Glaciers sentence example

glaciers
  • Glaciers are fully developed.
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  • Apart from the fjords and lakes the chief beauties of the Alps are glaciers and waterfalls.
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  • Among the great glaciers which stream from the peak the most noteworthy are those of Bossons and Taconnaz (northern slope) and of Brenva and Miage (southern slope).
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  • A district of considerable extent in the centre of the island is occupied by snowfields, whence glaciers descend east and west to the sea.
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  • The glaciers must have reached the sea at Cascade Point in southern Westland.
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  • To the west of Aorangi glaciers crawl into the forest as low as 400 ft.
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  • Most of the glaciers terminate at an altitude of 14,800-14,900 feet, but the small Cesar glacier, drained to the Hausberg valley, reaches to 14,450.
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  • These trenches have for successive geological periods been the drainage valleys of immense lakes (probably also of glaciers) which formerly extended over the plateau or fiords of the seas which surrounded it.
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  • Its glaciers send down a thousand rills which combine to form the Pangani river.
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  • The Scottish corries have been occupied by glaciers.
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  • Glaciers were not known till the year 1899, when they were discovered on the Byelaya and Ushkinskaya (15,400 ft.) mountains.
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  • Whistler offers more than 432,000 acres including 173 glaciers and 475 runs accessible from a helicopter.
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  • Whether you want to enjoy the tropical brilliance of the Caribbean or the majestic glaciers of Alaska, a cruise offers couples the chance to visit several ports and enjoy a bounty of food.
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  • A journal is also a great item to have to record your experiences watching the Alaskan wildlife, viewing glaciers, or other once-in-a-lifetime experiences you want to remember all the details of.
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  • The 49th state is home to some of the planet's most breathtaking scenery, including cobalt blue water, awe-inspiring glaciers, abundant wildlife, and stunning sunsets.
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  • Fortunately, you don't have to go bankrupt in order to experience the area's perfectly preserved glaciers, forests, mountains, and exotic wildlife.
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  • Its combination of unspoiled wilderness, glimmering glaciers, towering mountains, and quaint waterfront communities, make it a dream vacation destination for cruisers of all ages.
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  • The wildlife and glaciers are definitely impressive.
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  • Alaska last minute cruises are your ticket to view some of America's most awe-inspiring sights, from glimmering glaciers and rich forests to towering mountains and exotic wildlife, at drastically reduced prices.
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  • You'll see glaciers and other natural treasures up close.
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  • It's a great opportunity to view wildlife and majestic glaciers.
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  • Glacier Bay: This protected national park is where you can observe birds, humpback whales, otters, and glaciers.
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  • During the voyage you will see glaciers and wildlife.
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  • It is true that a great variety of evidence is afforded by the composition of the rocks, that glaciers have left their traces in glacial scratchings and transported boulders, also that proofs of arid or semiarid conditions are found in the reddish colour of rocks in certain portions of the Palaeozoic, Trias and Eocene; but fossils afford the most precise and conclusive evidence as to the past history of climate, because of the fact that adaptations to temperature have remained constant for millions of years.
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  • In New Mexico, if glaciers were formed at all in the high valleys, they were so small as not greatly to modify the more normal forms. In central Colorado and Wyoming, where the mountains are higher and the Pleistocene glaciers were larger, the valley heads were hollowed out in well-formed cirques, often holding small lakes; and the mountain valleys were enlarged into U-shaped troughs as far down as the ice reached, with hanging lateral valleys oii the way.
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  • Farther north in Montana, in spite of a decrease of height, there are to-day a few small glaciers with snowfields of good size; and, here the effects of sculpture by the much larger Pleistocene glaciers are seen in forms of almost alpine strength.
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  • One of the most remarkable features of this province is seen in the temporary course taken by the Columbia river across the plains, while its canyon was obstructed by Pleistocene glaciers that came from the Cascade Mountains on the north-west.
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  • The Cascade Range is in essence a maturely dissected highland, composed in part of upwarped Colombian lavas, in part of older rocks, and crowned with several dissected volcanoes, of which the chief are (beginning in the north) Mts Baker (Io,827 ft.), Rainier (14,363 ft.), Adams (12,470 ft.) and Hood (11,225 ft.); the first three in \Vashington, the last in northern Oregon- These bear snowfields and glaciers; while the dissected highlands, with ridges of very irregular arrangement, are everywhere sculptured in a fashion that strongly suggests the work of numerous local Pleistocene glaciers as an important supplement to preglacial erosion.
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  • The northernmost part of the coast ranges, in Washington, is often given independent rank as the Olympic Range (Mt Olympus, 8150 ft.); it is a picturesque mountain group, bearing snowfields and glaciers, and suggestive of the dome-like uplift of a previously worn-down mass; but it is now so maturely dissected as to make the suggested origin uncertain.
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  • In the north, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the intricately branching waterways of Puget Sound between the Cascade and the Olympic ranges occupy trough-like depressions which were filled by extensive glaciers in Pleistocene times; and thus mark the beginning of the great stretch of forded coast which extends northward to Alaska.
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  • Besides the drift of the icesheets, there is much drift in the western mountains, deposited by local glaciers.
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  • The climatic effects of relief are seen directly in the ascent of the higher mountain ranges to altitudes where low temperatures prevail, thus preserving snow patches through the summer on the high summits (over 12,000 ft.) in the south, and maintaining snowfields and moderate-sized glaciers on the ranges in the north.
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  • In most parts the Laurentian hills are bare roches moutonnees scoured by the glaciers of the Ice Age, but a broad band of clay land extends across northern Quebec and Ontario just north of the divide.
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  • For here five large glaciers united to form the grand trunk glacier that eroded fhe valley and occupied it as its channel.
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  • In 1854, after the meeting of the British Association in Liverpool, a memorable visit occurred to the Penrhyn slate quarries, where the question of slaty cleavage arose in his mind, and ultimately led him, with Huxley, to Switzerland to study the phenomena of glaciers.
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  • Every one knew that glaciers moved, but the questions were how they moved, for what reason and by what mechanism.
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  • It is unnecessary here to rake among the ashes of this prolonged dispute, but it may be noted that Helmholtz, who, in his lecture on "Ice and Glaciers," adopted Thomson's theory, afterwards added in an appendix that he had come to the conclusion that Tyndall had "assigned the essential and principal cause of glacier motion in referring it to fracture and regelation" (1865).
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  • There are still enormous glaciers about the head of the Brahmaputra, but the glacial epoch of the Chang-t'ang highlands has passed away, though comparatively recently.
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  • The accumulation of vast masses of snow, which have gradually been converted into permanent glaciers, maintains a gradation of very different climates within the narrow space that intervenes between the foot of the mountains and their upper ridges; it cools the breezes that are wafted to the plains on either side, but its most important function is to regulate the water-supply of that large region which is traversed by the streams of the Alps.
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  • Nearly all the moisture that is precipitated during six or seven months is stored up in the form of snow, and is gradually diffused in the course of the succeeding summer; even in the hottest and driest seasons the reserves accumulated during a long preceding period of years in the form of glaciers are available to maintain the regular flow of the greater streams. Nor is this all; the lakes that fill several of the main valleys on the southern side of the Alps are somewhat above the level of the plains of Lombardy and Venetia, and afford an inexhaustible supply of water, which, from a remote period, has been used for that system of irrigation to which they owe their proverbial fertility.
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  • About another quarter is utterly barren, consisting of snow-fields, glaciers, bare rock, lakes and the beds of streams. There remains about one-half, which is divided between forest and pasture, and it is the produce of this half which mainly supports the relatively large population.
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  • These conditions are satisfied in English Miles o 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 £30 Peaks Passes Glaciers Land above 1500 feet left white Emery Walker sG As very little snow can rest on rocks that lie at an angle exceeding 60°, and this is soon removed by the wind, some steep masses of rock remain bare even near the summits of the highest peaks, but as almost every spot offering the least hold for vegetation is covered with snow, few flowering plants are seen above ii,000 ft.
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  • As might be expected, the main chain boasts of more glaciers and eternal snow than the independent or external ranges.
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  • Yet it is a curious fact that the three longest glaciers in the Alps (the Great Aletsch, 162 m., and the Unteraar and the Fiescher, each 10 m.) are all in the Bernese Oberland.
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  • But the next two longest glaciers in the Eastern Alps (the Hintereis, 64 m., and the Gepatsch, 6 m.) are both in the Oetzthal Alps, and so close to the true main watershed.
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  • Among the great alpine rivers we may distinguish two classes: those which spring directly from glaciers and those which rise in lakes, these being fed by eternal snows or glaciers.
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  • With the return of a milder climate, the so-called northern forms of the present alpine flora were split in two, one portion following close on the northern ice in its gradual retreat to the Arctic, the other following the shrinking glaciers till the plants were able to establish (or re-establish) themselves on the slopes of the Alps.
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  • As the river rolls on, it is swollen by mountain torrents, descending from the glaciers on either side of its bed - so by the Geren (left), near Oberwald, by the Eginen (left), near Ulrichen, by the Fiesch (right), at Fiesch, by the Binna (left), near Grengiols, by the Massa (right), flowing from the great Aletsch glaciers, above Brieg.
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  • It receives at Bex the Avancon (right), flowing from the glaciers of the Diablerets range, at Monthey the Vieze (left), from Champery and the Val d'Illiez, and at Aigle the Grande Eau (right), from the valley of Ormonts-dessus.
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  • But about half a mile below Geneva this limpidity is disturbed by the pouring in of the turbid torrent of the Arve (left), descending from the glaciers of the Mont Blanc range, the two currents for some distance refusing to mix.
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  • In writing and in conversation the geological expression " drift " is now usually understood to mean Glacial drift, including boulder clay and all the varieties of sand, gravel and clay deposits formed by the agency of ice sheets, glaciers and icebergs.
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  • India possesses no great lakes from which to draw rivers and canals, but through the plains of northern India flow rivers which are fed from the glaciers of the Himalaya; and the Ganges, the Indus, and their tributaries are thus prevented from diminishing very much in volume.
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  • The principal river of northern Italy is the Po, which rises to the west of Piedmont and is fed not from glaciers like the Swiss torrents, but by rain and snow, so that the water has a somewhat higher temperature, a point to which much importance is attached for the valuable meadow irrigation known as marcite.
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  • For the summer irrigation Italy depends on the glaciers of the Alps; and the great torrents of the Dora Baltea and Sesia can be counted on for a volume exceeding 6000 cub.
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  • The glaciers front, with a perpendicular ice-wall, a shore of debris on which a few low plants are found to grow - poppies, mosses and the like.
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  • It is in such localities that we can best observe the last relics of the glaciers that once overspread the country.
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  • Much discussion has arisen as to their mode of origin, but it is probable they were caused by the erosive action of ice, since glaciers occupied the glens where they occur and wore down the rocks along the sides and bottom; but it is a point of difficulty in this theory whether ice could have eroded the deepest of the hollows.
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  • In the north-western counties, where the glaciers continued longest to descend to the sea-level, lakes retained by moraine-barriers may be found very little above the sea.
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  • Moraines of the last of the glaciers are numerous throughout the Highlands.
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  • The elevated mountain chain which is now called the Nicolas range, which divides the Great from the Little Pamir, is a region of vast glaciers and snow-fields, from which the lakes lying immediately north and south derive the greater part of their water-supply.
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  • This at any rate is the action of the Burgutai stream during certain seasons of the year, so that the glaciers and snowfields of the Nicolas range may be regarded as the chief fountain-head of at least two of the upper tributaries of the Oxus, namely, the Aksu (or Murghab) and the Pamir river, and as contributing largely to a third, the Ab-i-Panja.
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  • Another important source of the river (considered by Curzon to be the chief source) is to be found in the enormous glaciers which lie about the upper or main branch of the Ab-i-Panja (called the Ab-i-Wakhjir or Wakhan), which rises under the mountains enclosing the head of the Taghdumbash Pamirs.
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  • All the higher summits of Ecuador have true glaciers, the largest being found on Antisana, Cayambe and Chimborazo.
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  • The highest elevations are generally covered with ice and snow, and glaciers, according to Whymper, are to be found upon no less than nine of the culminating peaks, and possibly upon two or three more.
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  • The glaciers and the rocks called forth no raptures.
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  • There are no glaciers now to be found in Afghan Turkestan; but evidences of their recent existence are abundant.
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  • In the mountains west of Kabul glaciers have retired, leaving the moraines perfectly undisturbed.
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  • From this point the climb to the Plateau began through magnificent scenery of glaciers and peaks, the heights of which were estimated as 10,000, 15,000 and even 19,000 feet.
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  • There are a number of glaciers in the upper portion, and the climate of the whole district is very severe.
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  • Much of the ruggedness and beauty of the mountains is due to the erosive action of many alpine glaciers that once existed on the higher summits, and which have left behind their evidences in valleys and amphitheatres with towering walls, polished rock-expanses, glacial lakes and meadows and tumbling waterfalls.
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  • Remnants of these glaciers are still to be seen, - as notably on Mt.
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  • The canyons are largely the work of rivers, modified by glaciers that ran through them after the rivers had formed them.
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  • The same authority counted 65 small residual glaciers between 36° 30' and 39°; two-thirds of them lie between 37° and 38°, on some of the highest peaks in the district of the San Joaquin, Merced, Tuolumne and Owen's rivers.
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  • Several small glaciers still remain about the base of Cloud Peak, the highest summit in the range (13,165 ft.).
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  • All the higher parts are thus snow-clad; and glaciers, numerous in the north, occur as far south as the Helagsfjall.
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  • On the elevated parts of this large continent glaciers were formed, which, proceeding downwards to the lower levels, gave origin to large streams and rivers, the abundant deposits of which formed the diluvial sand and the diluvial clay.
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  • Farther south this excessive precipitation is in the form of snow in the Cordilleras, forming glaciers at a comparatively low level which in places discharge into the inlets and bays of the sea.
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  • Some of the larger lakes of the Andes have glaciers discharging into them.
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  • The Yarkand-Darya and its numerous tributaries, which are fed by the glaciers of the mountain regions, as also many rivers which are now lost in the steppe or amidst the irrigated fields, bring abundance of water to the desert; one of them is called Zarafshan ("gold-strewing"), as much on account of the fertility it brings as of its auriferous sands.
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  • The level to which the Himalayan glaciers extend is greatly dependent on local conditions, principally the extent and elevation of the snow basins which feed them, and the slope and position of the mountain on which they are formed.
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  • Glaciers on the outer slopes of the Himalaya descend much lower than is commonly the case in Tibet, or in the most elevated valleys near the snowy range.
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  • The glaciers of Sikkim and the eastern mountains are believed not to reach a lower level than 13,500 or 14,000 ft.
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  • In Europe the glaciers descend between 3000 and 5000 ft.
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  • The summer temperatures of the points where the glaciers end on the Himalaya also correspond fairly with those of the corresponding positions in European glaciers, viz, for July a little below 60° F., August 58° and September 55°.
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  • Measurements of the movement of Himalayan glaciers give results according closely with those obtained under analogous conditions in the Alps, viz.
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  • The dimensions of the glaciers on the outer Himalaya, where, as before remarked, the valleys descend rapidly to lower levels, are fairly comparable with those of Alpine glaciers, though frequently much exceeding them in length8 or io m.
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  • In the elevated valleys of northern Tibet, where the destructive action of the summer heat is far less, the development of the glaciers is enormous.
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  • In connexion with almost all the Himalayan glaciers of which precise accounts are forthcoming are ancient moraines indicating some previous condition in which their extent was much larger than now.
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  • The explanation suggested to account for the former great extension of glaciers in Norway would seem applicable here.
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  • The cicada's song resounds among the woods in the autumn; flights of locusts frequently appear after the summer, and they are carried by the prevailing winds even among the glaciers and eternal snows.
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  • The region is made up in general of high ranges deeply glaciated, preserving some remnants of ancient glaciers, and having fine " Alpine " scenery, with many sharp peaks and ridges, U-shaped valleys, cirques, lakes and waterfalls.
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  • Such are the Chuya Alps, having an average altitude of 9000 f t., with summits from 11,500 to 12,000 ft., and at least ten glaciers on their northern slope; the Katun Alps, which have a mean elevation of about lo,000 ft.
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  • Its upper parts abound in glaciers, the best known of which is the Berel, which comes down from the Byelukha.
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  • North of the morainic belt the effect of the glaciation is seen in the irregular courses of the streams, the numerous lakes and freshwater marshes and the falls and rapids along those streams displaced by the glaciers from their former courses.
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  • The cause of the climatic variations which brought about this complex history of the Salt Lake region is not known; but it is worthy of note that the periods of highest water levels were coincident with a great expansion of local valley glaciers, some of which terminated in the waters of lake Bonneville.
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  • In Lower Carboniferous times these mountains were snow-capped, and the valleys on their flanks were occupied by glaciers.
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  • The inter-insular straits are carried up into the shore as fjords heading in rivers and glaciers.
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  • Out of the Alaska and Nutzotin mountains two great rivers flow southward: the Copper, practically unnavigable except for small boats, because of its turbulence and the discharge of glaciers into its waters; and the Susitna, also practically unnavigable.
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  • The glaciers of the Panhandle and throughout the rest of the Pacific region are most remarkable - extraordinary alike for their number and their size.
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  • Thousands of Alpine glaciers from one to fifteen miles long fill the upper valleys and canyons of the mountains.
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  • Other glaciers are of the Piedmont type.
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  • It is fed by Alpine glaciers, among them one of the grandest in Alaska, the Seward, which descends from Mt.
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  • Of tide-water glaciers the most remarkable is probably the Muir.
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  • There are some 30 tide-water glaciers - a considerable number of them very noteworthy.
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  • Most of the Alaskan glaciers are receding, but not all of them; and at times there is a general advance.
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  • The vapour-laden sea air blowing landward against the girdle of snow and glaciers on the mountain barriers a few miles inland drains its moisture in excessive rain and snow upon the lisiere, shrouding it in well-nigh unbroken fog and cloud-bank.
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  • It is shut in on the south by the precipices of the Wetterhorn, Mettenberg and Eiger, between which two famous glaciers flow down.
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  • It is estimated that there are in all over nine hundred glaciers in this section of the range, and although they often rival those of the Alps in size, they do not descend generally to such low altitudes as the latter.
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  • The total area covered by glaciers in the central Caucasus is estimated at 625 to 650 sq.
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  • The glaciers too decrease in the same proportion both in magnitude and in extent.
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  • On some of these peaks again there is a considerable amount of glaciation, more particularly on the slopes of Diklos-mta, where the glaciers descend to 7700 ft.
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  • The most important of these are the Kuban and the Terek; but it is the latter that picks up most of the streams which have their sources among the central glaciers, e.g.
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  • They are hemmed in and separated by snowcapped mountain peaks and ridges, which are seamed with glaciers terminating in moraines and shingle slopes at the base of the foot-hills.
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  • The Murtagh chain, which holds within its grasp the mightiest system of glaciers in the world, forms a junction with the Sarikol at the head of the Taghdumbash, where also another great system (that of the Hindu Kush) has its eastern roots.
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  • The Wakhan glaciers under the Wakhjir water-parting, Lake Chakmaktin near the sources of the Aksu, and Lake Victoria of the Great Pamir have all been claimed as indicating the Glacial of true source of the Oxus.
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  • The same glacial beds of the Nicolas range send down tributary waters to the Panja or Wakhan river, below its junction with the ice stream from Wakhjir, and thus it becomes impossible to decide whether the glaciers of the Wakhjir or the glaciers of Nicolas should be regarded as effecting the most important contribution to the main stream.
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  • This is altogether an alpine region with numerous snow-clad summits and glaciers descending down to the sea.
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  • Mount Hood (11,225 ft.), which is the highest point in the state, Mount Jefferson (10,200 ft.), the Three Sister Peaks, Mount Adams, Bachelor Mountain, and Diamond Peak (8807 ft.) all have one or more glaciers on their sides.
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  • It exhibits much evidence of powerful erosion, having deep canyons in its sides, and it bears evidence of previous glaciers.
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  • He wrote also on the motion of glaciers and the transport of erratic blocks.
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  • Glaciers no longer exist in the Apennines, but Post-Pliocene moraines have been observed in Basilicata.
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  • Khantengri (Mushketov, Semenov, Inylchik) and the Kok-su Mountains (Fedchenko, Shurovsky), south of Peak Kaufmann, there are welldeveloped glaciers.
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  • About Khan-Tengri glaciers descended to a level of 6800 ft.
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  • The Scandinavian portion of Lapland presents the usual characteristics of the mountain plateau of that peninsula - on the west side the bold headlands and fjords, deeply-grooved valleys and glaciers of Norway, on the east the long mountain lakes and great lake-fed rivers of Sweden.
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  • At the outside, not more than onefourth of the area of Iceland is inhabited; the rest consists of elevated deserts, lava streams and glaciers.
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  • In external appearance they bear a closer resemblance to the glaciers of the Polar regions than to those of the Alps.
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  • The glaciers which stream off from these snowfields are often of vast extent, e.g.
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  • Altogether, more than 120 glaciers are known in Iceland.
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  • The glaciers of the north-west peninsula also descend nearly to sea-level.
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  • The great number of streams of large volume is due to the moist climate and the abundance of glaciers, and the milky white or yellowish-brown colour of their waters (whence the common name Hvita, white) is due to the glacial clays.
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  • The Kokshal-tau, which consists of several parallel ranges, is truly alpine in character and bears large glaciers, which send out polyp-like arms into U-shaped valleys, behind which the mountain peaks tower up into sharp-cut, angular " matterhorns."
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  • On neither of these ranges are there any true glaciers.
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  • At the present day four or five large glaciers stream down the shoulders and embed themselves in the hollow flanks of Khan-tengri - the Semenov at altitudes of 12,410-11,100 ft., the Mushketov at 11,910-10,920 ft., the Inylchik at 11,320-10,890 ft., and the Kaindy at 10,810-10,040 ft.
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  • Glaciers occur also on Manas mount to the south of the town of Aulie-ata.
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  • In the Alai region there are other extensive glaciers, e.g.
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  • The glacial deposits profoundly modified the surface of the country, whether they resulted from the melting of the ice-sheets of the time of maximum glaciation, or from the movements of local glaciers.
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  • In numerous cases, lakelets have gathered under rocky cirques behind the terminal moraines of the last surviving glaciers.
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  • The effect of the Glacial epoch in Europe is shown in northern Africa by the moraines of the higher Atlas, and the wider extension of the glaciers on Kilimanjaro, Kenya and Ruwenzori, and by the extensive accumulations of gravel over the Sahara.
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  • It is frequently precipitated as hoar-frost, snow or hail; and in the glaciers and snows of lofty mountain systems or of regions of high latitude it exists on a gigantic scale, being especially characteristic of the seas and lands around the poles.
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  • In the first place, the eastern Pyrenees are without glaciers, the quantity of snow falling there being insufficient to lead to their development.
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  • The glaciers are confined to the northern slopes of the central Pyrenees, and do not descend, like those of the Alps, far down in the valleys, but have their greatest length in the direction of the mountainchain.
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  • Here, as in the other great mountain ranges of central Europe, there are evidences of a much wider extension of the glaciers during the Ice age.
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  • North-western Tasmania in Pleistocene times had an._ extensive series of glaciers, of which the lower moraines were deposited only about 400 feet above sea level.
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  • The Cordillera of the Andes in Tierra del Fuego is formed of crystalline schists, and culminates in the snowcapped peaks of Mount Darwin and Mount Sarmiento (7200 ft.), which contains glaciers of greater extent than those of Mont Blanc. The extent of the glaciers is considerable in this region, which, geographically, is more complex than was formerly supposed.
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  • Volcanic action is still going on in these latitudes, as the glaciers are at times covered by ashes, but the predominant rocks to the east are the Tertiary granite, while to the west gneiss, older granite and Palaeozoic rocks prevail.
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  • The glaciers reach almost the western channels, as is the case at the river Quelal.
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  • While the scenery of the western slope of the Andes is exceedingly grand, with its deep fjords, glaciers and woods, yet the severity of its climate detracts considerably from its charm.
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  • The big glaciers had produced vast u-shaped valleys which had formed the lake our comfortable catamaran was on.
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  • The views become ever more expansive with views into great corries once filled with glaciers.
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  • This amazing country is full of incredible landscapes featuring glaciers, hot springs, geysers, active volcanoes and vast lava deserts.
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  • Two glaciers converged across the North Shropshire Plain leaving thick layers of glacial drift.
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  • Its incredible calving glaciers include the most productive in the world, which advances 30 meters every 24 hours.
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  • The calm waters of Paradise Harbor host many sculptured icebergs, calved from a backdrop of shimmering glaciers.
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  • In arid western China, shrinking glaciers account for at least 10 percent of freshwater supplies.
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  • The meres were formed by retreating glaciers, or at least that is what experts want us to believe.
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  • This work focuses on temperate glaciers in the Alps, polythermal glaciers in the Arctic, and cold glaciers in Antarctica.
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  • Cross the Continental Divide and behold incomparable vistas of lush meadows, Alpine glaciers, and thundering waterfalls.
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  • A recently published study in Science magazine indicates that up to 90% of antarctic glaciers are losing mass.
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  • Tephrochronology to study the response of Icelandic glaciers to climate change.
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  • In the afternoon we plan helicopter flights over Devon Island, viewing the tidewater glaciers on the eastern coast and ideally making landings.
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  • Many climatologists believe that the decline in mountain glaciers is one of the first observable signs of human-induced global warming.
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  • The earliest hunters used the cave before the glaciers of the last ice age covered most of Wales.
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  • Scoured by Ice Age glaciers, almost the entire length of Iceland's east coast is deeply indented.
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  • The movement and deposition of rocks and particle debris by glaciers to form moraines is also discussed.
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  • The sands and gravels of the alluvial plain originated as glacial outwash from the melting glaciers inland.
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  • For example glaciers shrinking, permafrost thawing, earlier flowering of trees.
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  • Pass native fishing villages and forested slopes; set foot on ice-age glaciers, visit gold rush settlements and parks of totem poles.
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  • Melt water on glaciers may contain mineral silt, which can cause gastrointestinal upsets.
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  • Stunning glacier-fed lakes, cascading waterfalls, majestic glaciers, tumbling rivers and impressive mountains make for an ideal setting for your holiday.
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  • Cross the Continental Divide and behold incomparable vistas of lush meadows, alpine glaciers, and thundering waterfalls.
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  • Next comes the Stura, which rises in the glaciers of the Roche Melon; then the Orca, flowing through the Val di Locana; and then the Dora Baltea, one of the greatest of all the Alpine tributaries of the Po, which has its source in the glaciers of Mont Blanc, above Courmayeur, and thence descends through the Val d'Aosta for about 70 m.
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  • But the effect of its southern latitude is tempered by its peninsular character, bounded as it is on both sides by seas of considerable extent, as well as by the great range of the Alps with its snows and glaciers to the north.
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  • Snow accumulating on the higher portions of the land, when compacted into ice and caused to flow downwards by gravity, gives rise, on account of its more coherent character, to continuous glaciers, which mould themselves to the slopes down which they are guided, different ice-streams converging to send forward a greater volume.
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  • Most of the glaciers terminate at an altitude of 14,800-14,900 ft., but the small Cesar glacier, drained to the Hausberg valley, reaches to 14,450.
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  • They not only indicate the height of the land, but also enable us to compute the declivity of the mountain slopes; and if minor features of ground lying between two contours - such as ravines, as also rocky precipices and glaciers - are indicated, as is done on the Siegfried atlas of Switzerland, they fully meet the requirements of the scientific man, the engineer and the mountain-climber.
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  • At several points the crest of the range has been deeply eroded by old glaciers and running waters, and thus have been formed a number of devious passes.
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  • In some parts the interior ice-covering extends down to the outer coast, while in other parts its margin is situated more inland, and the ice-bare coast-land is deeply intersected by fjords extending far into the interior, where they are blocked by enormous glaciers or " ice-currents " from the interior ice-covering which discharge masses of s"aefel's0° icebergs into them.
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  • The highest known velocities of glaciers were measured by Ryder in the Upernivik glacier (in 73° N.), where, between the 13th and 14th of August of 1886, he found a velocity of 125 ft.
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  • It is true that many of these ranges are characterized by the rounded tops and the rather evenly slanting, waste-covered slopes which ncrmally result from the long-continued action of the ordinary agencies of erosion; that they bear little snow in summer and are practically wanting in glaciers; that forests are often scanty on the middle and lower slopes, the mord so because of devastation by fires; and that the general impression of great altitude is much weakened because the mountains are seen from a base which itself is 5000 or 6000 ft.
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  • The Rockies and Selkirks support thousands of glaciers, mostly not very large, but having some 50 or 100 sq.
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  • There is, however, so little precipitation that snow does not accumulate on the surface to form glaciers, the summer's sun having warmth enough to thaw what falls in the winter.
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  • Its moraines, though mostly obscured by vegetation and weathering, may still be traced; while on the snowy peaks at the headwaters of the Merced a considerable number of small glaciers, once tributary to the main Yosemite glacier, still exist.
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  • He now followed a devious route to Lake Manasarowar, entering Nepal for a short distance from Tradum, discovering the main source of the Brahmaputra in a great mass of glaciers called Kubigangri, in the northernmost chain of the Himalaya.
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  • These conditions are satisfied in English Miles o 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 £30 Peaks Passes Glaciers Land above 1500 feet left white Emery Walker sG As very little snow can rest on rocks that lie at an angle exceeding 60°, and this is soon removed by the wind, some steep masses of rock remain bare even near the summits of the highest peaks, but as almost every spot offering the least hold for vegetation is covered with snow, few flowering plants are seen above ii,000 ft.
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  • Aiguille du Midi Tour Noir Aiguille des Glaciers.
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  • The same authority counted 65 small residual glaciers between 36° 30' and 39°; two-thirds of them lie between 37° and 38°, on some of the highest peaks in the district of the San Joaquin, Merced, Tuolumne and Owen's rivers.
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  • The summer temperatures of the points where the glaciers end on the Himalaya also correspond fairly with those of the corresponding positions in European glaciers, viz, for July a little below 60° F., August 58° and September 55°.
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  • Any modification of the coast-line which should submerge the area now occupied by the North Indian plain, or any considerable part of it, would be accompanied by a much wetter and more equable climate on the Himalaya; more snow would fall on the highest ranges, and less summer heat would be brought to bear on the destruction of the glaciers, which would receive larger supplies and descend lower.
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  • Greatest of these and of Alaskan glaciers is the Malaspina, a vast elevated plateau of wasting ice, 150o sq.
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  • Sixty miles inland (E.) rises the great massif of Sulitelma on the Swedish frontier, with its copper mines, broad snow-fields and glaciers.
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  • Also there is no worry about receding glaciers, rockfall or early hut starts.
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  • Pass native fishing villages and forested slopes; set foot on ice-age glaciers, visit Gold Rush settlements and parks of totem poles.
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  • From the slopes of the 2300m volcano, impressive glaciers spill into the sea.
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  • On your southward journey peer out over the frosty waters of mighty glaciers, which give way to majestic fjords colored with wild flowers.
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  • Glaciers are also melting away at an alarming rate.
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  • As of 2005, Live Science revealed that 84 percent of Antarctic glaciers have retreated over the past 50 years, a rate similar to that of the Arctic glaciers.
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  • Since 1954, the average retreat of the glaciers that experienced ice melt was approximately 1,970 feet . As these giant ice islands melt away, the oceans will rise.
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  • Higher temperatures from global warming cause ice and glaciers to melt and water to expand which results in the rise in water levels.
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  • Melting Glaciers - As the planet gets warmer, the glaciers that form the polar ice caps begin to melt.
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  • Additionally, rising temperatures melt glaciers, polar ice sheets, and sea ice, sending more and more water into the sea.
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  • Glaciers, which weigh approximately one ton per cubic meter, place pressure on the Earth's surface.
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  • As these glaciers melt, there is a resulting drop in pressure that may trigger serious geological reactions.
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  • Melting glaciers may lead to an increase in volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and tsunamis.
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  • Its high altitude glaciers offer challenging terrain for skiers and snowboarders.
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  • A 5 night Alaska cruise gives you plenty of time to see animals, glaciers and amazing landscapes during your trip.
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  • This cruise also takes you to Alaska's Inside Passage where you will see wildlife, glaciers and mountains.
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  • The Glaciers of Prince William Sound is a round-trip cruise departing from Anchorage during the summer months.
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  • The cruise to Alaska sails into smaller waterways where you can see tidewater glaciers, icebergs and fjords.
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  • Plus, you will get up close to the Fjords and glaciers on your way.
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  • Due to its immense popularity, sailings to Alaska on Princess Cruises sell out very quickly, especially the line's "Voyage of the Glaciers" option.
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  • The trip sails along Alaska's famed coastline and provides passengers with unprecedented views of massive glaciers, historic ports and unique wildlife.
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  • Mont Cenis Hairbell (Campanula Cenisia) - A high alpine plant growing among Saxifraga biflora on the sides of glaciers, making little show above ground but vigorous below, and compact rosettes of light green leaves, with blue flowers.
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  • Possibly the best tourist activity in Juneau, this adventure combines two of the most popular and inspiring Alaska activities: an amazing helicopter flight over the glaciers and an authentic dog sled trip across one of the glaciers!
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  • With the mountains, glaciers and surrounding valleys, Juneau has earned the title of the most beautiful state capital.
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  • For the best view of the great Juneau Icefield, the mountains, and the glaciers, you have to be in the air.
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  • There is simply no other way to grasp the sheer magnitude and natural wonder of the glaciers.
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  • This leg of your trip will begin at an exclusive dog mushing camp, located on the nearby glaciers.
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  • The striking beauty and majesty of the mountains and glaciers defy description.
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  • Once you see the glaciers from above, combined with the once-in-a-lifetime experience on the ice with the dogs, you will be moved.
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  • The basin has very few trees, providing hikers with a clear view of the surrounding mountain peaks and glaciers.
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  • Getting flight information from the major airlines over the phone is as fast a watching glaciers melt.
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  • Ok so maybe mastodon isn't readily available now but legend has it that when mastodons were discovered frozen into glaciers the Romans had the meat brought to Rome for their feasts.
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  • But there are no perpetual snow-fields, no glaciers creep down these valleys, and no alpine hamlets ever appear to break the monotony.
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  • Below Aosta also the Dora Baltea receives several considerable tributaries, which descend from the glaciers between Mont Blanc and Monte Rosa.
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  • Many of the valleys in the Falklands are occupied by pale glistening masses which at a little distance much resemble small glaciers.
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  • Their origin is attributed by some to the moraine formation of former glaciers.
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  • On the Swiss Alps it is one of the most prevalent and striking of the forest trees, its dark evergreen foliage often standing out in strong contrast to the snowy ridges and glaciers beyond.
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  • The Aptera have perhaps the most extensive distribution of all animals, being found in Franz Josef Land and South Victoria Land, on the snows of Alpine glaciers, and in the depths of the most extensive caves.
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  • C. von Sonklar, in his map of the Hohe Tauern (r: 144,000; 1864) coloured plains and valleys green; mountain slopes in five shades of brown; glaciers blue or white.
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  • They are printed in three colours, contours at intervals of 10 and 20 metres being in brown, incidental features (ravines, cliffs, glaciers) in black or blue.
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  • The shores are so extensively indented with voes, or firths - the result partly of denudation and partly caused by glaciers - that no spot in Shetland is more than 3 m.
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  • The presence of enormous glaciers in the Ice Age is attested by the moraines at the Atlantic end, and by other indications farther east.
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  • The coast-line of Melville Bay (the northern part of the west coast) is to some degree an exception, though the fjords may here be somewhat filled with glaciers, and, for another example, it may be noted that Peary observed a marked contrast on the north coast.
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  • In some parts the interior ice-covering extends down to the outer coast, while in other parts its margin is situated more inland, and the ice-bare coast-land is deeply intersected by fjords extending far into the interior, where they are blocked by enormous glaciers or " ice-currents " from the interior ice-covering which discharge masses of s"aefel's0° icebergs into them.
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  • The reason is to be found in its geographical position, a cold ice-covered polar current 68' running south along the land, while not far outside there is an open warmer sea, a circumstance which, while producing a cold climate, must also give rise to much precipitation, the land being C', thus exposed to the alternate erosion of a rough atmosphere and large glaciers.
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  • In the rapidly moving glaciers of the icefjords this striation is not distinctly visible, being evidently obliterated by the strong motion of the ice masses.
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  • Here the ice converges into the valleys and moves with increasing velocity in the form of glaciers into the fjords, where they break off as icebergs.
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  • There seem to be periodical oscillations in the extension of the glaciers and the inland ice similar to those that have been observed on the glaciers of the Alps and elsewhere.
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  • This iron is considered by several of the first authorities"on the subject to be of meteoric origin,' but no evidence hitherto given seems to prove decisively that it cannot be telluric. That the nodules found were lying on gneissic rock, with no basaltic rocks in the neighbourhood, does not prove that the iron may not originate from basalt, for the nodules may have been transported by the glaciers, like other erratic blocks, and will stand erosion much longer than the basalt, which may long ago have disappeared.
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  • It rises in the glaciers of the Tbdi range, and has cut out a deep bed which forms the Grossthal that comprises the greater portion of the canton of Glarus.
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  • There are also many smaller lakes fed by the glaciers of the Sailughem (Achit-nor, 4650 ft., and Uryu-nor), and others scattered through the Ektagh Altai.
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  • As a scientific investigator he is best known for his researches on heat and on glaciers.
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  • His attention was directed to the question of the flow of glaciers in 1840 when he met Louis Agassiz at the Glasgow meeting of the British Association, and in subsequent years he made several visits to Switzerland and also to Norway for the purpose of obtaining accurate data.
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  • Forbes was also interested in geology, and published memoirs on the thermal springs of the Pyrenees, on the extinct volcanoes of the Vivarais (Ardeche), on the geology of the Cuchullin and Eildon hills, &c. In addition to about 150 scientific papers, he wrote Travels through the Alps of Savoy and Other Parts of the Pennine Chain, with Observations on the Phenomena of Glaciers (1843); Norway and its Glaciers (1853); Occasional Papers on the Theory of Glaciers (1859); A Tour of Mont Blanc and Monte Rosa (1855).
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  • Over the whole state there is a layer of drift deposited by the glaciers which once covered this region.
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  • The narrow strait Strdmmen separates Kvalii from the larger Seiland, whose snow-covered hills with several glaciers rise above 3500 ft., while an insular rampart of mountains, Sord, protects the strait and harbour from the open sea.
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  • In the Dachstein group are found the most easterly glaciers of the Alps, of which the largest is the Karls-Eisfeld, nearly 22 m.
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  • The Carpathians, which only in a few places attain an altitude of over 8000 ft., lack the bold peaks, the extensive snow-fields, the large glaciers, the high waterfalls and the numerous large lakes which are found in the Alps.
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  • They are nowhere covered by perpetual snow, and glaciers do not exist, so that the Carpathians, even in their highest altitude, recall the middle region of the Alps, with which, however, they have many points in common as regards appearance, structure and flora.
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  • It drains the tract between the Yamdok Tso and Tigu Lakes, and is fed by the glaciers of the Kulha Kangri and other great ranges.
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  • There are no glaciers near its sources, although they must have existed there in geologically recent times, but masses of melting snow annually give rise to floods, which rush through the midst of the valley in a turbid red stream, frequently rendering the river impassable and cutting off the crazy brick bridges at Herat and Tirpul.
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  • Along the Ruwenzori range are glaciers and snowfields nearly 15 m.
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  • North America is bathed in frigid waters around its broad northern shores; its mountains bear huge glaciers in the north-west; the outlying area of Greenland in the north-east is shrouded with ice; and in geologically recent times a vast ice-sheet has spread over its north-eastern third; while warm waters bring corals to its southern shores.
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  • South America has warm waters and corals on the north-east, and cold waters and glaciers only on its narrowing southern end.
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  • After the continental ice sheet entirely disappeared from the state, local valley glaciers lingered in the Adirondacks and the Catskills.
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  • The Pleistocene system in the South Island includes glacial deposits, which prove a great extension of the New Zealand glaciers, especially along the western coast.
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  • On the eastern side of the Alps the glaciers appear to have been confined to the mountain valleys.
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  • The rocks are heavily scored by ice, but this was probably marine ice, not that of glaciers.
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  • On its slope, which rises abruptly from the Bitterroot Basin, glaciers have cut canyons between high and often precipitous walls, and between these canyons are steep and rocky ridges having peaked or saw-toothed crest lines.
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  • Deep and narrow canons are common, and, at higher levels, glaciers, carved out amphitheatres, or " cirques " and " U "-shaped troughs.
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  • Immediately north of the Arkatagh the country is studded with three or four exceptionally conspicuous and imposing detached mountain masses, all capped with snow and some of them carrying small glaciers.
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  • The Kashka-darya, which flows westwards out of the glaciers of Hazret-sultan (west of the Hissar range), supplies the Shahri-sabs (properly Shaarsabiz) oasis with water, but is lost in the desert to the west of Karshi.
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  • Such glaciers existed in all the high mountains of the west, even down to New Mexico and Arizona.
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  • There are no permanent ice sheets known on the mainland of north-eastern Canada, but some of the larger islands to the north of Hudson Bay and Straits are partially covered with glaciers on their higher points.
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  • All the glaciers are now in retreat, with old tree-covered moraines, hundreds or thousands of feet lower down the valley.
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  • All are similar in their trends, forms, sculpture and vegetation, and are plainly and harmoniously related to the ancient glaciers.
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  • While on your sail from Alaska to Seattle you'll see wildlife, glaciers and learn about history and culture.
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  • The mountains both in Victoria and New South Wales were snow-capped, and glaciers flowed down their flanks and laid down Carboniferous glacial deposits, which are still preserved in basins that flank the mountain ranges, such as the famous conglomerates of Bacchus Marsh, Heathcote and the Loddon valley in Victoria, and cf Branxton and other localities in New South Wales.
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  • From the central peaks fifteen glaciers, all lying west of the main divide, descend to the north and south, the two largest being the Lewis and Gregory glaciers, each about 1 m.
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  • Beyond this point the Anglo-Russian Commission of 1895 demarcated a line to the snowfields and glaciers which overlook the Chinese border.
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  • As the part east of the river was once covered by the ice-sheet, its hills have been lowered and its valleys filled through the attrition of glaciers until the surface has a gently undulating appearance.
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  • The culminating summits of the ranges generally present the appearance of a flat, rounded swelling, and when they are crowned with glaciers, as many of them are, these shape themselves into what may be described as a mantle, a breastplate, or a flat cap, from which lappets and fringes project at intervals; nowhere do there exist any of the long, narrow, winding glacier tongues which are so characteristic of the Alps of Europe.
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  • The glaciers also attain a greater development in the western portion of the Nan-shan, but the valleys are dry, and the slopes of both the mountains and the valleys, furrowed by deep ravines, are devoid of vegetation.
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  • The climate is so dry, and the rains are so scarce, that an absence of forests and Alpine meadows is characteristic of the ridge; but when heavy rain falls simultaneously with the melting of the snows in the mountains, the watercourses become filled with furious torrents, which create great havoc. The main glaciers (12) are on the north slope, but none creeps below io,000 to 12,000 ft.
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