Gloucester sentence example

gloucester
  • Gloucester is the chief centre of the trade.
    2
    0
  • This was St Bernard's College, founded by Chicheley under licence in mortmain in 1437 for Cistercian monks, on the model of Gloucester Hall and Durham College for the southern and northern Benedictines.
    0
    0
  • It was enclosed by Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, and laid out by Charles II., and contains a fine avenue of Spanish chestnuts planted in his time.
    0
    0
  • Cranmer had been tried by a papal commission, over which Bishop Brooks of Gloucester presided, in September 1555.
    0
    0
  • Carteret discovered the Charlotte and Gloucester Islands, and Pitcairn Island on the 2nd of July 1767; revisited the Santa Cruz group, which was discovered by Mendafia and Quiros; and discovered the strait separating New Britain from New Ireland.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • After Edward's burial, at which he bore the king's banner, Howard, an enemy of the Wydviles, linked his fortunes with those of the duke of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • War broke out with England, but James, made a prisoner by his nobles, was unable to prevent Albany and his ally, Richard, duke of Gloucester (afterwards Richard III.), from taking Berwick and marching to Edinburgh.
    0
    0
  • In 1891 he was elected Master of Pembroke College, which dignity carried with it a canonry of Gloucester Cathedral.
    0
    0
  • In 1387 he supported his uncle Thomas, duke of Gloucester, in his armed opposition to Richard II.
    0
    0
  • After his return to England he sided with his father and the king against Gloucester, and in 1397 was made duke of Hereford.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • One of the steepest gradients in England on an important line is the Lickey incline at Bromsgrove, on the Midland railway between Birmingham and Gloucester, where the slope is 1 in 37 for two miles.
    0
    0
  • They wasted the next few years in the attempt to win Normandy; but Earl Robert of Gloucester, the half-brother of the empress, at length induced her to visit England and raise her standard in the western shires, where his influence was supreme.
    0
    0
  • After his grandfather, George I., became king of Great Britain and Ireland in 1714, Frederick was known as duke of Gloucester and made a knight of the Garter, having previously been betrothed to Wilhelmina Sophia Dorothea (1709-1758), daughter of Frederick William I., king of Prussia, and sister of Frederick the Great.
    0
    0
  • After a marriage between the prince and Lady Diana Spencer, afterwards the wife of John, 4th duke of Bedford, had been frustrated by Walpole, Frederick was married in April 1736 to 1 Frederick was never actually created duke of Gloucester, and when he was raised to the peerage in 1736 it was as duke of Edinburgh only.
    0
    0
  • C(okayne), Complete Peerage, sub "Gloucester."
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He was educated at Gloucester and in Ceylon, and in 1848 entered the Ceylon Rifles as an ensign.
    0
    0
  • In 1822 he was appointed dean of Peterborough; in 1830, bishop of Gloucester (with which the see of Bristol was amalgamated in 1836).
    0
    0
  • She died in the same year at Tamworth (June 12), and was buried in St Peter's church at Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • The early castle, which existed before 1086, was important during the civil wars of Stephen's reign; in 1142 Robert, earl of Gloucester, on his departure for France, committed it to his son's charge.
    0
    0
  • In this he hoped to get help from Cuthbert Tunstall, bishop of London, and so "with the good will of his master" he left Gloucester in the summer of 1523.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A crisis was brought on by his sermon on the resurrection, preached at Easter 1771; and in November 1773 a prosecution was instituted against him in the consistory court of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • Shortly before his death at Colford, near Crediton, Devonshire, on the 25th of September 1805, he completed his Second Thoughts on the Trinity, in reply to a work of the bishop of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • Henry de Bohun figures with the earls of Clare and Gloucester among the twenty-five barons who were elected by their fellows to enforce the terms of the Great Charter.
    0
    0
  • They have also been found in Pleistocene gravels in several parts of England, as Maidenhead, Bromley, Freshfield near Bath, Barnwood near Gloucester, and in the brick-earth of the Thames valley at Crayford, Kent; while their remains also occur in Arctic America.
    0
    0
  • Catherine's name soon began to be coupled with that of Owen Tudor, a Welsh gentleman, and in 1428 Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, secured the passing of an act to prevent her from marrying without the consent of the king and council.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Its builder was probably Robert, earl of Gloucester, who also built Bristol castle.
    0
    0
  • The town received its earliest known grant of municipal privileges sometime before 1147 from Fitz Hamon's successor and son-in-law Robert, earl of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • About 1153, Ivor Bach (or the Little), a neighbouring Welsh chieftain, seized the castle and for a time held William, earl of Gloucester, and the countess prisoners in the hills.
    0
    0
  • Of these bastards the most important is Robert, earl of Gloucester, upon whom fell the main burden of defending Matilda's title against Stephen.
    0
    0
  • Edward the Confessor gave the manor to the church of Winchester in 1042, and it remained with the prior and convent of St Swithin until the 13th century, when it passed by exchange to Gilbert de Clare, earl of Gloucester, though the vassals of the prior and convent remained exempt from dues and tronage in the port.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The town is described as "but little" in 1733, but a few years afterwards it gained a reputation as a watering-place, and the duke of Gloucester built a house here; George III.
    0
    0
  • Thorpe gives, without explanations, the insertions of an ill-informed Gloucester monk who has obscured the accurate chronology of the original.
    0
    0
  • Among the survivals of names of non-ecclesiastical buildings Castle Baynard may be noted; it stood in the City on the banks of the Thames, and was held by Ralph Baynard, a Norman, in the time of William the Conqueror; a later building being erected in 1428 by Humphrey duke of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • When Richard, duke of Gloucester, laid his plans for seizing the crown, he obtained the countenance of the lord mayor, Sir Edmund Shaw, whose brother Dr Shaw praised Richard at Paul's Cross.
    0
    0
  • Ethelstan died at Gloucester in 940, and was buried at Malmesbury, an abbey which he had munificently endowed during his lifetime.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In December 1861 he was rewarded with the see of Gloucester and Bristol, and within a twelvemonth he was elevated to the archiepiscopal see of York.
    0
    0
  • Neath is a borough by prescription and received its first charter about the middle of the 12th century from William, earl of Gloucester, who granted its burgesses the same customs as those of Cardiff.
    0
    0
  • He was patronized by Robert, earl of Gloucester, and by two bishops of Lincoln; he obtained, about 1140, the archdeaconry of Llandaff "on account of his learning"; and in 1151 was promoted to the see of St Asaph.
    0
    0
  • In the next century the influence of Geoffrey is unmistakably attested by the Brut of Layamon, and the rhyming English chronicle of Robert of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • The Berkeley Ship Canal connects Gloucester with docks at Sharpness, avoiding the difficult navigation of the upper part of the Severn estuary.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Five of his sons played some part in the history of their time, these being Edward the Black Prince, Lionel of Antwerp, duke of Clarence, John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster, Edmund of Langley, afterwards duke of York, and Thomas of Woodstock, afterwards duke of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • In the great civil struggle he used his pen against the Scots, and was in the king's army at the siege of Gloucester, inventing certain engines for assaulting the town.
    0
    0
  • But these Richard never seems to have wholly credited, and during his three years' absence his younger brother, Thomas of Woodstock, duke of Gloucester, showed himself a far more dangerous intriguer.
    0
    0
  • Five confederate lords with Gloucester at their head took up arms against the king's favourite ministers, and the Wonderful Parliament put to death without remorse almost every agent of his former administration who had not fled the country.
    0
    0
  • Gloucester even contemplated the dethronement of the king, but found that in this matter he could not rely on the support of his associates, one of whom was Henry, earl of Derby, the duke of Lancaster's son.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Gloucester and his allies were then brought to account; but the earl of Derby and Thomas Mowbray, earl of Nottingham, were taken into favour as having opposed the more violent proceedings of their associates.
    0
    0
  • Kempe held office as chancellor for six years; his main task in government was to keep Humphrey of Gloucester in check.
    0
    0
  • His resignation on the 28th of February 1432 was a concession to Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • In June 1138, with the aid of Robert of Gloucester, Geoffrey obtained the submission of Bayeux and Caen; in October he devastated the neighbourhood of Falaise; finally, in March 1141, on hearing of his wife's success in England, he again entered Normandy, when he made a triumphal procession through the country.
    0
    0
  • Gloucester has the largest fishery interests of any place in the country, and is one of the chief fishing ports of the world.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The Gloucester quarries, opened in 1824, were probably the next to be worked regularly.
    0
    0
  • Other ports of entry in the state in 1909 were Newburyport, Gloucester, Salem, Marblehead, Plymouth, Barnstable, Nantucket, Edgartown, New Bedford and Fall River.
    0
    0
  • According to the census of 1900 there were 33 incorporated cities in Massachusetts, of which 8 had between 12,000 and 20,000 inhabitants; 5 between 20,000 and 25,000 (Everett, North Adams, Quincy, Waltham, Pittsfield); 2 io between 25,000 and 50,000 (Holyoke, Brockton, Haverhill, Salem, Chelsea, Malden, Newton, Fitchburg, Taunton, Gloucester); 7 between 50,000 and ioo,000 (Lowell, Cambridge, Lynn, Lawrence, New Bedford, Springfield, Somerville); and 3 more than roo,000 inhabitants, viz.
    0
    0
  • We hear 3 of " Brownists " in London about 1585, while the London petitioners of 1592 refer to their fellows in " other gaols throughout the land "; and the True Confession of 1596 specifies Norwich, Gloucester, Bury St Edmunds, as well as " many other places of the land."
    0
    0
  • Then in 1092 a fresh dispute arose between the two kings, and William summoned Malcolm to his court at Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • When he reached Gloucester Rufus refused to receive him unless he did homage for his kingdom; he declined and returned home in high dudgeon.
    0
    0
  • In the 13th century it was held by Nicholas Fitz Martin of the earl of Gloucester for the service of finding a bow with three arrows to attend the earl when he should hunt in Gower.
    0
    0
  • In 1387 the duke of Gloucester, uncle of Richard II., assembled in Hornsey Park the forces by the display of which he compelled the king to dismiss his minister de la Pole, earl of Suffolk; and in 1483 the park was the scene of the ceremonious reception of Edward V., under the charge of Richard, duke of Gloucester, by Edmund Shaw, lord mayor of London.
    0
    0
  • In 1607 he was made vicar of Stanford in Northamptonshire, and in 1608 he became chaplain to Bishop Neile, who in 1610 presented him to the living of Cuxton, when he resigned his fellowship. In 1611, in spite of the influence of Archbishop Abbot and Lord Chancellor Ellesmere, Laud was made president of St John's, and in 1614 obtained in addition the prebend of Buckden, in 1615 the archdeaconry of Huntingdon, and in 1616 the deanery of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • She brought up her youngest child Henrietta in her own faith, but her efforts to induce her youngest son, the duke of Gloucester, to take the same course only produced discomfort in the exiled family.
    0
    0
  • I came in with my horse and arms just at the retreat; but was not permitted to stay longer than the 15th by reason of the army marching to Gloucester; which would have left both me and my brothers exposed to ruin, without any advantage to his Majesty.
    0
    0
  • The township, heavily wooded in parts, and with picturesque shores alternating between rocky headlands and sandy beaches, stretches for several miles along the coast between Beverly on the west and Gloucester on the east.
    0
    0
  • Later, when this plan had fallen through, he was endowed with castles, revenues and lands on both sides of the channel; the vacant earldom of Cornwall was reserved for him (1175); he was betrothed to Isabella the heiress of the earldom of Gloucester (1176); and he was granted the lordship of Ireland with the homage of the Anglo-Irish baronage (1177).
    0
    0
  • Richard on his accession confirmed John's existing possessions; married him to Isabella of Gloucester; and gave him, besides other grants, the entire revenues of six English shires; but excluded him from any share in the regency which was appointed to govern England during the third crusade; and only allowed him to live in the kingdom because urged to this concession by their mother.
    0
    0
  • By his divorce from Isabella of Gloucester he offended the English baronage (1200); by his marriage with Isabella of Angouleme, the betrothed of Hugh of Lusignan, he gave an opportunity to the discontented Poitevins for invoking French assistance and to Philip Augustus for pronouncing against him a sentence of forfeiture.
    0
    0
  • Learning his letters first from the parish priest, he was sent at an early age to the claustral school at Evesham and thence, in his eighteenth year, to Gloucester Hall, Oxford, as a Benedictine student.
    0
    0
  • During these early years Bedford ruled France wisely and at first with success, but he could not prevent the mischief which Humphrey of Gloucester caused both at home and abroad.
    0
    0
  • Gloucester courted popularity by opposing them throughout; with him was Richard of York, who stood next in succession to the crown.
    0
    0
  • Humphrey of Gloucester and Cardinal Beaufort both died early in 1447.
    0
    0
  • Edward's final victory at Tewkesbury was followed by Henry's death on the 21st of May 1471, certainly by violence, perhaps at the hands of Richard of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • Another colonia is planted at Lincoln (Lindum), and a third at Gloucester (Glevum) in 96.
    0
    0
  • Five modern cities, Colchester, Lincoln, York, Gloucester and St Albans, stand on the sites, and in some fragmentary fashion bear the names of five Roman municipalities, founded by the Roman government with special charters and constitutions.
    0
    0
  • The greater part of eastern England being in the hands of the French pretender, Prince Louis, afterwards King Louis VIII., and the rebel barons, Henry was crowned by his supporters at Gloucester, the western capital.
    0
    0
  • The compromise with the surviving rebels was arranged by his son in concert with Richard of Cornwall and the legate Ottobuono; the statute of Marlborough (1267), which purchased a lasting peace by judicious concessions, was similarly arranged between Edward and the earl of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • As examples of English friaries, the Dominican house at Norwich, and those of the Dominicans and Franciscans at Gloucester, may be mentioned.
    0
    0
  • The Dominican convent at Gloucester still exhibits the cloister-court, on the north side of which is the desecrated church.
    0
    0
  • In his reign the Chronicle mentions two great victories over the Welsh, one at a place called Bedcanford in 571, by which Aylesbury and the upper part of the Thames valley fell into the hands of the West Saxons, and another at Deorham in 577, which led to the capture of Cirencester, Bath and Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • He therefore removed to Gloucester, and afterwards (1643-1645) settled in Coventry, where he preached regularly both to the garrison and the citizens.
    0
    0
  • In 1765 he was appointed preacher at Lincoln's Inn, and in 1767 he became archdeacon of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • He vindicated himself somewhat bitterly in a parliament at Gloucester, but still avoiding a prominent part in the government, accepted the command on the Scottish border.
    0
    0
  • Jacqueline, countess of Hainaut, the divorced wife of the duke of Brabant and the heiress of Holland and Zeeland, had married the duke of Gloucester, who attempted to take forcible possession of his wife's territories.
    0
    0
  • Philip, however, himself claimed Brabant as having been bequeathed to him by his cousin Philip, the late duke, with the result that the Burgundians repulsed the troops of the duke of Gloucester, and Jacqueline was forced to recognize the duke of Burgundy as her lieutenant and heir.
    0
    0
  • In 1865 he married again, his second wife being Miss Marianne Byles, second daughter of James Byles of Bowden Hall, Gloucester; and a year later purchased an estate in East Grinstead, the history of which may be read in How I managed my Estate, published in 1886.
    0
    0
  • In some places, notably Wales and Gloucester, a remnant of a spotted breed lingers; and a large proportion of common pigs, often parti-coloured, are mongrels.
    0
    0
  • Returning to England, he remained loyal to Henry; and after the king's death in 1422 became a member of the council and was the chief opponent of the wild and selfish schemes of Humphrey, duke of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • In 1424 he became chancellor for the third time, and was mainly responsible for the conduct of affairs during Gloucester's expedition to Hainaut.
    0
    0
  • He was disliked by the citizens of London; and this ill-feeling was heightened when Gloucester, who was a favourite of the Londoners, returned to England and was doubtless reproached by Beaufort for the folly of his undertaking.
    0
    0
  • Charged by Gloucester with treason against Henry IV.
    0
    0
  • Returning to England to raise money for a fresh crusade, he was received with great state in London; but his acceptance of the cardinalate had weakened his position and Gloucester refused to recognize his legatine commission.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile an attempt on the part of Gloucester to exclude the cardinal from the council had failed, and it was decided that his attendance was required except during the discussion of questions between the king and the papacy.
    0
    0
  • About this time Gloucester made another attempt to deprive Beaufort of his see, and it was argued in the council that as a cardinal he could not hold an English bishopric. The general council was not inclined to press the case against him; but the privy council, more clerical and more hostile, sealed writs of praemunire and attachment against him, and some of his jewels were seized.
    0
    0
  • In August 1435 he attended the congress at Arras, but was unable to make peace with France; and after Bedford's death his renewed efforts to this end were again opposed by Gloucester, who favoured a continuance of the war.
    0
    0
  • This step further irritated Gloucester, who drew up and presented to the king a long and serious list of charges against Beaufort; but the council defended the policy of the cardinal and ignored the personal accusations against him.
    0
    0
  • Humphrey of Gloucester favoured an Armagnac alliance.
    0
    0
  • Humphrey of Gloucester died in February 1447, within a few days of his arrest, and six weeks later Cardinal Beaufort died also.
    0
    0
  • On the 7th of February and again on the 9th of March the Commons presented articles of accusation dealing chiefly with alleged maladministration and the ill success of the French policy; there was a charge of aiming at the throne by the betrothal of his son to the little Margaret Beaufort, but no suggestion of guilt concerning the death of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • Two lives edited by Thomas Hearne under the names of Elmham and Titus Livius Forojuliensis come from a common source; the longer, which Hearne ascribed incorrectly to Elmham, is perhaps the original work of Livius, who was an Italian in the service of Humphrey of Gloucester, and wrote about 1440.
    0
    0
  • Along with some others he started a Sunday school at Gloucester in 1780, and on his giving publicity to the enterprise in the columns of his journal the notice was copied into the London papers and awakened considerable attention.
    0
    0
  • In 1091 William Rufus renewed the treaty of Abernethy with Malcolm and fortified Carlisle, thereby cutting Malcolm off from Cumberland; Malcolm was summoned to meet Rufus at Gloucester; he went, but declined to accept the jurisdiction of the Anglo-Norman peers, or to " do right" to Rufus, except on the frontier of the two realms, wherever he may have supposed that frontier to be.
    0
    0
  • The duke of Gloucester (later Richard III.) marched north and took Berwick, while the earl of Angus, with other nobles, hanged Cochrane and other favourites of James over Lauder bridge.
    0
    0
  • He greatly improved the buildings at St Albans, which suffered somewhat during his later years owing to the wars of the roses; he also did some building at Gloucester College, Oxford, with which he was connected.
    0
    0
  • He was a friend of Duke Humphrey of Gloucester, whom he helped to gather together his famous collection of books, and was himself a writer, his works including Granarium de viris illustribus; Palearium poetarum; and Super Valerium in Augustinum de Anchona.
    0
    0
  • On the 24th of July 1689, however, the birth of a son, William, created duke of Gloucester, who survived his infancy, gave hopes that heirs to the throne under the Bill of Rights might be forthcoming.
    0
    0
  • In March 1695 Marlborough was allowed to kiss the king's hands, and subsequently was made the duke of Gloucester's governor and restored to his employments.
    0
    0
  • Iron-mining - perhaps the first in the New World - was begun in Virginia in 1608, when the Virginia Company shipped a quantity of ore to England; and in 1619 the Company established on Falling Creek, a tributary of the James river, a colony of about 150 ironworkers from Warwickshire, Staffordshire and Sussex, who had established there several ore-reducing plants under the general management of John Berkeley of Gloucester, England, when on the 22nd of March 1622 the entire colony, excepting a girl and a boy, were massacred by the Indians.
    0
    0
  • But Bacon fell a victim to malaria and died in October in Gloucester county.
    0
    0
  • From this time at all events he attached himself to the war-party of which Humphrey of Gloucester was head, in opposition to the government under Cardinal Beaufort.
    0
    0
  • The death of Humphrey of Gloucester in February 1447 made York the first prince of the blood.
    0
    0
  • Cudworth was installed prebendary of Gloucester in 1678.
    0
    0
  • In 1397 it was the scene of a conspiracy organized by the earl of Arundel, archbishop of Canterbury and duke of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • But the most important result of this first Norman invasion was to be found in the marvellous and rapid success of Robert Fitz-Hamon, earl of Gloucester, who, accompanied by a number of knightly adventurers, quickly overran South Wales, and erected a chain of castles stretching from the Wye to Milford Haven.
    0
    0
  • At the same time the remaining lordships were added to the English border counties of Gloucester, Shropshire and Hereford, and also to the existing Welsh shires of Cardigan, Carmarthen, Glamorgan and Pembroke, all of which found their boundaries considerably enlarged under this statute.
    0
    0
  • For the energy displayed in the contest Horsley was rewarded by Lord Chancellor Thurlow with a prebendal stall at Gloucester; and in 1788 the same patron procured his promotion to the see of St David's.
    0
    0
  • In 577 he led the West Saxons from Winchester towards the Severn valley; gained an important victory over some British kings at Deorham, and added the district round Gloucester, Bath and Cirencester to his kingdom.
    0
    0
  • In 1386 he was one of the commissioners appointed to reform the kingdom and the royal household, and in 1387 he arranged a peace between Richard and his enemies under Thomas of Woodstock, duke of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • Nigel attempted to maintain himself in his see by force of arms, but he was forced to fly to the empress at Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • He was then sent to Samuel Jones's dissenting academy at Gloucester, and afterwards at Tewkesbury, where his most intimate friend was Thomas Secker, who became archbishop of Canterbury.
    0
    0
  • The murder of the duke of Gloucester, Richard's uncle, in 1397, was followed next year by the assumption of absolute power by Richard.
    0
    0
  • Provincetown village was long second only to Gloucester in the cod fisheries, which low prices and the introduction of larger vessels and correspondingly costlier fittings have greatly 1 Sulla excluded the equites from the list; the lex Aurelia (70) reinstated them.
    0
    0
  • In 1700 the young duke of Gloucester, son of Queen Anne, died here.
    0
    0
  • He became prebendary of Gloucester in 1753, chaplain to the king in 1754, prebendary of Durham in 1755, dean of Bristol in 1757, and in 1 759 bishop of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • He died at Gloucester on the 7th of June 1779.
    0
    0
  • Religious difficulties now began to beset him; but at the persuasion of Edward Cheyney, bishop of Gloucester, although holding Catholic doctrines, he took deacon's orders in the English Church.
    0
    0
  • A second edition of the Gesta regum (1127) was dedicated to Earl Robert of Gloucester, whose literary tastes made him an appreciative patron.
    0
    0
  • In Monmouth, Camden and parts of Burlington and Gloucester counties great quantities of pears are grown.
    0
    0
  • In 1623 the first party of permanent homeseekers arrived at New Amsterdam, and a portion of these formed a settlement on the eastern bank of the Delaware and built Fort Nassau near the site of the present Gloucester City.
    0
    0
  • He is said to have then entered the Cistercian monastery at Gloucester; but in 1538 a John Hooper appears among the names of the Black friars at Gloucester and also among the White friars at Bristol who surrendered their houses to the king.
    0
    0
  • Hooper became Warwick's chaplain, and after a course of Lent lectures before the king he was offered the bishopric of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • Hooper did his best in the time at his disposal; but in less than a year the bishopric of Gloucester was reduced to an archdeaconry and added to Worcester, of which Hooper was made bishop in succession to Nicholas Heath.
    0
    0
  • Hooper was sent down to suffer at Gloucester, where he was burnt on the 9th of February, meeting his fate with steadfast courage and unshaken conviction.
    0
    0
  • The Jurassic belt is occupied by the counties of Gloucester, Oxford, Buckingham, Bedford, Northampton, Huntingdon, Rutland, Lincoln and the North Riding of Yorkshire.
    0
    0
  • Bath, Gloucester, Oxford, Northampton, Bedford, Rugby, Lincoln and Scarborough are amongst the chief.
    0
    0
  • Of these, excluding Welsh ones, we may with some certainty identify Canterbury (Caint), Caerleonon-Usk, Leicester (Lerion), Penzelwood, Carlisle, Colchester, Grantchester (Granth), London, Worcester (Guveirangon), Doncaster (Daun), Wroxeter (Guoricon), Chester (Legion - this is Roman), Lichfield (Licitcsith) and Gloucester (Gloui).
    0
    0
  • Numerous additional main lines - Reading to Newbury, Weymouth and the west, a new line opened in 1906 between Castle Cary and Langport effecting a great reduction in mileage between London and Exeter and places beyond; Didcot, Oxford, Birmingham, Shrewsbury, Chester with connexions northward, and to North Wales; Oxford to Worcester, and Swindon to Gloucester and the west of England; South Welsh system (through route from London via Wootton Bassett or via Bristol, and the Severn tunnel), Newport, Cardiff, Swansea, Milford.
    0
    0
  • He built the monastic church of St Peter at Gloucester, and rebuilt a large part of that of St John at Beverley.
    0
    0
  • With Cardinal Ottoboni, who was to aid the English king, Henry III., against the bishops of the baronial party, he was besieged in the Tower of London by the rebellious earl of Gloucester, but was rescued by the future Edward I., on the 27th of April 1267.
    0
    0
  • Clarence had made his peace with Edward, but was at enmity with his other brother Richard of Gloucester, who now married Warwick's second daughter and claimed a share in the Neville inheritance.
    0
    0
  • Most of the power at court was in the hands of the Woodvilles, in spite of their unpopularity; the more arduous work of administration in the north was left to Richard of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • Edward I., however, denied the bishop's rights and granted the castle and town to Guy Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, whose descendants continued to hold them until they passed to the crown by the marriage of Anne Nevill with Richard III., then duke of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • In 1420 Jacoba fled to England; and there, declaring that her marriage with John of Brabant was illegal, she contracted a marriage with Humphrey, duke of Gloucester, in 1422.
    0
    0
  • In 1483 Edward himself died; and his eldest son, Edward V., after a nominal reign of two months and a half, was put aside by his uncle, the duke of Gloucester, who became Richard III., and then caused him and his brother Richard, duke of York, to be murdered.
    0
    0
  • The most acrimonious of all his works is his Defence of Justification by Faith, an answer to what Bunyan calls "the brutish and beastly latitudinarianism" of Edward Fowler, afterwards bishop of Gloucester, an excellent man, but not free from the taint of Pelagianism.
    0
    0
  • The mitred abbots in England were those of Abingdon, St Alban's, Bardney, Battle, Bury St Edmund's, St Augustine's Canterbury, Colchester, Croyland, Evesham, Glastonbury, Gloucester, St Benet's Hulme, Hyde, Malmesbury, Peterborough, Ramsey, Reading, Selby, Shrewsbury, Tavistock, Thorney, Westminster, Winchcombe, St Mary's York.
    0
    0
  • At about twelve years of age he was sent to the school of St Mary de Crypt, Gloucester, where he developed some skill in elocution and a taste for reading plays, a circumstance which probably had considerable influence on his subsequent career.
    0
    0
  • His enthusiastic piety attracted the notice of Martin Benson, bishop of Gloucester, who ordained him deacon on the 10th of June 1736.
    0
    0
  • Matilda had a few genuine partisans, such as her half-brother Robert, earl of Gloucester, tile illegitimate son of Henry I., btit the large majority of those who took arms in her name were ready to sell their allegiance to either candidate in return for lands, or grants of rank or privilege.
    0
    0
  • Their army drove the lately triumphant party out of Winchester, and captured its military chief, Robert, earl of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • Ere he had been many months on the throne he divorced his wife, Isabella of Gloucester, alleging that their marriage had been illegal because they were within the prohibited degrees.
    0
    0
  • It appointed Simon, with his closest allies, the young earl of Gloucester and the bishop of Chichester, as electors who were to choose a privy council for the king and to fill up all offices of state.
    0
    0
  • He himself was too much like a dictator; even his own followers complained that he was over-masterful, and the most important of them, the young earl of Gloucester, was gradually estranged from him by finding his requests often refused and his aims crossed by the old earls action.
    0
    0
  • In 1278 followed the Statute of Gloucester, an act empowering the king to make inquiry as to the right by which old royal estates, or exceptional franchises which infringed on the royal prerogative of justice or taxation, had passed into the hands of their present owners.
    0
    0
  • The flower of his knights had fallen, including his nephew, the earl of Gloucester, who was the only one of the great magnates of the realm who had shown loyalty to him during the last six years.
    0
    0
  • His youngest uncle, Thomas of Woodstock, duke of Gloucester, was a designing and ambitious prince who saw his own advantage in embittering the strife between Richard and his parliament.
    0
    0
  • John of Gaunt having departed to Spain, where he was stirring up civil strife in the name of his wife, the heiress of Peter the Cruel, Gloucester put himself at the head of the opposition.
    0
    0
  • He disarmed Gloucester by making a close alliance with his elder uncle John of Gaunt, who had been absent in Spain during the troubles of 1387-1388, and was displeased at the violent doings of his brother.
    0
    0
  • Having lived down his unpopularity, and made himself many powerful friends, he resolved to take his longdeferred revenge on Gloucester and the other lords appellant.
    0
    0
  • Gloucester, however, had personal charge of the child, who was to be reared in England; he had also hoped to become protector of the realm, and to use the position for his own private interests, for he was a selfish and ambitious prince.
    0
    0
  • The tiresome and monotonous domestic history of England during the next twenty years consisted of little else than quarrels between Gloucester and the lords of the council, of whom the chief was the dukes halfuncle Henry Beaufort, bishop of Winchester, the last to survive of all the sons of John of Gaunt.
    0
    0
  • The duke and the bishop were both unscrupulous; but the churchman, with all his faults, was a patriotic statesman, while Gloucester cared far more for his own private ends than for the welfare of the realm.
    0
    0
  • Pressing her claims, Gloucester came to open blows with Philip in Flanders and Hainaut (1424).
    0
    0
  • In 1441 the duchess of Gloucester had Beauforts been arrested and charged with practising sorcery d against the health of the young kingapparently not ngan without justification.
    0
    0
  • A violent clamour was raised against Suffolk and Somerset, and Humphrey of Gloucester emerged from his retirement to head the agitation.
    0
    0
  • He had plausible grounds for doing so; though he had distinguished himself in the French wars, and was, since the death of Humphrey of Gloucester, the first prince of the blood royal, he had been.
    0
    0
  • Since Clarences death he had been gradually falling into the habit of transferring the conduct of great matters of state to his active and hard-working youngest brother, Richard Richard, duke of Gloucester, who had served him well duke of and faithfully ever since he first took the field at Barnet.
    0
    0
  • Woo- Gloucester passed as a staid and religious prince, and cester.
    0
    0
  • It Qioucester was clear that there would be a long minority, and proclaims that the only possible claimants for the regency were himself the queen and Richard of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • Hence when Richard of Gloucester seized on the person of the young king, and imprisoned Lord Rivers and Sir Richard Grey, the queens brother and son, on the pretence that they were conspiring against him, his action was regarded with equanimity by the people.
    0
    0
  • It was not plausible to accuse such persons of plotting with the queen to overthrow the protector, and public opinion began to turn against Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • The demoralization brought about by the evil years between 1453 and 1483 could not be lived down in a dayany sort of treason was possible to the generation that had seen the career of Warwick and the usurpation of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • In his rhymed chronicle Robert of Gloucester tells how "A bourgois at Bristowe - Robert Harding Vor gret tresour and richesse - so wel was mid the king That he gat him and is eirs - the noble baronie That so riche is of Berkele - mid al the seignorie."
    0
    0
  • Being at Berkeley, the duke confirmed to Robert a grant of Bedminster made by Robert, earl of Gloucester, and in the first year of his reign as king of England he confirmed his own earlier grant of the Berkeley manor.
    0
    0
  • Earl and countess only withdrew after James Berkeley, the nephew and heir male, had livery of his lands by the purchased aid of Humphrey of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • At Cambridge he obtained fossil shells from the Pleistocene deposit at Barnwell; in the Vale of Wardour he discovered in Purbeck Beds the isopod named by Milne-Edwards Archaeoniscus Brodiei; in Buckinghamshire he described the outliers of Purbeck and Portland Beds; and in the Vale of Gloucester the Lias and Oolites claimed his attention.
    0
    0
  • During the years 1632-1639 he received the livings of Hackney (1633); Oddington, Oxfordshire; Ickford, Buckinghamshire (1636); and Newington, Oxfordshire; besides being a prebendary of Gloucester from 1632.
    0
    0
  • After the arrest of Gloucester, Warwick and Arundel, the archbishop was impeached by the Commons with the king's consent, although Richard, who had not yet revealed his hostility, held out hopes of safety to him.
    0
    0
  • In 1699 he was appointed tutor to the royal duke of Gloucester, son of the Princess Anne, an appointment which he accepted somewhat against his will.
    0
    0
  • He also wrote Samor, the Lord of The Bright City, the subject of which was taken from British legend, the "bright city" being Gloucester; but he failed to invest it with serious interest.
    0
    0
  • Chaucer wrote a treatise on the astrolabe; Milton constantly refers to planetary influences; in Shakespeare's King Lear, Gloucester and Edmund represent respectively the old and the new faith.
    0
    0
  • There are a number of residences of 18th century architecture, and the names of several of the streets - such as King George's, Prince George's, Hanover, and Duke of Gloucester - recall the colonial days.
    0
    0
  • After being in the possession of the earls of Clare and Hertford, and of the earls of Gloucester, it became the property of the Staffords, and on the attainder of the duke of Buckingham in the reign of Henry VIII.
    0
    0
  • Fifteen years after the Restoration he accepted a prebend in Gloucester Cathedral, but only to resign it in favour of his friend Dr Edward Fowler, afterwards bishop of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • Included within the city borders are several villages, of which the principal one, also known as Gloucester, has a deep and commodious harbour.
    0
    0
  • In this industry Gloucester is the most important place in the United States; and is, indeed, one of the greatest fishing ports of the world.
    0
    0
  • Gloucester harbour was probably noted by Champlain (as La Beauport), and a temporary settlement was made by English fishermen sent out by the Dorchester Company of "merchant adventurers" in 1623-1625; some of these settlers returned to England in 1625, and others, with Roger Conant, the governor, removed to what is now Salem.'
    0
    0
  • At the opening of the War of Independence Gloucester, whose fisheries then employed about boo men, was second to Marblehead as a fishing-port.
    0
    0
  • Throughout more than half of the same century also Gloucester carried on a varied and valuable trade with Surinam, hake being the chief article of export and molasses and sugar the principal imports.
    0
    0
  • About 1850 the fisheries revived, especially after 1860, under the influence of better prices, improved methods and the discovery of new grounds, becoming again the chief economic interest; and since that time the village of Gloucester has changed from a picturesque hamlet to a fairly modern, though still quaint and somewhat foreign, settlement.
    0
    0
  • The first "schooner" was launched at Gloucester in 1713.
    0
    0
  • Gloucester became a city in 1874.
    0
    0
  • During the event, held in Gloucester on October 18 last year, more than £ 50,000 was raised by wealthy backers.
    0
    0
  • Gloucester still contrive to give soft tries Only Premiership leaders Bath have a better defensive record in the league.
    0
    0
  • Bristol Shoguns will take on Gloucester on Saturday in what looks to be a juicy west Country Derby in the Powergen Cup quarter finals.
    0
    0
  • There have been many spooky happenings at his house, which is situated a couple of miles outside of Gloucester City.
    0
    0
  • Single Gloucester can, by official designation, only be made on farms in Gloucestershire which have a pedigree herd of Gloucester cattle.
    0
    0
  • Out of Gloucester - Dedicated to the fishermen of the Cecil H. Low ' s home port.
    0
    0
  • We had crossed the Severn and Gloucester Canal several times and watched the lock keeper open the lock keeper open the lock gates manually for a pleasure yacht.
    0
    0
  • These include Richard, earl of Gloucester, a leading magnate of the day.
    0
    0
  • Former Gloucester Wagon Works employe Terence Lamb, from Cheltenham, died on 19 January this year from the asbestos cancer mesothelioma.
    0
    0
  • One day, I found myself in Gloucester Record Office eagerly reading the microfiche of the Evenlode parish records.
    0
    0
  • The Anglo-Saxons re-settled Gloucester and created a new town, using the Roman street pattern to create a new urban community.
    0
    0
  • October 29, to Gloucester, through an orchard country, where the golden pippin claims the pre-eminence for cyder.
    0
    0
  • I think College Street is a charming little street of which Gloucester may be justly proud.
    0
    0
  • By January 1996 I was secretary of the newly regenerated Gloucester Branch.
    0
    0
  • In Stockbridge, which is 8 miles from Winchester, Robert Earl of Gloucester, was fighting a skirmish.
    0
    0
  • On the Scottish King's arrival at Gloucester, William delivered a snub by refusing to receive him.
    0
    0
  • The king's young sons were imprisoned in the Tower of London by their uncle, Richard of Gloucester, who seized the throne.
    0
    0
  • For a time, in 1734, not a single tollgate was left standing between Bristol and Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • The proposed 1000 units will make a significant contribution to meeting the strategic housing requirements for Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • In point of fact it was almost wholly personal, and was rather an incident in the rivalry between the duke of Gloucester and his half-brother, Cardinal Beaufort, than one involving any principle.
    0
    0
  • The sons were George (afterwards King George III.), Edward Augustus, duke of York and Albany (1739-1767), William Henry, duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (1743-1805), Henry Frederick, duke of Cumberland (1745-1790), and Frederick William (1750-1765); the daughters were Augusta (1737-1813), wife of Charles William Ferdinand,duke of Brunswick,and Caroline Matilda (1751-1775), wife of Christian VII., king of Denmark.
    0
    0
  • He married the daughter of Milo of Gloucester, and played an ambiguous part in Stephen's reign, siding at first with the king and afterwards with the empress.
    0
    0
  • At all events she had political importance enough to incur the hostility of Richard of Gloucester, afterwards King Richard III., who accused her of having practised sorcery against him in collusion with the queen and Hastings.
    0
    0
  • The middle or Mediterranean aisle was the Paul's Walk, also called the Duke's Gallery from the erroneous supposition that the tomb of Sir Guy Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, was that of the " good " Humphrey, duke of Gloucester.
    0
    0
  • It is pleasantly situated on a gentle eminence, in a rich pastoral vale to which it gives name, celebrated for its dairies, producing the famous cheese known as "double Gloucester."
    0
    0
  • Gloucester obtained possession of the king's person, and, having arrested Rivers and some of his supporters, assumed the crown himself after a very slight and feigned reluctance, on the ground that the marriage of Edward and Elizabeth Woodville was invalid, and consequently its issue was illegitimate.
    0
    0
  • In this Richard confirmed him at his accession, and gave him a more tangible endowment by allowing him to marry Isabella, the heiress of the earldom of Gloucester, and by bestowing on him the honor of Lancaster and the shires of Derby, Devon, Cornwall and Somerset.
    0
    0
  • A major sally by the defenders of Gloucester has only limited success.
    0
    0
  • On the Scottish King 's arrival at Gloucester, William delivered a snub by refusing to receive him.
    0
    0
  • We left shortly after Gloucester had stunned the home crowd with an equalizer and the game seemingly heading for a replay.
    0
    0
  • The story that the last Abbot of Gloucester died of grief at the suppression of the monasteries is a pious legend.
    0
    0
  • The steep cobbled lane to the right of the tenement building is Gloucester Street.
    0
    0
  • The king 's young sons were imprisoned in the Tower of London by their uncle, Richard of Gloucester, who seized the throne.
    0
    0
  • While attending college, he also coached the Gloucester High School soccer team.
    0
    0