Glastonbury sentence example

glastonbury
  • Through the machinations of enemies he was again expelled from the royal presence; but shortly afterwards Edmund revoked the sentence and made him abbot of Glastonbury.
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  • When Boniface found himself unable to continue the supervision of the society himself, he entrusted the office to Wigbert of Glastonbury, who thus became the first abbot of Fritzlar.
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  • Shepton, before the conquest called Sepeton, was in the possession of the abbots of Glastonbury for four hundred years, and then passed to a Norman, Roger de Courcelle.
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  • No evidence of settlement on the site of Lyme Regis exists before that afforded by a grant, dated 774, purporting to be by Cynewulf, king of the West-Saxons, of land here to the church of Sherborne, and a similar grant by King Æthelstan to the church of Glastonbury.
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  • The Welsh triads know no fewer than three Gwenhwyfars; Giraldus Cambrensis, relating the discovery of the royal tombs at Glastonbury, speaks of the body found as that of Arthur's second wife; the prose Merlin gives Guenevere a bastard half-sister of the same name, who strongly resembles her; and the Lancelot relates how this lady, trading on the likeness, persuaded Arthur that she was the true daughter of Leodegrance, and the queen the bastard interloper.
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  • Who the original lover was is doubtful; the Vita Gildae relates how she was carried off by Melwas, king of Aestiva Regis, to Glastonbury, whither Arthur, at the head of an army, pursued the ravisher.
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  • From Bridgwater the army marched through Glastonbury to attack Bristol, into which Lord Feversham had hastily thrown a regiment of foot-guards.
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  • Edmund, the "deed-doer" as the chronicle calls him, "Edmundus magnificus" as Florence of Worcester describes him, perhaps translating the Saxon epithet, was buried at Glastonbury, an abbey which he had entrusted in 943 to the famous Dunstan.
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  • As is shown by the Hundred Rolls, the Domesday of St Paul, the Surveys of St Peter, Glouc., Glastonbury Abbey, Ramsey Abbey and countless other records of the same kind, the customary conditions of villenage did not tally by any means with the identification between villenage and slavery suggested by the jurists.
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  • Perhaps owing to a confusion between Glasberg or Ynysvitrin and the Anglo-Saxon Glaestinga-burh, Glastonbury, the name "Isle of Avalon" was given to the low ridge in central Somersetshire which culminates in Glastonbury Tor, while Glastonbury itself came to be called Avalon.
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  • The town lies in the midst of orchards and water-meadows, reclaimed from the fens which encircled Glastonbury Tor, a conical height once an island, but now, with the surrounding flats, a peninsula washed on three sides by the river Brue.
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  • The Glastonbury thorn, planted, according to the legend, by Joseph of Arimathea, has been the object of considerable comment.
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  • The name of Glastonbury, however, is of much later origin, being a corruption of the Saxon Glestyngabyrig.
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  • According to the legends which grew up under the care of the monks, the first church of Glastonbury was a little wattled building erected by Joseph of Arimathea as the leader of the twelve apostles sent over to Britain from Gaul by St Philip. About a hundred years later, according to the same authorities, the two missionaries, Phaganus and Deruvianus, who came to king Lucius from Pope Eleutherius, established a fraternity of anchorites on the spot, and after three hundred years more St Patrick introduced among them a regular monastic life.
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  • From the decadent state into which Glastonbury was brought by the Danish invasions it was recovered by Dunstan, who had been educated within its walls and was appointed its abbot about 946.
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  • In the end of the 12th century, and on into the following, Glastonbury was distracted by a strange dispute, caused by the attempt of Savaric, the ambitious bishop of Bath, to make himself master of the abbey.
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  • The conflict was closed by the decision of Innocent III., that the abbacy should be merged in the new see of Bath and Glastonbury, and that Savaric should have a fourth of the property.
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  • As early at least as the beginning of the Ilth century the tradition that Arthur was buried at Glastonbury appears to have taken shape; and in the reign of Henry II., according to Giraldus Cambrensis and others, the abbot Henry de Blois, causing search to be made, discovered at the depth of 16 ft.
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  • In 1508 Warham and Goldston having examined the Canterbury shrine reported that it contained all the principal bones of the saint, but the abbot of Glastonbury in reply as stoutly maintained that this was impossible.
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  • In 1539 the last and 60th abbot of Glastonbury, Robert Whyting, was lodged in the Tower on account of "divers and sundry treasons."
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  • He was removed to Wells, where he was "arraigned and next day put to execution for robbing of Glastonbury church."
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  • The execution took place on Glastonbury Tor.
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  • In the 8th century Glastonbury was already a borough owned by the abbey, which continued to be overlord till the Dissolution.
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  • The abbey obtained charters in the 7th century, but the town received its first charter from Henry II., who exempted the men of Glastonbury from the jurisdiction of royal officials and freed them from certain tolls.
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  • In 1319 Glastonbury received a writ of summons to parliament, but made no return, and has not since been represented.
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  • Glastonbury owed its medieval importance to its connexion with the abbey.
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  • Ine is said to have built the minster at Glastonbury.
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  • He became a monk at Glastonbury, then dean of the monastery of Christ Church, Canterbury, and chaplain to King Canute, and on the 13th of November 1020 was consecrated archbishop of Canterbury.
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  • A Vita Sancti Patricii and Miracula Sancti Benigni are mentioned in the prologue to the book on Glastonbury; a metrical life of St iElfgyfu is quoted in the Gesta pontificum; Chronica tribus libellis are mentioned in the prologue to the Historia novella, and a fragment of them is apparently preserved in the Brit.
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  • The Eastern Division, lying to the east of the zone of New Red Sandstone, may be defined on the west by a slightly curved line drawn from the estuary of the Tees through Leicester and Stratford-on-Avon to the estuary of the Severn, and thence through Glastonbury to Sidmouth.
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  • Thus William of Malmesbury says that he was sent to Britain by St Philip, and, having received a small island in Somersetshire, there constructed "with twisted twigs" the first Christian church in Britain - afterwards to become the Abbey of Glastonbury.
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  • The legend says that his staff, planted in the ground, became a thorn flowering twice a year (see Glastonbury).
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  • The mitred abbots in England were those of Abingdon, St Alban's, Bardney, Battle, Bury St Edmund's, St Augustine's Canterbury, Colchester, Croyland, Evesham, Glastonbury, Gloucester, St Benet's Hulme, Hyde, Malmesbury, Peterborough, Ramsey, Reading, Selby, Shrewsbury, Tavistock, Thorney, Westminster, Winchcombe, St Mary's York.
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  • Of these the precedence was originally yielded to the abbot of Glastonbury, until in A.D.
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  • For instance, we read of Whiting, the last abbot of Glastonbury, judicially murdered by Henry VIII., that his house was a kind of well-ordered court, where as many as 300 sons of noblemen and gentlemen, who had been sent to him for virtuous education, had been brought up, besides others of a meaner rank, whom he fitted for the universities.
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  • Legends of the part played by Joseph of Arimathea in the conversion of Britain are closely connected with Glastonbury, the monks of which foundation showed, in the 12th century, considerable literary activity, and it seems a by no means improbable hypothesis that the present form of the Grail legend may be due to a monk of Glastonbury elaborating ideas borrowed from Fecamp. This much is certain, that between the Saint-Sang of Fecamp, the Volto Santo of Lucca, and the Grail tradition, there exists a connecting link, the precise nature of which has yet to be determined.
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  • A monastery was subsequently added, and around it the present town of St Albans gradually grew up. Pope Adrian IV., who was born in the neighbourhood, conferred on the abbot of St Alban's the right of precedence over his fellow abbots, a right hitherto attached to the abbey of Glastonbury.
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  • The quarries of granite near Long Island Sound, those of sandstone at Portland, and of feldspar at Branchville and South Glastonbury, however, have furnished building and paving materials for other states; the stone product of the state was valued at $1,386,540 in 1906.
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  • The last abbot of Glastonbury, Richard Whiting, caused these relics to be spirited away, refusing to give them up.
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  • Or click here to see the ley alignments emanating from Glastonbury.
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  • St Brigit's name appears under 1 February in the two tenth-century liturgical calendars with Glastonbury associations.
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  • The Glastonbury Thorn is simply a sport of common hawthorn, unusual but not unknown elsewhere.
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  • Wonderfully sited for visiting historic Wells, Bath, Bristol and Glastonbury, with pretty villages and ancient landmarks close by.
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  • Threading this labyrinth involves walking along the sculpted sides of Glastonbury Tor in a particular pattern, outlining the classical labyrinth.
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  • A Brief History of the Area The area around Glastonbury was once flooded marshland with dry areas of higher land.
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  • After Stevie and I managed to get on the security glastonbury ticket resale I knew that persistence would pay off in the end.
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  • She told us about the new retinal screening which is about to start at the West Mendip Hospital in Glastonbury.
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  • I paint on to pure silk in my studio on the slopes of Glastonbury Tor.
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  • I hope to spend the summer solstice at Glastonbury Festival, with Kindred Spirit " (still to be confirmed ).
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  • Then, in 1971, the Glastonbury Fayre was held to celebrate the summer solstice.
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  • The landscape is dominated by Glastonbury's conical hill, the Tor, surmounted by a church tower.
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  • No evidence of settlement on the site of Lyme Regis exists before that afforded by a grant, dated 774, purporting to be by Cynewulf, king of the West-Saxons, of land here to the church of Sherborne, and a similar grant by King Æthelstan to the church of Glastonbury.
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  • Several of various species in the Glastonbury area are of impressive age, rooted in pre-Christian days of the Druid religion.
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  • I hope to spend the summer solstice at Glastonbury Festival, with Kindred Spirit (still to be confirmed).
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  • The landscape is dominated by Glastonbury 's conical hill, the Tor, surmounted by a church tower.
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  • He and 11 followers arrived in Glastonbury where they built a wattled church.
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  • In due course, religious zealots of the Reformation caused further damage to Glastonbury.
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  • Many believe that the ancient well in Glastonbury, Somerset, located in the Vale of Avalon between Glastonbury Tor and Chalice Hill, is a place of great power, holiness and healing.
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  • The symbol, known as Vesica Piscis, depicts a sword dividing two interlocked circles and foliage to symbolize the Glastonbury Holy Thorn.
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  • The band played a number of festivals, including Glastonbury, The V Festival in Stafford, and the Leeds and Reading Carling Weekend Festivals.
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