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glaucous

glaucous

glaucous Sentence Examples

  • The absence of the ordinary bright green colours of vegetation is another peculiarity of this flora, almost all the plants having glaucous or whitened stems. Foliage is reduced to a minimum, the moisture of the plant being stored up in massive or fleshy stems against the long-continued drought.

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  • As a picturesque tree, for park and ornamental plantation, it is among the best of the conifers, its colour and form contrasting yet harmonizing with the olive green and rounded outline of oaks and beeches, or with the red trunk and glaucous foliage of the pine.

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  • The white spruce (Picea alba), sometimes met with in English plantations, is a tree of lighter growth than the black spruce, the branches being more widely apart; the foliage is of a light glaucous green; the small light-brown cones are more slender and tapering than in P. nigra, and the scales have even edges.

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  • C. atlantica, the Atlas cedar, has shorter and denser leaves than C. Libani; the leaves are glaucous, sometimes of a silvery whiteness, and the cones smaller than in the other two forms; its wood also is hard, and more rapid in growth than is that of the ordinary cedar.

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  • Correlated with their life in dry situations, the bulk of the tissue is succulent, forming a water-store, which is protected from loss by evaporation by a thickly cuticularized epidermis covered with a waxy secretion which gives a glaucous appearance to the plant.

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  • The twigs are densely clothed with flat spreading linear leaves of a fine glossy green above and glaucous beneath; in the old trees they become shorter and more rigid and partly lose their distichous habit.

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  • The leaves are glaucous and smooth like those of a swede turnip. For a seed-crop rape is sown in July or early August in order that the plants may be strong enough to pass the winter uninjured.

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  • The leaves in a young state are not glaucous, but sap-green in colour and rough, being very similar to those of the turnip, to which the plant is closely related.

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  • In the dry and more typical state it is most frequently white or whitish, and almost as often greyish or greyish glaucous.

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  • Lecanora metaboloides, Lecidea decolorans), while sometimes they are white or glaucous, rarely greenish, pruinose.

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  • Boutignianum, pale rose, both have glaucous leaves tipped with purple; S.

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  • aquilegifolium, 2 ft., purplish from the conspicuous stamens, the leave's glaucous, is a good border plant; and T.

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  • The Alternantheras, Amaranthuses, Iresines and Coleus Verschaffelti furnish high and warm colours; while Pyrethrum Parthenium aureum yields greenish-yellow; Thymus citriodorus aureus, yellowish; Mesembryanthemum cordifolium variegatum, creamy yellow; Centaureas and others, white; Lobelia Erinus, blue; and the succulent Echeverias and Sempervivums, glaucous rosettes, which last add much to the general effect.

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  • The largest species of the group are the glaucous gull and greater black-backed gull, L.

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  • in diameter at the base, and gnarled twisted boughs, densely clothed at the extremities with glaucous green foliage, which contrasts strongly with the fiery red-brown bark.

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  • The Scotch fir is a very variable tree, and certain varieties have acquired a higher reputation for the qualities of their timber than others; among those most prized by foresters is the one called the Braemar pine, the remaining fragments of the great wood in the Braemar district being chiefly composed of this kind; it is mainly distinguished by its shorter and more glaucous leaves and ovoid cones with blunt recurved spines, and especially by the early horizontal growth of its ultimately drooping boughs; of all varieties this is the most picturesque.

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  • The somewhat glaucous leaves form dense tufts at the ends of the branches, and are 4 or 5 in.

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  • in diameter, and weighing more than 4 lb); the scales end in long hooked points curving upwards; the leaves are long, rigid, and glaucous in hue.

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  • Nearly approaching this is P. excelsa, the Bhotan pine, which differs chiefly in its longer cones and drooping glaucous foliage.

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  • It is a straight-growing tree, with grey bark and whorls of horizontal branches giving a cylindro-conical outline; the leaves are short, rigid and glaucous; the cones, oblong and rather pointing upwards, grow only near the top of the tree, and ripen in the second autumn; the seeds are oily like those of P. Pinea, and are eaten both on the Alps and by the inhabitants of Siberia; a fine oil is expressed from them which is used both for food and in lamps, but, like that of the Italian pine, it soon turns rancid.

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  • P. Ayacahuite, the common white pine of Mexico, spreads southwards on to the mountains of Guatemala, it is a large tree with glaucous foliage like P. Strobus, and yields a valuable resin.

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  • A peculiar vegetation, consisting mainly of low shrubs with fleshy glaucous leaves (mule crithnioides, &c.), covers the swamps of the Guadalquivir and the salt-marshes of the south-west coast.

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  • glaucous sedge is prominent.

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  • glaucous gull was reported from the ARC site this morning.

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  • glaucous blue foliage.

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  • glaucous leaves show off the large heads of shining flowers.

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  • glaucous meadow-grass Poa glauca.

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  • glaucous green with a few cultivars showing variegation running the length of the leaf.

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  • glaucous gulls seen and five Mistle Thrushes together at Double Dike.

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  • A glaucous gull was reported from the ARC site this morning.

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  • Glaucous Gulls on the offshore sandbars to the East of Burry Port, Ivory Gull, 1 record at BPH.

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  • In the typical rushy grassland sedges are sparse, but in the more diverse areas glaucous sedge is prominent.

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  • The absence of the ordinary bright green colours of vegetation is another peculiarity of this flora, almost all the plants having glaucous or whitened stems. Foliage is reduced to a minimum, the moisture of the plant being stored up in massive or fleshy stems against the long-continued drought.

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  • As a picturesque tree, for park and ornamental plantation, it is among the best of the conifers, its colour and form contrasting yet harmonizing with the olive green and rounded outline of oaks and beeches, or with the red trunk and glaucous foliage of the pine.

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  • The white spruce (Picea alba), sometimes met with in English plantations, is a tree of lighter growth than the black spruce, the branches being more widely apart; the foliage is of a light glaucous green; the small light-brown cones are more slender and tapering than in P. nigra, and the scales have even edges.

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  • C. atlantica, the Atlas cedar, has shorter and denser leaves than C. Libani; the leaves are glaucous, sometimes of a silvery whiteness, and the cones smaller than in the other two forms; its wood also is hard, and more rapid in growth than is that of the ordinary cedar.

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  • Correlated with their life in dry situations, the bulk of the tissue is succulent, forming a water-store, which is protected from loss by evaporation by a thickly cuticularized epidermis covered with a waxy secretion which gives a glaucous appearance to the plant.

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  • The twigs are densely clothed with flat spreading linear leaves of a fine glossy green above and glaucous beneath; in the old trees they become shorter and more rigid and partly lose their distichous habit.

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  • The leaves are glaucous and smooth like those of a swede turnip. For a seed-crop rape is sown in July or early August in order that the plants may be strong enough to pass the winter uninjured.

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  • The leaves in a young state are not glaucous, but sap-green in colour and rough, being very similar to those of the turnip, to which the plant is closely related.

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  • In the dry and more typical state it is most frequently white or whitish, and almost as often greyish or greyish glaucous.

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  • Lecanora metaboloides, Lecidea decolorans), while sometimes they are white or glaucous, rarely greenish, pruinose.

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  • Boutignianum, pale rose, both have glaucous leaves tipped with purple; S.

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  • aquilegifolium, 2 ft., purplish from the conspicuous stamens, the leave's glaucous, is a good border plant; and T.

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  • The Alternantheras, Amaranthuses, Iresines and Coleus Verschaffelti furnish high and warm colours; while Pyrethrum Parthenium aureum yields greenish-yellow; Thymus citriodorus aureus, yellowish; Mesembryanthemum cordifolium variegatum, creamy yellow; Centaureas and others, white; Lobelia Erinus, blue; and the succulent Echeverias and Sempervivums, glaucous rosettes, which last add much to the general effect.

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  • The largest species of the group are the glaucous gull and greater black-backed gull, L.

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  • in diameter at the base, and gnarled twisted boughs, densely clothed at the extremities with glaucous green foliage, which contrasts strongly with the fiery red-brown bark.

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  • The Scotch fir is a very variable tree, and certain varieties have acquired a higher reputation for the qualities of their timber than others; among those most prized by foresters is the one called the Braemar pine, the remaining fragments of the great wood in the Braemar district being chiefly composed of this kind; it is mainly distinguished by its shorter and more glaucous leaves and ovoid cones with blunt recurved spines, and especially by the early horizontal growth of its ultimately drooping boughs; of all varieties this is the most picturesque.

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  • The somewhat glaucous leaves form dense tufts at the ends of the branches, and are 4 or 5 in.

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  • in diameter, and weighing more than 4 lb); the scales end in long hooked points curving upwards; the leaves are long, rigid, and glaucous in hue.

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  • The leaves, short and glaucous, like those of the Scotch fir, have deciduous sheaths; the cones have recurved scale-points like those of the cheer pine.

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  • Nearly approaching this is P. excelsa, the Bhotan pine, which differs chiefly in its longer cones and drooping glaucous foliage.

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  • It is a straight-growing tree, with grey bark and whorls of horizontal branches giving a cylindro-conical outline; the leaves are short, rigid and glaucous; the cones, oblong and rather pointing upwards, grow only near the top of the tree, and ripen in the second autumn; the seeds are oily like those of P. Pinea, and are eaten both on the Alps and by the inhabitants of Siberia; a fine oil is expressed from them which is used both for food and in lamps, but, like that of the Italian pine, it soon turns rancid.

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  • P. Ayacahuite, the common white pine of Mexico, spreads southwards on to the mountains of Guatemala, it is a large tree with glaucous foliage like P. Strobus, and yields a valuable resin.

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  • A peculiar vegetation, consisting mainly of low shrubs with fleshy glaucous leaves (mule crithnioides, &c.), covers the swamps of the Guadalquivir and the salt-marshes of the south-west coast.

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  • Instead of the white lily, which requires mud, or the common sweet flag, the blue flag (Iris versicolor) grows thinly in the pure water, rising from the stony bottom all around the shore, where it is visited by hummingbirds in June; and the color both of its bluish blades and its flowers and especially their reflections, is in singular harmony with the glaucous water.

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  • Glaucous Gulls on the offshore sandbars to the East of Burry Port, Ivory Gull, 1 record at BPH.

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  • These are the chief beauty of the plant, each from 1 foot to 13 inches long and 3 inches to 3 1/2 inches broad, tapering rather suddenly to a very fine point; the color a vivid green on the upper surface, glaucous on the lower.

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  • One peculiarity I have noticed in them is that they have a glaucous line running down the centre of each leaf, and by this they can be at once distinguished from the spring-flowering forms of nivalis.

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  • About 9 inches high, with sparingly branched, succulent stems and glaucous leaves, covered with stiff hairs and short terminal racemes of flowers about half an inch in diameter, resembling in form that of Borage.

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  • An effective half-hardy plant for the summer; M. major having finely-cut, large, glaucous leaves contrasting effectively with the garden vegetation, and being of the easiest cultivation, it has become a favourite in sub-tropical gardening.

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  • C. Mariscus is a vigorous native fen plant, 2 to 6 feet high, in flower crowned with dense, close chestnut-colored panicles, sometimes 3 feet in length, the leaves glaucous, rigid, and often 4 feet long.

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  • This is the only bushy Coronilla that can be well grown in the open air in England, but in mild districts C. glauca, a beautiful shrub with glaucous foliage and yellow flowers, usually grown in greenhouses, may be grown out of doors.

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  • In early summer, with its bright yellow blossoms, resting on deep glaucous blue foliage, it is very effective.

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  • The upper surface of the leaves is green, the under side glaucous, but there is usually, when young, a well-defined margin of red or brown.

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  • The new kind has bold leafage, a glaucous tinge overlying the deep green body color; the flowers, of a rich apricot color, open out widely, and are of great substance.

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  • A variety of Sheeps Fescue (F. ovina), named glauca, is a pretty dwarf hardy grass, forming dense tufts of leaves of a glaucous hue or soft blue, and on this account sometimes called "blue" Grass.

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  • Ledebours Fumitory (Corydalis Ledebouriana) - Distinct on account of its peculiar glaucous leaves, arranged in a whorl about half-way up the stem, 9 to 12 inches high.

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  • The leaves are partially persistent, glaucous beneath and sometimes above.

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  • Gum Seseli (Seseli) - S. gummiferum is a handsome plant, 1 1/2 to 3 feet high, with elegantly-divided leaves of a glaucous or almost silvery tone.

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  • G. repens rosea is a pretty dwarf rock plant, thriving also in borders, flowering long in summer and autumn, and with foliage of a pleasant glaucous color.

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  • Hardy and deciduous, it reaches 4 to 6 inches high at its best, the stems freely furnished with glaucous ovate acutely pointed leaves, each stem terminated by a solitary salvershaped, azure-blue flower with a base of deepest violet.

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  • Glaucous Houseleek (Sempervivum Calcareum) - No finer Houseleek has ever been introduced than this, often misnamed S. californicum.

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  • Planted singly, its rosettes are sometimes nearly 5 inches across, the leaves glaucous, and tipped at the points with chocolate.

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  • Hunnemannia - H. fumarioefolia is an erect perennial, 2 to 3 feet high, with glaucous foliage, like some of the Fumitories.

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  • It is known by its very glaucous foliage and erect single stems, with bright yellow flowers about 2 inches across.

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  • The chief difference from the netted Iris is in the bulb and leaves, which are narrow, linear, deeply channelled on the inner face, with a central band or rib like a Crocus leaf, and pale green without the glaucous tint usual to this group.

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  • It grows from 1 foot to 1 1/2 feet high, and has broad glaucous leaves and nodding flowers, greenish outside and vinous purple within.

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  • L. macrophylla is vigorous, with an erect stem nearly 3 1/2 feet high, and very large glaucous leaves, the yellow flowers borne in a long spike.

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  • Sternbergia Macrantha - This is a really handsome species, the leaves blunt and slightly glaucous, about an inch broad when fully developed about midsummer; flowers bright yellow in autumn.

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  • T. minus forms compact slightly glaucous symmetrical tufts, 12 to 18 inches high.

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  • The branches are erect, rather sturdier than in the true Tamarisks, and the leaves are of a pale glaucous hue, the flowers white or rosy in June.

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  • Omphalodes Luciliae - A lovely rock plant, with flowers a pretty lilac-blue, and glaucous grey foliage.

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  • Some of its forms are more resistant, the hardiest of all being the Powerscourt variety, with a narrower and more glaucous leaf of erect growth, and about 6 feet long.

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  • This varies from 6 inches to more than 1 foot in height; it has a few glaucous leaves near the ground; flowers in early summer, the lip of a rich velvety brown with yellow markings, bearing a fanciful resemblance to a bee.

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  • Sieboldi, and they are of a much more bluish or glaucous tint.

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  • It is 18 inches to 3 feet high, and has large glaucous leaves, somewhat heart-shaped.

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  • Callirhoe Digitata - A distinct glaucous perennial herb, 2 or 3 feet high, with reddish-purple flowers in summer; it is not so showy as the other kinds.

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  • The leaves are oblong or oval, 4 inches long and glaucous beneath, the flowers of a bright red.

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  • The young, strong shoots are purple-red overlaid with a pale grey bloom, whilst the leaves are of a peculiar glaucous color brightly tinged with red.

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  • Rue (Ruta) - The common Rue (R. graveolens) is not ornamental, but R. albiflora is a graceful autumn-flowering plant about 2 feet high, with leaves resembling those of the common Rue, only more glaucous and finely divided.

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  • Shrubby Poppy (Dendromecon Rigidum) - A handsome half-shrubby Poppy bearing yellow flowers and glaucous grey leaves; a little tender, and one that requires a warm wall and some protection in winter.

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  • Columbia Fir (Abies Nobilis) - A mountain tree, 200 to 300 feet high, with deep glaucous foliage and brown cones 5 to 7 inches long.

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  • The glaucous form is a handsome tree, more rapid in growth than any other silvery conifer.

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  • Its glaucous foliage and elegant panicles of purple flowers are welcome along the margins of shallow ponds or streams, and it is hardy in sheltered places.

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  • The variety praecox flowers much earlier than K. aloides, from the middle to the end of May; its leaves are broader than those of the type, and are not glaucous, while the raceme is shorter, the stems being about half as long as the leaves.

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  • K. caulescens differs from all the forms of aloides in being smaller, and in having very glaucous leaves, short heads, and smaller and less curved flowers.

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  • The glaucous blue-grey foliage is pretty.

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  • Kniphofia Rooperi - Nearly allied to K. aloides, but is an early or summer-flowering plant, while the stamens are included in the tube; the flowers are paler and less curved, and the leaves are broad and very glaucous.

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  • Kniphofia Sarmentosa - Distinguished from K. aloides by its smaller glaucous leaves, the cylindrical flower-heads from 6 inches to 1 foot long, the flowers red in the upper half, and yellow, or yellow tinged red, in the lower.

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  • Kniphofia Tucki - Has large, glaucous, Yucca-like foliage, growing 4 to 5 feet high, with massive heads of bright red flowers, changing to yellow, and borne early in June.

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  • Kniphofia Tysoni - A handsome new variety, with persistent strong foliage of a soft glaucous shade, each left measuring 3 feet or more in length and 3 1/2 inches wide at base, tapering to a fine point; the edges of leaf finely serrated.

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