Glasgow sentence example

glasgow
  • In the interval, Douglas's rights in Aberbrothock had been transferred to James Beaton, archbishop of Glasgow, and he was now without title or temporality.
    1
    0
  • It had been known in Scotland since the close of the 16th century (the Glasgow kirk session fulminated an edict against Sunday bowls in 1595), but greens were few and far between.
    1
    0
  • In 1848 and 1849, however, when many clubs had come into existence in the west and south of Scotland (the Willowbank, dating from 1816, is the oldest club in Glasgow), meetings were held in Glasgow for the purpose of promoting a national association.
    1
    0
  • In Edinburgh, Glasgow, and elsewhere in Scotland, and in London (through the county council), Newcastle and other English towns, the corporations have laid down greens in public parks and open spaces.
    1
    0
  • The Queen's Park and Titwood clubs in Glasgow have each three greens, and as they can quite comfortably play six rinks on each, it is not uncommon to see 144 players making their game simultaneously.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Mitchell, Manual of Bowl-playing (Glasgow, 1880); Laws of the Game issued by the Scottish B.A.
    1
    0
  • Since then it has met in Philadelphia, Belfast, London, Toronto, Glasgow, Washington and Liverpool.
    1
    0
  • William Dunlop (c. 1650-1700) ministered to them until 1688, when he became principal of the university of Glasgow.
    1
    0
  • He was educated at Glasgow university, where he had a brilliant academic career; and having entered the ministry of the Presbyterian Church, he returned to Canada and obtained a pastoral charge in Halifax, Nova Scotia, which he held from 1863 to 1877.
    1
    0
  • The underground system of paper cables has been very largely extended, Cables between London, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Liverpool.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Thomson (Lord Kelvin) at a meeting of the Philosophical Society of Glasgow in 1854, because its greater flexibility renders it less likely to damage the insulating envelope during the manipulation of the cable.
    1
    0
  • Local authorities (particularly London and Glasgow) refused to permit the company to lay wires underground.
    1
    0
  • The corporation of Glasgow having persisted in its efforts to obtain a licence, the Treasury appointed Sheriff Andrew Jameson (afterwards Lord Ardwall) a special commissioner to hold a local inquiry in Glasgow to report whether the telephone service in that city was adequate and efficient and whether it was expedient to grant the corporation a licence.
    1
    0
  • Glasgow opened its exchange in March 1901, Tunbridge Wells in May 1901, Portsmouth in March 1903, Brighton in October 1903, Swansea in November 1903 and Hull in October 1904.
    1
    0
  • The Tunbridge Wells and Swansea municipal undertakings were subsequently sold to the National Telephone Company, and the Glasgow and Brighton undertakings to the Post Office.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • In those cases in which the company's licence has been extended beyond 1911 (Glasgow to 1913, Swansea to 1926, Brighton to 1926 and Portsmouth to 1926) the Postmaster-General will buy the unexpired licence with allowance for goodwill.
    1
    0
  • The total number of subscribers to the Post Office provincial exchanges on the 31st of March 1907 (excluding those in Glasgow and Brighton) was 10,010, and the number of telephones rented was 12,006.
    1
    0
  • The Glasgow system included 11,103 subscribers' lines with 12,964 telephones, and the Brighton system contained 1542 subscribers lines with 1884 telephones.
    1
    0
  • Wallace (Lectures and Essays, incorporating Glasgow lectures) gives some useful historical references.
    1
    0
  • As late as 1566 ticalJuris= Archbishop Hamilton of Glasgow, upon his appointment, had restitution of his jurisdiction in the probate Scotland.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • From Glasgow University he went to Balliol College, Oxford.
    1
    0
  • In 1869 he was elected chancellor of Edinburgh University, having already been rector of the university of Glasgow.
    1
    0
  • It is the place of transhipment from the large Glasgow passenger steamers to the small craft built for the navigation of the canal.
    1
    0
  • This method of construction has been used for building other railways in Glasgow and London, and in the latter city alone the " tube railways " of this character have a length of some 40 m.
    1
    0
  • Two years later, however, he obtained leave to continue his studies at Glasgow University.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Much bibliographical and other information about the later writers on alchemy is contained in Bibliotheca Chemica (2 vols., Glasgow, 1906), a catalogue by John Ferguson of the books in the collection of James Young of Kelly (printed for private distribution).
    1
    0
  • In 1866 he became professor of moral philosophy in the university of Glasgow, and in 1893 succeeded Benjamin Jowett as master of Balliol.
    1
    0
  • C. Ramsay, was born at Glasgow on the 2nd of October 1852.
    1
    0
  • After going through the high school and university courses at Glasgow, he went to Trinity College, Oxford, and in 1862 was elected a fellow of Oriel.
    1
    0
  • In Great Britain the first public laboratory appears to have been opened in 1817 by Thomas Thomson at Glasgow.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • Having quarrelled with her husband, Robert Buchan, a potter of Greenock, she settled with her children in Glasgow, where she was deeply impressed by a sermon preached by Hugh White, minister of the Relief church at Irvine.
    1
    0
  • In Scotland there were works in Glasgow, Leith and Portobello.
    1
    0
  • When the " Glasgow " sighted the enemy the " Good Hope " was some 26 m.
    1
    0
  • In 1848 the family removed to London, and at sixteen he went to Glasgow University.
    1
    0
  • In 1845 he entered the ministry of the Church of Scotland, and after holding several livings accepted the chair of divinity at Glasgow in 1862.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 1873 he was appointed vice-chancellor and principal of Glasgow University.
    0
    0
  • Henderson's next public opportunity was in the famous Assembly which met in Glasgow on the 21st of November 1638.
    0
    0
  • In this year, Reid succeeded Adam Smith as professor of moral philosophy in the university of Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • Hamilton's edition of Reid also contains an account of the university of Glasgow and a selection of Reid's letters, chiefly addressed to his Aberdeen friends the Skenes, to Lord Kames, and to Dr James Gregory.
    0
    0
  • His portrait by Raeburn is the property of Glasgow University, and in the National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, there is a good medallion by Tassie, taken in his eighty-first year.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The ports in Great Britain at which foreign animals may be landed are Bristol, Cardiff, Glasgow, Hull, Liverpool, London; t 'Manchester and Newcastle-upon-Tyne.
    0
    0
  • Within little more than six weeks Bruce, collecting his adherents in the south-west, passed from Lochmaben to Glasgow and thence to Scone, where he was crowned king of Scotland on the 27th of March 1306.
    0
    0
  • In 1709 he entered the university of Glasgow, where he exhibited a decided genius for mathematics, more especially for geometry; it is said that before the end of his sixteenth year he had discovered many of the theorems afterwards published in his Geometria organica.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at the universities of St Andrews and Glasgow, and in his sixteenth year was sent to Paris, where he studied civil and canon law.
    0
    0
  • About this time he was presented to the rectory of Campsie by his uncle James Beaton, then archbishop of Glasgow.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He was the only Scotsman who had been named to that high office by an undisputed right, Cardinal Wardlaw, bishop of Glasgow, having received his appointment from the anti-pope Clement VII.
    0
    0
  • This prelate must not be confused with another, James Beaton, or Bethune (1517-1603), the last Roman Catholic archbishop of Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • In 1552 he was consecrated archbishop of Glasgow, but from 1560 until his death in 1603 he lived in Paris, acting as ambassador for Scotland at the French court.
    0
    0
  • Macneill, working chiefly on surveys, harbours and railroads, and was appointed in 1855 to the chair of civil engineering in Glasgow, vacant by the resignation of Lewis Gordon, whose work he had undertaken during the previous session.
    0
    0
  • Rankine died at Glasgow on the 24th of December 1872.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The parish lies a few miles south-east of Glasgow, and contains High Blantyre (pop. 2521), Blantyre Works (or Low Blantyre), Stonefield and several villages.
    0
    0
  • High Blantyre and Blantyre Works are connected with Glasgow by the Caledonian railway.
    0
    0
  • Even pure waters, however, such as that of Loch Katrine (which forms the Glasgow supply), act so slowly, at least on such lead pipes as have already been in use for some time, that there is no danger in using short lead service pipes even for them, if the taps are being constantly used.
    0
    0
  • In the name of the king, who now appointed him lord-lieutenant and captain-general of Scotland, he summoned a parliament to meet at Glasgow on the 10th of October, in which he no doubt hoped to reconcile loyal obedience to the king with the establishment of a non-political Presbyterian clergy.
    0
    0
  • He was lord rector of the University of Glasgow from 1868 to 1871, and later held the same office in that of Edinburgh.
    0
    0
  • There is no direct evidence that he accompanied Blackadder, archbishop of Glasgow, on a similar embassy to Spain in 1495.
    0
    0
  • His elder brother James, who just outlived him, was Conservative M.P. for Glasgow and Aberdeen Universities from 1880 to 1906.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at Glasgow University and at Trinity College, Cambridge (senior optime, and classical honours); was returned to parliament for Stirling as a Liberal in 1868 (after an unsuccessful attempt at a by-election); and became financial secretary at the war office (1871-1874; 1880-1882), secretary to the admiralty (1882-1884), and chief secretary for Ireland (1884-1885).
    0
    0
  • It has a station on the Glasgow & South-Western line from Dumfries to Kirkcudbright.
    0
    0
  • Glass-cutting was carried on at works in Birmingham, Bristol, Belfast, Cork, Dublin, Glasgow, London, Newcastle, Stourbridge, Whittington and Waterford.
    0
    0
  • From 1703 till his death, on the 21st of March 1734, he was parish minister at Eastwood, near Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • In 1694 he was elected a master in the university of Glasgow - an office that was converted into the professorship of moral philosophy in 1727, when the system of masters was abolished at Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • There is regular communication between Scalasaig and Glasgow and the Clyde ports.
    0
    0
  • In 1817 he became lecturer in chemistry at Glasgow University, and in the following year was appointed to the regius professorship. This chair he retained until his death, which happened on the 2nd of July 1852 at Kilmun, Argyleshire; but from 1841 he was assisted by his nephew and son-in-law ROBERT DINDAS
    0
    0
  • His attention was directed to the question of the flow of glaciers in 1840 when he met Louis Agassiz at the Glasgow meeting of the British Association, and in subsequent years he made several visits to Switzerland and also to Norway for the purpose of obtaining accurate data.
    0
    0
  • Among the earlier of the modern forms of apparatus which came into practical adoption are the inventions of Dr Normandy and of Chaplin of Glasgow, the apparatus of Rocher of Nantes, and that patented by Gall& and Mazeline of Havre.
    0
    0
  • At the age of twelve he was sent to a grammar school in Belfast, whence he removed in 1746 to study medicine in Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • In 1756 he succeeded Cullen as lecturer in chemistry at Glasgow, and was also appointed professor of anatomy, though that post he was glad to exchange for the chair of medicine.
    0
    0
  • This doctrine of latent heat he taught in his lectures from 1761 onwards, and in April 1762 he described his work to a literary society in Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • After short assistant pastorates at St Andrew's, Glasgow, and Bonhill, Dumbartonshire, he obtained a settled charge as minister of the important parish of St George's, Edinburgh.
    0
    0
  • In 1827 he became a student at Glasgow University, and in 1831 went to Edinburgh to study divinity under Dr Thomas Chalmers.
    0
    0
  • In 1851 he was called to the Barony church, Glasgow, in which city the rest of his days were passed.
    0
    0
  • The presbytery of Glasgow issued a pastoral letter on the subject of Sunday trains and other infringements of the Sabbath.
    0
    0
  • His Glasgow church was named after him the "Macleod Parish Church," and the "Macleod Missionary Institute" was erected by the Barony church in Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • It is on the Glasgow & South-Western railway, and has a harbour and dock from which coal and goods are the main exports.
    0
    0
  • Oxford, Edinburgh and Glasgow gave him honorary degrees; the two Scottish universities made him lord rector.
    0
    0
  • It is an important railway centre, with terminal stations of the Great Northern, Northern Counties (Midland of England), and Belfast & County Down railways, and has regular passenger communication by sea with Liverpool, Fleetwood, Heysham, Glasgow, and other ports of Great Britain.
    0
    0
  • Controversy centres round a very long and singular undated epistle called "The Glasgow Letter" or "Letter II."
    0
    0
  • According to Moray's version of the letter, Mary was to try to poison Darnley in a house on the way between Glasgow and Edinburgh where he and she were to stop. Clearly Lord Livingstone's house, Callendar, where they did rest on their journey, is intended.
    0
    0
  • Lennox (June 11, 1568) asked Crawford for his reminiscences, not of Darnley's reports of his talks with Mary, but of Crawford's own interview with her as she entered Glasgow to visit Darnley, probably on the 21st of January 1567.
    0
    0
  • In 1893 he went to Aberdeen, and finally in 1895 to the chair of logic at Glasgow, which he held till his death on the 5th of February 1902.
    0
    0
  • In addition to his professional work, he did much administrative work for Victoria University and the university of Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • At Glasgow lie was soon elected one of the representatives on the court, and to him were due in large measure the extension of the academical session and the improved equipment of the university.
    0
    0
  • He followed James to England on his accession, but was the same year nominated to the see of Glasgow, his consecration in London, however, not taking place until October 1610.
    0
    0
  • The density of the column at any level is determined by means of the areometrical beads proposed by Alexander Wilson (1714-1786), professor of astronomy at Glasgow University.
    0
    0
  • In the heavy weather prevailing at the time the " Good Hope " and " Monmouth " could not fight their main-deck guns, and their broadside discharge (including " Glasgow ") was reduced to 2 9.2-in.
    0
    0
  • The " Glasgow " had been sent on to Coronel (Concepcion) to send and receive telegrams, and a rendezvous had been arranged with her 50 m.
    0
    0
  • Had he not been hampered by the 0 Otranto., Var 19 E Glasgow yMONMOUTH Good Hope 5.55 Sun Set 6.45 p.m.
    0
    0
  • The " Otranto " asked if she was to keep out of range, and not getting a clear reply drew out of line on the " Glasgow's " starboard quarter, a potent reminder that a ship that has no guns to fight and no speed to run away is a delusion and a snare.
    0
    0
  • The rest of the German squadron joined in, the "Scharnhorst " engaging the " Good Hope," the " Gneisenau " the " Monmouth," and the " Leipzig " the " Glasgow."
    0
    0
  • The " Monmouth " had ceased fire and turned away to the W., followed by the " Glasgow," who had been heavily engaged by the " Leipzig " and " Dresden " and had received five hits.
    0
    0
  • In the district around Port Glasgow, on the south coast of the eastern peninsula, are the Boioro limestones, also of unknown age; they are lead-coloured, brecciated limestones with interbedded dolerites.
    0
    0
  • In 1668 it was purchased from Sir Patrick Maxwell of Newark by the Glasgow magistrates, who here constructed a harbour.
    0
    0
  • In 1695 it was erected into a separate parish under the name of New Port Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • In 1775 Port Glasgow was created a burgh of barony and since 1832 has formed one of the Kilmarnock parliamentary burghs (with Kilmarnock, Dumbarton, Renfrew and Rutherglen).
    0
    0
  • In 1845 he was appointed professor of mathematics and natural philosophy in the Andersonian University of Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • New York is served by the American line, the North German Lloyd line, &c. Regular steamers serve the Channel Islands, Cherbourg and Havre, the principal English ports, Dublin, Belfast and Glasgow; and local steamers serve Cowes (Isle of Wight) and other neighbouring ports.
    0
    0
  • Angus Smith determined London air to vary in oxygen content from 20.857 to 20.95, the air in parks and open spaces showing the higher percentage; Glasgow air showed similar results, varying from 20.887 in the streets to 20 92 9 in open spaces.
    0
    0
  • After studying at Tubingen and Leipzig and travelling in Egypt and Syria, he entered the ministry of the Free Church of Scotland and was appointed professor of Old Testament subjects in the Free Church College at Glasgow 1892.
    0
    0
  • He received his early education at the grammar-school of Hamilton, and he appears to have subsequently attended some classes at the university of Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • He began his medical career as apprentice to John Paisley, a Glasgow surgeon, and after completing his apprenticeship he became surgeon to a merchant vessel trading between London and the West Indies.
    0
    0
  • On coming to Glasgow he appears to have begun to lecture in connexion with the university, the medical school of which was as yet imperfectly organized.
    0
    0
  • The next governor, the earl of Glasgow, remained in the colony from June 1892 to February 1897, and was succeeded in August of the last-mentioned year by the earl of Ranfurly, who did not retire until 1904.
    0
    0
  • Lords Onslow and Glasgow came into collision with Ballance over a proposal to nominate a large batch of Liberals to the then Conservative legislative council.
    0
    0
  • From 1846 to 1855 he represented the county of Renfrew in parliament in the Conservative interest, and was lord rector of Glasgow University in 1847-1848.
    0
    0
  • In May 1888 she attended a performance of Sir Arthur Sullivan's Golden Legend at the Albert Hall, and in August she visited Glasgow to open the magnificent new municipal buildings, remaining for a couple of nights at Blythswood, the seat of Sir Archibald Campbell.
    0
    0
  • Since 1859 it has formed the chief source of the water-supply of Glasgow, the aqueduct leaving the lake about z 2 m.
    0
    0
  • The garden of the Royal Dublin Society at Glasnevin was opened about 1796; that of Trinity College, Dublin, in 1807; and that of Glasgow 1 Morison, Praeludia Botanica (1672); Plantarum Historia Universalis (1680).
    0
    0
  • He received the honorary degree of doctor of divinity from Glasgow University in 1885.
    0
    0
  • After attending the high school for six years, he studied at the university of Glasgow from 1787 to May 1789, and at Queen's College, Oxford, from September 1791 to June 1792.
    0
    0
  • Jeffrey was twice, in 1820 and 1822, elected lord rector of the university of Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • This step, however, failed to satisfy most of the society's supporters in Scotland, who proceeded to form themselves into independent organizations, grouped for the most part round centres at Edinburgh and Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • In Scotland the Edinburgh Bible Society (1809), the Glasgow Bible Society (1812), and other Scottish auxiliaries, many of which had dissociated themselves from the British and Foreign Bible Society after 1826, were finally incorporated (1861) with the National Bible Society of Scotland, which has carried on vigorous work all over the world, especially in China.
    0
    0
  • He was sent in 1737 to the university of Glasgow, where he attended the lectures of Dr Hutcheson; and in 1740 he went to Balliol College, Oxford, as exhibitioner on Snell's foundation.
    0
    0
  • At Glasgow his favourite studies had been mathematics and natural philosophy; but at Oxford he appears to have devoted himself almost entirely to moral and political science and to ancient and modern languages.
    0
    0
  • About this time began his acquaintance with David Hume, which afterwards ripened into friendship. In 1751 he was elected professor of logic at Glasgow, and in 1752 was transferred to the chair of moral philosophy, which had become vacant by the death of Thomas Craigie, the successor of Hutcheson.
    0
    0
  • In 1762 the senatus academicus of Glasgow conferred on him the honorary degree of doctor of laws.
    0
    0
  • Among the papers destroyed were probably, as Stewart suggests, the lectures on natural religion and jurisprudence which formed part of his course at Glasgow, and also the lectures on rhetoric which he delivered at Edinburgh in 1748.
    0
    0
  • In 1815 he became minister of the Tron Church, Glasgow, in spite of determined opposition to him in the town council on the ground of his evangelical teaching.
    0
    0
  • He declared that twenty new churches, with parishes, should be erected in Glasgow, and he set to work to revivify, remodel and extend the old parochial economy of Scotland.
    0
    0
  • In 1823, after eight years of work at high pressure, he was glad to accept the chair of moral philosophy at St Andrews, the seventh academic offer made to him during his eight years in Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • In 1826 he published a third volume of the Christian and Civic Economy of Large Towns, a continuation of work begun at St John's, Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • Owing to its pleasant situation it has become a residential quarter of Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • Passenger steamers, however, also serve Liverpool, Heysham, Bristol, the south coast ports of England and London; Edinburgh and Glasgow, and other ports of Great Britain.
    0
    0
  • There are trans-oceanic lines to Japan and China, to the Philippines and Hawaii, and to London, Liverpool and Glasgow, by way of the Suez Canal.
    0
    0
  • Alexander in 1809, after a year at Glasgow University, joined his father in Washington, Pennsylvania, where the elder Campbell had just formed the Christian Association of Washington, "for the sole purpose of promoting simple evangelical Christianity."
    0
    0
  • Subsequently he was minister at Logiealmond in Perthshire and at Glasgow, and in 1880 he became minister of Sefton Park Presbyterian church, Liverpool, from which he retired in 1905.
    0
    0
  • The woollen trade once promised to reach considerable dimensions, but towards the end of the 18th century was superseded by the linen (for which flax came to be largely grown); and when this in turn collapsed before the products of the mills of Dundee, Dunfermline and Glasgow, straw-plaiting was taken up, though only to be killed in due time by the competition of the south.
    0
    0
  • It then included a portion of Glasgow, but in 1226 the boundaries were rectified so as to exclude the whole of the city.
    0
    0
  • In 1895 it was demonstrated that Alabama pig-iron could be sent to Liverpool and sold cheaper than the English product, and Birmingham (Alabama) came consequently to rank next to Middlesborough and Glasgow among the world centres of the pig-iron trade.
    0
    0
  • McKechnie's Magna Carta (Glasgow, 1905) are among the most useful.
    0
    0
  • Newport News is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio railway, of which it is a terminus; by river boats to Richmond and Petersburg, Va.; by coastwise steamship lines to Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Providence; by foreign steamship lines to London, Glasgow, Liverpool, Dublin, Belfast, Rotterdam, Hamburg and other ports; and by electric lines to Old Point Comfort, Norfolk and Portsmouth.
    0
    0
  • Tweddale of Glenluce, to whom the original Covenant, now in the Glasgow Museum, had been confided.
    0
    0
  • At the age of eleven he was taught Latin and Greek by Dr Andrews, a scholar of Glasgow University.
    0
    0
  • Churches of this order were founded in Paisley, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Leith, Arbroath, Montrose, Aberdeen, Dunkeld, Cupar, Galashiels, Liverpool and London, where Michael Faraday was long an elder.
    0
    0
  • See James Ross, History of Congregational Independency in Scotland (Glasgow, 1900).
    0
    0
  • This visit was followed by a return visit to Paris and a similar exchange of visits between the London City Corporation and the Paris Municipal Council, exchange visits Of the city corporations of Manchester, Glasgow and Edinburgh and Lyons, and a visit of the Manchester Corporation to Dusseldorf, Barmen and Cologne.
    0
    0
  • Although his exceptional method of address seems to have gained him the qualified approval of certain dignitaries of the church, the prospect of his obtaining a settled charge seemed as remote as ever, and he was meditating a missionary tour in Persia when his departure was arrested by steps taken by Dr Chalmers, which, after considerable delay, resulted, in October 1819, in Irving being appointed his assistant and missionary in St John's parish, Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at the university of Glasgow, where he graduated first in classics, logic and philosophy.
    0
    0
  • In 1574 Melville returned to Scotland, and almost immediately received the appointment of principal of Glasgow University, which had fallen into an almost ruinous state, the college having been shut and the students dispersed.
    0
    0
  • He assisted in the reconstruction of Aberdeen University in 1575, and in order that he might do for St Andrews what he had done for Glasgow, he was appointed principal of St Mary's College, St Andrews, in 1580.
    0
    0
  • M`Kendrick, of Glasgow, he investigated the physiological action of light, and examined the changes which take place in the electrical condition of the retina under its influence.
    0
    0
  • Some Manchester export business is done through London, Glasgow, and continental towns, of which Hamburg is the principal.
    0
    0
  • Glasgow buys largely of yarns and cloth, some considerable part of which is dyed or printed, for India and elsewhere, and has an indigenous manufacture and trade in fine goods such as book-muslins and lappets, a somewhat delicate department of manufacture which necessitates a slower running of machinery than is usual in Lancashire.
    0
    0
  • In 1874 he delivered his Cunningham Lectures, afterwards published as The Humiliation of Christ, and in the following year was appointed to the chair of Apologetics and New Testament exegesis at the Free Church College, Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • In 1817 Dr Cross of Glasgow wrote his defence of a scientific physiognomy based on general physiological principles.
    0
    0
  • His third and only surviving son, George Robert Gleig (1796-1888), was educated at Glasgow University, whence he passed with a Snell exhibition to Balliol College, Oxford.
    0
    0
  • He studied first at the Edinburgh Academy, then for two years under the Rev. Thomas Dale, the poet, in Kent, passed one session at Glasgow University in 1833, and, having chosen the career of the Indian civil service, completed his studies with distinction at Haileybury College.
    0
    0
  • He was intended for the church, but the bent of his mind was towards mathematics, and, when a prospect opened of his succeeding to the mathematical chair at the university of Glasgow, he proceeded to London for further study.
    0
    0
  • After a year in London he returned to Glasgow, and in 1711 was appointed by the university to the professorship of mathematics, an office which he retained until 1761.
    0
    0
  • Among wellknown natives of the town were Adam Smith, Henry Balnaves of Halhill, the Scottish reformer and lord of session in the time of Queen Mary; George Gillespie, the theologian and a leading member of the Westminster Assembly, and his younger brother Patrick (1617-1675), a friend of Cromwell and principal of Glasgow University; John Ritchie (1778-1870), one of the founders of the Scotsman; General Sir John Oswald (1771-1840), who had a command at San Sebastian and Vittoria.
    0
    0
  • It has been supposed that this theory was suggested to him either by researches on olefiant gas and carburetted hydrogen or by analysis of "protoxide and deutoxide of azote," both views resting on the authority of Dr Thomas Thomson (1773-1852), professor of chemistry in Glasgow university.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at the grammar school of Irvine, the university of Glasgow, and the East India Company's College at Haileybury.
    0
    0
  • Societies formed in Glasgow and Edinburgh in the spring of the same year gave their attention to the continent of Africa.
    0
    0
  • They were followed by the Glasgow Missionary Society (1821), the Paris Evangelical Society (1829), the Moravian, Rhenish and Berlin Societies, and the American Board.
    0
    0
  • The Glasgow Society's work was ultimately taken over by the Free Church of Scotland, whose great achievement is the Lovedale Institute, combining industrial and mission work.
    0
    0
  • He was removed to Glasgow, and left for the time in charge of his father; but on the news of his progress towards recovery a bond was drawn up for execution of the sentence of death which had secretly been pronounced against the twice-turned traitor who had earned his doom at all hands alike.
    0
    0
  • On the 11th of February she wrote to the bishop of Glasgow, her ambassador in France, a brief letter of simple eloquence, announcing her providential escape from a design upon her own as well as her husband's life.
    0
    0
  • The queen's abdication was revoked, messengers were despatched to the English and French courts, and word was sent to Murray at Glasgow that he must resign the regency, and should be pardoned in common with all offenders against the queen.
    0
    0
  • But on the day when Mary arrived at Hamilton Murray had summoned to Glasgow the feudatories of the Crown to take arms against the insurgent enemies of the infant king.
    0
    0
  • Mary's followers had failed to retake Dunbar Castle from the regent, and made for Dumbarton instead, marching two miles south of Glasgow, by the village of Langside.
    0
    0
  • From Sheffield Lodge, twelve years later, she applied to the archbishop of Glasgow and the cardinal of Guise for some pretty little dogs, to be sent her in baskets very warmly packed, - "for besides reading and working, I take pleasure only in all the little animals that I can get."
    0
    0
  • Having taken the arts curriculum at Glasgow University, he studied for the ministry at the Divinity Hall of the Secession Church, a dissenting body which, on its union a few years later with the Relief Church, adopted the title United Presbyterian.
    0
    0
  • In 1835 he became minister of the Cambridge Street Secession church in Glasgow, and for many years he was generally regarded as the leading representative of his denomination in Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • He died at Glasgow on the 3rd of June 1876.
    0
    0
  • The Caledonian Railway bridge at Glasgow, the reconstructed Tay bridge (1882-7), Forth bridge (1882-9), the Tower bridge, London, and the Nile lgridge at Cairo were amongst his principal achievements.
    0
    0
  • London was not to be supposed helpless in such an emergency; Manchester, Glasgow and Dumfries, rid of his presence, had risen against him, and Charles paused.
    0
    0
  • They extend from Northamptonshire to near Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • He entered a solicitor's office in Glasgow, and while in that city attended courses at the university.
    0
    0
  • In consequence of the success of these early enterprises his following largely increased, several of the more patriotic nobles - including the steward of Scotland, Sir Andrew Moray, Sir John de Graham, Douglas the Hardy, Wishart, bishop of Glasgow, and others - having joined him.
    0
    0
  • On the 5th of August 1305 he was taken - as is generally alleged, through treachery - at Robroyston, near Glasgow, by Sir John Menteith, carried to the castle of Dumbarton, and thence conveyed in fetters and strongly guarded to London.
    0
    0
  • Educated at Helensburgh, Glasgow University and Trinity College, Cambridge, he was elected fellow of his college in 1879 and was called to the bar.
    0
    0
  • Kentigern, the apostle to Cumbria and first bishop of Glasgow, was born at Culross, his mother having been driven ashore during a tempest, and was adopted by St Serf as his son.
    0
    0
  • He spoke at great gatherings at Edinburgh, Glasgow, Bradford and Manchester, and his speeches filled the papers.
    0
    0
  • After practising for a short time as a lawyer in the church courts, he was ordained priest, becoming rector of St Michael's church, Trongate, Glasgow, in 1465.
    0
    0
  • Before 1474 he had returned to Scotland, and was made rector of the university, and official of the see of Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • There is frequent communication daily by steamer with the railway piers at Craigendoran and Gourock, and Glasgow merchants are thus enabled to reside here all the year round.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at Glasgow and Edinburgh, where, from 1846 to 1856, he was professor of Logic at New College.
    0
    0
  • Apart from the philosophical interest of the Biographia, the work contains valuable pictures of the Land of Lorne and Argyllshire society in the early 19th century, of university life in Glasgow and Edinburgh, and a history of the North British Review.
    0
    0
  • At Glasgow on the 5th of December he again outlined a Liberal programme, this and other speeches all leading to the assumption that his return to active co-operation with the Liberal party in the general election - which could not be long delayed - was fairly certain.
    0
    0
  • McNeill Whistler's portrait of him is in the possession of the Glasgow corporation.
    0
    0
  • Those of British-Colonial birth were most numerous in Edinburgh (with 0.933%), and foreigners in Glasgow (with 0.890), Leith (with 0.741) and Hamilton (with 0.720).
    0
    0
  • In several burghs grammar schools have existed from a very early date, and some of them, such as the Royal High School of Edinburgh and the High School of Glasgow, reached a high standard of proficiency.
    0
    0
  • In virtue of a Continuation Class code, technical and specialized education is given in day and, chiefly, evening classes in various centres, the principal being the Heriot-Watt College, Edinburgh; the Edinburgh and East of Scotland College of Agriculture; the Glasgow and West of Scotland Technical College; the Glasgow School of Art; the Glasgow Athenaeum Commercial College; the West of Scotland Agricultural College; the Dundee Technical Institute; Gray's School of Art, Aberdeen; the Edinburgh Royal Institution School of Art, and the Edinburgh School of Applied Art; but wellequipped classes are held in most of the large towns, and several county councils maintain organizers of technical instruction.
    0
    0
  • As regards agricultural education, the county is found to be in most cases too small an area for efficient organization, and consequently several counties combine to support, for instance, the East of Scotland Agricultural College - a corporation consisting of the agricultural department in the University, the Heriot-Watt College and the Veterinary College in Edinburgh, - the West of Scotland Agricultural College, Glasgow, and the agricultural department in Aberdeen University.
    0
    0
  • There are four universities in Scotland, namely (in the order of foundation), St Andrews (1411), Glasgow (1450), Aberdeen (1494) and Edinburgh (1582), in which are the customary faculties of arts, divinity, law, medicine and science.
    0
    0
  • Under the act of 1899 the University College of Dundee was incorporated with St Andrews University, and Queen Margaret College became a part of the university of Glasgow, the buildings and endowments, used for women students exclusively, being handed over to the University Court.
    0
    0
  • St Mungo's College, Glasgow, incorporated in 1889 under a Board of Trade licence, has medicinal and law faculties, and Anderson's College Medical School, Glasgow, was instituted in 1887.
    0
    0
  • The United Free Church maintains colleges at Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow, and there is a Roman Catholic college at Blairs near Aberdeen, besides a monastery and college at Fort Augustus.
    0
    0
  • The Forth and Clyde Navigation runs from Bowling on the Clyde, through the north-western part of Glasgow and through Kirkintilloch and Falkirk to Grangemouth on the Forth, a distance of 35 m.
    0
    0
  • This last has a length of 124 m., and runs from the north-east of Glasgow through Coatbridge to Woodhall in the parish of Old Monkland.
    0
    0
  • Begun in 1818 it was completed in 1822, and in 1849 was vested in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Company, which in turn was absorbed by the North British Railway Company in 1865.
    0
    0
  • The chief companies are the Caledonian, formed in 1845; the North British, of the same date; the Glasgow and South-Western, formed by amalgamation in 1850; the Highland, formed by amalgamation in 1865; and the Great North of Scotland, 1846.
    0
    0
  • The principal seats of the silk manufacture are Paisley and Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • From two reports printed by the Scottish Burgh Record Society in 1881, it appears that the number of vessels belonging to the principal ports - Leith, Dundee, Glasgow, Kirkcaldy and Montrose - in 1656 was 58, the tonnage being 3140, and that by 1692 they had increased to 97 of 5905 tons.
    0
    0
  • The figure for Glasgow in that year was £41,238,867.
    0
    0
  • The principal Clyde yards are situated in the Glasgow district (Govan, Partick, Fairfield, Clydebank, Renfrew), Dumbarton, Port Glasgow and Greenock.
    0
    0
  • The telephones are mainly conducted by the post office and the National Telephone Company, but the corporation of Glasgow has a municipal service.
    0
    0
  • The counties are thirty-three in number, Ross and Cromarty constituting one, while Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Dundee are each a county of a city.
    0
    0
  • Glasgow, for example, might found a chair in the University from the Common Good but not from the rates, and Edinburgh maintains from the same source the city observatory and defrays part of the cost of the time-gun.
    0
    0
  • Only Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, Greenock, Aberdeen and Paisley have private and local acts, conferring powers exceeding the general law, to deal with, e.g.
    0
    0
  • The corporation of the burghs consists of the provost (or lord provost, in the cases of Edinburgh, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Dundee), bailies and councillors, with certain permanent officials, of whom the town clerk is the most important.
    0
    0
  • About the same date (573) the king of Cymric Strathclyde summoned, from exile in Wales, St Kentigern, the patron saint of Glasgow, who restored a Christianity almost or quite submerged in paganism, Celtic and English.
    0
    0
  • Old legends represent him as having exterminated the Picts to the last man; and the Picts become, hi popular tradition, a mythical folk, hardly human, to whom great feats, including the building of Glasgow cathedral, are attributed, as the walls of Tiryns and Mycenae in Greece were traditionally assigned to the energy of the Cyclopes.
    0
    0
  • Six custodians of the realm were then appointed, including the bishop g p of Glasgow (Wishart) and the bishop of St Andrews (Frazer).
    0
    0
  • The bishop of St Andrews was for Baliol, he of Glasgow was for Bruce; and the Baliol party, the seven earls complain, was ravaging Moray.
    0
    0
  • He was taken near Glasgow, in his own country, and handed over to England by Sit John Menteith, sheriff of Dumbartonshire.
    0
    0
  • Glasgow also became an archbishopric.
    0
    0
  • Darnley had retired to his father's house at Glasgow, where he fell ill of small-pox, and, on the 14th of January 1567 Mary, from Holyrood, offered to visit him, though he had replied by a verbal insult to a former offer of a visit from Stirling.
    0
    0
  • On the 10th of January 1567 Mary left Edinburgh for Glasgow, her purpose being to bring Darnley back to Craigmillar.
    0
    0
  • But Charles did grant a General Assembly in Glasgow (21st of November), where, among unseemly uproar, the ecclesiastical legislation of James I.
    0
    0
  • The murderers rode to the west, joined the company of Robert Hamilton, defeated Graham of Claverhouse with a small force of horse at Drumclog, occupied Glasgow, and proved the total inability of the regular forces to cope with a rising.
    0
    0
  • Wade drove his military roads through the highlands, and, poor as the country still was, the city of Glasgow throve on the tobacco and sugar trade with America and the West Indies.
    0
    0
  • After a stay to re-fit at Glasgow, Charles moved to besiege Stirling castle, and to join a force from the north, almost as numerous as that with which he had invaded the heart of England.
    0
    0
  • Fawsitt (The Education of the Examiner, Royal Philosophical Society of Glasgow, 1905) shows that frequency-curves deduced from actual investigation of class-marks are not symmetrical, but have two maxima corresponding to the performance of " non-workers " and of " workers."
    0
    0
  • His parents were Presbyterians, but he early turned towards the Scottish Episcopal Church, and was confirmed in his first year at Oxford, having entered Balliol College in October 1830 as a Snell exhibitioner from the University of Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • In 1771, in the hope of gaining a Snell exhibition and proceeding to Oxford to study for the English Church, he went to Glasgow, where he attended the classes of Thomas Reid.
    0
    0
  • After a single session in Glasgow, Dugald Stewart, at the age of nineteen, was summoned by his father, whose health was beginning to fail, to conduct the mathematical classes in the university of Edinburgh.
    0
    0
  • In 1887 he removed to Glasgow as professor of church history; he had also been appointed in 1886 to a chaplaincy to Queen Victoria.
    0
    0
  • Brown (The Authorship of the Kingis Quair, Glasgow, 1896) have been convincingly answered by Jusserand in his Jacques Ier d'Ecosse fut-il poete ?
    0
    0
  • He was educated at Glasgow University, and subsequently attended classes in Edinburgh.
    0
    0
  • The most interesting extensions of plague in 1900 were those in Australia and Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • That in Glasgow was on a still smaller scale.
    0
    0
  • With regard to Great Britain, a few ship-borne cases have been dealt with at different ports from time to time since 1896, but except at Glasgow the disease has nowhere obtained a footing on land.
    0
    0
  • One such case occurred at Glasgow, and another at Oporto.
    0
    0
  • In the Glasgow case the wife of a laundryman employed in handling plague linen contracted the disease.
    0
    0
  • In Glasgow the experience was just the contrary.
    0
    0
  • Tobacco-growing was the one vocation of Virginia, and many of the planters were able to spend their winters in London or Glasgow and to send their sons and daughters to the finishing schools of the mother country.
    0
    0
  • The work began in May 1860 at the York- a congress held at Glasgow, under the presidency of Antwerp Lord Brougham, assisted by Lord Neaves.
    0
    0
  • For a short time he read private lectures on divinity in London; and in 1622 the king appointed him principal of the university of Glasgow in the room of Robert Boyd, who had been removed from his office in consequence of his adherence to Presbyterianism.
    0
    0
  • The crown was unable either to check the popular movement or to come to any compromise with it, and the Glasgow assembly of 1638, the first free assembly that had met for thirty years, proceeded to make the church what the Covenant required.
    0
    0
  • The church continued till lately to carry on normal schools for the training of teachers in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen; but these, along with the normal schools of the United Free Church, were recently made over to the state.
    0
    0
  • Norman Macleod, minister of the Barony Parish, Glasgow, a man of great natural eloquence and an ardent philanthropist, enjoyed the warm friendship of Queen Victoria and was beloved by his nation.
    0
    0
  • John Caird, professor of divinity and then principal of Glasgow University, wrote An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion, exercised a deep influence as a teacher on Scottish thought, and was the most distinguished British preacher, of the intellectual order, of his day.
    0
    0
  • Robert Herbert Story (1835-1906), principal after Caird of Glasgow University, stood by the side of Lee and Tulloch in their assembly contendings and was an outspoken defender of the National Church against her spoliators from without.
    0
    0
  • There are six dioceses (two archbishops, one of Edinburgh and St Andrews and the other of Glasgow; and four suffragans, Aberdeen, Argyll and the Isles, Dunkeld and Galloway), with, in 1909, 550 priests; 398 churches, chapels and stations; and a Roman Catholic population estimated at about 519,000.
    0
    0
  • The chief village is Castlebay, at which the Glasgow steamer calls once a week.
    0
    0
  • There is also a Baptist theological college in Glasgow, and there are two colleges in Wales and one in Ireland.
    0
    0
  • He found that when the potential of the needle exceeded a certain value, of about volts, for the particular instrument he was using (made by White of Glasgow), the above formula did not hold good.
    0
    0
  • He was a member of the Old Testament Revision Committee (1876-1884) and examining chaplain to the bishop of Southwell (1884-1904); received the honorary degrees of doctor of literature of Dublin (1892),(1892), doctor of divinity of Glasgow (1901), doctor of literature of Cambridge (1905); and was elected a fellow of the British Academy in 1902.
    0
    0
  • He exchanged his "regency" or professorship in Glasgow University for one in that of St Andrews in 1523.
    0
    0
  • But in Major's last Glasgow session a "Joannes Knox" (not an uncommon name, however, at that time in the west of Scotland) matriculated there; and if this were the future reformer, he may thereafter either have followed his master to St Andrews or returned from Glasgow straight to Haddington.
    0
    0
  • Returning to Scotland, however, he entered Glasgow University and there qualified for the Scottish ministry, being licensed as a preacher by the presbytery of Ayr.
    0
    0
  • Returning to Strathclyde Kentigern lived for some time at Glasgow, near a cemetery ascribed to St Ninian, and was eventually made bishop of that region by the king and clergy.
    0
    0
  • This story is partially attested by Welsh documents, in which Kentigern appears as the bishop of Garthmwl, apparently the ruler of the region about Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • He fixed his see first at Hoddam in Dumfriesshire, but afterwards returned to Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • In 1875 he was appointed one of the Old Testament revisers; in1880-1882he delivered by invitation, to very large audiences in Edinburgh and Glasgow, two courses of lectures on the criticism of the Old Testament, which he afterwards published (The Old Testament in the Jewish Church, first edition 1881, second edition 1892, and The Prophets of Israel, 1882, which also passed through two editions); and soon after his dismissal from his chair he joined Professor Baynes in the editorship of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and after Professor Baynes's death remained in supreme editorial control till the work was completed.
    0
    0
  • Returning to Scotland in 1790, he first settled as a carpenter at Glasgow and afterwards removed to Helensburgh, on the Firth of Clyde, where he pursued his mechanical projects, and also found occasional employment as an engineer.
    0
    0
  • A handsome sum was raised for Bell by subscription among the citizens of Glasgow; and he also received from the trustees of the river Clyde a pension of X100 a year.
    0
    0
  • Next in order came the Wesleyans and the Glasgow Missionary Society (Presbyterian), the last-named society founding in 1824 the station of Lovedale - now the most important institution in South Africa in connexion with native missions.
    0
    0
  • It lies on the south bank of the Clyde in actual contact with Glasgow, and in a parish of the same name which includes a large part of the city on both sides of the river.
    0
    0
  • Govan is supplied with Glasgow gas and water, and its tramways are leased by the Glasgow corporation; but it has an electric light installation of its own, and performs all other municipal functions quite independently of the city, annexation to which it has always strenuously resisted.
    0
    0
  • Here, too, are the workshops of the Glasgow & South-Western railway company.
    0
    0
  • The burgh, which is governed by a provost and council, unites with Dumbarton, Port Glasgow, Renfrew and Rutherglen in returning one member to parliament.
    0
    0
  • The commercial prosperity that was produced by his war policy was in a great part delusive, as prosperity so produced must always be, though it had permanent effects of the highest moment in the rise of such centres of industry as Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • In 1700 these rights were transferred to Glasgow by contract, but were afterwards vested in a special trust created by successive acts of parliament.
    0
    0
  • The first steam navigation company was established in Dumbarton in 1815, when the "Duke of Wellington" (built in the town) plied between Dumbarton and Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • The General Assembly of Glasgow in 1638 abjured Laud's book and took its stand again by the Book of Common Order, an act repeated by the assembly of 1639, which also demurred against innovations proposed by the English separatists, who objected altogether to liturgical forms, and in particular to the Lord's Prayer, the Gloria Pcrtri and the minister kneeling for private devotion in the pulpit.
    0
    0
  • S., a seat of the earl of Glasgow, stands in romantic scenery.
    0
    0
  • S., another seaside resort, with a station on the Glasgow & South-Western railway, is the connecting-point for Millport on Great Cumbrae.
    0
    0
  • The village is of considerable antiquity, and was formerly held by the see of Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • The passenger steamers to Great Britain, mainly under the control of the City of Cork Steam Packet Company, serve Fishguard, Glasgow, Liverpool, Plymouth and Southampton, London and other ports, starting from Penrose Quay on the North Channel.
    0
    0
  • He visited Scotland in 1515 and returned in 1518, when he was appointed principal regent in the university of Glasgow, John Knox being among the number of those who attended his lectures there.
    0
    0
  • There is a continuous line of electric tramways, connecting with Port Glasgow on the east and Gourock on the west, a total distance of 72 m.
    0
    0
  • Greenock was the birthplace of James Watt, William Spence (1777-1815) and Dr John Caird (1820-1898), principal of Glasgow University, who died in the town and was buried in Greenock cemetery.
    0
    0
  • Rumours of the plot came to his ears, and he fled from Stirling to Glasgow, where he fell ill, possibly by poisoning, and where Mary came to visit him.
    0
    0
  • After his appointment to one of the churches in Glasgow, he openly resisted the measures of the government.
    0
    0
  • In 1687 he entered Glasgow University, and in 1690 was created M.A.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at Glasgow University, where he studied medicine and philosophy.
    0
    0
  • The boundary between the prairie and Ozark regions follows the Missouri river from its mouth to Glasgow, running thence south-westward, with irregular limits, but with a direct trend, to Jasper county at the south-east corner of Kansas; and the boundary between the Ozark and embayment regions runs due south-west from Cape Girardeau.
    0
    0
  • In 1853 a good edition (3 vols., Glasgow) was produced by George Offer.
    0
    0
  • He attended for two sessions the medical and the Greek classes in Anderson's College, Glasgow, and also a theological class.
    0
    0
  • He took his medical degree in the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons in Glasgow in November 1840.
    0
    0
  • The harbour was intended to be in connexion with a canal from Glasgow to Ardrossan, but this was only completed as far as Johnstone.
    0
    0
  • Though his early life was passed, and his education begun, in Canada, he, a Scot on both sides, came to Scotland when still a boy, and finished his schooling at the Glasgow high school.
    0
    0
  • He entered at once into commercial life in Glasgow, and became a member of a kinsman's firm, William Kidston & Sons, iron merchants, subsequently joining William Jacks & Co., iron merchants.
    0
    0
  • His success as an iron merchant led to his becoming chairman of the Glasgow Iron Trade Association.
    0
    0
  • He retired with a sufficient competence, and went into Parliament in 190o as Conservative and Unionist member for the Blackfriars division of Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • He left Bootle and stood for Central Glasgow, the business quarter of his own city, being returned by a huge majority.
    0
    0
  • Mr. Law resigned office, but not his seat for Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • He married in 1891 Annie Pitcairn, daughter of Harrington Robley, of Glasgow, by whom he had a family; but he was left a widower in 1909.
    0
    0
  • Of natural lakes in Great Britain raised above their ordinary levels that the upper portions may be utilized as reservoirs, Loch Katrine supplying Glasgow is well known.
    0
    0
  • Hawick is a substantial and flourishing town, the prosperity of which dates from the beginning of the 19th century, its enterprise having won for it the designation of "The Glasgow of the Borders."
    0
    0
  • Aberdeen and Glasgow Universities combine to return one member to Parliament.
    0
    0
  • It is served by the Baltimore & Ohio, the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (the Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Annapolis Short Line, the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic; the Northern Central; the Western Maryland and the Maryland & Pennsylvania railways; and by steamship lines running directly to all the more important ports on the Atlantic coast of the United States, to ports in the West Indies and Brazil, to London, Liverpool, Southampton, Bristol, Leith, Glasgow, Dublin, Belfast, Havre, Antwerp, Rotterdam, Bremen, Hamburg and other European ports.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at Glasgow University, where, at the age of twenty, he acted for a short time as substitute for the professor of Greek.
    0
    0
  • In July of that year he went with other commissioners to Aberdeen in the vain attempt to induce the university and the presbytery of that city to subscribe the National Covenant, and in the following November sat in the general assembly at Glasgow which abolished episcopacy in Scotland.
    0
    0
  • After completing his course at Trinity College, Cambridge, William Lamb studied law at the university of Glasgow, and was called to the bar in 1804.
    0
    0
  • In 1748 the synods of Glasgow, Perth and Lothian passed vain resolutions intended to exclude him from churches; in 1753 he compiled his hymn-book, and in 1756 opened the chapel which still bears his name in Tottenham Court Road.
    0
    0
  • Its first leader was none of the great barons, but a Renfrewshire knight, Sir William Wallace; but ere long more important persons, including Robert Bruce, earl of Carrick (grandson of Robert Bruce of Annandale, one of the competitors for the crown of Scotland), and the bishop of Glasgow, were found to be in communication with the rebels.
    0
    0
  • A riot at Edinburgh in 1637 quickly led to national resistance, and when in November 1638 the general assembly at Glasgow set Charless orders at defiance, he was compelled to choose between tame submission and immediate war.
    0
    0
  • The common story that he was a candidate for Adam Smith's chair of moral philosophy at Glasgow, when Hume was rejected in favour of an obscure nobody (1751), can be shown to be wholly false.
    0
    0
  • There is regular communication by steamer with Cork, with Dublin and Belfast, with Fishguard, Glasgow, Liverpool, Bristol, Plymouth, Southampton, London and other ports.
    0
    0
  • To the west of Kilmany lies Creich, where Alexander Henderson (1583-1646), the Covenanting divine and diplomatist, and John Sage (1652-1711), the non-juring archbishop of Glasgow, were born.
    0
    0
  • There are cathedrals at Perth, Inverness, Edinburgh and Cumbrae; the sees of Aberdeen, Brechin and Glasgow have no cathedrals.
    0
    0
  • In 1669 he resigned his parish to become professor of divinity in the university of Glasgow, and in the same year he published an exposition of his ecclesiastical views in his Modest and Free Conference between a Conformist and a Nonconformist (by "a lover of peace").
    0
    0
  • Once in London he resigned his professorship (September 1674) at Glasgow; but, although James remained his friend, Charles struck him off the roll of court chaplains in 1674, and it was in opposition to court influence that he was made chaplain to the Rolls Chapel by the master, Sir Harbottle Grimston, and appointed lecturer at St Clement's.
    0
    0
  • In 1819 he entered the university of Glasgow with the intention of becoming a minister of the Established Church.
    0
    0
  • C. Hope at Edinburgh, and on returning to Glasgow gave lessons in mathematics, and subsequently chemistry, until the year 1829, when he was appointed lecturer in the Mechanics' Institute.
    0
    0
  • He communicated papers to the Philosophical Society of Glasgow before the work of that society was recorded in Transactions, but his first published paper, "On the Absorption of Gases by Liquids," appeared in the Annals of Philosophy for 1826.
    0
    0
  • In later life Oxford and Cambridge gave him their doctors' degrees; and in 1897 he was made lord rector of Glasgow Crystal of Chalybite.
    0
    0
  • On October 6th he opened his campaign with a speech at Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • In 1832 James Thomson accepted the chair of mathematics at Glasgow, and migrated thither with his two sons, James and William, who in 1834 matriculated in that university, William being then little more than ten years of age, and having acquired all his early education through his father's instruction.
    0
    0
  • In 1846, when only twenty-two years of age, he accepted the chair of natural philosophy in the university of Glasgow, which he filled for fifty-three years, attaining universal recognition as one of the greatest physicists of his time.
    0
    0
  • The Glasgow chair was a source of inspiration to scientific men for more than half a century, and many of the most advanced researches of other physicists grew out of the suggestions which Thomson scattered as sparks from his anvil.
    0
    0
  • A list of the degrees and other honours which he received during the fifty-three years he held his Glasgow chair would occupy as much space as this article; but any biographical sketch would be conspicuously incomplete if it failed to notice the celebration in 1896 of the jubilee of his professorship. Never before had such a gathering of rank and science assembled as that which filled the halls in the university of Glasgow on the 15th, 16th and 17th of June in that year.
    0
    0
  • Three years after this celebration Lord Kelvin resigned his chair at Glasgow, though by formally matriculating as a student he maintained his connexion with the university, of which in 1904 he was elected chancellor.
    0
    0
  • The great centres of the seed-oil trade (linseed, cotton-seed, rapeseed, castor-seed) are Hull, London, Liverpool, Bristol, Leith and Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • Coleman of Glasgow, and in the early part of 1879 one of his machines was fitted on board the Anchor liner " Circassia," which successfully brought a cargo of chilled beef from America-the first imported by the aid of refrigerating machinery, ice having been previously used.
    0
    0
  • He distinguished himself by being the only member of the assembly who entered a protest against what he deemed the inadequate sentence passed on John Simson, professor of divinity at Glasgow, who was accused of heterodox teaching on the Incarnation.
    0
    0
  • A useful selection (in English) is that of John Watson, The Philosophy of Kant (Glasgow, 1888).
    0
    0
  • He was educated at the universities of Edinburgh and Berlin, and at the Evangelical Union Theological Academy in Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • Among the chief localities are the neighbourhood of Stourbridge in Worcestershire and Stannington near Sheffield, which supply most of the materials for crucibles used in steel and brass melting, and the pots for glass houses; Newcastle-on-Tyne and Glenboig near Glasgow, where heavy blast furnace and other firebricks, gas retorts, &c., are made in large quantities.
    0
    0
  • Renfrew belongs to the Kilmarnock district group of parliamentary burghs (with Kilmarnock, Dumbarton, Rutherglen and Port Glasgow).
    0
    0
  • In sharp contrast to slower locations, Glasgow has the highest spend on roads per capita.
    0
    0
  • The story involves palpable anachronisms as Johnson's only visit to Glasgow was before Hume's death.
    0
    0
  • On the Monday I was rushed to Glasgow Southern General Hospital where I was given an angiogram.
    0
    0
  • A local breeder of the Glasgow Dingo who wished to remain anonymous witnessed the apparitions on New Year's Eve.
    0
    0
  • The first in a new fellowship scheme to encourage research into childhood arthritis has been awarded to another children's arthritis expert in Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • The Glasgow convicts, 22 in number, were convicted at the last assize.
    0
    0
  • The Museum of Piping 30-34 McPhater Street, Glasgow, G4 0HW The world's leading museum on the highland bagpipe.
    0
    0
  • She lives in Glasgow where she ran an antiquarian bookshop for many years.
    0
    0
  • Work with Graeme Ruxton from the University of Glasgow has focused on modeling intraspecific brood parasitism in various ways.
    0
    0
  • He moved there ' to escape from Glasgow ' and started byre Books in a converted byre just off the town's main street.
    0
    0
  • The Glasgow newspaper found it proper to repeat this canard, without citing its source, as an expression of faith in its accuracy.
    0
    0
  • Lib Dem candidate Amy Rodger was born in 1977 and has an MA in politics from Glasgow university.
    0
    0
  • Charlie Harrington graduated in Microbiology from Glasgow University where he developed an interest in chemical microbiology and the study of microbial cell walls.
    0
    0
  • The 17th British colloquium for Theoretical Computer Science was held in early April 2001 in the Kelvin Conference Center in Glasgow.
    0
    0
  • He also writes a weekly column for The Glasgow Herald.
    0
    0
  • The United Reformed Church Scottish Synod Office, PO Box 189, 240 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G1 2BX can advise on Scottish congregationalism.
    0
    0
  • His courageous struggle against the war achieved international recognition and in 1918 he was made honorary Soviet consul in Glasgow.
    0