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glamorganshire

glamorganshire Sentence Examples

  • Other experiments in inductive telegraphy were made by Preece, aided by the officials of the British Postal Telegraph Service, in Glamorganshire in 1887; at Loch Ness in Scotland in 1892; on Conway Sands in 1893; and at Frodsham, on the Dee, in 1894.

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  • Among other occurrences of the name of Avon in Great Britain there may be noted - in England, a stream flowing south-east from Dartmoor in Devonshire to the English Channel; in South Wales, the stream which has its mouth at Aberavon in Glamorganshire; in Scotland, tributaries of the Clyde, the Spey and the Forth.

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  • From Macclesfield a descent was made on Manchester; from Oakengates in South Shropshire came extensions to Herefordshire, Glamorganshire and Wiltshire, where the famous Brinkworth circuit was established.

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  • CARDIFF, a city, municipal, county and parliamentary borough, seaport and market-town, and the county town of Glamorganshire, South Wales, situated on the Taff, 5 m.

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  • The Glamorganshire canal, opened in 1794, runs from Cardiff to Merthyr Tydfil, with a branch to Aberdare.

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  • The only place of this name we know is Daventry, but it seems more probable that Patrick's home is to be sought near the Severn, and Rhys conjectures that one of the three places called Banwen in Glamorganshire may be intended.

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  • CAERPHILLY, a market town of Glamorganshire, Wales, 1524 m.

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  • NEATH (Welsh, Castell-Nedd), a municipal and contributory parliamentary borough, seaport and market-town of Glamorganshire, south Wales, prettily situated near the mouth of the Neath or Nedd, on the Great Western and the Rhondda and Swansea Bay railways, 72 m.

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  • BARRY, an urban district and seaport of Glamorganshire, Wales, on the Bristol Channel, 153 m.

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  • A branch of the Glamorganshire canal passes through the place.

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  • PORTHCAWL, a seaport and urban district in the midparliamentary division of Glamorganshire, South Wales, 30 m.

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  • ABERAVON, a contributory parliamentary and municipal borough of Glamorganshire, Wales, on the right bank of the Avon, near its mouth in Swansea Bay, 11 m.

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  • RICHARD PRICE (1723-1791), English moral and political philosopher, son of a dissenting minister, was born on the 23rd of February 1723, at Tynton, Glamorganshire.

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  • Llanelly is now the most populous town in Wales outside the confines of Glamorganshire.

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  • He was the lover of Lady Alice Fitzalan, daughter of Richard, earl of Arundel, by whom he had a daughter, Joan, who married Sir Edward Stradling of St Donat's in Glamorganshire.

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  • In 795 a fleet appeared off Glamorganshire.

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  • These figures prove a steady upward tendency, but the increase itself is confined entirely to the industrial districts of the Principality, and in a special degree to Glamorganshire; while the agricultural counties, such as Pembroke, Merioneth, Cardigan or Montgomery, present a continuous though slight decrease owing to local emigration to the centres of industry.

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  • But with the systematic development of the vast mineral resources of the South Wales coalfield, the population of Glamorganshire has increased at a more rapid rate than that of any other county of the United Kingdom, so that at present this county contains about half the population of all Wales.

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  • It will be noted, therefore, that the vast mass of the inhabitants of Wales are settled in the industrial area which covers the northern districts of Glamorganshire and the southeastern corner of Carmarthenshire; whilst central Wales, comprising the four counties of Cardigan, Radnor, Merioneth and Montgomery, forms the least populous portion of the Principality.

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  • Only four towns in North Wales are included in these eighteen, and the combined populations of these four - Wrexham (14,966), Festiniog (11,435), Bangor (11,269) and Holyhead (10,079) - fall far below that of Merthyr Tydfil (69,228), the fourth largest town in Glamorganshire.

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  • The great South Wales coalfield, one of the largest in the kingdom, covers the greater part of Monmouthshire and Glamorganshire, the south-eastern corner of Carmarthenshire, and a small portion of south Pembrokeshire, and the quality of its coal is especially suitable for smelting purposes and for use in steamships.

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  • The supply of limestone and ironstone in Glamorganshire is said to be practically unlimited.

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  • A network of lines connects the great industrial districts of Glamorganshire with the main line of the Great Western railway.

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  • The principal canals are the Swansea, the Neath, the Aberdare & Glamorgan, and the Brecon & Abergavenny, all worked in connexion with the industrial districts of north Glamorganshire.

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  • The see of Llandaff comprises Monmouthshire, all Glamorganshire as far west as the Tawe, and some parishes in Brecon and Hereford.

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  • There have been occasional strikes accompanied by acts of lawlessness in the industrial and mining districts of Glamorganshire, and also amongst the workmen employed in the quarries of Gwynedd.

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  • BRIDGEND, a market town in the southern parliamentary division of Glamorganshire, Wales, on both sides of the river Ogwr (whence its Welsh name Penybont-ar-Ogwr).

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  • SWANSEA, a municipal, county and parliamentary borough, market town, and seaport of Glamorganshire, South Wales, finely situated in an angle between lofty hills, on the river Taw& or Tawy near its mouth in Swansea Bay, a beautiful recess of the Bristol Channel, 201 m.

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  • His son Charles, who filled the office of lord chancellor, was created Baron Talbot of Hensol in Glamorganshire in 1733; and his son William was advanced to the dignity of Earl Talbot in 1761, to which was added Ingestre, the barony of Dynevor, with special remainder to his daughter, Lady Cecil Rice, in 1780.

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  • Wrexham is the seat of the Roman Catholic bishop of Menevia, whose diocese includes all Wales except Glamorganshire.

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  • ABERDARE, a market town of Glamorganshire, Wales, situated (as the name implies) at the confluence of the Dar and Cynon, the latter being a tributary of the Taff.

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  • bangers made within the county would be able to be labeled ' Glamorganshire ' .

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  • Other experiments in inductive telegraphy were made by Preece, aided by the officials of the British Postal Telegraph Service, in Glamorganshire in 1887; at Loch Ness in Scotland in 1892; on Conway Sands in 1893; and at Frodsham, on the Dee, in 1894.

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  • Among other occurrences of the name of Avon in Great Britain there may be noted - in England, a stream flowing south-east from Dartmoor in Devonshire to the English Channel; in South Wales, the stream which has its mouth at Aberavon in Glamorganshire; in Scotland, tributaries of the Clyde, the Spey and the Forth.

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  • From Macclesfield a descent was made on Manchester; from Oakengates in South Shropshire came extensions to Herefordshire, Glamorganshire and Wiltshire, where the famous Brinkworth circuit was established.

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  • CARDIFF, a city, municipal, county and parliamentary borough, seaport and market-town, and the county town of Glamorganshire, South Wales, situated on the Taff, 5 m.

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  • The Glamorganshire canal, opened in 1794, runs from Cardiff to Merthyr Tydfil, with a branch to Aberdare.

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  • The only place of this name we know is Daventry, but it seems more probable that Patrick's home is to be sought near the Severn, and Rhys conjectures that one of the three places called Banwen in Glamorganshire may be intended.

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  • CAERPHILLY, a market town of Glamorganshire, Wales, 1524 m.

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  • NEATH (Welsh, Castell-Nedd), a municipal and contributory parliamentary borough, seaport and market-town of Glamorganshire, south Wales, prettily situated near the mouth of the Neath or Nedd, on the Great Western and the Rhondda and Swansea Bay railways, 72 m.

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  • BARRY, an urban district and seaport of Glamorganshire, Wales, on the Bristol Channel, 153 m.

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  • MOUNTAIN ASH, an urban district of Glamorganshire, south Wales, in the Aberdare valley on the Cynon, a west bank tributary of the Taff, with stations on the Taff Vale and Great Western railways, 18 m.

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  • A branch of the Glamorganshire canal passes through the place.

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  • PORTHCAWL, a seaport and urban district in the midparliamentary division of Glamorganshire, South Wales, 30 m.

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  • ABERAVON, a contributory parliamentary and municipal borough of Glamorganshire, Wales, on the right bank of the Avon, near its mouth in Swansea Bay, 11 m.

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  • RICHARD PRICE (1723-1791), English moral and political philosopher, son of a dissenting minister, was born on the 23rd of February 1723, at Tynton, Glamorganshire.

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  • Llanelly is now the most populous town in Wales outside the confines of Glamorganshire.

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  • He was the lover of Lady Alice Fitzalan, daughter of Richard, earl of Arundel, by whom he had a daughter, Joan, who married Sir Edward Stradling of St Donat's in Glamorganshire.

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  • The Taff, the Nedd (with its tributaries the Hepste and the Mellte) and the Tawe, all rise on the south of the Beacon range, and passing through Glamorganshire, flow into the Bristol Channel, the upper reaches of the Nedd and its tributaries in the Vale of Neath being deservedly famous for its scenery.

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  • In 795 a fleet appeared off Glamorganshire.

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  • These figures prove a steady upward tendency, but the increase itself is confined entirely to the industrial districts of the Principality, and in a special degree to Glamorganshire; while the agricultural counties, such as Pembroke, Merioneth, Cardigan or Montgomery, present a continuous though slight decrease owing to local emigration to the centres of industry.

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  • But with the systematic development of the vast mineral resources of the South Wales coalfield, the population of Glamorganshire has increased at a more rapid rate than that of any other county of the United Kingdom, so that at present this county contains about half the population of all Wales.

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  • It will be noted, therefore, that the vast mass of the inhabitants of Wales are settled in the industrial area which covers the northern districts of Glamorganshire and the southeastern corner of Carmarthenshire; whilst central Wales, comprising the four counties of Cardigan, Radnor, Merioneth and Montgomery, forms the least populous portion of the Principality.

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  • Only four towns in North Wales are included in these eighteen, and the combined populations of these four - Wrexham (14,966), Festiniog (11,435), Bangor (11,269) and Holyhead (10,079) - fall far below that of Merthyr Tydfil (69,228), the fourth largest town in Glamorganshire.

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  • The great South Wales coalfield, one of the largest in the kingdom, covers the greater part of Monmouthshire and Glamorganshire, the south-eastern corner of Carmarthenshire, and a small portion of south Pembrokeshire, and the quality of its coal is especially suitable for smelting purposes and for use in steamships.

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  • The supply of limestone and ironstone in Glamorganshire is said to be practically unlimited.

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    0
  • A network of lines connects the great industrial districts of Glamorganshire with the main line of the Great Western railway.

    0
    0
  • The principal canals are the Swansea, the Neath, the Aberdare & Glamorgan, and the Brecon & Abergavenny, all worked in connexion with the industrial districts of north Glamorganshire.

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    0
  • The see of Llandaff comprises Monmouthshire, all Glamorganshire as far west as the Tawe, and some parishes in Brecon and Hereford.

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  • There have been occasional strikes accompanied by acts of lawlessness in the industrial and mining districts of Glamorganshire, and also amongst the workmen employed in the quarries of Gwynedd.

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  • BRIDGEND, a market town in the southern parliamentary division of Glamorganshire, Wales, on both sides of the river Ogwr (whence its Welsh name Penybont-ar-Ogwr).

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  • SWANSEA, a municipal, county and parliamentary borough, market town, and seaport of Glamorganshire, South Wales, finely situated in an angle between lofty hills, on the river Taw& or Tawy near its mouth in Swansea Bay, a beautiful recess of the Bristol Channel, 201 m.

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  • His son Charles, who filled the office of lord chancellor, was created Baron Talbot of Hensol in Glamorganshire in 1733; and his son William was advanced to the dignity of Earl Talbot in 1761, to which was added Ingestre, the barony of Dynevor, with special remainder to his daughter, Lady Cecil Rice, in 1780.

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  • Wrexham is the seat of the Roman Catholic bishop of Menevia, whose diocese includes all Wales except Glamorganshire.

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  • ABERDARE, a market town of Glamorganshire, Wales, situated (as the name implies) at the confluence of the Dar and Cynon, the latter being a tributary of the Taff.

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