Glass sentence example

glass
  • Could I have a glass of water?
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  • He set a glass of Coke on the counter before her.
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  • I took them off and showed her that the two wooden ones must go on first, then the glass bead.
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  • I shook my head and took them all off and made her feel of the two wooden beads and the one glass bead.
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  • It was senseless to look elsewhere, as both had been present when Cynthia placed the small fragment in the cut glass enclosure.
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  • Picking up the glass of orange juice, he took a swallow.
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  • Finally, his intent gaze left the glass and found hers.
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  • Either that or change my eye glass prescription.
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  • Daniela refilled the glass without asking, and Deidre drank more.
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  • Before long they neared the Black Pit, where a busy swarm of Mangaboos, headed by their Princess, was engaged in piling up glass rocks before the entrance.
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  • "Sit. Have a drink," Dean said as he filled Fred's glass to the top and handed it to him.
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  • A full wine glass sat in front of the seat.
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  • He took the glass from her hand and sipped it.
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  • Yancey put his glass down and stood, moving around the table to take her by the arm.
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  • The rainbow tints from the colored suns fell upon the glass city softly and gave to the buildings many delicate, shifting hues which were very pretty to see.
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  • She brought him a plate of warm cookies and a glass of milk.
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  • "I hope this will prove the last drop that will make the glass run over," Anna Pavlovna continued.
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  • The cavern did not come to an end, as they had expected it would, but slanted upward through the great glass mountain, running in a direction that promised to lead them to the side opposite the Mangaboo country.
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  • The surface of the pond was as smooth as glass, reflecting a small fluffy cloud as it floated across the inky sky.
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  • Daniela observed her for a moment then replaced the cup with a glass filled with the alcohol.
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  • As the horse ambled along, drawing the buggy, the people of the glass city made way for them and formed a procession in their rear.
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  • At once the Mangaboos began piling up the rocks of glass again, and as the little man realized that they were all about to be entombed in the mountain he said to the children:
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  • He tipped the glass up and drained it.
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  • "We'll leave you to talk," Andre said, raising his glass in greeting to his father.
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  • Someone offered her a glass of punch.
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  • Finally he lifted his glass of tea in a half salute to her.
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  • Proud of herself, she sipped from a glass of wine.
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  • The man had taken a step or two across the glass roof before he noticed the presence of the strangers; but then he stopped abruptly.
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  • If there are, they are liable to be glass oats!
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  • This time she put on the glass bead first and the two wooden ones next.
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  • Candy spilled across the coffee table and a glass bowl was shoved in front of her mouth.
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  • He set down his glass, and taking Cynthia's hand, retreated from the parlor to the kitchen, without even bothering to make an excuse.
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  • The glass carafe exploded.
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  • He drank hot tea from a glass.
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  • Kris asked as he poured himself a second glass of whiskey.
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  • Soon he reached the street and disappeared through a glass doorway into one of the glass buildings.
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  • Yet, look where she would, Dorothy could discover no bells at all in the great glass hall.
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  • Then the boy returned to one of the upper rooms, and in spite of the hardness of the glass bench was soon deep in slumberland.
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  • He dried a glass carefully, studying it against the light for spots.
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  • Sofia drank another glass of water and forced her attention to her list.
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  • The roof beside them had a great hole smashed through it, and pieces of glass were lying scattered in every direction.
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  • He returned from the kitchen with tray holding a glass of orange juice, a plate with what looked like homemade granola bars, and a small bowl of sliced apples.
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  • Shall we with pains erect a heaven of blue glass over ourselves, though when it is done we shall be sure to gaze still at the true ethereal heaven far above, as if the former were not?
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  • Jackson collected his painting and glass.
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  • He sat down with the bottle, not bothering to use a glass.
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  • She snatched it and swept past him, popping it open as she neared a wall covered in a titanium glass screen.
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  • "Café Richard is a pretty swank place," Fred said, rising and refilling Mrs. Byrne's glass from a crystal pitcher Dean hadn't seen since his mother died.
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  • It is well known that a large plate of glass will have a green tint, owing, as the makers say, to its "body," but a small piece of the same will be colorless.
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  • He retrieved her glass from the basin of the sink and poured her more wine.
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  • Her headache was gone, her stomach full, and another glass of whiskey in her hand.
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  • her glass to keep from hurling it at him.
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  • She tiptoed through the glass and leaned out the window, eyeing the wide ledge.
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  • She wiped the glass shards from the ledge and carefully stepped out, standing against the outside wall.
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  • The French doors were locked, and she beat on them, looking around wildly for deck furniture to break the glass.
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  • The rocket smashed into the floor below, shattering glass and pulverizing part of the balcony.
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  • Her only chance at safety was across a swath of broken glass.
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  • She ran, crying out as glass shredded her feet.
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  • She pried glass free with shaking hands between sobs, then set her foot down and did the same for the other.
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  • Her arms and legs were only faintly scarred despite the glass shards from the rocket attacks and the damage done by Sasha.
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  • The windows were open with no glass, and heavy iron chandeliers hung from thick wooden rafters and were burning real candles.
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  • Daniela filled her glass with two more shots and smiled.
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  • Katie raised the glass in a salute and left.
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  • A hand took her brandy and flung it and the glass over the wall.
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  • "Rhyn is our…guest," Kris said, as if eating glass shards.
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  • He stood in front of the glass French doors of the balcony, taking up the whole space with his massive frame and heavy trench coat.
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  • She followed, uninterested in the sterile glass and stainless steel landscape.
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  • He set his glass down and looked again at Sasha, who had yet to glance away from the fire.
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  • Jade.s hand brushed the glass in Sasha.s pocket.
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  • Ully.s lab was a disaster, with glass covering the floor and counters flipped on end.
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  • "Ully?" she called, picking her way through the broken glass and fallen instruments.
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  • One counter was still standing next to the refrigerator tucked in a corner, and he swept the broken glass from the top to create a little work space.
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  • There they each drank a glass of Fat Tire Ale.
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  • "I wonder what they do with the holes," Fred mused as he spooned his breakfast and poured a glass of milk for Donnie.
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  • This girl can find a handhold on a sheet of glass and she's as strong as any man I know.
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  • They hadn't, but as long as he was awake and unable to sleep, he went to the kitchen and poured himself a glass of milk.
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  • Go in the parlor and pour yourself a glass of sherry and put your feet up.
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  • Cynthia sat up in bed as she read the brief passage, an uncommon glass of amber liquid in her hand Donnie deciphered it.
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  • Cynthia lifted her glass and drained it.
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  • Fred poured a full glass of Tequila for Weller but left the other two glasses empty.
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  • "Look," Weller said as he reached for his glass.
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  • Weller tipped his glass high.
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  • Fred drained his glass and stacked it in the dishwasher.
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  • He rose, held her hand, and led her to the looking glass.
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  • When he began pouring the second glass, both guests said, "None for me, thank you."
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  • Connor stared straight ahead for a moment, picked up his glass and drained it.
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  • As he refilled the human's glass he continued, Why don't you have a few more drinks, make yourself some food; I'm sure Sarah stocked the fridge with all your favorites.
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  • He sat back with the glass, smelled the contents, frowned and took a sip.
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  • As her eyes began to glass over, he played softer until she started to nod off.
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  • He raised his glass to show him and took a sip.
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  • She picked up the glass and held it up.
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  • She took a sip, licked her lips, then studied the glass for a moment.
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  • Where most houses would have a deck, there was a large studio, with professional lighting and lots of glass.
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  • I don't know, something innocuous like pour a glass of wine and dump it down the sink, or open and close a window.
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  • Jackson poured a drink and a glass of blood, then sat at the board.
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  • Of course not, I'm not made of glass.
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  • He sat for a minute staring into his glass of blood.
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  • Jackson looked up from his glass.
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  • Do you want a glass of port before we go up?
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  • She opened a bottle and poured a glass for him.
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  • He went to get some blood and a drink, no bottle, just a glass.
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  • She returned with a bottle and a glass.
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  • He poured a tall glass and headed to the drawing room.
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  • I'm guessing you don't want a glass of port tonight, but believe me, I could use a drink.
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  • Connor passed out the champagne, and held up his glass.
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  • He tipped his glass.
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  • Elisabeth raised her glass.
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  • She stopped and sniffed the air, then gaped at his glass.
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  • He lifted his glass.
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  • Connor tilted his glass to Jackson in a thank you, his other arm draped around his blubbering bride.
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  • Connor gave him a sheepish half-smile, then took the glass, shattering it in his hand.
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  • Elisabeth and Jackson were sweeping up the glass when she asked, "Will it take long for him to curb his strength?"
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  • He observed the glass for a minute then dipped his index finger and touched it to his tongue.
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  • Jackson stood and raised his glass.
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  • Jackson kept filling Connor's wine glass, yet he still appeared shaken.
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  • He poured carbonated red grape juice into a long-stemmed glass and set the bottle back in the refrigerator.
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  • With the glass in one hand and the letter in another, he sauntered into his office.
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  • Taking a sip of the wine colored liquid, he sat the glass in a coaster on the smooth mahogany desk and dropped the letter beside it.
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  • Retrieving the glass of grape sparkly, he picked up the picture and leaned back in the chair.
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  • He tossed the picture back on the table and drained the glass.
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  • He stood and took the glass to the kitchen.
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  • She leaned down; peering through the soot smudged glass on the stove door.
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  • He lifted his tea glass and examined the amber liquid.
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  • Even the beggars outside the thick, bulletproof glass of the main gate were quiet, their small fires dark.
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  • Her eyes strayed to the wall kept behind translucent, titanium-reinforced glass.
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  • Arnie knew the importance of the buttons and keypads behind that glass, but the wall looked secured.
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  • She sipped from a container of water and turned again to the wall behind the titanium glass, unable to pinpoint how one of the sensitive keypads had made it outside the compound or when.
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  • His gaze drifted to the wall of glass.
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  • Lana waited until the others in the center left and stood before the titanium-reinforced glass in front of the keypads.
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  • At last, the glass slid open.
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  • She lowered the titanium glass and stepped away, tossing the case onto a desk.
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  • Her gaze went again to the keypads protected behind the titanium glass.
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  • An hour glass with streaming black sand appeared in his palm.
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  • Although they were the same shape, they were lighter, like comparing plastic beads to glass ones.
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  • Kiki poured himself a glass of whiskey and tossed it back.
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  • A milk glass vase with a spray of daffodils rested atop the table.
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  • He grabbed an order of French fries and a burger at the drive-in of a national chain, eating on the road, licking the salt from his fingers as he searched among the glass and steel structures for the address he had jotted down earlier.
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  • Everything about him was perfect, from the glass polish of his black shoes to the knife-like crease in his thousand-dollar suit.
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  • He handed the old man ten dollars and was handed a slip of paper with the phone number from the rental sign Mrs. Glass was apparently an early riser and answered the phone on the second ring.
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  • They were still early when ten minutes later they located Mrs. Glass's address.
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  • Mrs. Glass ushered them into a frilly little apartment in a restored brownstone located in a neighborhood that was a marked improvement over Bascomb Place.
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  • Mrs. Glass added, "You see, I've never met Mr. Cleary."
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  • Fred now wore an "I-told-you-so," smile as broad as Mrs. Glass.
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  • Fred mentioned there was no name on the mailbox for apart­ment C. Mrs. Glass said there had been a name the last time she was there, a couple of weeks ago.
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  • Mrs. Glass shook her head.
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  • Dean ignored him and turned to Mrs. Glass.
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  • Mrs. Glass bowed her head.
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  • Fred could have Mrs. Glass and her ilk—Dean was now in his element.
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  • I'm sure Mrs. Glass would find you the first day rent's overdue.
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  • Mrs. Glass said there was someone named Pat Corbin living in the same apartment as Cleary.
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  • He raised his glass.
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  • I called Mrs. Glass again, just to see if she remembered anything else.
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  • I don't suppose Mrs. Glass got a license number?
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  • Well, tell him Mrs. Glass called.
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  • I didn't realize it was you, Mrs. Glass.
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  • I understand from Mrs. Glass he was back in town but has moved out, so you don't have to worry.
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  • Dean eased into the latest news by first telling of Winston's unsuccessful inquiry about a Post Office forwarding address before mentioning his conversation with Mrs. Glass.
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  • I spent 20 minutes on the phone with Mrs. Glass.
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  • Mrs. Glass said the guy asked for Cleary by name.
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  • How would Nota get Mrs. Glass's number or even know Cleary even existed?
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  • Mrs. Glass's number was on the telephone pad.
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  • Mrs. Glass told him he wasn't the first person asking about her Bascomb Place tenant and the fellow wanted to know all about us.
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  • Call Mrs. Glass back.
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  • He had no reason to antagonize Mrs. Glass and have her upset with him.
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  • Dean tried to remember his earlier phone conversation with Mrs. Glass.
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  • Now that Mrs. Glass has spilled the beans that someone's looking for him, if he wants to remain incognito, he's going to be twice as cau­tious.
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  • He'd made a courtesy call on Mrs. Glass who had promptly donated a vacant furnished apartment for his use.
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  • She grabbed the closest object, a brass paperweight, and hurled it at him, bouncing it off a picture of her shaking hands with the late governor, sending glass flying.
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  • She kicked away a few shards of glass.
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  • Besides," he added, "Mrs. Glass was getting a mite too friendly and she's not much of a cook."
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  • A million little diamonds of glass showered the inside of the vehicle as it swerved up the street, spinning a track of rubber.
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  • She ignored his tap on the glass until he persisted and she finally flipped open the lock and he slid in.
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  • That's why you changed the lock so snoopy Mrs. Glass wouldn't stumble on it.
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  • She twisted the stem of her glass.
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  • Dean said as he raised his glass.
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  • Cynthia's glass remained on the table.
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  • Her eyes were cast downward, and her glass still in place on the table.
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  • He raised his manhattan and touched her glass.
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  • They both reached for a glass at the same time and bumped into each other.
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  • As she leaned over the table to put them in the serving containers, a glass came down on the table on each side of her – his hands still attached.
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  • She wrote her name in the condensation on the side of her tea glass.
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  • Maybe a glass of milk would help.
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  • She was sitting at the table drinking a glass of milk when Katie walked in.
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  • The soft music and light clinking of glass were soothing.
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  • Sensing motion, she opened her eyes to find Alex leaning across her, placing a long stemmed glass on the window sill beside her.
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  • He sat down with his glass.
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  • "Oh," She picked up the glass and sipped the sweet bubbly liquid.
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  • He sat his glass on the window sill and stretched out his legs.
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  • Picking his glass up, he took a sip before answering.
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  • In answer, Carmen set her glass on the sill and stood.
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  • After they ordered dinner, he pondered over his water glass.
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  • He took a sip from his glass and avoided her eyes.
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  • She twisted her glass around in the puddle of condensation.
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  • He leaned back and lifted his glass again.
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  • He gave her a level look over his glass.
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  • She took a drink of her tea and carefully set the glass back on the table.
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  • Why don't you come into the house and have a glass of cold tea.
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  • Glass bit into his skin.
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  • She stared absently at her glass of punch.
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  • His gaze moved around the room as he sipped on his glass of punch.
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  • He absently swirled the iced tea in his glass as his gaze finally met hers.
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  • The window ruptured, spraying glass across the kitchen floor.
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  • She retrieved the broom from the corner and started sweeping up the glass.
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  • He nailed the wood over the window while she cleaned the rest of the glass from the counter.
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  • She relinquished the ax for the glass of tea.
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  • He swirled the ice cubes around in his glass.
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  • He took a long drink and lowered the glass.
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  • She held the cool glass to the side of her face and gazed out over the hills.
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  • He gulped the rest of his tea and handed her the empty glass.
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  • A glass of water would taste good right now.
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  • He exited out the sliding glass doors off the formal living area that led to the private beach behind the building.
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  • She opened it and stretched upward on tiptoes to pull down a set of nestled, glass bowls.
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  • Furious and freaked out, she grabbed her purse and strode out the front door, just as Xander came into sight through the glass doors from the direction of the beach.
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  • Purple light arced through the broken glass windows, high above.
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  • When a few lumps of sugar are added to a glass of water and stirred, the sugar soon disappears and we are left with a uniform liquid resembling water, except that it is sweet.
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  • The metal is chiefly used, as the oxide, for colouring glass and porcelain.
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  • Metallic cobalt may be obtained by reduction of the oxide or chloride in a current of hydrogen at a red heat, or by heating the oxalate, under a layer of powdered glass.
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  • After being well shaken, the liquid was poured into a sterile glass Petrie dish and covered with a moist and sterile bell-jar.
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  • The experiment is, in fact, much improved by passing the primary light through a coloured glass.
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  • If we begin with a blue glass, we may observe the gradually increasing obliquity of the direction of maximum polarization; and then by exchanging the blue glass for a red one, we may revert to the original condition of things, and observe the transition from perpendicularity to obliquity over again.
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  • Much of the natural gas is piped out of the state into Ohio (even into the northern parts), Kentucky, Pennsylvania and Maryland; within the state gas has been utilized as a fuel in carbon black and glass factories.
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  • An excellent glass sand is procured from crushed sandstone near Berkeley Springs, Morgan county.
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  • The glass industry began in Wheeling in 1821, and there a process was discovered by which in 1864 for soda ash bicarbonate of lime was substituted, and a lime glass was made which was as fine as lead glass; other factors contributing to the localization of the manufacture of glass here are the fine glass sand obtained in the state and the plentiful supply of natural gas for fuel Transportation and Commerce.
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  • It was not completed, however, till the 19th century, when the west portal and towers and two bays of the nave were added, according to the plans of Violletle-Duc. The fine stained glass of the windows dates from the 13th to the 15th centuries.
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  • The latter are in fact little microscopes carrying a vernier etched on glass, in lieu of a filar micrometer.
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  • The illumination of the field is given by a lamp near the object glass, controlled by a switch near the micrometer.
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  • These differences arise primarily from the fact that glass for optical uses is required in comparatively large and thick pieces, while for most other purposes glass is used in the form of comparatively thin sheets; when, therefore, as a consequence 5 and crown glass.
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  • There were paths through these gardens, and over some of the brooks were ornamental glass bridges.
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  • The little man, having had a good sleep, felt rested and refreshed, and looking through the glass partition of the room he saw Zeb sitting up on his bench and yawning.
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  • If you are in a desert dying of thirst, you value the first glass of water very highly, the second glass a bit less, and the 802nd not at all.
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  • Many a traveller came out of his way to see me and the inside of my house, and, as an excuse for calling, asked for a glass of water.
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  • Denisov, who was living luxuriously because the soldiers of his squadron liked him, had also a board in the roof at the farther end, with a piece of (broken but mended) glass in it for a window.
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  • She gave her attention to a glass she was washing.
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  • She gave her attention to the glass she was rinsing.
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  • "You're right, I do forget," he answered roughly and slammed his glass down on the counter.
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  • She dropped her glass in the sink and took a step backward.
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  • If it was a tornado, standing next to glass doors wasn't the smartest thing to do.
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  • I could hear a glass clink and there was a pause.
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  • She returned in an instant, glass in hand.
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  • She raised her glass and bit her lip but didn't cry, then cast her eyes downward.
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  • He wrote "800 rubles" on a card, but while the waiter filled his glass he changed his mind and altered it to his usual stake of twenty rubles.
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  • She stared at her glass.
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  • He smiled and joined us for a glass.
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  • He's run it all summer, Martha said, handing Howie a glass.
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  • "God," said Martha, empting a glass.
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  • Let me get you a glass.
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  • I didn't manage to say much before I heard the sound of breaking glass.
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  • Not some guy who sells you a six dollar wine in a half-full glass.
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  • She poured the last of the liquor into her glass.
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  • Lydia Larkin continued to stare, then shrugged and began filling her glass.
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  • "I could use one of these," she said, taking a long pull, not bothering to get a glass.
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  • He found a fifth of whiskey setting on the counter and opened half the cabinet doors before finding a glass.
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  • She refilled he glass.
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  • She placed her hands on the window and leaned her forehead against the cool glass.
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  • She cleared her throat, staring into the wine glass.
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  • He swiped a badge to enter what she imagined was the Mecca of all science labs, with rows of stainless steel, machines, computers, and glass.
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  • She waited until the door closed before crossing to the carafe and refilling her glass.
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  • Kris accepted the glass of whiskey but avoided Jade's extended hand.
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  • Completely free, she relaxed and accepted a glass of champagne from one of the wait staff and waded toward the buffet.
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  • Saluting the bartender with her glass, she started to move away when a warm hand on her forearm stopped her.
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  • She tossed the whiskey back and gulped it down, then slapped the glass on the bar before turning away.
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  • When she accepted the glass, he followed with a quick and confident, "Let's take a walk around."
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  • He leaned forward and placed the glass on the table.
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  • Dean rose to pour himself a glass of milk.
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  • Brady watched Angel carefully place the keypad into a wall with several others, then secure them behind a thick shield of titanium glass.
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  • The only thing she had to eat since yesterday noon was a glass of milk in the wee hours of the morning.
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  • The discrepancies produced in this way are, however, very small, if care is taken to minimize the distance between the silver film and the photographic plate and to select a reasonably good piece of glass for the reseau.
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  • reseau-square by means of a spider-line micrometer, a glass scale, on the plan shown in fig.
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  • The image of the star is set updn the intersections of the lines of the central cross, and the positions of the reseau-lines are read off by estimation to - of a division on the glass scale.
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  • The object glass of the micrometer-microscope is placed midway between the plane of the photographic plate and the plane of the micrometer webs.
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  • Its fundamental principle is that, by a combination of glass scales with a micrometer screw, " the chief part of the distance to be measured is read off on the scale; the fractional part of the scalespace is not estimated but measured by the screw."
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  • spectrograph is the larger of the two it becomes necessary to adjust the object glass 0 1 farther C Ia from the stellar spectrograph.
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  • FLOWERS Imitations of natural flowers are sometimes made for scientific purposes (as the collection of glass flowers at Harvard University, which illustrates the flora of the United States), but more often as articles of decoration and ornament.
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  • In light Kundt's name is widely known for his inquiries in anomalous dispersion, not only in liquids and vapours, but even in metals, which he obtained in very thin films by means of a laborious process of electrolytic deposition upon platinized glass.
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  • The building, chiefly of iron and glass, is flanked by two towers and is visible from far over the metropolis.
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  • He obtains a magic glass cage, yoked with eight griffins, flies through the clouds, and, thanks to enchanters who know the language of birds, gets information as to their manners and customs, and ultimately receives their submission.
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  • That he was capable of better work than is suggested by his average accomplishment is shown by two allegorical poems - the Complaint of the Black Knight and the Temple of Glass (once attributed to Hawes).
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  • Lydgate's most doughty and learned apologist is Dr Schick, whose preface to the Temple of Glass embodies practically all that is known or conjectured concerning this author, including the chronological order of his works.
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  • The import trade shows the largest totals in foodstuffs, wines and liquors, textiles and raw materials for their manufacture, wood and its manufactures, iron and its manufactures, paper and cardboard, glass and ceramic wares.
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  • The market-gardeners of Paris and its vicinity have a high reputation for skill in the forcing of early vegetables under glass.
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  • Glass is manufactured in the departments of Nord (Aniche, &c.), Seine, Loire (Rive-de-Gier) and Meurthe-et-Moselle, Baccarat in the latter department being famous for its table-glass.
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  • and baldacchini, choir-screens, paschal candlesticks, ambones, tombs and the like, all enriched with sculpture and glass mosaic of great brilliance and decorative effect.
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  • It fumes strongly in air, and does not attack glass.
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  • The town has a tribunal of commerce and a communal college, flour-mills, manufactories of earthenware, biscuits, furniture, casks, and glass and brick works; the port has trade in grain, timber, hemp, flax, &c.
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  • Victoria (under glass) Pineapple..
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  • Among the industrial establishments of the city are stove and range factories, flour mills, rolling mills, distilleries, breweries, shoe factories, copper refining works, nail and tack factories, glass works and agricultural implement factories.
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  • These vary in form, but essentially they consist of a stem of porcelain, coarse earthenware, glass or other non-conducting substance, protected by an overhanging roof or screen.
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  • In the Korn apparatus the light from a Nernst electric lamp is concentrated to a point by means of a lens on the original picture, which is wound on a glass cylinder in the shape of a transparent photographic film.
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  • A totally reflecting prism placed inside the glass cylinder projects the light which penetrates the film upon a selenium cell situated at the end of the cylinder.
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  • A fine glass siphon tube is suspended with freedom to move in only one degree, and is connected with the signal-coil and moves with it.
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  • He constructed one form of his coherer of a glass tube a few inches long filled with iron borings or brass filings, having contact plates or pins at the end.
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  • The tube is then exhausted of its air, and attached to a bone or glass rod as a holder.
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  • The transformer T has its secondary or high-pressure terminals connected to spark balls S1, which are also connected by a circuit consisting of a large glass plate condenser C, and the primary circuit of an air-core transformer called an oscillation transformer.
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  • In its course it passes through a glass tube wound over with two coils of wire; one of these is an oscillation coil through which the oscillations to be detected pass, and the other is in connexion with a telephone.
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  • If a loop of very fine platinum wire, prepared by the Wollaston process, is included in an exhausted glass bulb like an incandescent lamp, then when electric oscillations are sent through it its resistance is increased.
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  • Mag., December 1906) as follows: It consists of two glass vessels like test tubes one inside the other, the space between the two being exhausted.
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  • Down the inner test tube pass four copper strips having platinum wires at their ends sealed through the glass.
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  • This plate is supported by a platinum wire sealed through the glass.
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  • A highly insulated tube contains a little mercury, which is used as a negative electrode, and the tube also has sealed through the glass a platinum wire carrying an iron plate as an anode.
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  • The finest glass is made in Tuscany and Venetia; Venetian glass is often colored and of artistic form.
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  • A vast variety of trinketsin coral, glass, lava, &c.is exported from Italy, or carried away by the annual host of tourists.
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  • The richest, however, of the co-operative societies, though few in number, are those for the production of electricity, for textile industries and for ceramic and glass manufactures.
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  • The most important imports are minerals, including coal and metals (both in pig and wrought); silks, raw, spun and woven; stone, potters earths, earthenware and glass; corn, flour and farinaceous products; cotton, raw, spun and woven; and live stock.
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  • In the south the body is slightly cut by women with small flakes of glass or quartz in zigzag or lineal patterns downwards.
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  • The varied manufactures of the town comprise cloth, linen, wax candles, starch, glass and porcelain.
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  • Amber has often been imitated by other resins like copal and kauri, as well as by celluloid and even glass.
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  • The architecture of the department is chiefly displayed in its churches, many of which possess stained glass of the 16th century.
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  • In its simplest form it consists of a tube about twelve inches long containing two glass plates, extending along its whole length and inclined at an angle of 60°.
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  • The eye-end of the tube is closed by a metal plate having a small hole at its centre near the intersection of the glass plates.
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  • The other end is closed by a plate of muffed glass at the distance of distinct vision, and parallel to this is fixed a plate of clear glass.
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  • In the intervening space (the object-box) are contained a number of fragments of brilliantly coloured glass, and as the tube is turned round its axis these fragments alter their positions and give rise to the various patterns.
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  • These images take the place of the coloured fragments of glass, and they are symmetrically multiplied by the mirrors.
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  • The town gives its name to an important coalbasin, and carries on the manufacture of glass.
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  • The city has a considerable trade with the surrounding country, in which large quantities of tobacco and hemp are produced; its manufactures include lumber, brooms, chairs, shoes, hemp twine, canned vegetables and glass bottles.
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  • Sometimes a 30-second glass is used instead of a 28-second one, and the intervals between the knots on the log-line are then made 50 ft.
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  • For speeds over six knots a 14-second glass is employed, and the speed indicated by the log-line is doubled.
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  • When the bunting at the end of the stray line passes his hand, he calls to his assistant to turn the glass, and allows the line to pay out freely.
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  • In a steam vessel running at high speed on an ocean route, with engines working smoothly and uniformly, a careful officer with correct line and glass can obtain very accurate results with the common log.
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  • Pop. (1 9 01) 3799 The church of the Holy Trinity, one of the most noteworthy in Staffordshire, is principally Early English, and has fine stained glass.
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  • Next after cottons come woollens, silk, cloth, chemicals, machinery, paper, furniture, hats, cement, leather, glass and china and other products.
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  • Whatever the pattern adopted for the roof, a sufficient portion of it must be glazed to admit light, and it should be so designed that the ironwork can be easily inspected and painted and the glass readily cleaned.
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  • Gradually, however, the accommodation improved, and by the middle of the 19th century second-class passengers had begun to enjoy " good glass windows and cushions on the seat," the fares they paid being about 2d.
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  • The great reflecting telescope at Dorpat was manufactured by him, and so great was the skill he attained in the making of lenses for achromatic telescopes that, in a letter to Sir David Brewster, he expressed his willingness to furnish an achromatic glass of 18 in.
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  • Manufactures based on the products of mines and quarries (chemicals, glass, clay, stone and metal works) constituted about one-fifth of the whole product.
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  • Parkersburg is the see of a Protestant Episcopal bishop. Oil, coal, natural gas and fire-clay abound in the neighbouring region, and the city is engaged in the refining of oil and the manufacture of pottery, brick and tile, glass, lumber, furniture, flour, steel, and foundry and machine-shop products.
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  • In the Industrial Museum there is (besides collections of various kinds) some good painted glass of the 16th century, taken from the neighbouring Benedictine monastery of Muri (founded 1027, suppressed 1841 - the monks, are now quartered at Gries, near Botzen, in Tirol).
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  • The calorimeter used for solutions is usually cylindrical, and made of glass or a metal which is not, attacked by the reacting substances.
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  • In the older type the combustion chamber (of metal or glass) is sunk in the calorimeter proper, tubes being provided for the entrance and exit of the gaseous substances involved in the action.
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  • The city's manufactures include glass, brick, tile, carriages and wagons, agricultural implements, pianos and organs and cigars.
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  • The principal imports are butter, woollens, timber, cereals, eggs, glass, cottons, preserved meat, wool, sugar and bacon.
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  • They have a passion for fine clothes and ornaments, tricking themselves out with glass trinkets, rings and articles of ivory and horn.
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  • The abbey church contained famous stained glass, and some of this is preserved in the neighbouring church at Morley.
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  • The parish churches of Dronfield, Hathersage (with some notable stained glass), Sandiacre and Tideswell exemplify the Decorated period; the last is a particularly stately and beautiful building, with a lofty and ornate western tower and some good early brasses.
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  • From 1879 to 1888 he was engaged on difficult experimental investigations, which began with an inquiry into the corrections required, owing to the great pressures to which the instruments had been subjected, in the readings of the thermometers employed by the "Challenger" expedition for observing deep-sea temperatures, and which were extended to include the compressibility of water, glass and mercury.
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  • These flew away, leaving their cup at the water's edge, and singing "If that glass either break or fall, Farewell to the luck of Eden Hall."
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  • It is a tradition that, this work not being favourably regarded by the authorities of the Paris Museum, its draughtsman and author were refused closer access to the specimens required, and had to draw and describe them through the glass as they stood on the shelves of the cases.
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  • They hold in their hands books turned upside down, and pretend to read through spectacles in which for glass have been substituted bits of orange-peel."
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  • The pavement consists partly of opus Alexandrinum of red and green porphyry mixed with marbles, partly of tesselated work of glass and marble tesserae.
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  • The glass manufactory of Murano (q.v.), a small island about 12 m.
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  • to the north of Venice, was a great source of revenue to the republic. Glass drinking cups and ornamental vessels, some decorated with enamel painting, and "silvered" mirrors were produced in great quantities from the 14th century downwards, and exported.
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  • Like many other arts in Venice, that of glass-making appears to have been imported from Moslem countries, and the influence of Oriental design can be traced in much of the Venetian glass.
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  • The art of making stained xxv11.3 2 a glass windows was not practised by the Venetians; almost the only fine glass in Venice is that in a south transept window in the Dominican church, which, though designed by able Venetian painters, is obviously the work of foreigners.
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  • Similarly, the glass industry has revived.
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  • Other valuable minerals are clay suitable for making pottery, brick and tile (in 1908 the value of the clay working products was $26,622,490) and sand suitable for making glass.
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  • An active trade is carried on with Austria, especially through the Isakovets and Gusyatin custom-houses, corn, cattle, horses, skins, wool, linseed and hemp seed being exported, in exchange for wooden wares, linen, woollen stuffs, cotton, glass and agricultural implements.
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  • Scheele had done, and because he was employing a glass vessel he got "fluor acid air" (silicon fluoride).
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  • It is the chief seat of the glass pearl and imitation jewelry manufacture, and has also an important textile industry, and produces large quantities of hardware, papier mache and other paper goods.
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  • The earliest form of testing instrument employed for this purpose was that of Giuseppe Tagliabue of New York, which consists of a glass cup placed in a copper water bath heated by a spirit lamp. The cup is filled with the oil to be tested, a thermometer placed in it and heat applied, the temperatures being noted at which, on passing a lighted splinter of wood over the surface of the oil, a flash occurs, and after further heating, the oil ignites.
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  • from the Arabic); the use of powder and of glass mirrors, and also of the rosary itself - all these things came to Europe from the East and as a result of the Crusades.
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  • Industry especially attained a high state of development; rich garments were embroidered, and glass, pastes, faience, &c., were manufactured.
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  • It consists of a glass bulb, in which there is a loop of fine wire, and to the bulb is attached a U-tube in which there is some liquid.
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  • But side by side with this literary transmission Berthelot insists that there was another mode of transmission, by means of the knowledge of practical receipts and processes traditional among jewellers, painters, workers in glass and pottery, and other handicraftsmen.
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  • The city's manufactures include glass, brick, tile, foundry and machine-shop products, &c. In 1905 the factory product was valued at $1,888,894, being 51.4% greater than in 1900.
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  • Nursery and market gardening, largely under glass, brickmaking and saw-mills are the chief industries of Cheshunt.
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  • The central tower and the south portal (13th century) are the chief features of its simple exterior; in the interior, the decorative work, notably the chapel-screens and some fine stained glass, is remarkable.
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  • The chief industries include distilleries, breweries, glass works, cigar factories and the ancient linen and cutlery manufactures.
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  • The manufacture of glass, also practised in Egypt, demanded a knowledge of sodium or potassium carbonates; the former occurs as an efflorescence on the shores of certain lakes; the latter was obtained from wood ashes.
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  • Heat the substance in a hard glass tube.
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  • A hard glass tube slightly longer than the furnace and 12 to 15 mm.
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  • The oxidation, which is effected by chromic acid and sulphuric acid, is conducted in a flask provided with a funnel and escape tube, and the carbon dioxide formed is swept by a current of dry air, previously freed from carbon dioxide, through a drying tube to a set of potash bulbs and a tube containing soda-lime; if halogens are present, a small wash bottle containing potassium iodide, and a U tube containing glass wool moistened with silver nitrate on one side and strong sulphuric acid on the other, must be inserted between the flask and the drying tube.
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  • In this method the operation is carried out in a hard glass tube sealed at one end and packed as shown in fig.
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  • Attached to the bulb was a glass rod and then a tube containing iron wire.
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  • The chief article of export is coal from the neighbouring collieries, the other leading exports being ale, whisky, glass and manufactured goods.
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  • The churches of St Etienne and St Jean, both of the Renaissance period with later additions, preserve stained glass of the 16th century.
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  • Instead of drawing these squares upon the map itself, they may be engraved or etched upon glass, or drawn upon transparent celluloid or tracing-paper.
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  • The manufactures include boots and shoes, glass and agricultural implements.
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  • Saw-mills, iron foundries, chemicals, glass and soap works, shipbuilding yards and a cocoanut-oil factory in connexion with the soap-manufacture at Port Sunlight, England,are among the chief industrial establishments.
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  • Coal, oil, natural gas, clay and iron are found in the vicinity, and among the city's manufactures are iron, steel, glass, furniture and pottery.
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  • On the south bank of the river is the township and urban district of Cowpen (pop. 17,879), with collieries and glass works; coal is shipped from this point by river.
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  • Owing to their want of adhesiveness, they are, however, usually mounted on glass as microscopic slides, either in glycerin jelly, Canada balsam or some other suitable medium.
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  • A plan which has been found to answer well is to arrange them in cardboard boxes, either with glass tops or in sliding covers, in drawers - the name being placed outside each box and the specimens gummed into the boxes.
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  • - Glass Bottles.
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  • The stained glass both in the cathedral and in other churches of the city is particularly noteworthy; its survival may be traced to the stipulation made by the citizens when surrendering to parliament in the civil wars that it should not be damaged.
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  • The statuary of the lateral portals, the stained glass of the 13th century, and the choir-screen of the Renaissance are all unique from the artistic standpoint.
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  • The abbey church of St Pierre, dating chiefly from the 1 3 th century, contains, besides some fine stained glass, twelve representations of the apostles in enamel, executed about 1 547 by Leonard Limosin.
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  • The game-pies and other delicacies of Chartres are well known, and the industries also include flour-milling, brewing, distilling, iron-founding, leather manufacture, dyeing, and the manufacture of stained glass, billiard requisites, hosiery, &c.
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  • It is very unstable, decomposing into nitrous oxide and water when mixed with copper oxide, lead chromate or even powdered glass.
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  • The imports consist principally of food stuffs, building materials, drinks, sugar, machinery, glass, fats, clothes, wooden and stone wares, and various manufactured goods.
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  • Not far off, similar relics were found at Sobunar, Zlatiste and Debelobrdo; iron and bronze ornaments, vessels and weapons, often of elaborate design, occur in the huts and cemeteries of Glasinac, and in the cemetery of Jezerine, where they are associated with objects in silver, tin, amber, glass, &c. Among the numerous finds made in other districts may be mentioned the discovery, at Vrankamer, near Bihac, of 98 African coins, the oldest of which dates from 300 B.C. Many vestiges of Roman rule survive, such as roads, mines, ruins, tombs, coins, frescoes and inscriptions.
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  • The church of St Martin is ancient, and contains stained glass from Cartmel priory in Furness.
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  • Manufactories of porcelain, glass and earthenware are numerous.
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  • It is questionable whether it is not better, in cold soils and bleak situations, to abandon outdoor peach culture, and to cover the walls with a casing of glass, so that the trees may be under shelter during the uncongenial spring weather.
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  • Wooden and glass copings are also very useful in warding off frosts.
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  • Cardinal (under glass) e.
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    0
  • Stanwick (under glass) m.e.
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  • in height (completed 1878); the granite columns from the old cathedral, the stained glass windows by Kellner of Nuremberg, and H.
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  • The Myvyrian Archaeology (408-484) gives the three principal bangor (college) institutions as follows: - the bangor of Illtud Farchawg at Caer Worgorn (Wroxeter); that of Emrys (Ambrosius) at Caer Caradawg; bangor wydrin (glass) in the glass isle, Afallach; bangor Illtud, or Llanilltud, or Llantwit major (by corruption), being a fourth.
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  • These crystals have, as a rule, very good crystalline form, but the quartz and felspar are often filled with enclosures of glass.
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    0
  • These crystallites (q.v.) show that the glassy rock has a tendency to crystallize which is inhibited only by the very viscous state of the glass and the rapidity with which it was cooled.
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    0
  • Often bands of spherulites alternate with bands of pure glass, a fact which seems to indicate that the growth of these bodies took place before the rock ceased to flow.
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    0
  • Porphyritic crystals often contract less than the surrounding glass, which accordingly becomes strained, and in polarized light may show a weak double refraction in a limited area surrounding the crystal.
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  • These surround little spherules of glass which are detached when the rock is struck with a hammer.
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  • In mineralogical collections rounded nodules of brown glass, varying from the size of a pea to that of an orange, may often be seen labelled marekanite.
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    0
  • Their behaviour in this respect closely resembles the balls of rapidly cooled, unannealed glass which are called Prince Rupert's drops.
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  • Often this felsitic devitrified glass is so fine-grained that its constituents cannot be directly determined even with the aid of the microscope, but chemical analysis leaves little doubt as to the real nature cf the minerals which have been formed.
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  • Many vitreous rocks show alteration of this type in certain parts where either the glass has been of unstable nature or where agencies of change such as percolating water have had easiest access (as along joints, perlitic cracks and the margins of dikes and sills).
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  • In the same way artificial glass can be devitrified if it be kept at a temperature slightly below the fusing point for some days.
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    0
  • Window glass exposed to alkaline vapours often shows a thin iridescent surface film which is supposed to be due to crystallization; the same change is found in pieces of Roman glass which have been dug out of the ruins of Pompeii.
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    0
  • The chemical composition of typical obsidians is shown by the following analyses Obsidian, when broken, shows a conchoidal fracture, like that of glass, and yields sharp-edged fragments, which have been used in many localities as arrow-points, spear-heads, knives and razors.
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  • By the ancient Greeks and Romans obsidian was worked as a gem-stone; and in consequence of its having been often imitated in glass there arose among collectors of gems in the 18th century the practice of calling all antique pastes "obsidians."
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  • The modern stained glass in the chancel is reckoned amongst the finest in Scotland.
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  • The vats for depositing may be of enamelled iron, slate, glazed earthenware, glass, lead-lined wood, &c. The current densities and potential differences frequently used for some of the commoner metals are given in the following table, taken from M ` Millan's Treatise on Electrometallurgy.
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  • Elec. Eng., 1898, 2 7, p. 99) very successfully produced true parabolic reflectors for projectors, by depositing copper upon carefully ground and polished glass surfaces rendered conductive by a film of deposited silver.
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    0
  • At one time it was used for window panes of houses and the port-holes of Russian men-of-war, being commonly known as "Muscovy glass."
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  • The cathedral contains some fine stained glass, the largest organ in Germany (1856), and a number of interesting old paintings and carvings by Jorg Syrlin the elder, Jorg Syrlin the younger, Burkhard Engelberger, and other masters of the Swabian school.
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  • The tube is made of glass, indiarubber, copper or lead, according to the liquid which is to be transferred.
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  • for a sum of £25; for a liquor measure or glass containing less than a half-pint; and in America for a literal translation of a foreign or classical author, a "crib."
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    0
  • Among the manufactures are cut glass, stoves and ranges, kitchen furniture, guns, thread-cutting machines, brooms and agricultural implements.
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    0
  • In 1905 the borough ranked fifth among the cities of the United States in the manufacture of glass (plateglass, lamp chimneys and bottles), its product (valued at $1,841,308) being 2.3% of that of the whole country.
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    0
  • It is chiefly used as a pigment and in the manufacture of flint glass.
    0
    0
  • By fusing litharge with boron trioxide, glasses of a composition varying with the proportions of the mixture are obtained; some of these are used in the manufacture of glass.
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    0
  • A is the upper end of a glass tube, half a metre or so in length, which is clamped in a vertical position.
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  • The wire is supported inside the glass tube A with its upper pole at the same height as the magnetometer needle.
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    0
  • For the practical measurement of field intensity du Bois has used plates of the densest Jena flint glass.
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    0
  • Since Verdet's constant is somewhat uncertain for different batches of glass even of the same quality, each plate should be standardized in a field of known intensity.
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    0
  • A part of one surface of the plate may be silvered, so that the polarized ray, after having once traversed the glass, is reflected back again; the rotation is thus doubled, and moreover, the arrangement is, for certain experiments, more convenient than the other.
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  • The whole was wrapped in several coverings of asbestos and placed in a glass vessel from which the air was partially exhausted, additional precautions being taken to guard against oxidation of the iron.
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  • The temperature of Cutch during the hot season is high, the thermometer frequently rising to roo° or 105° F.; and in the months of April and May clouds of dust and sand, blown about by hurricanes, envelop the houses, the glass windows scarcely affording any protection.
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  • Among other manufactures are butter and cheese, canned fruits and vegetables, glass and earthenware, printing and wrapping paper, furniture, matches, hats, clothing, pharmaceutical products, soaps and - p erfumery, ice, artificial drinks, cigars and cigarettes, fireworks anc candles.
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  • The church of St Martin, dating from the i 5th century, has good stained glass.
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  • Leather-working and the manufacture of stained glass are leading industries.
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  • Clothing, carriages, pottery, glass, paper and furniture are made, and there are numerous minor industries.
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  • Other principal branches of industry are: tobacco manufactories, belonging to the state, tobacco being a government monopoly; iron foundries, mostly in the mining region; agricultural machinery and implements, notably at Budapest; leather manufactures; paper-mills, the largest at Fiume; glass (only the more common sort) and earthenwares; chemicals; wooden products; petroleum-refineries; woollen yarns and cloth manufactories, as well as several establishments of knitting and weaving.
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  • In his experiments upon this subject Fraunhofer employed plates of glass dusted over with lycopodium, or studded with small metallic disks of uniform size; and he found that the diameters of the rings were proportional to the length of the waves and inversely as the diameter of the disks.
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  • An admissible error of phase of 4X will correspond to an error of IX in a reflecting and 2X in a (glass) refracting surface, the incidence in both cases being perpendicular.
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  • In the case of a single lens of glass with the most favourable curvatures, Sf is about equal to a 2 f, so that a 4 must not exceed off.
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  • Subsequently he ruled gratings on a layer of gold-leaf attached to glass, or on a layer of grease similarly supported, and again by attacking the glass itself with a diamond point.
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  • In an engraved glass grating there is no opaque material present by which light could be absorbed, and the effect depends upon a difference of retardation in passing the alternate parts.
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  • Rutherfurd introduced into common use the reflection grating, finding that speculum metal was less trying than glass to the diamond point, upon the permanence of which so much depends.
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  • The earliest is that of Quincke, who coated a glass grating with a chemical silver deposit, subsequently thickened with copper in an electrolytic bath.
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  • A much easier method, applicable to glass originals, is that of photographic reproduction by contact printing.
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  • To save the diamond point it might be possible to use something softer than ordinary glass as the material of the plate.
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  • of glass or mica.
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  • The slits may be cut out of tin-plate, and half covered by mica or " microscopic glass," held in position by a little cement.
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  • a disturbance limited to an infinitely thin slice of the medium, is supposed to fall upon a parallel grating, which again may With the best thickness so that in this case w=0 w = (2 w w= 0 be regarded as formed of infinitely thin wires, or infinitely narrow lines traced upon glass.
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  • In observing the bands he received them at first upon a screen of finely ground glass, upon which a magnifying lens was focused; but it soon appeared that the ground glass could be dispensed with, the diffraction pattern being viewed in the same way as the image formed by the object-glass of a telescope is viewed through the eye-piece.
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  • In 1845 he established at Paris a special archaeological library, and at the same time a manufactory of painted glass.
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  • Sodium uranate, Na2U207, is used as a pigment for painting on glass and porcelain under the name of uranium yellow.
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  • a crystal or glass circular disk, more suited to the shape of the sacred wafer; this is mounted in a frame of golden rays, and the whole is supported by a stem and bases.
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  • Ann., 1888, 33, 194) obtained similar results by using cylindrical glass rods in place of the column of water.
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  • Leber experimented with several chemical compounds to find what reaction they had on these cells; by using fine glass tubes sealed at the outer end and containing a chemical substance, and by introducing the open end into the blood vessels he found that the leucocytes were attracted - positive chemiotaxis - by the various compounds of mercury, copper, turpentin, and other substances.
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  • But there his stay was equally short, for in 1872 he undertook the duties of engineering manager in the glass manufactories of Messrs Chance Brothers and Company at Birmingham.
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  • Moreover, his association with glass manufacture led him to study the refractive indices of different kinds of glass; he further undertook abstruse researches on electrostatic capacity, the phenomena of the residual charge, and other problems arising out of Clerk Maxwell's electro-magnetic theory.
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  • It consisted of a spherical glass vessel opening below by means of a stop-cock and narrow nozzle into the cylinder of an "exhausting syringe," which inclined upwards from the extremity of the nozzle.
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  • A and B are pear-shaped glass vessels connected by a long narrow india-rubber tube, which must be sufficiently strong in the body (or strengthened by a linen coating) to stand an outward pressure of 1 to 2 atmospheres.
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  • At the upper end of A is a glass two-way stop-cock, by turning which the vessel A can either be made to communicate with the vessel to be exhausted, or with the atmosphere, or can be shut off from both when the cock holds an intermediate position.
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  • Mile of Warsaw in 1828, who termed it a "hydrostatic air-pump without cylinders, taps, lids or stoppers," this is attained by using, both for the inlet and the outlet, vertical capillary glass tubes, soldered, the former to somewhere near the bottom, the latter to the top of the vessel.
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  • Neisen and others to introduce glass valves in lieu of stop-cocks.
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  • 4), consists of a vertical capillary Pump. glass tube a of about 1 mm.
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  • If the vertical tube, measuring from the point where the branch comes in, is a few inches greater than the height of the barometer, and the glass and mercury are perfectly clean, the apparatus slowly but surely produces an almost absolute vacuum.
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  • The trade is chiefly connected with the produce of the neighbouring coal-mines and that of the numerous important iron and glass works of the district.
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  • are many varieties of glass differing widely in chemical composition and in physical qualities.
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  • They pass through a viscous stage in cooling from a state of fluidity; they develop effects of colour when the glass mixtures are fused with certain metallic oxides; they are, when cold, bad conductors both of electricity and heat, they are easily fractured by a blow or shock and show a conchoidal fracture; they are but slightly affected by ordinary solvents, but are readily attacked by hydrofluoric acid.
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  • The structure of glass has been the subject of repeated investigations.
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  • The theory most widely accepted at present is that glass is a quickly solidified solution, in which silica, silicates, borates, phosphates and aluminates may be either solvents or solutes, and metallic oxides and metals may be held either in solution or in suspension.
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  • Long experience has fixed the mixtures, so far as ordinary furnace temperatures are concerned, which produce the varieties of glass in common use.
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  • The essential materials of which these mixtures are made are, for English flint glass, sand, carbonate of potash and red lead; for plate and sheet glass, sand, carbonate or sulphate of soda.
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  • and carbonate of lime; and for Bohemian glass, sand, carbonate of potash and carbonate of lime.
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  • The recent large increase in the number of varieties of glass has been chiefly due to developments in the manufacture of optical glass.
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  • In the same way glass can be rendered more or less fusible, and its stability can be increased both in relation to extremes of temperature and to the chemical action of solvents.
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  • The fluidity of glass at a high temperature renders possible the processes of ladelling, pouring, casting and stirring.
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  • A mass of glass in a viscous state can be rolled with an iron roller like dough; can be rendered hollow by the pressure of the human breath or by compressed air; can be forced by air pressure, or by a mechanically driven plunger, to take the shape and impression of a mould; and can be almost indefinitely extended as solid rod or as hollow tube.
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  • So extensible is viscous glass that it can be drawn out into a filament sufficiently fine and elastic to be woven into a fabric.
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  • Semi-opacity and opacity are usually produced by the addition to the glass-mixtures of materials which will remain in suspension in the glass, such as oxide of tin, oxide of arsenic, phosphate of lime, cryolite or a mixture of felspar and fluorspar.
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  • Little is known about the actual cause of colour in glass beyond the fact that certain materials added to and melted with certain glass-mixtures will in favourable circumstances produce effects of colour.
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  • Ferrous oxide produces an olive green or a pale blue according to the glass with which it is mixed.
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  • Silver oxide, mixed as a paint and spread on the surface of a piece of glass and heated, gives a permanent yellow stain.
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  • Finely divided vegetable charcoal added to a soda-lime glass gives a yellow colour.
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  • It has been suggested that the colour is due to sulphur, but the effect can be produced with a glass mixture containing no sulphur, free or combined, and by increasing the proportion of charcoal the intensity of the colour can be increased until it reaches black opacity.
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  • Nickel with a potash-lead glass gives a violet colour, and a brown colour with a soda-lime glass.
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  • If oxide of copper is added to a glass mixture containing a strong reducing agent, a glass is produced which when first taken from the crucible is colourless but on being reheated develops a deep crimson - ruby colour.
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  • A similar glass, if its cooling is greatly retarded, produces throughout its substance minute crystals of metallic copper, and closely resembles the mineral called avanturine.
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  • There is also an intermediate stage in which the glass has a rusty red colour by reflected light, and a purpleblue colour by transmitted light.
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  • Glass containing gold behaves in almost precisely the same way, but the ruby glass is less crimson than copper ruby glass.
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  • C. Maxwell Garnett, who has studied the optical properties of these glasses, has suggested that the changes in colour correspond with changes effected in the structure of the metals as they pass gradually from solution in the glass to a state of crystallization.
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  • For this reason chemical agents are added to glass mixtures to remove or neutralize accidental colour.
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  • Oxidation may be effected by the addition to the glass mixture of a substance which gives up oxygen at a high temperature, such as manganese dioxide or arsenic trioxide.
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  • With the same object, red lead and saltpetre are used in the mixture for potash-lead glass.
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  • Manganese dioxide not only acts as a source of oxygen, but develops a pink tint in the glass, which is complementary to and neutralizes the green colour due to ferrous oxide.
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  • Glass is a bad conductor of heat.
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  • When boiling water is poured into a glass vessel, the vessel frequently breaks, on account of the unequal expansion of the inner and outer layers.
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  • If in the process of glass manufacture a glass vessel is suddenly cooled, the constituent particles are unable to arrange themselves and the vessel remains in a state of extreme tension.
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  • de la Bastie's process of " toughening " glass consisted in dipping glass, raised to a temperature slightly below the melting-point, into molten tallow.
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  • The surface of the glass was hardened, but the inner layers remained in unstable equilibrium.
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  • In all branches of glass manufacture the process of " annealing," i.e.
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  • 15) employed for melting glass are usually heated with gas on the " Siemens," or some similar system of regenerative heating.
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  • Electrical furnaces have not as yet been employed for ordinary glass-making on a commercial scale, but the electrical plants which have been erected for melting and moulding quartz suggest the possibility of electric heating being employed for the manufacture of glass.
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  • Many forms of apparatus have been tried for ascertaining the temperature of glass furnaces.
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  • Optical Glass II.
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  • Blown Glass III.
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  • Mechanically Pressed Glass A.
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  • Plate and rolled plate glass.
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  • Pressed table glass.
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  • Optical Glass.
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  • - As regards both mode of production and essential properties optical glass differs widely from all other varieties.
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  • Table glass.
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  • - Siemens's Continuous Tank of Dollond's invention of achromatic telescope objectives in 1 757, a demand first arose for optical glass, the industry was unable to furnish suitable material.
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  • Flint glass particularly, which appeared quite satisfactory when viewed in small pieces, was found to be so far from homogeneous as to be useless for lens construction.
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  • The first step towards overcoming this vital defect in optical glass was taken by P. L.
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  • Guinand, towards the end of the 18th century, by introducing the process of stirring the molten glass by means of a cylinder of fireclay.
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  • Guinand was induced to migrate from his home in Switzerland to Bavaria, where he worked at the production of homogeneous flint glass, first with Joseph von Utzschneider and then with J.
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