after a load has been placed on the platform, and thus to enable the weights and values of the goods to be read rapidly, the piston of a glycerin cylinder is attached to the end of the lever which pulls upon the hook of the horizontal bar and is worked by it in the glycerin.
    0
    0
  • In order to deaden the vibrations of the index arm when weighing goods a vertical rod is attached to the lever from the lever machine near its left-hand end, and this rod carries on its lower end a plunger which works in a closed cylindrical dash-pot containing oil or glycerin.
    0
    0
  • At the bottom of the vertical leg from the goods-pan there is also a projecting piece which is attached to the top of a vertical piston rod, the piston of which plays in a dash-pot of glycerin as the beam sways, and deadens the vibrations of the index arm.
    0
    0
  • By means of suitable and simple mechanism this vertical movement of the cylinders works plunger pistons in a pair of cylinders which contain glycerin, and these deaden the vibrations of the machinery while weighing is going on.
    0
    0
  • By gentle oxidation with potassium permanganate it may be converted into glycerin.
    0
    0
  • Glycerin is chiefly used as immersion fluid.
    0
    0
  • In this way a monochromat for glycerin of a numerical aperture 1.25 gives a relative numerical aperture of 2.50.
    0
    0
  • In addition to the fatty acids mentioned already there occur also, although in much smaller quantities, other fatty acids combined with glycerin, as natural glycerides, such as the glyceride of butyric acid in butterfat, of caproic, caprylic and capric acids in butter-fat and in coco-nut oil, lauric acid in coco-nut and palm-nut oils, and myristic acid in mace butter.
    0
    0
  • If the action of air and moisture is allowed free play, the hydrolysis of the oils and fats may become so complete that only the insoluble fatty acids remain behind, the glycerin being washed away.
    0
    0
  • The conversion of the glycerides (triglycerides) into fatty acids and glycerin must be looked upon as a reaction which takes place in stages, one molecule of a triglyceride being converted first into diglyceride and one molecule of fatty acid, the diglyceride then being changed into monoglyceride, and a second molecule of fatty acid, and finally the monoglyceride being converted into one molecule of fatty acid and glycerin.
    0
    0
  • All these reactions take place concurrently, so that one molecule of a diglyceride may still retain its ephemeral existence, whilst another molecule is already broken up completely into free fatty acids and glycerin.
    0
    0
  • Lanolin, linseed oil, wax, spermaceti, &c., also belong to this group. The paraffins, glycerin and vaseline, although not fats, have much the same effect when applied externally, but they are not nutritive.
    0
    0
  • For labels, &c., it is usual to mix sugar or glycerin with it to prevent it from cracking.
    0
    0
  • Glycerin and organic silicones combine with soothing aloe and allantoin to renew, calm, and condition skin.
    0
    0
  • I usually use glycerin instead of oil under the slide for easier cleanup.
    0
    0
  • Gages can be filled with a variety of fluids including glycerin, mineral oil and silicone oil.
    0
    0
  • The best thing I have found it to select pieces of jellied glycerin that are bubble free to start with.
    0
    0
  • Water and alcohol are removed to produce 80-88% pure glycerin that is ready to be sold as crude glycerin.
    0
    0
  • Our soaps are made from vegetable glycerin base and.. .
    0
    0
  • The gel contains hydrogen peroxide which bleaches the teeth, together with glycerin and purified water to protect your teeth from dehydration.
    0
    0
  • They put out tubes holding cuttings of milkweed stems with two leaves, whole potted milkweed plants, and microscope slides coated with glycerin.
    0
    0
  • Glycerin acts as a preservative against decomposition, owing to its antiseptic qualities, which also led to its being employed to preserve untanned leather (especially during transit when exported, the hides being, moreover, kept soft and supple); to make solutions of gelatin, albumen, gum, paste, cements, &c. which will keep without decomposition; to preserve meat and other edibles; to mount anatomical preparations; to preserve vaccine lymph unchanged; and for many similar purposes.
    0
    0
  • Fischer, Ann., 1882, 215, p. 283), or from glycerin diacetate and concentrated nitric acid in the cold (E.
    0
    0
  • Biodiesel is created by removing glycerin from soybean oil.
    0
    0
  • Solvent bases include alcohol, glycerin, and vinegar.
    0
    0
  • Salves commonly include other herbal and natural ingredients, such as arnica, calendula, lavender, and glycerin.
    0
    0
  • Non-medicinal ingredients include gelatin, glycerin and purified water.
    0
    0
  • These products have fewer ingredients than chemical laden foundations, and they are made with natural ingredients like such as glycerin, clay, and distilled water.
    0
    0
  • You'll love the Cinderella glass slippers and the Frog Prince Glycerin Soap available at Favors by Serendipity.
    0
    0
  • Rolled fondant's additional ingredients are gelatin, corn syrup (glucose), and glycerin.
    0
    0
  • Another alternative is making fondant using a traditional recipe with glucose and glycerin.
    0
    0
  • Ruby purple in color, coupled with high glycerin levels, result in a surprisingly green wine.
    0
    0
  • The hyperosmotic laxatives are glycerin and lactulose (Chronulac, Duphalac), both of which act by holding water within the intestine.
    0
    0
  • Garlic juice can be combined with equal parts of glycerin and a carrier oil such as olive or sweet olive and applied (one to three drops) to the infected ear every three hours.
    0
    0
  • For this reason you will see ingredients like sodium lauryl sulfate, Cocamide DEA, Parabens, glycerin, citric acid, and many other familiar but phonetically complicated agents.
    0
    0
  • In soap making, you can melt old bits of soap, glycerin soap blocks, or solid fat such as lard or tallow.
    0
    0
  • A dispersing solution can be a patented product, or a simple combination of witch hazel, alcohol, distilled water, and glycerin (except for vegan brands which will use alternatives to glycerin).
    0
    0
  • It's often composed of witch hazel, alcohol, distilled water and glycerin (except for vegan brands which will use alternatives to glycerin).
    0
    0
  • In a bucket, pour in 2.5 gallons of hot water, then add melted soap mixture, washing soda, borax and glycerin.
    0
    0
  • Some recipes also call for vinegar and/or glycerin.
    0
    0
  • As you learn and discover more about soap making, you will find out about glycerin, castor oil, sodium hydroxide, borax, hot process soap making and many more terms and techniques.
    0
    0
  • Melt and pour soap making involves taking a base soap, such as bulk glycerin or goat's milk soap, melting it down, adding fragrance and color, and putting it into a mold.
    0
    0
  • Most beginners start with glycerin soap, also known as melt and pour soap making because its made by melting a soap base, adding color, scent and other additives, and pouring it into molds.
    0
    0
  • For more information on this type of soap making, read Making Glycerin Soap.
    0
    0
  • Add a tablespoon of glycerin and five to ten drops of food coloring.
    0
    0
  • You can make it from scratch with lye and oils, you can grind up soap bars and reblend them, or melt and pour glycerin blocks.
    0
    0
  • The easiest method of soapmaking is to buy glycerin blocks, melting it in the microwave in a covered Pyrex container and pouring into soap molds.
    0
    0
  • Add the olive oil or glycerin and blend the mixture again.
    0
    0
  • If you're wondering how to make glycerin soap with salt added to it, you may be aware of the benefits of both glycerin for smoothing the skin and salt as a gentle exfoliator.
    0
    0
  • It's not recommended to use glycerin soap with salt added to it on the face, however.
    0
    0
  • Glycerin is often a byproduct of commercial soap making.
    0
    0
  • Since glycerin is often used for pharmaceutical purposes, you should be able to find it at your local drugstore.
    0
    0
  • Place the glycerin in a bowl and melt it in the microwave on high for two minutes.
    0
    0
  • After you melt the soap base, such as glycerin or goat's milk, add additives to customize the fragrance, coloring, or texture.
    0
    0
  • Glycerin soap from the store is not formulated to be melted or re-used.
    0
    0
  • Glycerin soap is one of the easiest soaps to make and the best place to start the hobby.
    0
    0
  • In addition to glycerin soaps, there are a variety of products made from ingredients like lye, olive oil, and even oatmeal.
    0
    0
  • For novice adult soap makers, melt and pour soap making projects that involve working with a glycerin base are the most popular.
    0
    0
  • If you are making melt and pour glycerin soap, try embedding a small plastic toy into the bar for a decorative effect.
    0
    0
  • If you're making melt and pour glycerin soap, you can tint your soap with food coloring instead of purchasing special dyes for this task.
    0
    0
  • The start of World War II was also a good time for home soap making, as the government was buying up all of the commercially available grease to make glycerin and thus producing a shortage of manufactured soap products.
    0
    0
  • Also known as glycerin soap making, this craft involves melting a premade soap base to personalize with your own color, fragrance, and skin care additives.
    0
    0
  • Melt and pour soap, also known as "glycerin soap," is created by melting a premade soap base and adding the colors or fragrances of your choice.
    0
    0
  • You will just need some glycerin soap or pour and melt soap blocks and a few other items.
    0
    0
  • Because of these issues, some soap makers prefer to make pour and melt soaps with glycerin, a completely safe, gentle, and natural product.
    0
    0
  • Cut the glycerin into chunks if you are not using the commercial pour and melt type of soap.
    0
    0
  • In the top of the double boiler, melt the glycerin until it is a liquid.
    0
    0
  • Melt and pour soap, commonly known as glycerin soap, is made by adding custom colors, fragrances, and skin care additives to a premade soap base.
    0
    0
  • Liquid Soaps - A popular type of soap in today's market, liquid soaps can be made with a combination of glycerin, milk soap shards, and essential oils.
    0
    0
  • Melt and pour soap making bases are glycerin based.
    0
    0
  • However, a number of variations on basic glycerin soap give amateur soap makers many options.
    0
    0
  • Soap making bases allow the beginning soap maker to experiment with a broad number of variations on basic glycerin soap.
    0
    0
  • Use a clear glycerin soap base, available at most craft stores, and microwave the soap until it is a liquid.
    0
    0
  • The process for transparent soaps, also referred to as glycerin soaps, requires the addition of an ingredient such as alcohol to change the composition of the soap.
    0
    0
  • Glycerin soaps, which are more drying, are also often used for acne.
    0
    0
  • For those with dry skin, rich moisturizers that contain ingredients such as glycerin, dimethicone, and hyaluronic acid are helpful.
    0
    0
  • A highly moisturizing ingredient, like glycerin, will help plump the skin around the eyes, making existing lines less noticeable.
    0
    0
  • It is important to note that this is a temporary fix; glycerin provides moisture and masks wrinkles only while it is worn.
    0
    0
  • You can also add a teaspoon or two of liquid glycerin to moisturize the skin.
    0
    0
  • Blend the baking soda, salt and glycerin, stirring until there are no clumps.
    0
    0
  • You will spend slightly more for the added glycerin (try to find a vegetarian version) and essential oils.
    0
    0
  • If you want to give a little basket of treats, you can also include homemade bubble bath, which is very easy to make with just distilled water, castile soap and glycerin, scented as you like.
    0
    0
  • Prominent among these are glycerin and succinic acid.
    1
    1
  • Glycerin is a viscid, colourless liquid of sp. gr.
    3
    4
  • Certain kinds of copying inks are greatly improved by the substitution of glycerin, in part or entirely, for the sugar or honey usually added.
    1
    2